H.R. 1777 (100th): Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989

Introduced:
Mar 25, 1987 (100th Congress, 1987–1988)
Status:
Signed by the President
Slip Law:
This bill became Pub.L. 100-204.
Sponsor
Daniel Mica
Representative for Florida's 14th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Dec 22, 1987
Length
Related Bills
H.Res. 190 (rule)

Introduced
Last Action: Jun 10, 1987

S. 1394 (Related)
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1988

Reported by Committee
Last Action: May 15, 1987

 
Status

This bill was enacted after being signed by the President on December 22, 1987.

Progress
Introduced Mar 25, 1987
Referred to Committee Mar 25, 1987
Reported by Committee Mar 25, 1987
Passed House Jun 23, 1987
Passed Senate with Changes Oct 08, 1987
Conference Report Agreed to by Senate Dec 16, 1987
Signed by the President Dec 22, 1987
 
Full Title

A bill to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1988 and 1989 for the Department of State, the United States Information Agency, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
1 cosponsors (1R) (show)
Committees

House Foreign Affairs

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

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Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


12/14/1987--Conference report filed in House.
(Conference report filed in House, H. Rept. 100-475) Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 -
Title I - The Department of State
Part A - Authorization of Appropriations; Allocations of Funds; Restrictions
Authorizes appropriations to the Department of State (the Department) for:
(1) administration of foreign affairs (including diplomatic and ongoing operations, the diplomatic security program, and diplomatic security program capital construction);
(2) international organizations;
(3)) international peacekeeping activities;
(4) international conferences and contingencies;
(5) international commissions;
(6) migration and refugee assistance; and
(7) other programs, including bilateral science and technology agreements and Soviet-East European research and training.
Provides for reduction in earmarked amounts if appropriations are less than authorizations.
Provides, with specified limitations, for transfers of funds to salaries and expenses from certain capital program funds.
Requires compliance with the presidential-congressional summit agreement on deficit reduction.
Prohibits use of foreign affairs funds for political purposes.
Directs the Secretary of State (the Secretary) to use specified funds for FY 1988 and 1989 to establish a Latin America and Caribbean Data Base.
Part B - Department of State Authorities and Activities; Foreign Missions
Amends the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to prohibit the reprogramming of appropriated State Department funds during the last 15 days in which such funds are available (unless notice of such reprogramming is made before such period).
Prohibits the use of funds authorized by this or any other Act to pay expenses related to:
(1) the closing of any U.S. mission or consulate abroad; or
(2) the Bureau of Administration of the Department or any of its functions if any U.S. consulate or mission is closed after January 1, 1987, and not reopened.
Provides for exceptions from such prohibition when:
(1) a host government will not allow the post to be reopened;
(2) a post is closed because of a break or downgrading of diplomatic relations;
(3) there is a threat to personnel; or
(4) it is reported that a new higher priority post is to receive the funds for the post proposed to be closed.
Authorizes the Secretary to submit a report proposing a list of posts to be downgraded or closed in the event of a sequestration order under the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act). Allocates specified funds for FY 1988 and 1989 to operate certain consulates.
Prohibits the use of Department funds for the expenses of maintaining a diplomatic or consular post in Antigua and Barbuda. Allows a presidential waiver of such prohibition on national security grounds.
Directs the Secretary to provide a quarterly report to specified congressional committees on expenditures made from the appropriations for Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service. Prohibits the expenditures of gift funds for representational purposes at U.S. missions except in accordance with the conditions that apply to appropriated funds.
Directs the Secretary to administer the historic and artistic furnishings of the reception areas of the Department of State Building by such means and measures as to conform to the fundamental purpose of such museum areas.
Authorizes the Secretary, with the advice and concurrence of the Director of the National Gallery of Art, to sell items which are not needed and to trade or purchase articles for such museum areas.
Authorizes the Secretary to obtain insurance for such historic and artistic furnishings.
Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to require that the Secretary's annual report on human rights practices in foreign countries includes information on coercive population control.
Requires that such information be provided wherever applicable.
Prohibits a foreign mission from allowing an unaffiliated alien to use its premises for any purpose, including residence, incompatible with its status as a foreign mission.
Authorizes the Secretary to waive such prohibition after notifying specified congressional committees.
Directs the Secretary, within 180 days after enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on implementation of this prohibition, and to submit other reports on such implementation as necessary.
Authorizes the Secretary to delay this prohibition in hardship cases.
Directs the Secretary to review, and revise if necessary, the allocation procedures under which agencies reimburse the Department of State for shared administrative costs at U.S. missions abroad.
Directs the Secretary to report on such review and any revision to specified congressional committees within three months after enactment of this Act. Prohibits the use of funds under this title for site acquisition, development, or construction of any new facility in Israel, Jerusalem, or the West Bank. Expresses the sense of the Congress that the Department should include in its FY 1989 congressional budget presentations information on the advantages and disadvantages of purchasing rather than leasing residential properties.
Directs the Department to make recommendations to the Congress on such purchasing and leasing.
Prohibits the Department from soliciting or receiving funds or gifts to provide living quarters for the Secretary. Prohibits the Department from declaring itself to be a foreign diplomatic mission for purposes of denying freedom of speech to American citizens.
Amends the Diplomatic Security Act to repeal provisions establishing the Office of Policy and Program Review. Amends the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 to authorize the Secretary to transfer up to a specified amount of funds to the Administrator of General Services for studies, site preparation, and planning for a consolidated training facility for the Foreign Service Institute. Amends the Foreign Service Act of 1980 to restrict the supervisory authority of the Chief of Mission to a foreign country to employees of the executive branch.
Directs the Secretary to study the minimum liability insurance coverage required for members of foreign missions and their families and the feasibility of requiring an increase in such coverage.
Directs the Secretary to report to the Congress on the problem arising from diplomatic immunity from criminal prosecution and from civil suit.
Requires the findings and recommendations of such study and report to be submitted to specified congressional committees within 90 days after enactment of this Act. Allows Federal jurisdiction over direct actions against insurers of diplomatic agents or their families who had diplomatic immunity at the time of an alleged tortious act, but who no longer have such immunity.
(Current law limits such jurisdiction to insurers of agents, for their families, who have such immunity at the time of the filing of the lawsuit.) Prohibits any authorized funds from being used to implement any international agreement, if a Case-Zablocki Act requirement to submit the text of the agreement to the Congress within a 60-day period has not been met, until such text is submitted.
Makes such prohibition applicable during FY 1988 and 1989.
Directs the Secretary to transmit to a specified congressional officer and committee an annual report containing specified information on terrorism in each foreign country and on certain international terrorist groups.
Prohibits the use of authorized funds for certain specified "public diplomacy" efforts, with certain exceptions and limitations.
Amends the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 to direct the Secretary of the Treasury to invest funds paid by foreign governments in claims settlement cases, pending disbursal to U.S. citizens.
Amends the Department of State Appropriation Act of 1937 to authorize the Department of State to accept reimbursement from corporations, firms, and individuals for expenses incurred in pursuing a claim on their behalf against a foreign government or other foreign entity.
Part C - Diplomatic Reciprocity and Security
Requires, if the President is unable to make specified determinations regarding the security of the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow and the presence of the Soviet Embassy on Mount Alto in Washington, D.C., and to thereby waive this requirement, that the United States withdraw from the United States-Soviet Embassy Agreement. Directs the Secretary, if such waiver does not occur, to notify the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics that the Mount Alto site will cease to be available to it after a specified period.
Prohibits, if such requirement takes effect, the Mount Alto site from being made available for use thereafter by any foreign mission.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the arbitration process concerning damages from construction delays on the new U.S. Embassy in Moscow should include Soviet reimbursement of the full costs incurred by the United States as a result of Soviet intelligence activities directed at such Embassy. Requires the Secretary to ensure that:
(1) diplomatic and consular posts in the Soviet Union do not pay more than fair value for goods and services;
(2) U.S. diplomatic and consular posts in the Soviet Union have full access to goods and services; and
(3) the real property used by U.S. diplomatic and consular posts in the Soviet Union is equivalent in quantity and quality to the real property used by diplomatic and consular posts of the Soviet mission to the United States. Directs the Secretary of the Treasury to assist the Secretary with respect to determining the payment of fair value.
Directs the Secretary to report to the Congress on such requirements for embassy reciprocity within 60 days after enactment of this Act and annually thereafter.
Prohibits the Secretary from allowing the Soviet mission to the United States to occupy any new consulate until the U.S. mission in Kiev can occupy secure permanent facilities.
Includes financial and currency exchange services under the definition of benefit under the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956.
Directs the Secretary to submit to the Congress a report discussing whether the number of Soviet trading enterprise personnel in the United States should be reduced.
Directs the Secretary to develop and implement a special personnel security program for State Department personnel assigned to U.S. diplomatic and consular posts in high intelligence threat countries.
Directs the Secretary to report on such program to the Congress within six months after the enactment of this Act. Amends the Diplomatic Security Act to direct the Secretary to convene an Accountability Review Board when a serious breach of security involving intelligence activities of a foreign government directed at a U.S. mission abroad occurs.
Authorizes the Secretary to delay establishing such a board if intelligence sources and methods would be compromised.
Requires the Secretary to consult with the chairman of specified congressional committees before such a determination of delay and to promptly advise them of such determinations.
Prohibits, after September 30, 1990, the employment of any national of a Communist country as a foreign national employee in any area of a U.S. diplomatic or consular facility in any Communist country where classified materials are maintained.
Expresses congressional willingness to provide additional funds to employ U.S. nationals to replace such individuals.
Directs the Secretary, as part of the FY 1990-1991 budget request, to report on the feasibility and budget impact of such requirement and to request funds necessary for its implementation.
Authorizes the President to waive such requirement under specified circumstances and to notify the appropriate congressional committees of such waivers.
Directs the Secretary to terminate retirement benefits for foreign nationals (who are or were Department employees) engaging in intelligence activities directed against the United States. Authorizes the Secretary to waive such requirement under specified circumstances and to notify the appropriate congressional committees of such waivers.
Directs the Secretary, within six months after enactment of this Act, to submit a report to the Congress discussing the advisability of employing foreign nationals at foreign service posts abroad.
Directs the Secretary to consult with specified Federal officials and to include information on the access of such employees to automatic data processing systems and networks.
Directs the Secretary to certify to the Congress, before undertaking any new construction project, that:
(1) appropriate steps have been taken to secure the project; and
(2) the resulting facility will incorporate adequate security measures for protection of classified information, national security activities, and all personnel.
Requires that certification documentation be made available to the chairmen of specified congressional committees in appropriate classified form.
Requires the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to assist the Secretary in such security certification and to submit disagreeing views to the Secretary. Amends the State Department Basic Authorities Act to 1956 to provide certain restrictions on the sale or lease of real property to unfriendly foreign countries.
Prohibits the acquisition of real property in the United States by or on behalf of a foreign mission of such a foreign country if either the Secretary of Defense or the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) judges that such acquisition might substantially improve that country's ability to engage in intelligence activities hostile to U..S. national security interests.
Provides that such prohibition shall not prevent the establishment of a foreign mission by a country which does not have a mission in the United States or the opening of a consular mission in a city which currently does not have such a mission.
Imposes travel restrictions on certain individuals connected with a foreign government that engages in intelligence activities in the United States that are harmful to U.S. national security interests, if such individuals are:
(1) personnel of an international organization and nationals of such a foreign country; or
(2) personnel of a mission to an international organization, if that is the mission of such a foreign government.
Authorizes the Secretary to waive such restrictions, in consultation with the Director of the CIA and FBI. Directs the Secretary to report every six months on implementation of such restrictions to specified congressional committees.
Directs the Secretary to:
(1) implement a program of counterintelligence polygraph examinations for members of the Diplomatic Security Service during FY 1988 and 1989; and
(2) issue regulations to govern such program.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the Department of State should conclude an agreement with Hungary to:
(1) allow for the construction of new chancery facilities in Budapest which would totally segregate sensitive activities from those of an unclassified and public-oriented character and
(2) ensure the U.S. Government's right to employ only American construction personnel and to have complete control over access to the chancery site from the inception of construction.
Part D - Personnel Matters
Directs the Secretary, in consultation with specified congressional committees, to appoint a commission to study the Foreign Service personnel system with a view toward developing a system that provides adequate career stability to the members of the Service. Directs the Commission to report to the Secretary and specified congressional committees within one year after enactment of this Act. Requires the Secretary to take all appropriate steps to assure that the burden of budget cuts for the Department is not imposed disproportionately or inequitably upon its Civil Service employees.
Establishes within the Office of the Secretary of State the position of Ombudsman for Civil Service Employees. Makes such position one of the Senior Executive Service positions in existence on the date of enactment of this Act. Sets forth the rate of compensation for the Coordinator for International Communications and Information Policy and for the Director of the Office of Foreign Missions. Directs the Comptroller General to conduct an audit and inspection of the operation of the merit personnel system in the Foreign Service, with particular attention to reports of discriminatory practices, and to report to the Congress within one year after the enactment of this Act. Directs the Inspector General of the Department of State to review the performance award system of the Department and to report to the Secretary and the Congress by May 1, 1988.
Suspends performance awards for the Senior Foreign Service until the review is completed and the Congress receives such report.
Directs the Secretary, within 60 days after receiving such report, to report to the Congress with comments and on actions taken or proposed.
Amends the Foreign Service Act of 1980 to provide for a carry-over of Senior Foreign Service performance pay by allowing that portion of a performance pay award which cannot be paid because of a pay cap limitation to remain available for the individual in the following year.
Amends the Foreign Service Act of 1980 to provide for extension of certain limited appointments.
Limits the maximum total compensation, exclusive of danger pay, for any chief of mission to the executive level II rate.
Provides that a Senior Foreign Service member who accepts a presidential appointment may receive only the pay and benefits of such appointment, and is no longer eligible to receive performance pay.
Reduces the salary of future Ambassadors-at-Large from executive level II to level IV, or from the equivalent of the Deputy Secretary to that of an Assistant Secretary. Amends the Foreign Service Act of 1980 to prohibit Foreign Service employees from representing to the income tax authorities of the District of Columbia or any State or locality that they are exempt from income taxes on the basis of holding a presidential appointment or serving an appointment whose tenure is at the pleasure of the President. Expresses the sense of the Congress that the Secretary should assure that those who direct and conduct negotiations on behalf of management of the Department are not also beneficiaries of the agreements made with the exclusive representative of the Foreign Service employees.
Directs the Secretary, upon determination that a Foreign Service Grievance Board (the Board) recommendation is contrary to law, to request, within 30 days of receiving such recommendation, that the Board reconsider the recommendation.
Directs the Board, within 30 days of receiving such request, to confirm, modify, or vacate its original recommendation.
Provides that this new recommendation shall be considered a final action to be implemented by the Secretary. Specifies that the Board has the authority to recommend granting tenure to remedy harm.
Provides that specified provisions do not limit the authority of the Secretary and the Board to provide for the alternative remedy of extending limited appointments where necessary to afford candidates a full and fair opportunity to demonstrate fitness and aptitude for career appointment.
Authorizes the Board to direct the Department to pay attorneys fees in certain separation for cause cases.
Requires the Board to maintain records of all grievances awarded in favor of the grievant which concern gross misconduct by a supervisor.
Directs the Board to provide a copy of the grievance decision, and to make the entire record of proceedings available, upon a member's request, to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations whenever such a supervisor is nominated for any position requiring the advice and consent of the Senate. Directs the Board to provide to the supervisor a copy of all material provided to the Committee or its members.
Gives the supervisor the right to review such record and provide comments to the Committee. Makes all such decisions, proceedings, records, and comments confidential.
Directs the Secretary and the heads of each Federal agency utilizing the Foreign Service personnel system to increase their efforts to implement specified plans to make the Foreign Service at all levels representative of the American people and to promote increased numbers of qualified women and minority group members into the senior levels of the Foreign Service. Directs the Secretary, in a required annual report, to also report on the progress made at the Assistant Secretary and Bureau level in increasing the presence of minorities and women at all levels in the Foreign Service and Civil Service work forces of the Department and on specific actions taken to address the lack of Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans in the Senior Executive Service and the Senior Foreign Service of the Department. Directs the Secretary, within 90 days after the enactment of this Act, to submit to specified congressional committees a report complying with a 1984 request for a listing and description of all policy and supporting positions in the Department and related agencies.
Directs the Secretary to respond in a timely manner whenever specified congressional committees request information for inclusion in the publication "U.S. Government Policy and Supporting Positions." Directs the Secretary to transmit to specified congressional officers the Department's reports on its equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs.
Directs the Secretary to report annually to a specified congressional officer and committee on the use of Foreign Service personnel by Federal agencies.
Makes other changes in specified reporting requirements under the Foreign Service Act of 1980.
Amends the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 to set forth limitations on the disposition of personal property abroad.
Directs the Secretary to issue regulations to ensure that Department employees and their family members do not personally profit from transactions with persons not entitled to exemptions from import restrictions, duties, or taxes.
Amends the Fascell Fellowship Act to allow Fascell Fellows to be employed:
(1) under a temporary appointment in the Civil Service;
(2) under a limited appointment in the Foreign Service; or
(3) by contract under specific provisions of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956.
Amends the Foreign Service Act of 1980 to provide retirement and survivor annuities and access to health insurance to former spouses who were divorced from Foreign Service members before the effective date of such Act.
Title II - The United States Information Agency
Authorizes appropriations for FY 1988 and 1989 to the U.S. Information Agency (USIA) to carry out international information activities and other purposes under specified laws, allocating amounts for:
(1) salaries and expenses;
(2) television and film service; and
(3) the East-West Center. Amends the United States Information and Education Exchange Act of 1948 to make permanent the existing grant notification requirement for certain USIA grants.
Prohibits the reprogramming of any USIA funds during the last 15 days in which such funds are available, unless notice of such reprogramming is made before that period.
Authorizes the USIA to retain receipts from the rental of English-teaching tapes and programs and from the provision of library services.
Prohibits the use of funds authorized by this or any other Act to pay any expense associated with:
(1) the closing of any USIA post abroad; or
(2) the USIA Bureau of Management or the television or film service if any USIA post abroad is closed after April 1, 1987, and not reopened within 180 days after enactment of this Act. Prohibits reductions in the number of positions filled by USIA American employees stationed abroad until the ratio of the number of such positions to the total number of USIA American employees returns to the 1981 level.
Extends from 25 to 40 years the period for which real property associated with facilities for radio transmission and reception may be leased.
Requires the Director of the USIA to implement a formal comprehensive country plan on Afghanistan based on specified guidelines and to provide the proposed plan to the Congress within 60 days after enactment of this Act. Requires the USIA television and film service, including Worldnet broadcasts, to operate under the same criteria and conditions specified under law for the Voice of America (VOA). Prohibits the reprogramming or transfer of funds in FY 1988 and 1989 from any program, project, or activity for the Worldnet Program. Earmarks certain Worldnet Program funds for 1988 to conduct a market survey in Europe of Worldnet programming.
Sets forth qualifications of the surveyor and requires notification of the selected surveyor to be given to the Congress. Requires the Director of the USIA to report to specified congressional committees within nine months after enactment of this Act on the surveyor's report and estimates.
Prohibits the USIA after October 1, 1988, from funding Worldnet passive (noninteractive) television programs unless such survey has been completed, such report has been submitted, and the survey shows with a high degree of reliability that the average daily European audience for such programs is at least 2,000,000 viewers.
Authorizes appropriations for FY 1988 and 1989 to the USIA for a grant to the National Endowment for Democracy (NED) to carry out its purposes.
Earmarks a specified portion of such funds for FY 1988 to support elements of the free press, including free radio, and the democratic oppositions inside Nicaragua which espouse democratic principles and objectives.
Prohibits any U.S. Government employee from participating, directly or indirectly, in controlling and directing the use of such funds.
Amends the National Endowment for Democracy Act to require the NED to ensure that grantees keep NED assistance in separate accounts.
Allows the NED to make grants to independent labor unions.
Amends the United States Information and Education Exchange Act of 1948 to redesignate the United States Advisory Commission on International Communication, Cultural and Educational Affairs as the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy (thus updating the statutory authority for the Commission). Provides that members shall serve at the pleasure of the President. Repeals a prohibition limiting membership of individuals from the same political party.
Authorizes distribution of the USIA film "America the Way I See It" within the United States. Requires the Director of the USIA to make available, upon request, photographs of military operations and related activities that occurred in the Republic of Vietnam to the Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of the military departments concerned to develop and publish military histories.
Expresses the sense of the House of Representatives that the USIA should provide increased funding for students in the Caribbean region (including Aruba) under the scholarship program for developing countries under the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987.
Title III - Educational and Cultural Affairs
Authorizes appropriations (in addition to those under title II) for FY 1988 and 1989 to the USIA for the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs (the Bureau) to carry out the purposes of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchanges Act of 1961.
Earmarks portions of such funds for:
(1) the Fulbright Academic Exchange Programs;
(2) the International Visitors Program;
(3) the Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program;
(4) the Congress-Bundestag Exchange;
(5) the Seattle Goodwill Games Organizing Committee for Cultural Exchange and other exchange-related activities associated with the 1990 Goodwill Games;
(6) the Arts America Program;
(7) books and materials for the Edward Zorinsky Memorial Library In Jakarta, Indonesia; and
(8) grants for exchange of persons programs between the United States and the Soviet Union. Amends the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (MECEA) to establish the Samantha Smith Memorial Exchange Program which advances understanding between the United States and the Soviet Union and between the United States and Eastern European countries through the exchange of persons under the age of 21 years and of students at an institution of higher education who have not received their initial baccalaureate degree.
Authorizes appropriations for FY 1988 and 1989 for such program.
Amends MECEA to transfer under the Bureau's control the USIA's Arts America program which promotes a greater appreciation and understanding of American art abroad by supporting exhibitions and tours by American artists in other countries.
Directs the President to support a professorship in constitutional democracy at the Santo Tomas University in the Republic of the Philippines. Encourages American war veterans to contribute funds to support such professorship under MECEA. Amends the United States-India Fund for Cultural Educational and Scientific Cooperation Act to permit certain funds set aside for such Fund to be used in accordance with a specified agreement.
Names the USIA library in Jakarta, Indonesia, the Edward Zorinsky Memorial Library. Amends the Convention on Cultural Property Implementation Act to revise the terms of service of members of the Cultural Property Advisory Committee.
Title IV - Voice of America
Authorizes appropriations (in addition to those under title II) for FY 1988 and 1989 to the USIA for the Voice of America (VOA) to carry out specified provisions of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 and the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act. Allocates such funds for:
(1) salaries and expenses;
(2) VOA/Europe; and
(3) radio broadcasting to Cuba. Amends the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 to require VOA/Europe to:
(1) target news and features in accordance with the findings and recommendations of the Young European Survey;
(2) conduct periodic audience evaluations and measurements; and
(3) promote and advertise its programs.
Requires bidders for contracts under the facilities modernization program of VOA to establish that the U.S. goods and services content is a specified portion of their bid in order for it to be considered a responsive bid.
Provides a preference for U.S. contractor bidding on the projects of the facilities modernization program.
Provides for exceptions from such preference, including whenever the Secretary of Commerce certifies to the Director of the USIA that the foreign bidder is not receiving any direct subsidy from any government the effect of which would be to disadvantage the competitive position of U.S. persons who also bid on such projects.
Title V - The Board for International Broadcasting
Amends the Board for International Broadcasting Act of 1973 to authorize appropriations for FY 1988 and 1989 for the Board for International Broadcasting. Earmarks a portion of such funds for radio transmitter construction and modernization.
Revises provisions relating to Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty to provide for a reserve fund for offsetting downward fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.
Provides for certification of creditable service with respect to the Asia Foundation and the Armed Forces Network, Europe.
Title VI - Asia Foundation
Amends the Asia Foundation Act to authorize appropriations for FY 1988 and 1989 for grants to the Asia Foundation.
Title VII - International Organizations
Part A - United Nations
Expresses certain findings concerning a current hiring freeze within the United Nations Secretariat, including the following:
(1) that the Secretary-General of the UN is considering the hiring of a specified number of exceptions to such hiring freeze;
(2) that the majority of such exceptions would be Soviet Nationals who are current members of the UN and would be replaced by highly-trained members of the Soviet KGB or GRU;
(3) that to allow such hiring-freeze exemptions would violate the UN Charter, which calls for the establishment of an international civil service whose members are loyal only to the UN; and
(4) that the UN's hiring of such individuals would be inconsistent with the terms of the UN's self-imposed reform program.
Directs the Secretary of State, no later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, to report to the Congress as to the status of secondment (employees serving on short, fixed-term contracts) within the Soviet and Soviet-bloc-member nations of the UN. Expresses the sense of the Congress that:
(1) the President should take all necessary action to enforce compliance with the hiring-freeze rule;
(2) the Secretary-General of the UN should revoke all exceptions to the hiring-freeze rule; and
(3) member-nations of the UN should not be permitted to have more than 50 percent of its UN employees employed under secondment contracts.
Condemns the Soviet Union for its actions in violating the principles of the UN Charter. Expresses findings favoring a concensus-based budget decision-making procedure for the UN and its specialized agencies.
Directs that 40 percent of the U.S.-assessed contribution toward the yearly UN budget be paid on October 1 of each calendar year, and that the remainder should be paid only after certain action occurs, including:
(1) adoption of the consensus-based budget decision-making process, above;
(2) progress is made toward implementation of the 50 percent secondment employee rule, above; and
(3) an equally-applied reduction in the staff of the Secretariat is implemented.
Requires the President to make the above determinations and report them to the Congress, after which time (30 days after) the final 20 percent of the U.S. contribution toward the UN budget shall be paid.
Limits the amount to be paid to specialized agencies of the UN by the United States as its assessed portion unless the President has certified to the Congress that such agency has made substantial progress in achieving the decision-making procedures on budgetary matters referred to above.
Allows the Congress to stop payment of the final 20 percent of the U.S.-assessed share of the UN contribution if a joint resolution prohibiting such payment is adopted.
Outlines procedures for the adoption of such joint resolution.
Expresses as the policy of the United States implementation of a certain procedure which deducts from the pay of an international civil servant a specified amount for a housing allowance, and directs the U.S. Ambassador to the UN to seek adoption of such procedure.
Amends the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 to suspend U.S. participation in the UN if Israel is illegally expelled or otherwise denied the right to participate in any organization of the UN. Amends such Act to authorize the withholding of 25 percent of the amount for the UN Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting Human Rights of the Population of the Occupied Territories. Expresses the sense of the Congress that the United States should support access by interested individuals and organizations to the files of the United Nations War Crimes Commission. Expresses congressional findings regarding the importance of the archaeological value of ancient Tyre and the threat posed to such site by civil strife in Lebanon. Directs the Secretary of State to request the Secretary General of the UN to extend the mandate of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon to include protection of Tyre and to seek an order prohibiting the purchase of any artifacts from Tyre by any person associated with the UN. Directs the Secretary of State, no later than six months after the enactment of this Act and annually thereafter, to report to specified congressional committees on the progress made in implementing this provision.
Part B - United States Commission on Improving the Effectiveness of the United Nations
Establishes the United States Commission on Improving the Effectiveness of the United Nations (the Commission), whose purposes shall be to:
(1) identify the UN system as a whole and identify its strengths and weaknesses; and
(2) prepare and submit to the President and the Congress recommendations on ways to improve the effectiveness of the UN system and the U.S. role in the UN system, including the feasibility of and means for implementing such recommendations.
Outlines membership, powers, staffing, and funding requirements for such Commission, and requires the recommendations report of the Commission to be submitted by the Commission no later than 18 months after the members of the Commission are appointed.
Terminates the Commission 60 days after receipt of its report.
Part C - Other International Organizations
Authorizes the President to extend diplomatic privileges and immunities to other offices of the Mission to the United States of the Commission of the European Communities. Directs the Secretary of State to make a contribution to the regular budget of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) equal to not less than ten percent of the ICRC's regular budget.
Provides that such contribution shall not exceed or be less than that made in FY 1987.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the Red Shield of David should be given a status of recognition identical to that granted to the Red Cross and the Red Crescent. Amends the International Organizations Immunities Act to provide that the ICRC be granted the same privileges and immunities as are granted to public international organizations in which the United States participates.
Amends specified Federal law to provide that the secretaries to the House and Senate delegations to the North Atlantic Assembly shall be appointed by the chairmen of the House Foreign Affairs and Senate Foreign Relations Committees. Increases the authorization for U.S. participation in NATO parliamentary conferences.
Authorizes the President to continue membership for the United States in the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration under the amended name International Organization for Migration (IOM). Authorizes such funds as necessary for periodic payments by the United States of salaries and expenses incident to such membership.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the Secretary of State should consider recognizing the Caribbean Community and Common Market as a regional planning organization in the Caribbean. Directs the Secretary of State, within 180 days after the enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on the nature and extent in the Asian-Pacific region and on the willingness of countries in the region to negotiate a regional human rights convention.
Title VIII - International Narcotics Control
Provides that if the Secretary authorizes the assignment of any Drug Enforcement Administration agent to a particular U.S. mission abroad, he shall authorize the assignment of at least two such agents to that mission.
Amends the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 to include information on the detention and torture of DEA agents in quarterly reports required on progress made in investigating and prosecuting those responsible for the murders of DEA agent Camarena and his pilot.
Directs the Secretary of State to ensure that the extradition of narcotic traffickers to the United States be included as a primary objective in the country plan for the U.S. mission in each major drug-producing or drug-transit country.
Directs that necessary steps be taken to implement existing treaties which provide for the extradition of drug traffickers.
Directs the Secretary of State, within 90 days after enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on the comprehensive information-sharing system on drug arrests of foreign nationals established under the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987.
Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to require, within certain reports required under such Act, specific comments and recommendations by appropriate Federal agencies involved in drug enforcement.
Extends from 30 to 45 days the period for congressional disapproval of Presidential certifications on major drug-producing and transit countries.
Amends the Trade Act of 1974 to add to the current list of tariff sanctions against any country which the President has determined is not fully cooperating in anti-narcotics efforts the following:
(1) authorizing the President to take certain steps to curtail air transportation between the United States and that country; and
(2) mandating the withdrawal of personnel and resources of the United States from participation in any arrangement with that country for the preclearance of customs by visitors between the United States and that country.
Requires the President, when determining the extent of drug enforcement cooperation by a country, to consider whether such government has taken legal and law enforcement steps to eliminate, to the maximum extent possible, corruption by government officials, with particular emphasis on the elimination of bribery.
Outlines action to be taken by the President in the event of an air transportation sanction undertaken against a country.
Repeals a specified provision of Federal law which authorizes the President to reduce by one-half the number of nonimmigrant visas to noncooperative countries.
Amends the Immigration and Nationality Act to specify that individuals convicted of violations of drug law statutes or are known or are believed to be drug traffickers may be barred from entry into the United States.
Title IX - Immigration and Refugee Provisions
Prohibits any alien from being denied a visa or excluded from admission into the United States, being subject to conditions on entry into the United States, or being subject to deportation because of any past, current, or expected beliefs, statements, or associations which would be protected under the Constitution if engaged in by a U.S. citizen in the United States. Provides rules of construction for the determination of those aliens who may be excludible for other reasons (such as national security purposes, or criminal or terrorist activity).
Adjusts to lawful resident alien the status of any alien who is a national of a foreign country which has been provided extended voluntary departure privileges by the Attorney General during the last five-year period ending on November 1, 1987, as long as certain procedures are followed.
Requires the Attorney General to provide for such acceptance and application process within 90 days after the enactment of this Act. Directs the State Department and the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) to begin the normal visas processing and entry application process for entry into the United States of any Cuban who has been imprisoned in Cuba for political reasons since 1959, in light of a statement by the Government of Cuba that it would reestablish normal migration procedures between the United States and Cuba. Directs the State Department to process immigrant visa applications by nationals of Cuba located in third countries on the same basis as immigrant visa applications by nationals of other countries.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the United States continues to be committed to playing a major role in responding to the Indochinese refugee problem.
Commends the government of Thailand for recently allowing the United States to begin processing certain refugees and for its cooperation in creating a more effective antipiracy campaign.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the State Department should urge the Government of Thailand to allow full access to the Lao Screening Program for all Lao refugees.
Directs the State Department and responsible international organizations to address the protection problems of the Khmer along the Thai-Cambodian border.
Requires the President, within 180 days after enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on the respective roles of the INS and the State Department on the refugee problem, with appropriate recommendations.
States that the President should continue to recommend generous and sufficient numbers of admissions from East Asia first asylum camps and from the Orderly Departure Program consistent with worldwide refugee requirements.
Earmarks a specified amount for educational programs for the protection, health care, nutrition, education, and skills training programs for refugees in Thailand. Provides certain congressional findings and declarations regarding Amerasian children still in Vietnam. Expresses the sense of the Congress that:
(1) the United States should continue their commitment to receive the Amerasian children in Vietnam and their families; and
(2) the Socialist Republic of Vietnam should cooperate fully in facilitating the processing of all Amerasians who wish to resettle in the United States, and in the processing of Amerasians for emigration.
States certain congressional findings regarding the plight of refugees from Southeast Asia. Expresses the sense of the Congress that:
(1) any Cambodians who are or were in Khao I Dang camp should be interviewed for eligibility for the U.S. refugee program, regardless of when they entered Thailand or that camp;
(2) any Cambodian previously rejected for admission into the United States, having new or additional evidence relating to his or her claim, should have his or her case reviewed;
(3) the United States should work with specified international organizations and the Government of Thailand to improve the security for all refugee facilities in Thailand and to prevent the forced repatriation of Cambodian refugees;
(4) the United States should treat seriously reports of the forced repatriation of would-be asylum seekers to Laos and should protest the Thai Government to end such repatriations; and
(5) within the Orderly Departure Program the United States will give high priority consideration to determining the eligibility of serious health cases and cases involving children separated from both parents.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the People's Republic of China should immediately release Yang Wei, a student of the University of Arizona, who has been imprisoned without charge since January 11, 1987, and that the United States should consider sympathetically applications for asylum from Chinese students in the United States who can demonstrate a well-founded fear of persecution.
Title X - Anti-Terrorism Act of 1987
Anti-Terrorism Act of 1987 - Makes certain congressional findings with respect to Middle East terrorism, in particular, terrorism effected by the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). Determines that the PLO is a terrorist organization and a threat to the interests of the United States, and should not benefit from operating in the United States. Establishes certain prohibitions regarding the PLO and actions involving them in the United States. Provides enforcement of such prohibitions through the Attorney General, and relief through any district court in the United States. Terminates such prohibitions if a certain certification is made that the PLO no longer practices or supports terrorist action anywhere in the world.
Title XI; Global Climate Protection - Global Climate Protection Act of 1987 - Expresses certain congressional findings regarding global climate protection, including the following:
(1) there is evidence that manmade pollution may be producing a long-term and substantial increase in the average temperature on the surface of the Earth, a phenomenon known as the "greenhouse" effect; and
(2) vigorous research is required in order to prevent such pollution from altering the global climate, and affecting agriculture and habitability over large portions of the Earth's surface within the next century.
Provides that U.S. policy should seek to:
(1) increase worldwide understanding of the greenhouse effect and its consequences;
(2) foster cooperation among nations to coordinate research efforts with respect to such effect; and
(3) identify technologies and activities that limit mankind's adverse effect on the global climate.
Directs the President, through the Environmental Protection Agency, to develop and propose to the Congress a coordinated national policy on global climate change.
Directs the Secretary of State to coordinate such U.S. policy in the international arena.
Directs the Secretary and the administrator of the EPA, within 24 months after enactment of this Act, to jointly report to the appropriate congressional committees an analysis, description, and strategy of the United States with respect to the greenhouse effect and its effect on global climate change.
Directs the Secretary to promote an International Year of Global Climate Protection. Urges the President to accord the problem of climate protection a high priority on the agenda of U.S.-Soviet relations.
Title XII - Regional Foreign Relations Matters
Part A - Soviet Union and Eastern Europe
Expresses certain congressional findings regarding Soviet ballistic missile tests near Hawaii. Expresses the sense of the Congress that such tests were provocative and unnecessary, that the United States should protest such tests and seek assurances that they will not occur again, and that the President should report to the Congress on the details of such tests and on steps taken to be sure that no such further tests occur.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the Soviet Union should permit the emigration of Jews and other who wish to emigrate from the Soviet Union, and remove restrictions and cease harassment of individuals for reasons based solely on their cultural or religious heritage.
Expresses the sense of the Congress disapproving of the systematic nondelivery of international mail addressed to certain persons residing within the Soviet Union. Expresses the sense of the Congress disapproving of the policy of persecution of Christians in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, and calls upon such countries to cease such action.
Deplores the activity of the Government of Romania in restricting the internationally recognized human rights of Hungarians and other nationalities in Transylvania and elsewhere in Romania. Expresses the sense of the Congress that:
(1) the right of freedom and independence of the people of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania from the Soviet Union should be recognized; and
(2) the President should take specified action to provide for such self-determination.
Expresses congressional support for the Solidarity movement for democracy in Poland, and earmarks funds for such activities in Poland.
Part B - Latin America and Cuba
Expresses certain findings regarding the violation of human rights in Cuba, and the failure of the United Nations to place Cuba on its human rights agenda.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that:
(1) the Government of Cuba should respect such internationally recognized human rights; and
(2) the U.S. delegation to the UN should continue its efforts to place Cuban human rights abuses on the agenda of the United Nations Human Rights Commission. Expresses the sense of the Congress approving a partial lifting of the trade embargo against Nicaragua, disapproving the harboring of a certain terrorist by the Government of Mexico, and disapproving of the violation of internationally recognized human rights of the citizens of the Government of Paraguay.
Part C - Africa
Expresses congressional disapproval of certain human rights violations in Ethiopia. Expresses the sense of the Congress that the United States should continue to work toward a peaceful settlement of the Angolan conflict, and should provide humanitarian assistance to the Angolan people.
Directs the Secretary of State, within 180 days after enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on discussions between the United States and the Soviet Union on the conflict in Angola. Directs the Secretary, no later than 90 days after enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on the existence of certain forced detentions in South Africa since the South African Government enacted a state of emergency in June of 1986.
Expresses certain congressional findings concerning the detention of children in South Africa, and calls for the cessation of the practice of detaining children under 18 years of age without charge or trial in South Africa. Calls upon the Government of South Africa to either release such children or bring them to a fair trial.
Part D - Middle East
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the United States should not actively encourage the participation of the Soviet Union in any conference or summit on the Arab-Israeli conflict which includes nations other than the Middle East unless the Government of the Soviet Union has undertaken certain action regarding its formal relations with Israel. Expresses certain congressional findings approving of the recognition of the territorial integrity of the country of Lebanon, calling for the withdrawal of all foreign forces from such country, and providing certain humanitarian assistance (wheat donations) to overcome such country's hunger problems.
Expresses the policy of the Congress that the use of force by the United States to terminate illegal Iranian mine-laying activities in the Persian Gulf is justified by international law.
Expresses congressional policy calling for a peaceful resolution to the Iran-Iraq war, and calling for the withdrawal of troops from both countries to internationally-recognized boundaries.
Expresses congressional policy disapproving of human rights violations in Iran under the Khomeini regime, and supports the official U.S. policy of halting any arms shipments to Iran until such violations cease.
Urges the President to take every action necessary to help bring about an end to government-sponsored torture in Iranian prisons.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the President shall take all necessary steps to help bring about an end to the persecution by the Government of Iran of the Baha'i community.
Part E - Asia
Makes certain congressional findings concerning Soviet actions in Afghanistan and the Afghan Resistance. Declares the policy of the United States to be providing assistance to the Afghan Resistance, and supporting a negotiated settlement to the Afghanistan war and the withdrawal of all Soviet forces from Afghanistan. Directs the Secretary of State, within 60 days after enactment of this Act, to provide to the chairmen of the Senate and House Foreign Relations Committees specified reports containing information on the official U.S. policy toward Afghanistan, including sanctions imposed against the Soviet Union for their participation in the Afghanistan war, and the disposition of Soviet forces in Afghanistan. Expresses congressional findings regarding certain human rights violations in Tibet by the People's Republic of China. States that the policy of the United States should be to:
(1) express sympathy for those Tibetans who have suffered and died as the result of fighting, persecution, or famine over the past four decades;
(2) have the People's Republic of China respect internationally-recognized human rights and end such violations against the Tibetan people;
(3) commend the efforts of the Dalai Lama to bring about an end to such human rights violations in Tibet; and
(4) have the President instruct all appropriate U.S. officials, including the Ambassadors to China and India, to bring about an end to such human rights violations and work toward the release of all political prisoners in Tibet. Directs the Secretary of State, within 60 days after enactment of this Act, to determine whether the needs of displaced Tibetans are similar to the needs of other displaced refugees, and, if so, to make amounts available for assistance to such displaced Tibetans during FY 1988 and 1989, including the availability of scholarships to Tibetan students.
Expresses certain congressional findings in support of the right of self-determination for the Cambodian people.
States that the policy of the United States should be to:
(1) deplore the continued violation of the sovereignty and territorial independence of Cambodia by the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;
(2) call upon the Government of Vietnam to withdraw all its occupation forces from Cambodia and negotiate a settlement that restores self-determination to the Cambodian people; and
(3) support all efforts to restore free and fair elections to Cambodia, and ensure that there will be no return to the genocidal policies of the Pol Pot regime.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the leadership of the People's Republic of China should take necessary steps toward establishing a more democratic society, with a free and open political system.
Expresses the sense of the Congress welcoming the democratic trends emerging in Taiwan and the lifting of martial law there, and encouraging Taiwanese leaders to continue such progress.
Part F - Miscellaneous
Directs the Secretary of State, no later than 30 days after the enactment of this Act, to report to appropriate congressional committees on investigations regarding illegal technology transfers to the Soviet Union by the Toshiba Corporation of Japan and the Kongsberg Vappenfabrik Corporation of Norway. Directs the Secretary to enter into discussions with such countries regarding compensation for damages suffered as the result of such illegal technology transfers.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that the President should convene a summit of Western world leaders to adopt a unified effective program against international terrorism.
Urges the President to enter into discussions with other countries regarding the feasibility of deleting the place of birth as a required item of information on passports.
Expresses certain findings of the Congress regarding support of the mutual defense alliances.
States that the President should enter into discussions, especially with NATO-member nations and Japan, to reach an agreement on a more equitable distribution of the burden of financial support for the alliances.
Directs the President, within one year of enactment of this Act, to report to the Congress on the progress of such discussions.
Amends the Arms Export Control Act to direct the President to develop mechanisms to identify, in connection with the export licensing process, persons indicted for or convicted of violations of specified provisions of Federal law relating to espionage, sabotage, or the otherwise illegal dissemination of classified information, communication, or data.
Directs the President to require each applicant for a license to export an item on the United States Munitions List to identify all consignees and freight forwarders involved in the proposed export.
Authorizes the President to disapprove of such license applications for reasonable cause, and prohibits such licenses to be issued to known violators of the Federal provisions referred to, above.
Directs the President to develop standards for identifying high-risk exports for regular end-use verification.
Revises provisions concerning the review of munitions control registrations, and specified uses of munitions control registration fees.
Title XIII - Effective Date
Sets forth the effective date for provisions of this Act.

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