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H.R. 3743 (101st): Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990

The text of the bill below is as of Nov 21, 1989 (Passed Congress).

H.R.3743

One Hundred First Congress of the United States of America

AT THE FIRST SESSION

Begun and held at the City of Washington on Tuesday, the third day of January,

one thousand nine hundred and eighty-nine

An Act

Making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs

for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1990, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1990, and for other purposes, namely:

TITLE I--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

International Financial Institutions

CONTRIBUTIONS FOR ARREARAGES

CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

    For payment to the International Development Association by the Secretary of the Treasury, $6,666,667, for the United States contribution to the replenishments, to remain available until expended: Provided, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while the alternate United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCE CORPORATION

    For payment to the International Finance Corporation by the Secretary of the Treasury, $75,000,000, for the United States share of the increase in subscriptions to capital stock, to remain available until expended: Provided, That of this amount not more than $24,544,000 may be expended for the purchase of such stock in fiscal year 1990.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTER-AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

    For payment to the Inter-American Development Bank by the Secretary of the Treasury for the United States share of the paid-in share portion of the increase in capital stock, $31,617,983, and for the United States share of the increases in the resources of the Fund for Special Operations, $63,724,629, to remain available until expended: Provided, That the funds made available under this heading shall be withheld from obligation until the Secretary of the Treasury certifies that the Board of Executive Directors of the Inter-American Development Bank has adopted policies to ensure that all recipients of assistance must agree in writing that in general any procurement of goods or services utilizing Bank funds shall be conducted in a manner that does not discriminate on the basis of nationality against any member country, firm or person interested in providing such goods or services: Provided further, That the Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Director of the Inter-American Development Bank to use the voice and vote of the United States to oppose any assistance by the Bank to any recipient of assistance who refuses to agree in writing that in general any procurement of goods or services utilizing Bank funds shall be conducted in a manner that does not discriminate on the basis of nationality against any member country, firm or person interested in providing such goods or services: Provided further, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while the alternate United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

    For the United States contribution by the Secretary of the Treasury to the increases in resources of the Asian Development Fund, as authorized by the Asian Development Bank Act, as amended (Public Law 89-369), $137,948,091, to remain available until expended: Provided, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate which, together with whatever compensation such Director receives from the United States, is in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while any alternate United States Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

    For payment to the African Development Bank by the Secretary of the Treasury, for the paid-in share portion of the United States share of the increase in capital stock, $1,654,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while the alternate United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

ANNUAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT

    For payment to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development by the Secretary of the Treasury, for the United States share of the paid-in share portion of the increases in capital stock, for the General Capital Increase, $50,000,795, to remain available until expended: Provided, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while the alternate United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION

    For payment to the International Development Association by the Secretary of the Treasury, $958,333,333, for the United States contribution to the replenishment, to remain available until expended: Provided, That $115,000,000 of the funds made available under this heading shall be withheld from obligation until January 1, 1990: Provided further, That such funds withheld from obligation may be obligated after January 1, 1990, only if the President certifies: (1) that the International Development Association has not provided any new loans to China since June 27, 1989, or (2) that, if such loans have been provided, the United States Government believes that such loans will support the process of increasing individual freedoms and improving human rights in China: Provided further, That fifteen days prior to any obligation of funds for the International Development Association, the President shall report his certification to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate, and the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate: Provided further, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while the alternate United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

    For the United States contribution by the Secretary of the Treasury to the increases in resources of the Asian Development Fund, as authorized by the Asian Development Bank Act, as amended (Public Law 89-369), $40,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That no such contribution may be made while the United States Executive Director to the Asian Development Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate which, together with whatever compensation such Director receives from the United States, is in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while any alternate United States Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FUND

    For payment to the African Development Fund by the Secretary of the Treasury, $105,000,000, for the United States contribution to the fifth replenishment of the African Development Fund, to remain available until expended.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

    For payment to the African Development Bank by the Secretary of the Treasury, for the paid-in share portion of the United States share of the increase in capital stock, $7,987,308 to remain available until expended: Provided, That no such payment may be made while the United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, or while the alternate United States Executive Director to the Bank is compensated by the Bank at a rate in excess of the rate provided for an individual occupying a position at level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.

LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL SUBSCRIPTIONS

    The United States Governor of the African Development Bank may subscribe without fiscal year limitation to the callable capital portion of the United States share of such capital stock in an amount not to exceed $134,809,613.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE ENHANCED STRUCTURAL ADJUSTMENT FACILITY OF THE INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

    For payment to the Interest Subsidy Account of the Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility of the International Monetary Fund, $140,000,000 to remain available until expended: Provided, That such funds are available subject to authorization: Provided further, That none of the funds made available by this paragraph shall be available for obligation or disbursement until the Secretary of the Treasury has assured the Committees on Appropriations in writing that the current policy of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the United States Government requiring that all congressional inquiries to IMF employees be cleared through the office of the United States Executive Director of the IMF has been reversed thereby allowing unmonitored and unfettered contact between Congress and IMF employees.

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of sections 301 and 103(g) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, and of section 2 of the United Nations Environment Program Participation Act of 1983, $265,115,000: Provided, That no funds shall be available for the United Nations Fund for Science and Technology: Provided further, That the total amount of funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available only as follows: $109,510,000 for the United Nations Development Program; $65,400,000 for the United Nations Children’s Fund, of which amount 75 per centum (less amounts withheld consistent with section 307 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and section 526 of this Act) shall be obligated and expended no later than thirty days after the date of enactment of this Act and 25 per centum of which shall be expended within thirty days from the start of the United Nations Children’s Fund fourth quarter of operations for 1990; $980,000 for the World Food Program; $1,500,000 for the United Nations Capital Development Fund; $800,000 for the United Nations Voluntary Fund for the Decade for Women; $200,000 for the United Nations International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women; $100,000 for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; $2,000,000 for the International Convention and Scientific Organization Contributions; $2,000,000 for the World Meteorological Organization Voluntary Cooperation Program; $22,000,000 for the International Atomic Energy Agency; $12,000,000 for the United Nations Environment Program; $800,000 for the United Nations Educational and Training Program for Southern Africa; $110,000 for the United Nations Institute for Namibia; $500,000 for the United Nations Trust Fund for South Africa; $750,000 for the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species; $220,000 for the World Heritage Fund; $100,000 for the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture; $245,000 for the United Nations Fellowship Program; $400,000 for the United Nations Center on Human Settlements; $500,000 for the UNIDO Investment Promotion Service; $10,000,000 for the Organization of American States; and $35,000,000 for the United States contributions to the third replenishment of the International Fund for Agricultural Development: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for the International Fund for Agricultural Development until agreement has been reached on the third replenishment of the Fund: Provided further, That funds appropriated under this heading may be made available for the International Atomic Energy Agency only if the Secretary of State determines (and so reports to the Congress) that Israel is not being denied its right to participate in the activities of that Agency.

TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT

    For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, and for other purposes, to remain available until September 30, 1990, unless otherwise specified herein, as follows:

Agency for International Development

AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, AND NUTRITION, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 103, $483,715,000: Provided, That up to $5,000,000 shall be provided for new development projects of private entities and cooperatives utilizing surplus dairy products: Provided further, That not less than $8,000,000 shall be provided for the Vitamin A Deficiency Program: Provided further, That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, up to $10,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, and remain available until expended, for agricultural activities in Poland which are managed by the Polish Catholic Church or other nongovernmental organizations: Provided further, That not less than $1,000,000 shall be available for a Farmer-to-Farmer program for Poland, notwithstanding any other provision of law.

POPULATION, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 104(b), $220,000,000: Provided, That none of the funds made available in this Act nor any unobligated balances from prior appropriations may be made available to any organization or program which, as determined by the President of the United States, supports or participates in the management of a program of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization: Provided further, That none of the funds made available under this heading may be used to pay for the performance of abortion as a method of family planning or to motivate or coerce any person to practice abortions; and that in order to reduce reliance on abortion in developing nations, funds shall be available only to voluntary family planning projects which offer, either directly or through referral to, or information about access to, a broad range of family planning methods and services: Provided further, That in awarding grants for natural family planning under section 104 of the Foreign Assistance Act no applicant shall be discriminated against because of such applicant’s religious or conscientious commitment to offer only natural family planning; and, additionally, all such applicants shall comply with the requirements of the previous proviso: Provided further, That nothing in this subsection shall be construed to alter any existing statutory prohibitions against abortion under section 104 of the Foreign Assistance Act.

health, development assistance

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 104(c), $125,994,000.

INTERNATIONAL AIDS PREVENTION AND CONTROL PROGRAM

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, $42,000,000, which shall be made available only for activities relating to research on, and the treatment and control of, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in developing countries: Provided, That of the funds made available under this heading $21,000,000 shall be provided directly to the World Health Organization for its use in financing the Global Program on AIDS, including activities implemented by the Pan American Health Organization.

CHILD SURVIVAL FUND

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 104(c)(2), $71,000,000.

EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES

DEVELOPMENT, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 105, $134,541,000: Provided, That $1,500,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for the Caribbean Law Institute: Provided further, That not less than $67,270,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading and under the heading ‘Sub-Saharan Africa, Development Assistance’ shall be available only for programs in basic primary and secondary education: Provided further, That in fiscal year 1990 the Agency for International Development shall initiate three new bilateral projects in basic primary and secondary education, at least two of which shall be initiated in Sub-Saharan Africa: Provided further, That not less than $20,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for the International Student Exchange Program, of which $2,000,000 shall be available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for students from Poland and Hungary: Provided further, That not less than $1,200,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for leadership programs for the Americas that have a demonstrated record of performance: Provided further, That not less than $2,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for technical training for the people of Poland and Hungary in skills which would foster the development of a market economy and the private sector, including training in management and agricultural extension: Provided further, That not less than $3,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for educational and cultural exchanges with Poland and Hungary, which shall be undertaken in cooperation with the United States Information Agency.

PRIVATE SECTOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND ENERGY, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 106, $149,209,000: Provided, That not less than $7,500,000 shall be made available only for cooperative projects among the United States, Israel and developing countries of which not less than $5,000,000 shall be made available for the Cooperative Development Program, and of which not less than $2,500,000 shall be made available for cooperative development research projects: Provided further, That not less than $5,000,000 shall be made available only for the Central American Rural Electrification Support project: Provided further, That not less than $2,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading or under the heading ‘Sub-Saharan Africa, Development Assistance’, shall be made available for assistance in support of elephant conservation and preservation: Provided further, That not less than $3,300,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for assistance to establish an air quality monitoring network in the Krakow, Poland metropolitan area, to improve water quality and the availability of drinking water in the Krakow metropolitan area, and to establish and support a regional environmental center in Budapest, Hungary for facilitating cooperative environmental activities, which activities shall be undertaken in cooperation with the Environmental Protection Agency: Provided further, That not less than $10,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for support for retrofitting a coal-fired commercial plant in the Krakow, Poland region with clean coal technology and for assistance to assess and develop the capability within Poland to manufacture or modify equipment that will enable industrial activities within Poland to use fossil fuels cleanly, which activities shall be undertaken in cooperation with the Department of Energy: Provided further, That the Administrator of the Agency for International Development or his designee may vest title in any property acquired under the previous two provisos in an entity other than the United States: Provided further, That not less than $1,500,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the provision of technical assistance to Poland and Hungary (1) for the implementation of labor market reforms, and (2) to facilitate adjustment during the period of transition to free labor markets and labor organizations, which activities shall be undertaken in cooperation with the Department of Labor and United States labor and business representatives.

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 106, $8,662,000.

micro-enterprise development

    Of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out chapter 1 of part I and chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not less than $75,000,000 shall be made available for programs of credit and other assistance for micro-enterprises in developing countries: Provided, That local currencies which accrue as a result of assistance provided to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 may be used for assistance for micro-enterprises: Provided further, That such local currencies which are used for this purpose shall be in lieu of funds earmarked under this heading and shall reduce the amount earmarked for assistance for micro-enterprises by an equal amount.

POLAND AND HUNGARY

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out chapter 1 of part I and chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not less than $45,000,000 shall be made available for Poland and not less than $5,000,000 shall be made available for Hungary, which funds shall be used in support of the private sector and other economic development programs: Provided, That funds made available under this heading shall remain available until September 30, 1991.

SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA, DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of sections 103 through 106 and section 121 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, $565,000,000, for assistance only for Sub-Saharan Africa, which shall be in addition to any amounts otherwise available for such purposes: Provided, That the authorities contained under this heading in the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989 (Public Law 100-461), shall be applicable to amounts appropriated under this heading until an Act authorizing assistance for such purposes for the fiscal year 1990 is enacted into law: Provided further, That not less than $50,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available only to assist activities supported by the Southern Africa Development Coordination Conference: Provided further, That funds appropriated under this heading which are made available for activities supported by the Southern Africa Development Coordination Conference shall be made available notwithstanding section 518 of this Act and section 620(q) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

ZAIRE

    Funds appropriated to carry out chapter 1 of part I which are allocated for Zaire shall be made available through private and voluntary organizations to the maximum extent practicable.

ASSISTANCE FOR DISPLACED CHILDREN

    Of the aggregate of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not less than $3,000,000 shall be made available for programs and activities for children who have become orphans as a result of the effects of drought, civil strife, and other natural and man-made disasters: Provided, That assistance under this heading shall be made available in accordance with the policies and general authorities contained in section 491 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS OF WAR

    Of the aggregate of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out part I and chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not less than $5,000,000 shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for assistance for the provision of prostheses and related assistance for civilians who have been injured as a result of civil strife and warfare: Provided, That this amount shall be derived in equal amounts from part I and from chapter 4 of part II.

women in development

    In recognition that the full participation of women in, and the full contribution of women to, the development process are essential to achieving economic growth, a higher quality of life, and sustainable development in developing countries, not less than $5,000,000 of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, in addition to funds otherwise available for such purposes, shall be used to encourage and promote the participation and integration of women as equal partners in the development process in developing countries, of which not less than $3,000,000 shall be made available as matching funds to support the activities of the Agency for International Development’s field missions to integrate women into their programs: Provided, That the Agency for International Development shall seek to ensure that country strategies, projects, and programs are designed so that the percentage of women participants will be demonstrably increased.

PRIVATE AND VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS

    None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available by this Act for development assistance may be made available to any United States private and voluntary organization, except any cooperative development organization, which obtains less than 20 per centum of its total annual funding for international activities from sources other than the United States Government: Provided, That the requirements of the provisions of section 123(g) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the provisions on private and voluntary organizations in title II of the ‘Foreign Assistance and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1985’ (as enacted in Public Law 98-473) shall be superseded by the provisions of this section.

PRIVATE SECTOR REVOLVING FUND

(INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 108 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not to exceed $5,000,000 to be derived by transfer from funds appropriated to carry out the provisions of chapter 1 of part I of such Act, to remain available until expended. During fiscal year 1990, obligations for assistance from amounts in the revolving fund account under section 108 shall not exceed $3,500,000.

    During fiscal year 1990, total commitments to guarantee loans shall not exceed $46,115,020 of contingent liability for loan principal.

AMERICAN SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS ABROAD

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 214, $35,000,000.

INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 491, $25,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That not less than $500,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading may be made available for assistance for children who have become orphans as a result of natural disasters.

PAYMENT TO THE FOREIGN SERVICE RETIREMENT AND DISABILITY FUND

    For payment to the ‘Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund’, as authorized by the Foreign Service Act of 1980, $40,147,000.

OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 667, $437,000,000: Provided, That not more than $15,000,000 (except that payment may be made under this limitation only for those categories of services for which charges have been made under Foreign Affairs Administrative Support both in prior years and in the current year) of this amount shall be for Foreign Affairs Administrative Support.

OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 667, $31,000,000, which sum shall be available only for the operating expenses of the Office of the Inspector General notwithstanding section 451 or 614 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 or any other provision of law: Provided, That up to 3 per centum of the amount made available under the heading ‘Operating Expenses of the Agency for International Development’ may be transferred to and merged and consolidated with amounts made available under this heading: Provided further, That except as may be required by an emergency evacuation affecting the United States diplomatic missions of which they are a component element, none of the funds in this Act, or any other Act, may be used to relocate the overseas Regional Offices of the Inspector General to a location within the United States without the express approval of the Inspector General: Provided further, That the total number of positions authorized for the Office of Inspector General in Washington and overseas shall be not less than two hundred and forty at September 30, 1990.

HOUSING AND OTHER CREDIT GUARANTY PROGRAMS

    During the fiscal year 1990, total commitments to guarantee loans shall not exceed $125,000,000 of contingent liability for loan principal: Provided, That the President shall enter into commitments to guarantee such loans in the full amount provided under this heading, subject only to the availability of qualified applicants for such guarantees: Provided further, That guarantees issued under this heading shall guarantee 100 per centum of the principal and interest payable on such loans: Provided further, That no loans guaranteed under this heading shall be issued or held by the Federal Financing Bank: Provided further, That pursuant to section 223(e)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 borrowing authority provided therein may be exercised in such amounts as may be necessary to retain an adequate level of contingency reserves for the fiscal year 1990: Provided further, That section 222(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by striking out ‘September 30, 1990’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘September 30, 1991’: Provided further, That notwithstanding the prior limitation on total commitments to guarantee loans at not to exceed $125,000,000, during the fiscal year 1990, total commitments to guarantee loans shall not exceed $100,000,000 of contingent liability for loan principal.

ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of chapter 4 of part II, $3,205,000,000: Provided, That of the funds appropriated under this heading, not less than $1,200,000,000 shall be available only for Israel, which sum shall be available on a grant basis as a cash transfer and shall be disbursed within thirty days of enactment of this Act or by October 31, 1989, whichever is later: Provided further, That not less than $815,000,000 shall be available only for Egypt, which sum shall be provided on a grant basis, and of which sum cash transfer assistance may be provided, with the understanding that Egypt will undertake significant economic reforms which are additional to those which were undertaken in previous fiscal years, and of which not less than $200,000,000 shall be provided as Commodity Import Program assistance: Provided further, That sufficient Egyptian pounds generated from funds made available under this heading or any other heading of this Act shall be made available to the United States pursuant to the United States-Egypt Economic, Technical and Related Assistance Agreements of 1978 (which provide for local currency requirement for programs of the United States in Egypt to be made available to the United States in the manner requested by the United States Government), to enable the United States Embassy in Cairo to restore the endowment entitled ‘U.S. Government Trustee’ to the Egyptian pound equivalent level, at the commercial rate of exchange, of $50,000,000, the level of endowment established by Congress in Public Law 99-88: Provided further, That an additional 20,000,000 Egyptian pounds generated from the same sources shall be made available pursuant to the same agreements to enable the United States Embassy in Cairo to establish an endowment to support other United States educational programs in Egypt: Provided further, That in exercising the authority to provide cash transfer assistance for Israel and Egypt, the President shall ensure that the level of such assistance does not cause an adverse impact on the total level of nonmilitary exports from the United States to each such country: Provided further, That it is the sense of the Congress that the recommended levels of assistance for Egypt and Israel are based in great measure upon their continued participation in the Camp David Accords and upon the Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading and allocated for El Salvador, up to $1,500,000 (or the equivalent in local currencies generated with funds provided to El Salvador under this heading) may be made available, notwithstanding section 660 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, to assist the Government of El Salvador’s Special Investigative Unit, including for the purpose of bringing to justice those responsible for the murders of United States citizens in El Salvador: Provided further, That section 534(e) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by (1) striking ‘each of fiscal years 1988 and 1989’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘fiscal year 1990’; and (2) striking ‘September 30, 1989’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘September 30, 1990’: Provided further, That not less than $12,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for the West Bank and Gaza Program through the Asia and Near East regional program: Provided further, That not less than $35,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for Jordan: Provided further, That not less than $15,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for Cyprus: Provided further, That not less than $230,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for Pakistan: Provided further, That not less than $20,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for Morocco: Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for Zaire: Provided further, That prior to the initial obligation of assistance for El Salvador from funds appropriated under this heading, the President shall report to the Congress on the extent to which the Government of El Salvador has made demonstrable progress in settling outstanding expropriation claims of American citizens in compliance with the judgment of the Supreme Court of El Salvador: Provided further, That the total amount of assistance provided for any country in Central America under this heading and to carry out the provisions of sections 103 through 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall not be reduced, from amounts allocated to such country for such purposes for fiscal year 1989, by a percentage greater than the percentage reduction from amounts allocated for any other country in Central America for such purposes for such fiscal year: Provided further, That if funds made available under this heading are provided to a foreign country as cash transfer assistance, that country shall be required to maintain these funds in a separate account and not commingle them with any other funds: Provided further, That such funds may be obligated and expended notwithstanding provisions of law which are inconsistent with the nature of this assistance including provisions which are referenced in the Joint Explanatory Statement of the Committee of Conference accompanying House Joint Resolution 648 (H. Rept. No. 98-1159): Provided further, That all local currencies that may be generated with such funds shall be treated in accordance with section 592 of this Act: Provided further, That at least fifteen days prior to obligating any such assistance to a foreign country under this heading, the President shall submit a notification through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, which shall include a detailed description of how the funds proposed to be made available will be used, with a discussion of the United States interests that will be served by the assistance (including, as appropriate, a description of the economic policy reforms that will be promoted by such assistance): Provided further, That not more than $5,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading may be made available to finance tied aid credits, unless the President determines it is in the national interest to provide in excess of $5,000,000 and so notifies the Committees on Appropriations through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, none of the funds appropriated under this heading may be used for tied aid credits without the prior approval of the Administrator of the Agency for International Development: Provided further, That, except as provided by this Act, none of the funds appropriated under this heading by this Act or prior foreign assistance appropriations Acts, shall be made available for tied aid credits in accordance with any provision of law enacted after May 19, 1988: Provided further, That not less than $5,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the humanitarian relief, medical treatment, education and vocational training of victims of the Armenian earthquake of December 7, 1988, which amount shall be channeled through United States private and voluntary organizations and other United States nongovernmental organizations: Provided further, That $2,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the provision of medical supplies and hospital equipment to Poland, including expenses of purchasing, transporting, and distributing such supplies and equipment, and for training Polish medical personnel: Provided further, That $1,500,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, only to support Solidarity through the AFL-CIO’s Free Trade Union Institute to promote democratic activities in Poland: Provided further, That not less than $200,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for Poland: Provided further, That $2,500,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, to support independent, democratic organizations and activities in Poland and Hungary: Provided further, That funds made available under this heading shall remain available until September 30, 1991.

INTERNATIONAL FUND FOR IRELAND

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of chapter 4 of part II, $20,000,000, which shall be available for the United States contribution to the International Fund for Ireland and shall be made available in accordance with the provisions of the Anglo-Irish Agreement Support Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-415): Provided, That such amount shall be expended at the minimum rate necessary to make timely payment for projects and activities: Provided further, That funds made available under this heading shall remain available until expended.

MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE INITIATIVE FOR THE PHILIPPINES

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, $160,000,000, which shall be available for the Multilateral Assistance Initiative for the Philippines: Provided, That not less than 75 per centum of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for project and sector activities consistent with the purposes of sections 103 through 106 of such Act: Provided further, That the President shall seek to channel through indigenous and United States private voluntary organizations and cooperatives not less than $20,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading and of the funds appropriated and allocated for the Philippines to carry out sections 103 through 106 of such Act: Provided further, That up to a total of $40,000,000 of the funds appropriated to carry out sections 103 through 106 and chapter 4 of part II of such Act may be transferred to and consolidated and merged with the funds appropriated under this heading notwithstanding the limitations on transfers between accounts contained in section 514 of this Act and sections 109 and 610 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961: Provided further, That any funds transferred to carry out the purposes of this heading shall be made available only for projects and activities which are consistent with the purposes of those funds as initially appropriated: Provided further, That of the total amount of funds transferred to carry out the purposes of this heading not less than 50 per centum shall be derived from funds appropriated to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act: Provided further, That transfers of any funds to carry out the purposes of this heading shall be subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, That funds made available under this heading shall remain available until September 30, 1991: Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available except as provided through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

Independent Agencies

AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of title V of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1980, Public Law 96-533, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations, as provided by section 9104, title 31, United States Code, $9,000,000: Provided, That, when, with the permission of the Foundation, funds made available to a grantee under this heading are invested pending disbursement, the resulting interest is not required to be deposited in the United States Treasury if the grantee uses the resulting interest for the purpose for which the grant was made. This provision applies with respect to both interest earned before and interest earned after the enactment of this provision: Provided further, That section 507(a)(1) of the African Development Foundation Act is amended by adding at the end thereof the following: ‘Members of the Board shall be appointed so that no more than four members of the Board are members of any one political party.’: Provided further, That the amendment to section 507(a)(1) of such Act shall not affect an appointment made to the Board prior to the date of enactment of this Act: Provided further, That section 511 of the African Development Foundation Act is repealed.

INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION

(INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

    For expenses necessary to carry out the functions of the Inter-American Foundation in accordance with the provisions of section 401 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1969, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations, as provided by section 9104, title 31, United States Code, $16,932,000.

OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION

    The Overseas Private Investment Corporation is authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds available to it and in accordance with law (including not to exceed $35,000 for official reception and representation expenses), and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations, as provided by section 9104 of title 31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year.

    During the fiscal year 1990 and within the resources and authority available, gross obligations for the amount of direct loans shall not exceed $20,000,000.

    During the fiscal year 1990, total commitments to guarantee loans shall not exceed $215,000,000 of contingent liability for loan principal: Provided, That not less than $40,000,000 of such amount shall be used for projects for Poland, notwithstanding any other provision of law.

    Except as provided in this Act, no provision of any other Act not enacted into law by May 19, 1988, shall be construed to require the exercise of authority to provide direct loans or to make commitments to guarantee loans contrary to the limitations contained under this heading.

PEACE CORPS

    For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the Peace Corps Act (75 Stat. 612), $168,614,000, including the purchase of not to exceed five passenger motor vehicles for administrative purposes for use outside of the United States: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be used to pay for abortions.

Department of State

INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 481 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, $115,000,000: Provided, That in carrying out the provisions of section 481, increased emphasis should be placed on (1) further intensifying United States efforts in the eradication and interdiction of illicit narcotics, and (2) seeking international cooperation on narcotics enforcement matters such as in the areas of extradition treaties, mutual legal assistance to combat money laundering, sharing of evidence, and other initiatives for cooperative narcotics enforcement efforts: Provided further, That of the funds made available under this heading, such funds as the President deems necessary may be made available for the funding of United States participation in a multilateral anti-narcotics strike force not including any Communist or Warsaw Pact troops: Provided further, That funds for such a force may only be provided if the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and of the Senate are notified at least 15 days in advance of the obligation of funds.

MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE

    For expenses, not otherwise provided for, necessary to enable the Secretary of State to provide, as authorized by law, a contribution to the International Committee of the Red Cross and assistance to refugees, including contributions to the Intergovernmental Committee for Migration and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees; salaries and expenses of personnel and dependents as authorized by the Foreign Service Act of 1980; allowances as authorized by sections 5921 through 5925 of title 5, United States Code; hire of passenger motor vehicles; and services as authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code; $370,000,000: Provided, That not less than $25,000,000 shall be available for Soviet, Eastern European and other refugees resettling in Israel: Provided further, That funds appropriated under this heading shall be administered in a manner that ensures equity in the treatment of all refugees receiving Federal assistance: Provided further, That no funds herein appropriated shall be used to assist directly in the migration to any nation in the Western Hemisphere of any person not having a security clearance based on reasonable standards to ensure against Communist infiltration in the Western Hemisphere: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading not less than $15,000,000 shall be available for Refugee Entrant Assistance: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading not less than $46,000,000 shall be made available for the refugee admission program for first asylum refugees from East Asia: Provided further, That section 584(a)(3) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988 (as contained in section 101(e) of Public Law 100-202), is amended by striking ‘8 months’ and inserting ‘one year’: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading not less than $1,500,000 shall be made available for a Thailand-Cambodia border refugee protection program: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading not less than $1,500,000 shall be made available for the antipiracy program, none of which funds shall be used by any government to deny asylum to individuals seeking asylum: Provided further, That not less than $10,000,000 shall be made available to the Republic of Turkey for assistance for shelter, food and other basic needs to ethnic Turkish refugees fleeing the People’s Republic of Bulgaria and resettling on the sovereign territory of Turkey: Provided further, That section 584(a)(1)(B) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988 (as contained in section 101(e) of Public Law 100-202), is amended by striking ‘during the 2-year period beginning 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act’ and inserting ‘during the period beginning on March 22, 1988, and ending on September 30, 1990’: Provided further, That the sixth proviso under Migration and Refugee Assistance, Department of State, in title II of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989 is amended by striking ‘before the end of the 2-year period’ and inserting ‘before the end of the period’: Provided further, That not more than $8,250,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for the administrative expenses of the Office of Refugee Programs of the Department of State: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading, $250,000 shall be made available, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for food, medicine, medical supplies, medical training, clothing, and other humanitarian assistance for displaced Burmese students at camps on the border with Thailand.

UNITED STATES EMERGENCY REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE FUND

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 2(c) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962, as amended (22 U.S.C. 260(c)), $50,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, That the funds made available under this heading are appropriated notwithstanding the provisions contained in section 2(c)(2) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 which would limit the amount of funds which could be appropriated for this purpose.

ANTI-TERRORISM ASSISTANCE

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of chapter 8 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, $10,017,000.

TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE

Funds Appropriated to the President

INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 541, $47,400,000: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available for grant financed military education and training for any country whose annual per capita GNP exceeds $2,349 unless that country agrees to fund from its own resources the transportation cost and living allowances of its students.

foreign military financing program

    For expenses necessary for grants to enable the President to carry out the provisions of section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act, $4,297,404,194: Provided, That of the funds appropriated by this paragraph not less than $1,800,000,000 shall be available for grants only for Israel, not less than $1,300,000,000 shall be available for grants only for Egypt, not less than $230,000,000 shall be available for grants only for Pakistan, and not less than $48,000,000 shall be available for grants only for Jordan: Provided further, That to the extent that the Government of Israel requests that funds be used for such purposes, grants made available for Israel by this paragraph shall, as agreed by Israel and the United States, be available for advanced fighter aircraft programs or for other advanced weapons systems, as follows: (1) up to $150,000,000 shall be available for research and development in the United States; and (2) not less than $400,000,000 shall be available for the procurement in Israel of defense articles and defense services, including research and development: Provided further, That grants provided with funds made available by this paragraph shall be implemented by grant documents which do not include a requirement to repay the United States Government, notwithstanding any requirement in section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act.

    For expenses necessary for loans to enable the President to carry out the provisions of section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act, $406,000,000: Provided, That any funds made available by this paragraph, except as otherwise specified, may be made available at concessional rates of interest: Provided further, That the concessional rate of interest on Foreign Military Financing Program loans shall be not less than 5 per centum per year: Provided further, That all country and funding level changes in requested concessional financing allocations shall be submitted through the regular notification procedures: Provided further, That during fiscal year 1990, gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans under this heading, exclusive of loan guarantee defaults, shall not exceed $406,000,000.

    Of the funds appropriated under this heading $500,000,000 only shall be available for Turkey and $350,000,000 only shall be available for Greece and, if Turkey receives any funds under this heading on a grant basis then not less than $30,000,000 of the funds provided for Greece shall be made available as grants: Provided, That funds previously obligated for the Philippines under the heading ‘Foreign Military Credit Sales’ but uncommitted on the date of enactment of this Act shall be used at any time hereafter only to finance sales made under the Arms Export Control Act: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading not more than $85,000,000 shall be available for El Salvador: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading not more than $9,000,000 shall be available for non-lethal assistance for Guatemala: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading, except through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations, not more than $3,000,000 shall be available for Zaire: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading $43,000,000 shall be available for Morocco: Provided further, That of the funds appropriated under this heading $30,000,000 shall be available for countries in sub-Saharan Africa: Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for Sudan or Somalia, except through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, That not more than $687,404,194 of the funds made available under this heading shall be available for use in financing the procurement of defense articles, defense services, or design and construction services that are not sold by the United States Government under the Arms Export Control Act to countries other than Israel and Egypt: Provided further, That only those countries for which assistance was justified for the ‘Foreign Military Sales Financing Program’ in the fiscal year 1989 congressional presentation for security assistance programs may utilize funds made available under this heading for procurement of defense articles, defense services or design and construction services that are not sold by the United States Government under the Arms Export Control Act: Provided further, That any material assistance provided with funds appropriated under this heading for Haiti shall be limited to non-lethal items such as transportation and communications equipment and uniforms: Provided further, That funds made available under this heading for Haiti shall be made available only through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, That funds appropriated under this heading shall be expended at the minimum rate necessary to make timely payment for defense articles and services: Provided further, That the Department of Defense shall conduct during the current fiscal year nonreimbursable audits of private firms whose contracts are made directly with foreign governments and are financed with funds made available under this heading (as well as subcontractors thereunder) as requested by the Defense Security Assistance Agency: Provided further, That any reference in title V of this Act to ‘Foreign Military Credit Sales’ shall be deemed to be a reference to grants and loans pursuant to the Foreign Military Financing Program under this heading: Provided further, That not more than $39,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading may be obligated for necesary expenses, including the purchase of passenger motor vehicles for replacement only for use outside of the United States, for the general costs of administering military assistance and sales: Provided further, That section 515(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by inserting immediately after the word ‘chapter’ the phrase ‘or the Arms Export Control Act’, and section 636(g) of that Act is amended by inserting immediately after the phrase ‘for the purposes of part II’ the phrase ‘or the Arms Export Control Act’.

FOREIGN MILITARY SALES DEBT REFORM

    Funds made available by the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988, for obligation and expenditure after October 1, 1988, subject to a Presidential budget request, under the heading ‘Foreign Military Sales Debt Reform’, subsection (b) ‘Interest Rate Reduction’ shall be available, subject to the same conditions and provisos, only after October 1, 1990: Provided, That such subsection and subsection (a) under such heading are amended by striking ‘ten’ in all places in which that word appears and inserting in lieu thereof ‘eight’.

GUARANTY RESERVE FUND

    If during fiscal year 1990 the funds available in the Guaranty Reserve Fund (Fund) are insufficient to enable the Secretary of Defense (Secretary) to discharge his responsibilities, as guarantor of loans guaranteed pursuant to section 24 of the Arms Export Control Act (AECA) or pursuant to the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988, under the heading ‘Foreign Military Sales Debt Reform’, the Secretary shall issue to the Secretary of the Treasury notes or other obligations in such forms and denominations, bearing such maturities, and subject to such terms and conditions, as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Treasury. Such notes or obligations may be redeemed by the Secretary from appropriations and other funds available, including repayments by the borrowers of amounts paid pursuant to guarantees issued under section 24 of the AECA. Such notes or other obligations shall bear interest at a rate determined by the Secretary of the Treasury, taking into consideration the average market yield on outstanding marketable obligations of the United States of comparable maturities during the month preceding the issuance of the notes or other obligations. The Secretary of the Treasury shall purchase any notes or other obligations issued hereunder and for that purpose he is authorized to use as a public debt transaction the proceeds from the sale of any securities issued under the Second Liberty Bond Act, and the purposes for which securities may be issued under the Second Liberty Bond Act are extended to include any purchase of such notes or obligations. The Secretary of the Treasury may at any time sell any of the notes or other obligations acquired by him under this heading. All redemptions, purchases, and sales by the Secretary of the Treasury of such notes or other obligations shall be treated as public debt transactions of the United States.

Special Defense Acquisition Fund

(LIMITATION ON OBLIGATIONS)

    Not to exceed $280,000,000 may be obligated pursuant to section 51(c)(2) of the Arms Export Control Act for the purposes of the Special Defense Acquisition Fund during fiscal year 1990, to remain available for obligation until September 30, 1992: Provided, That section 632(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall be applicable to the transfer to countries pursuant to chapter 2 of part II of that Act of defense articles and defense services acquired under chapter 5 of the Arms Export Control Act.

PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 551, $33,377,000.

TITLE IV--EXPORT ASSISTANCE

EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES

    The Export-Import Bank of the United States is authorized to make such expenditures within the limits of funds and borrowing authority available to such corporation, and in accordance with law, and to make such contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations, as provided by section 104 of the Government Corporation Control Act, as may be necessary in carrying out the program for the current fiscal year for such corporation: Provided, That none of the funds available during the current fiscal year may be used to make expenditures, contracts, or commitments for the export of nuclear equipment, fuel, or technology to any country other than a nuclear-weapon State as defined in article IX of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons eligible to receive economic or military assistance under this Act that has detonated a nuclear explosive after the date of enactment of this Act.

LIMITATION ON PROGRAM ACTIVITY

    During the fiscal year 1990 and within the resources and authority available, gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans shall not exceed $615,000,000: Provided, That gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans pursuant to the medium-term financing program shall not exceed $215,000,000: Provided further, That the interest subsidy authority and the tied aid grants authority provided under this heading are subject to authorization: Provided further, That there are hereby appropriated $110,000,000 to be made available for tied aid grants in accordance with section 15 of the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, as amended, or, at the discretion of the Chairman of the Export-Import Bank, in accordance with the Trade and Development Enhancement Act of 1983, as amended: Provided further, That there are hereby appropriated $20,000,000 to be made available for interest subsidy payments in accordance with the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945, as amended: Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading for interest subsidy payments may be used in conjunction with any loan guaranteed from authority provided under this heading: Provided further, That the funds made available under this heading for both grant and subsidy purposes shall be subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate: Provided further, That $110,000,000 of the funds made available for tied aid grant purposes and $20,000,000 of the funds made available for interest subsidy payments shall be subject to the limitation on the gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans specified under this heading: Provided further, That funds made available for grants or interest subsidy payments shall be made available only as authorized by law: Provided further, That loan guarantee authority available to the Export-Import Bank of the United States may be used by the Bank to participate in the financing of commercial sales of defense articles and services destined for Greece and Turkey, notwithstanding any other provision of law: Provided further, That the authority provided by the previous proviso shall not be used for the procurement of defense articles or services for use on Cyprus: Provided further, That during the fiscal year 1990, total commitments to guarantee loans shall not exceed $10,384,000,000 of contingent liability for loan principal: Provided further, That the direct loan, tied aid grant and interest subsidy authority provided under this heading shall remain available until September 30, 1991.

LIMITATION ON ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

    Not to exceed $22,000,000 (to be computed on an accrual basis) shall be available during fiscal year 1990 for administrative expenses, including hire of passenger motor vehicles and services as authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, and not to exceed $16,000 for official reception and representation expenses for members of the Board of Directors: Provided, That (1) fees or dues to international organizations of credit institutions engaged in financing foreign trade, (2) necessary expenses (including special services performed on a contract or a fee basis, but not including other personal services) in connection with the acquisition, operation, maintenance, improvement, or disposition of any real or personal property belonging to the Export-Import Bank or in which it has an interest, including expenses of collections of pledged collateral, or the investigation or appraisal of any property in respect to which an application for a loan has been made, and (3) expenses (other than internal expenses of the Export-Import Bank) incurred in connection with the issuance and servicing of guarantees, insurance, and reinsurance, shall be considered as nonadministrative expenses for the purposes of this heading.

Funds Appropriated to the President

TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    For necessary expenses to carry out the provisions of section 661 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, $30,000,000: Provided, That except as provided in this or any other Act appropriating funds for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs, no provision of law enacted after May 19, 1988, may transfer funds to, or otherwise make available funds for, the Trade and Development Program.

Agency for International Development

TRADE CREDIT INSURANCE PROGRAM

    During fiscal year 1990, total commitments to guarantee or insure loans for the ‘Trade Credit Insurance Program’ shall not exceed $200,000,000 of contingent liability for loan principal for Central America and, notwithstanding any other provision of law, not to exceed $200,000,000 of contingent liability for loan principal for Poland pursuant to the authorities of section 224 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961: Provided, That section 224(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by striking out ‘September 30, 1989’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘September 30, 1990’.

TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

COST BENEFIT STUDIES

    SEC. 501. None of the funds appropriated in this Act (other than funds appropriated for ‘International Organizations and Programs’) shall be used to finance the construction of any new flood control, reclamation, or other water or related land resource project or program which has not met the standards and criteria used in determining the feasibility of flood control, reclamation, and other water and related land resource programs and projects proposed for construction within the United States of America under the principles, standards and procedures established pursuant to the Water Resources Planning Act (42 U.S.C. 1962, et seq.) or Acts amendatory or supplementary thereto.

OBLIGATIONS DURING LAST MONTH OF AVAILABILITY

    SEC. 502. Except for the appropriations entitled ‘International Disaster Assistance’, and ‘United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund’, not more than 15 per centum of any appropriation item made available by this Act shall be obligated during the last month of availability.

PROHIBITION AGAINST PAY TO FOREIGN ARMED SERVICE MEMBER

    SEC. 503. None of the funds appropriated in this Act nor any of the counterpart funds generated as a result of assistance hereunder or any prior Act shall be used to pay pensions, annuities, retirement pay, or adjusted service compensation for any person heretofore or hereafter serving in the armed forces of any recipient country.

TERMINATION FOR CONVENIENCE

    SEC. 504. None of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, may be used for making payments on any contract for procurement to which the United States is a party entered into after the date of enactment of this Act which does not contain a provision authorizing the termination of such contract for the convenience of the United States.

PROHIBITION OF PAYMENTS TO UNITED NATIONS MEMBERS

    SEC. 505. None of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, may be used to pay in whole or in part any assessments, arrearages, or dues of any member of the United Nations.

PROHIBITION OF BILATERAL FUNDING FOR INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    SEC. 506. None of the funds contained in title II of this Act may be used to carry out the provisions of section 209(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

AID RESIDENCE EXPENSES

    SEC. 507. Of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act, not to exceed $126,500 shall be for official residence expenses of the Agency for International Development during the current fiscal year: Provided, That appropriate steps shall be taken to assure that, to the maximum extent possible, United States-owned foreign currencies are utilized in lieu of dollars.

AID ENTERTAINMENT EXPENSES

    SEC. 508. Of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act, not to exceed $11,500 shall be for entertainment expenses of the Agency for International Development during the current fiscal year.

REPRESENTATIONAL ALLOWANCES

    SEC. 509. Of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act, not to exceed $115,000 shall be available for representation allowances for the Agency for International Development during the current fiscal year: Provided, That appropriate steps shall be taken to assure that, to the maximum extent possible, United States-owned foreign currencies are utilized in lieu of dollars: Provided further, That of the funds made available by this Act for general costs of administering military assistance and sales under the heading ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’, not to exceed $2,875 shall be available for entertainment expenses and not to exceed $75,000 shall be available for representation allowances: Provided further, That of the funds made available by this Act under the heading ‘International Military Education and Training’, not to exceed $125,000 shall be available for entertainment allowances: Provided further, That of the funds made available by this Act for the Inter-American Foundation, not to exceed $2,875 shall be available for entertainment and representation allowances: Provided further, That of the funds made available by this Act for the Peace Corps, not to exceed a total of $4,600 shall be available for entertainment expenses: Provided further, That of the funds made available by this Act under the heading ‘Trade and Development Program’, not to exceed $2,300 shall be available for representation and entertainment allowances.

PROHIBITION ON FINANCING NUCLEAR GOODS

    SEC. 510. None of the funds appropriated or made available (other than funds for ‘International Organizations and Programs’) pursuant to this Act, for carrying out the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, may be used to finance the export of nuclear equipment, fuel, or technology.

HUMAN RIGHTS

    SEC. 511. Funds appropriated by this Act may not be obligated or expended to provide assistance to any country for the purpose of aiding the efforts of the government of such country to repress the legitimate rights of the population of such country contrary to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

PROHIBITION AGAINST DIRECT FUNDING FOR CERTAIN COUNTRIES

    SEC. 512. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to this Act shall be obligated or expended to finance directly any assistance or reparations to Angola, Cambodia, Cuba, Iraq, Libya, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, South Yemen, Iran, or Syria: Provided, That for purposes of this section, the prohibition on obligations or expenditures shall include direct loans, credits, insurance and guarantees of the Export-Import Bank or its agents: Provided further, That such prohibition shall not apply to the Export-Import Bank or its agents if in the judgment of the President its application is not in the national interest of the United States and so reports to Congress.

MILITARY COUPS

    SEC. 513. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to this Act shall be obligated or expended to finance directly any assistance to any country whose duly elected Head of Government is deposed by military coup or decree: Provided, That assistance may be resumed to such country if the President determines and reports to the Committees on Appropriations that subsequent to the termination of assistance a democratically elected government has taken office.

TRANSFERS BETWEEN ACCOUNTS

    SEC. 514. None of the funds made available by this Act may be obligated under an appropriation account to which they were not appropriated, unless the President, prior to the exercise of any authority contained in the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to transfer funds, consults with and provides a written policy justification to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate: Provided further, That the exercise of such authority shall be subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

DEOBLIGATION/REOBLIGATION AUTHORITY

    SEC. 515. Amounts certified pursuant to section 1311 of the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1955, as having been obligated against appropriations heretofore made under the authority of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for the same general purpose as any of the headings under the ‘Agency for International Development’ are, if deobligated, hereby continued available for the same period as the respective appropriations under such headings or until September 30, 1990, whichever is later, and for the same general purpose, and for countries within the same region as originally obligated: Provided, That the Appropriations Committees of both Houses of the Congress are notified fifteen days in advance of the deobligation and reobligation of such funds in accordance with regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

PROHIBITION ON PUBLICITY OR PROPAGANDA

    SEC. 516. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall be used for publicity or propaganda purposes within the United States not authorized before the date of enactment of this Act by the Congress.

AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS

    SEC. 517. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall remain available for obligation after the expiration of the current fiscal year unless expressly so provided in this Act: Provided, That funds appropriated for the purposes of chapter 1 of part I and chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, shall remain available until expended if such funds are initially obligated before the expiration of their respective periods of availability contained in this Act: Provided further, That, notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, any funds made available for the purposes of chapter 1 of part I and chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 which are allocated or obligated for cash disbursements in order to address balance of payments or economic policy reform objectives, shall remain available until expended: Provided further, That the report required by section 653(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall designate for each country, to the extent known at the time of submission of such report, those funds allocated for cash disbursement for balance of payment and economic policy reform purposes.

LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO COUNTRIES IN DEFAULT

    SEC. 518. No part of any appropriation contained in this Act shall be used to furnish assistance to any country which is in default during a period in excess of one calendar year in payment to the United States of principal or interest on any loan made to such country by the United States pursuant to a program for which funds are appropriated under this Act: Provided, That this section and section 620(q) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall not apply to funds made available in this Act for any narcotics-related activities in Colombia, Bolivia, and Peru authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, or the Arms Export Control Act.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS--NAMES OF BORROWERS

    SEC. 519. None of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act shall be available to any international financial institution whose United States governor or representative cannot upon request obtain the amounts and the names of borrowers for all loans of the international financial institution, including loans to employees of the institution, or the compensation and related benefits of employees of the institution.

FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS--DOCUMENTATION

    SEC. 520. None of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act shall be available to any international financial institution whose United States governor or representative cannot upon request obtain any document developed by or in the possession of the management of the international financial institution, unless the United States governor or representative of the institution certifies to the Committees on Appropriations that the confidentiality of the information is essential to the operation of the institution.

COMMERCE AND TRADE

    SEC. 521. None of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act for direct assistance and none of the funds otherwise made available pursuant to this Act to the Export-Import Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corporation shall be obligated or expended to finance any loan, any assistance or any other financial commitments for establishing or expanding production of any commodity for export by any country other than the United States, if the commodity is likely to be in surplus on world markets at the time the resulting productive capacity is expected to become operative and if the assistance will cause substantial injury to United States producers of the same, similar, or competing commodity: Provided, That such prohibition shall not apply to the Export-Import Bank if in the judgment of its Board of Directors the benefits to industry and employment in the United States are likely to outweigh the injury to United States producers of the same, similar, or competing commodity.

SURPLUS COMMODITIES

    SEC. 522. The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Directors of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Development Association, the International Finance Corporation, the Inter-American Development Bank, the International Monetary Fund, the Asian Development Bank, the Inter-American Investment Corporation, the African Development Bank, and the African Development Fund to use the voice and vote of the United States to oppose any assistance by these institutions, using funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act, for the production or extraction of any commodity or mineral for export, if it is in surplus on world markets and if the assistance will cause substantial injury to United States producers of the same, similar, or competing commodity.

NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

    SEC. 523. For the purposes of providing the Executive Branch with the necessary administrative flexibility, none of the funds made available under this Act for ‘Agriculture, rural development, and nutrition, Development Assistance’, ‘Population, Development Assistance’, ‘Child Survival Fund’, ‘Health, Development Assistance’, ‘International AIDS Prevention and Control Program’, ‘Education and human resources development, Development Assistance’, ‘Private Sector, environment, and energy, Development Assistance’, ‘Science and technology, Development Assistance’, ‘Sub-Saharan Africa, Development Assistance’, ‘International organizations and programs’, ‘American schools and hospitals abroad’, ‘Trade and development program’, ‘International narcotics control’, ‘Economic support fund’, ‘Peacekeeping operations’, ‘Operating expenses of the Agency for International Development’, ‘Operating expenses of the Agency for International Development Office of Inspector General’, ‘Anti-terrorism assistance’, ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’, ‘International military education and training’, ‘Inter-American Foundation’, ‘African Development Foundation’, ‘Peace Corps’, or ‘Migration and refugee assistance’, shall be available for obligation for activities, programs, projects, type of materiel assistance, countries, or other operation not justified or in excess of the amount justified to the Appropriations Committees for obligation under any of these specific headings for the current fiscal year unless the Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress are previously notified fifteen days in advance: Provided, That the President shall not enter into any commitment of funds appropriated for the purposes of chapter 2 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 or of funds appropriated for the purposes of section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act for the provision of major defense equipment, other than conventional ammunition, or other major defense items defined to be aircraft, ships, missiles, or combat vehicles, not previously justified to Congress or 20 per centum in excess of the quantities justified to Congress unless the Committees on Appropriations are notified fifteen days in advance of such commitment: Provided further, That this section shall not apply to any reprogramming for an activity, program, or project under chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 of less than 20 per centum of the amount previously justified to the Congress for obligation for such activity, program, or project for the current fiscal year.

CONSULTING SERVICES

    SEC. 524. The expenditure of any appropriation under this Act for any consulting service through procurement contract, pursuant to section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, shall be limited to those contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record and available for public inspection, except where otherwise provided under existing law, or under existing Executive order pursuant to existing law.

PROHIBITION ON ABORTION LOBBYING

    SEC. 525. None of the funds appropriated under this Act may be used to lobby for abortion.

LIMITATION ON AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS

    SEC. 526. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law or of this Act, none of the funds provided for ‘International Organizations and Programs’ shall be available for the United States proportionate share for any programs for the Palestine Liberation Organization (or for projects whose purpose is to provide benefits to the Palestine Liberation Organization or entities associated with it), the Southwest Africa People’s Organization, Libya, Iran, or, at the discretion of the President, Communist countries listed in section 620(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended: Provided, That, subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations, funds appropriated under this Act or any previously enacted Act making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs, which are returned or not made available for organizations and programs because of the implementation of this section or any similar provision of law, shall remain available for obligation through September 30, 1991.

    (b) The United States shall not make any voluntary or assessed contribution--

      (1) to any affiliated organization of the United Nations which grants full membership as a state to any organization or group that does not have the internationally recognized attributes of statehood, or

      (2) to the United Nations, if the United Nations grants full membership as a state in the United Nations to any organization or group that does not have the internationally recognized attributes of statehood,

    during any period in which such membership is effective.

UNITED NATIONS VOTING RECORD

    SEC. 527. (a) IN GENERAL- Not later than March 31 of each year, the Secretary of State shall transmit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate a full and complete annual report which assesses for the prior calendar year, with respect to each foreign country member of the United Nations, the voting practices of the governments of such countries at the United Nations, and evaluates General Assembly and Security Council actions and the responsiveness of those governments to United States policy on issues of special importance to the United States.

    (b) INFORMATION ON VOTING PRACTICES IN THE UNITED NATIONS- Such report shall include, with respect to voting practices and plenary actions in the United Nations during the preceding year, information to be compiled and supplied by the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations, consisting of--

      (1) an analysis and discussion, prepared in consultation with the Secretary of State, of the extent to which member countries supported United States policy objectives at the United Nations;

      (2) an analysis and discussion, prepared in consultation with the Secretary of State, of actions taken by the United Nations by consensus;

      (3) with respect to plenary votes of the United Nations General Assembly--

        (A) a listing of all such votes on issues which directly affected important United States interests and on which the United States lobbied extensively and a brief description of the issues involved in each such vote;

        (B) a listing of the votes described in subparagraph (A) which provides a comparison of the vote cast by each member country with the vote cast by the United States;

        (C) a country-by-country listing of votes described in subparagraph (A); and

        (D) a listing of votes described in subparagraph (A) displayed in terms of United Nations regional caucus groups;

      (4) a listing of all plenary votes cast by member countries of the United Nations in the General Assembly which provides a comparison of the vote cast by each member country with the vote cast by the United States;

      (5) an analysis and discussion, prepared in consultation with the Secretary of State, of the extent to which other members supported United States policy objectives in the Security Council and a separate listing of all Security Council votes of each member country in comparison with the United States; and

      (6) a side-by-side comparison of agreement on important and overall votes for each member country and the United States.

    (c) FORMAT- Information required pursuant to subsection (b)(3) shall also be submitted, together with an explanation of the statistical methodology, in a format identical to that contained in chapter II of the March 14, 1988, Report to Congress on Voting Practices in the United Nations.

    (d) STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE- Each report under subsection (a) shall contain a statement by the Secretary of State discussing the measures which have been taken to inform United States diplomatic missions of United Nations General Assembly and Security Council activities.

    (e) TECHNICAL AND CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- The following provisions of law are repealed:

      (1) The second undesignated paragraph of section 101(b)(1) of the Foreign Assistance and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1984 (Public Law 98-151; 97 Stat. 964).

      (2) Section 530 of the Foreign Assistance and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1985 (Public Law 98-473, 98 Stat. 1837).

      (3) Section 529 of the Foreign Assistance and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1986, as enacted by Public Law 99-190 (99 Stat. 1185).

      (4) Section 528 of the Foreign Assistance and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1987, as enacted by Public Law 99-500 (100 Stat. 1783) and Public Law 99-591 (100 Stat. 3341).

      (5) Section 528 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988, as enacted by Public Law 100-202 (101 Stat. 1329).

      (6) Section 527 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989, as enacted by Public Law 100-461 (101 Stat. 2268).

LOANS TO ISRAEL UNDER ARMS EXPORT CONTROL ACT

    SEC. 528. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, Israel may utilize any loan which is or was made available under the Arms Export Control Act and for which repayment is or was forgiven before utilizing any other loan made available under the Arms Export Control Act.

PROHIBITION AGAINST UNITED STATES EMPLOYEES RECOGNIZING OR NEGOTIATING WITH PLO

    SEC. 529. In reaffirmation of the 1975 memorandum of agreement between the United States and Israel, and in accordance with section 1302 of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-83), no employee of or individual acting on behalf of the United States Government shall recognize or negotiate with the Palestine Liberation Organization or representatives thereof, so long as the Palestine Liberation Organization does not recognize Israel’s right to exist, does not accept Security Council Resolutions 242 and 338, and does not renounce the use of terrorism.

ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND ASSISTANCE FOR ISRAEL

    SEC. 530. The Congress finds that progress on the peace process in the Middle East is vitally important to United States security interests in the region. The Congress recognizes that, in fulfilling its obligations under the Treaty of Peace Between the Arab Republic of Egypt and the State of Israel, done at Washington on March 26, 1979, Israel incurred severe economic burdens. Furthermore, the Congress recognizes that an economically and militarily secure Israel serves the security interests of the United States, for a secure Israel is an Israel which has the incentive and confidence to continue pursuing the peace process. Therefore, the Congress declares that it is the policy and the intention of the United States that the funds provided in annual appropriations for the Economic Support Fund which are allocated to Israel shall not be less than the annual debt repayment (interest and principal) from Israel to the United States Government in recognition that such a principle serves United States interests in the region.

CEILINGS AND EARMARKS

    SEC. 531. Ceilings and earmarks contained in this Act shall not be applicable to funds or authorities appropriated or otherwise made available by any subsequent Act unless such Act specifically so directs.

NOTIFICATION CONCERNING AIRCRAFT IN CENTRAL AMERICA

    SEC. 532. (a) During the current fiscal year, the authorities of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act may not be used to make available any helicopters or other aircraft for military use, and licenses may not be issued under section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act for the export of any such aircraft, to any country in Central America unless the Committees on Appropriations, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate are notified in writing at least fifteen days in advance.

    (b) During the current fiscal year, the Secretary of State shall promptly notify the committees designated in subsection (a) whenever any helicopters or other aircraft for military use are provided to any country in Central America by any foreign country.

ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS

    SEC. 533. (a) It is the policy of the United States that sustainable economic growth must be predicated on the sustainable management of natural resources. The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Directors of each multilateral development bank (MDB) to promote vigorously within each MDB the expansion of programs in areas which address the problems of global climate change through requirements to--

      (1) augment and expand the professional staff of each MDB with expertise in end-use energy efficiency and conservation and renewable energy;

      (2) develop methodologies which allow borrowing countries to include investments in end-use energy efficiency and renewable energy as explicit alternatives in the ‘least cost’ energy sector investments plans they prepare with MDB assistance. Such plans shall give priority to projects and programs which support energy conservation, end-use efficiency and renewable energy sources in major economic sectors, and shall compare the economic and environmental costs of those actions with the economic and environmental costs of investments in conventional energy supplies;

      (3) provide analysis for each proposed loan to support additional power generating capacity, comparing the economic and environmental costs of investments in demand reduction, including energy conservation and end-use energy efficiency, with the economic and environmental costs of the proposal;

      (4) assure that systematic, detailed environmental impact assessments (EIA) of proposed energy projects, or projects with potential significant environmental impacts, are conducted early in the project cycle. Assessments should include but not be limited to--

        (A) consideration of a wide range of alternatives to the proposed project including, where feasible, alternative investments in end-use energy efficiency and non-conventional renewable energy; and

        (B) encouragement and adoption of policies which allow for public participation in the EIA process;

      (5) include environmental costs in the economic assessment of the proposed projects with significant potential environmental impacts, or power projects, and if possible for all projects which involve expansion of generating capacity of more than 10 MW, develop a standard increase in project cost as a surrogate for the environmental costs;

      (6) encourage and promote end-use energy efficiency and renewable energy in negotiations of policy-based energy sector lending, and MDBs should consider not proceeding with policy-based sector loans which do not contain commitments from the borrowing country to devote a significant portion of its sector investments toward energy efficiency and renewable energy;

      (7) provide technical assistance as a component of all energy sector lending to help borrowing countries identify and pursue end-use energy efficiency investments. This technical assistance shall include support for detailed audits of energy use and the development of institutional capacity to promote end-use energy efficiency and conservation;

      (8) work with borrowing countries, with input from the public in both borrowing and donor countries, to develop loans for end-use energy efficiency and renewable energy, where possible ‘bundling’ small projects into larger, more easily financed projects; and

      (9) seek the convening of a special seminar for board members and senior staff of each MDB concerning alternate energy investment opportunities and end-use energy efficiency and conservation.

    (b) The Secretary of the Treasury as a part of the annual report to the Congress shall describe in detail, progress made by each of the MDBs in adopting and implementing programs meeting the standards set out in subsection (a), including in particular--

      (1) efforts by the Department of Treasury to assure implementation by each of the MDBs of programs substantially equivalent to those set out in this section, and results of such efforts;

      (2) progress made by each MDB in drafting and implementing least cost energy plans for each recipient country which meets requirements outlined in subsection (a)(2);

      (3) the absolute dollar amounts, and proportion of total lending in the energy sector, of loans and portions of loans, approved by each MDB in the previous year for projects or programs of end-use energy efficiency and conservation and renewable energy.

    (c) Not later than April 1, 1990, the Secretary of the Treasury shall request each MDB to prepare an analysis of the impact its current forestry sector loans will have on borrowing country emissions of CO2 and the status of proposals for specific forestry sector activities to reduce CO2 emissions.

    (d)(1) The Administrator of the Agency for International Development shall issue guidance to all Agency missions and bureaus detailing the elements of a ‘Global Warming Initiative’ which will emphasize the need to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases, especially CO2, through strategies consistent with their continued economic development. This initiative shall emphasize the need to accelerate sustainable development strategies in areas such as reforestation, biodiversity, end-use energy efficiency, least-cost energy planning, and renewable energy, and shall encourage mission directors to incorporate the elements of this initiative in developing their country programs.

    (2) The Agency for International Development shall--

      (A) increase the number and expertise of personnel devoted to end-use energy efficiency, renewable energy, and environmental activities in all bureaus and missions;

      (B) devote increased resources to technical training of mission directors, in energy planning, energy conservation, end-use energy efficiency, renewable energy, reforestation, and biodiversity;

      (C) accelerate the activities of the Multi-Agency Working Group on Power Sector Innovation to enable completion of case studies of at least ten countries in fiscal year 1990; and

      (D) devote at least 10 percent of the resources allocated for forestry activities to the preservation and restoration (as opposed to management for extraction) of natural forests.

    (3) Funds appropriated by this Act to carry out the provisions of sections 103 to 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 may be used to reimburse the full cost of technical personnel detailed or assigned to, or contracted by, the Agency for International Development to provide expertise in the environmental sector.

    (4)(A) Section 119(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by inserting ‘, notwithstanding section 660,’ after ‘this part’.

    (B) Not less than $10,000,000 of the funds appropriated to carry out the provisions of sections 103 through 106 of such Act (including funds for sub-Saharan Africa) shall be made available for biological diversity activities, of which $2,000,000 shall be made available for the Parks in Peril project, pursuant to the authority of section 119(b) and $1,000,000 shall be available for the National Science Foundation’s international biological diversity program.

    (C) Funds obligated in prior fiscal years pursuant to the authority of section 119(b) may be expended in fiscal year 1990 pursuant to the authority of such section as amended by subparagraph (A).

    (e) The Secretary of the Treasury shall--

      (1) instruct the United States Executive Directors to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Development Association, the Inter-American Development Bank, the African Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, and the International Monetary Fund, to actively support lending portfolios which allow debtor developing countries to reduce or restructure debt in concert with the sustainable use of their natural resources. As a part of any such debt restructuring program, the United States Executive Director should require a thorough review of opportunities this initiative may offer for providing additional financial resources for the management of natural resources. The Secretary shall submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations on the progress of this program by April 30, 1990;

      (2) instruct the United States Executive Directors to the international financial institutions to seek the support of other donor countries in the implementation of this policy; and

      (3) instruct the United States Executive Director to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development to actively seek the implementation by the World Bank of the recommendations set forth in its April 1, 1988, report on ‘Debt-for-Nature swaps’, including the setting up of a pilot debt-for-nature swap program in one or more interested countries. The Secretary shall submit a progress report on the implementation of this program to the Committees on Appropriations by April 1, 1990.

    (f) The Secretary of the Treasury shall seek to incorporate natural resource management initiatives throughout the implementation of the Brady Plan. The Secretary shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations a report by April 15, 1990, describing how such initiatives have been incorporated into the Brady Plan and identifying any such initiatives undertaken to date.

    (g) The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Director to the Inter-American Development Bank to--

      (1) seek implementation of the environmental reform measures agreed to as part of the Bank’s 7th Replenishment;

      (2) seek adoption of Bank policies regarding indigenous people, relations with nongovernmental organizations, and the protection of wildlife and unique natural and cultural features;

      (3) require the Bank to demonstrate how it has improved, and will improve, the monitoring of environmental and social components of loans; and

      (4) within four months after the date of enactment of this Act report to the Committees on Appropriations on the progress the Bank has made in implementing each of these reforms.

GLOBAL WARMING INITIATIVE

    SEC. 534. (a) TROPICAL FORESTRY ASSISTANCE- (1) In order to achieve the maximum impact from activities relating to tropical forestry, the Agency for International Development shall focus tropical forestry assistance programs on the key middle- and low-income developing countries (hereinafter ‘key countries’) which are projected to contribute large amounts of greenhouse gases related to global warming as a result of industrialization and the burning of fossil fuels, and destruction of tropical forests.

    (2) Funds appropriated to carry out the provisions of sections 103 and 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be used by the Agency for International Development, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the purpose of supporting tropical forestry programs aimed at reducing emissions of greenhouse gases with regard to the key countries in which deforestation makes a significant contribution to global warming, except that such assistance shall be subject to sections 116, 502B, and 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

    (3) In providing assistance relating to tropical forests, the Administrator of that Agency shall, to the extent feasible and appropriate, assist countries in developing a systematic analysis of the appropriate use of their total tropical forest resources, with the goal of developing a national program for sustainable forestry.

    (b) ENERGY ASSISTANCE- (1) In order to achieve the maximum impact from activities relating to energy, the Agency for International Development shall focus energy assistance activities on the key countries, where assistance would have the greatest impact on reducing emissions from greenhouse gases. Such assistance shall be focused on improved energy efficiency, increased use of renewable energy resources and national energy plans (such as least-cost energy plans) which include investment in end-use efficiency and renewable energy resources.

    (2) Funds appropriated to carry out the provisions of sections 103 and 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be used by the Agency for International Development, notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the purpose of supporting energy programs aimed at reducing emissions of greenhouse gases related to global warming with regard to the key countries, except that such assistance shall be subject to sections 116, 502B, and 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

    (3) It is the sense of the Congress that the Agency for International Development should increase its efforts in the fields of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy planning. Such increase should take place with respect to key countries and countries with large Economic Support Fund project assistance. Such efforts should include--

      (A) an increase in the number of Agency for International Development staff with energy expertise, including staff with expertise in renewable energy technologies and end-use efficiency;

      (B) assistance to develop analyses of energy-sector actions that could minimize emissions of greenhouse gases at least cost, while at the same time meeting basic economic and social development needs. Such assistance should include country-specific analyses which compare the economic and environmental costs of actions to promote energy efficiency and nonconventional renewable energy with the economic and environmental costs of investments to provide additional conventional energy supplies;

      (C) assistance to develop energy-sector plans that employ end-use analysis and other techniques to identify the most cost-effective actions to minimize increased reliance on fossil fuels, ensuring to the maximum extent feasible that nongovernmental organizations and academic institutions are involved in this planning;

      (D) insuring that AID energy assistance--including support for private-sector initiatives--is consistent with the analyses and plans described in subparagraphs (B) and (C) above, and that environmental impacts (including that on global warming) and alternatives have been fully analyzed;

      (E) assistance to improve efficiency in the production, transmission, distribution, and use of energy. Such assistance should focus on the development of institutions to (i) promote energy efficiency in all sectors of energy production and use, (ii) provide training and technical assistance to help energy producers and users identify cost-effective actions to improve energy efficiency, (iii) finance specific investments in energy efficiency in all sectors of energy production and use, and (iv) improve local capabilities in the research, development, and sale of energy efficient technologies;

      (F) assistance in exploiting nonconventional renewable energy resources, including wind, solar, small-hydro, geothermal, and advanced biomass systems. This assistance should also promote efficient use of traditional biomass fuels through improved fuelwood management and improved methods of charcoal production;

      (G) expanding efforts to meet the energy needs of the rural poor through the methods described in subparagraphs (E) and (F). Specifically these efforts should promote improved efficiency in the use of biomass fuels for household energy, improved systems of fuelwood management, and the development of the nonconventional renewable energy systems described in subparagraph (F);

      (H) encouraging host countries to sponsor meetings with officials from the United States utility sector who are leaders in energy efficiency and other United States experts to discuss the application of least-cost planning techniques;

      (I) developing a cadre of United States experts from industry, academia, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies capable of providing technical assistance to developing countries concerning energy policy and planning, energy efficiency and renewable energy resources;

      (J) in cooperation with the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, the World Bank, and the Development Assistance Committee of the OECD, supporting research concerning the ways developing nations can meet their energy needs while minimizing global warming and how to meet those needs; and

      (K) strengthening the Agency for International Development’s partnership with the Department of Energy in order to ensure that the Agency’s energy efforts take full advantage of United States expertise and technology.

    (c) REPORTS AND AUTHORITIES- (1) The Agency for International Development, in consultation with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of State, and other appropriate agencies, shall submit to Congress no later than April 15, 1990, a report which (1) examines the potential contributions of developing countries to future global emissions of greenhouse gases under different economic growth scenarios, (2) estimates the relative contributions of those countries to global greenhouse gas emissions, and (3) identifies specific key countries which stand to contribute significantly to global greenhouse gas emissions, and in which actions to promote energy efficiency, reliance on renewable energy resources, and conservation of forest resources could significantly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. This report should utilize existing data, including the models and methodologies already developed by the EPA for their report to Congress on policy options for stabilizing global climate.

    (2) Of the funds appropriated to carry out the provisions of sections 103 and 106 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, the Agency for International Development may use such amounts as may be necessary to reimburse United States Government agencies, agencies of State governments, and institutions of higher learning for the full costs of employees detailed or assigned to the Agency for International Development for the purpose of carrying out activities relating to forestry and energy programs aimed at reducing emissions of greenhouse gases related to global warming. Personnel who are detailed or assigned for the purposes of this section shall not be included within any personnel ceiling applicable to any United States Government agency during the period of detail or assignment.

    (d) EXPORT-IMPORT BANK- (1) Of the financing provided by the Export-Import Bank that is utilized for the support of exports for the energy sector, the Bank shall seek to provide not less than 5 per centum of such financing for renewable energy projects.

    (2) The Export-Import Bank shall take all appropriate steps to finance information exchanges and training whose purpose it is to help link United States producers in the renewable energy sector with assistance programs and potential foreign customers.

    (3) Beginning on April 15, 1990, the Chairman of the Export-Import Bank shall submit an annual report to the Committees on Appropriations on the Bank’s implementation of this subsection.

PROHIBITION CONCERNING ABORTIONS AND INVOLUNTARY STERILIZATION

    SEC. 535. None of the funds made available to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be used to pay for the performance of abortions as a method of family planning or to motivate or coerce any person to practice abortions. None of the funds made available to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be used to pay for the performance of involuntary sterilization as a method of family planning or to coerce or provide any financial incentive to any person to undergo sterilizations. None of the funds made available to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be used to pay for any biomedical research which relates in whole or in part, to methods of, or the performance of, abortions or involuntary sterilization as a means of family planning. None of the funds made available to carry out part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended, may be obligated or expended for any country or organization if the President certifies that the use of these funds by any such country or organization would violate any of the above provisions related to abortions and involuntary sterilizations. The Congress reaffirms its commitments to Population, Development Assistance and to the need for informed voluntary family planning.

AFGHANISTAN--HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE

    SEC. 536. Of the aggregate amount of funds appropriated by this Act, to be derived in equal parts from the funds appropriated to carry out the provisions of chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, and chapter 4 of part II of that Act, not less than $70,000,000 shall be made available for the provision of food, medicine, or other humanitarian assistance to the Afghan people, notwithstanding any other provision of law: Provided, That of the funds appropriated under the heading ‘Private Sector, Environment, and Energy, Development Assistance’, $13,500,000 shall be transferred to ‘International Organizations and Programs’ and made available only for the United Nations Afghanistan Emergency Trust Fund.

PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS--DOCUMENTATION

    SEC. 537. None of the funds appropriated or made available pursuant to this Act shall be available to a private voluntary organization which fails to provide upon timely request any document, file, or record necessary to the auditing requirements of the Agency for International Development, nor shall any of the funds appropriated by this Act be made available to any private voluntary organization which is not registered with the Agency for International Development.

EL SALVADOR--INVESTIGATION OF MURDERS

    SEC. 538. Of the amounts made available by this Act for military assistance and financing for El Salvador under chapters 2 and 5 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and under the Arms Export Control Act, $5,000,000 may not be expended until the President reports, following the conclusion of the Appeals process in the case of Captain Avila, to the Committees on Appropriations that the Government of El Salvador has (1) substantially concluded all investigative action with respect to those responsible for the January 1981 deaths of the two United States land reform consultants Michael Hammer and Mark Pearlman and the Salvadoran Land Reform Institute Director Jose Rodolfo Viera, (2) pursued all legal avenues to bring to trial and obtain a verdict of those who ordered and carried out the January 1981 murders, and (3) pursued all legal avenues to bring to trial those who ordered and carried out the September 1988 massacre of ten peasants near the town of San Francisco, El Salvador, and to obtain a verdict.

REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT

    SEC. 539. It is the sense of the Congress that all countries receiving United States foreign assistance under the ‘Economic Support Fund’, ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’, ‘International Military Education and Training’, the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (Public Law 480), development assistance programs, or trade promotion programs should fully cooperate with the international refugee assistance organizations, the United States, and other governments in facilitating lasting solutions to refugee situations. Further, where resettlement to other countries is the appropriate solution, such resettlement should be expedited in cooperation with the country of asylum without respect to race, sex, religion, or national origin.

IMMUNIZATIONS FOR CHILDREN

    SEC. 540. The Congress calls upon the President to direct the Agency for International Development, working through the Centers for Disease Control and other appropriate Federal agencies, to work in a global effort to provide enhanced support toward achieving the goal of universal access to childhood immunization by 1990.

ETHIOPIA--FORCED RESETTLEMENT, VILLAGIZATION

    SEC. 541. None of the funds appropriated in this Act shall be made available for any costs associated with the Government of Ethiopia’s forced resettlement or villagization programs.

SUDAN, SOMALIA, LEBANON, LIBERIA, AND ZAIRE NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

    SEC. 542. None of the funds appropriated in this Act shall be obligated or expended for Sudan, Uganda, Liberia, Lebanon, Zaire, or Somalia except as provided through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

DEFINITION OF PROGRAM, PROJECT, AND ACTIVITY

    SEC. 543. For the purpose of this Act, ‘program, project, and activity’ shall be defined at the Appropriations Act account level and shall include all Appropriations and Authorizations Acts earmarks, ceilings, and limitations with the exception that for the following accounts: Economic Support Fund and Foreign Military Financing Program, ‘program, project, and activity’ shall also be considered to include country, regional, and central program level funding within each such account; for the development assistance accounts of the Agency for International Development ‘program, project, and activity’ shall also be considered to include central program level funding, either as (1) justified to the Congress, or (2) allocated by the executive branch in accordance with a report, to be provided to the Committees on Appropriations within thirty days of enactment of this Act, as required by section 653(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended.

CHILD SURVIVAL AND AIDS ACTIVITIES

    SEC. 544. Of the funds made available by this Act for assistance for health, child survival, and AIDS, up to $6,000,000 may be used to reimburse United States Government agencies, agencies of State governments, and institutions of higher learning for the full cost of employees detailed or assigned, as the case may be, to the Agency for International Development for the purpose of carrying out child survival activities and activities relating to research on, and the treatment and control of, acquired immune deficiency syndrome in developing countries: Provided, That personnel who are detailed or assigned for the purposes of this section shall not be included within any personnel ceiling applicable to any United States Government agency during the period of detail or assignment.

CHILE--LOANS FROM MULTILATERAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONS

    SEC. 545. (a) It is the sense of Congress that pursuant to section 701 of the International Financial Institutions Act of 1977, the United States Government should oppose all loans to Chile from international financial institutions, except for those for basic human needs, until--

      (1) the Government of Chile has ended its practice and pattern of gross abuse of internationally recognized human rights;

      (2) significant steps have been taken by the Government of Chile to restore democracy, including--

        (A) the implementation of political reforms which are essential to the development of democracy, such as the legalization of political parties, the enactment of election laws, the establishment of freedom of speech and the press, and the fair and prompt administration of justice; and

        (B) a precise and reasonable timetable has been established for the transition to democracy.

    (b) Except for programs under section 534(b) (4) or (6) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to support the efforts of private groups and individuals seeking to develop a national consensus on the importance of an independent judiciary and the administration of justice generally in a democratic society, assistance for which programs may be made available notwithstanding section 726 of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1981, and assistance under subsection (c) of this section, none of the funds made available by this Act for ‘Economic Support Fund’ or for title III shall be obligated or expended for Chile.

    (c)(1) The Congress supports the democratic transition underway in Chile, and intends to assist the new democratically elected government, following its inauguration in March of 1990, with assistance to--

      (A) strengthen democratic institutions; and

      (B) establish a new relationship with the Chilean armed forces appropriate to a democratic system of government.

    (2) Of the funds appropriated by this Act under the heading ‘International Military Education and Training’, up to $50,000 may be made available for Chile for fiscal year 1990, subject to the following conditions--

      (A) a civilian, democratically elected President is in power in Chile and has requested such funds;

      (B) internationally recognized human rights are being respected and the civilian government is exercising independent and effective authority; and

      (C) the Government of Chile is making good-faith efforts in attempting to resolve the murders of Orlando Letelier and Ronni Moffitt.

    (3) Assistance may be provided under paragraph (2) without regard to the requirements of section 726(b) of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1981.

COMMODITY COMPETITION

    SEC. 546. None of the funds appropriated by this or any other Act to carry out chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall be available for any testing or breeding feasibility study, variety improvement or introduction, consultancy, publication, conference, or training in connection with the growth or production in a foreign country of an agricultural commodity for export which would compete with a similar commodity grown or produced in the United States: Provided, That this section shall not prohibit:

      (1) activities designed to increase food security in developing countries where such activities will not have a significant impact in the export of agricultural commodities of the United States; or

      (2) research activities intended primarily to benefit American producers.

PROHIBITION OF FUNDING RELATED TO COMPETITION WITH UNITED STATES EXPORTS

    SEC. 547. None of the funds provided in this Act to the Agency for International Development, other than funds made available to carry out Caribbean Basin Initiative programs under the Tariff Schedules of the United States, section 1202 of title 19, United States Code, schedule 8, part I, subpart B, item 807.00, shall be obligated or expended--

      (1) to procure directly feasibility studies or prefeasibility studies for, or project profiles of potential investment in, the manufacture, for export to the United States or to third country markets in direct competition with United States exports, of import-sensitive articles as defined by section 503(c)(1) (A) and (E) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(1) (A) and (E)); or

      (2) to assist directly in the establishment of facilities specifically designed for the manufacture, for export to the United States or to third country markets in direct competition with United States exports, of import-sensitive articles as defined in section 503(c)(1) (A) and (E) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 2463(c)(1) (A) and (E)).

PROHIBITION AGAINST INDIRECT FUNDING TO CERTAIN COUNTRIES

    SEC. 548. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to this Act shall be obligated to finance indirectly any assistance or reparations to Angola, Cambodia, Cuba, Iraq, Libya, the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, South Yemen, Iran, or Syria unless the President of the United States certifies that the withholding of these funds is contrary to the national interest of the United States.

ASSISTANCE FOR LIBERIA

    SEC. 549. (a) During fiscal year 1990, in determining whether to furnish economic support fund assistance and foreign military financing under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to Liberia, the President shall take into account whether the Government of Liberia--

      (1) has demonstrated its commitment to economic reform, including taking steps to fundamentally change the current financial practice of making extra-budgetary expenditures, including steps to channel the revenues from such major sources as the Liberia Petroleum Refinery Corporation and the Forestry Development Authority through the normal budgetary process; and

      (2) has taken significant steps to increase respect for internationally recognized human rights including--

        (A) the removal of all restrictions on the right of political parties to operate freely;

        (B) the lifting of restrictions on freedom of the press; and

        (C) the restoration of an independent judiciary.

RECIPROCAL LEASING

    SEC. 550. Section 61(a) of the Arms Export Control Act is amended by striking out ‘1989’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘1990’.

DEFENSE EQUIPMENT DRAWDOWN

    SEC. 551. (a) Defense articles, services and training drawn down under the authority of section 506(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, shall not be furnished to a recipient unless such articles are delivered to, and such services and training initiated for, the recipient country or international organization not more than one hundred and twenty days from the date on which Congress received notification of the intention to exercise the authority of that section: Provided, That if defense articles have not been delivered or services and training initiated by the period specified in this section, a new notification pursuant to section 506(b) of such Act shall be provided, which shall include an explanation for the delay in furnishing such articles, services, and training, before such articles, services, or training may be furnished.

    (b) Section 506(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by--

      (1) inserting ‘(1)’ after ‘(a)’;

      (2) striking ‘(1)’ and ‘(2)’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘(A)’ and ‘(B)’, respectively; and

      (3) inserting the following new paragraph:

      ‘(2)(A) If the President determines and reports to the Congress in accordance with section 652 of this Act that it is in the national interest of the United States to draw down defense articles from the stocks of the Department of Defense, defense services of the Department of Defense, and military education and training, he may direct--

        ‘(i) the drawdown of such articles, services, and the provision of such training for the purposes and under the authorities of chapters 8 and 9 of part I, as the case may be; and

        ‘(ii) the drawdown of defense services for the purposes and under the authorities of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962.

      ‘(B) An aggregate value of not to exceed $75,000,000 in any fiscal year of defense articles, defense services, and military education and training may be provided pursuant to subparagraph (A) of this paragraph.’.

    (c) Drawdowns made pursuant to section 506(a)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall be subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

NOTIFICATION ON EXCESS DEFENSE EQUIPMENT

    SEC. 552. Prior to providing excess Department of Defense articles in accordance with section 516(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Department of Defense shall notify the Committees on Appropriations to the same extent and under the same conditions as are other committees pursuant to subsection (c) of that section: Provided, That such Committees shall also be informed of the original acquisition cost of such defense articles.

AUTHORIZATION REQUIREMENT

    SEC. 553. Funds appropriated by this Act may be obligated and expended notwithstanding section 10 of Public Law 91-672 and section 15 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956: Provided, That of the funds appropriated by this Act for the ‘Economic Support Fund’ and ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’ accounts, not more than 33 1/3 percent of the amounts made available by this Act for each such account excluding amounts made available for Israel, Egypt, Poland, and Hungary, may be obligated and expended prior to March 1, 1990, unless an Act authorizing appropriations for such account has been enacted.

NOTIFICATION CONCERNING EL SALVADOR

    SEC. 554. (a) The Congress expects that--

      (1) the Government of El Salvador and the armed opposition forces and their political representatives will be willing to pursue a dialog for the purposes of achieving an equitable political settlement of the conflict, including free and fair elections;

      (2) the elected civilian government will be in control of the Salvadoran military and security forces, and those forces will comply with applicable rules of international law and with Presidential directives pertaining to the protection of civilians during combat operations, including Presidential directive C-111-03-984 (relating to aerial fire support);

      (3) the Government of El Salvador will make demonstrated progress, during the period covered by each report pursuant to subsection (b), in ending the activities of the death squads;

      (4) the Government of El Salvador will make demonstrated progress, during the period covered by each report pursuant to subsection (b), in establishing an effective judicial system; and

      (5) the Government of El Salvador will make demonstrated progress, during the period covered by each report pursuant to subsection (b), in implementing the land reform program.

    (b) REPORTS- On April 1, 1990, and September 30, 1990, the President shall report to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the Committees on Appropriations and the chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate on the extent to which the objectives described in subsection (a) are being met. With respect to the objective described in paragraph (4) of that subsection, each report shall specify the status of all cases presented to the Salvadoran courts involving human rights violations against civilians by members of the Salvadoran security forces, including military officers and other military personnel and civil patrolmen.

NOTIFICATION TO CONGRESS ON DEBT RELIEF AGREEMENTS

    SEC. 555. The Secretary of State shall transmit to the Appropriations Committees of the Congress and to such other Committees as appropriate, a copy of the text of any agreement with any foreign government which would result in any debt relief no less than thirty days prior to its entry into force, other than one entered into pursuant to this Act, together with a detailed justification of the interest of the United States in the proposed debt relief: Provided, That the term ‘debt relief’ shall include any and all debt prepayment, debt rescheduling, and debt restructuring proposals and agreements.

MIDDLE EAST REGIONAL COOPERATION AND ISRAELI-ARAB SCHOLARSHIPS

    SEC. 556. (a) Middle East regional cooperative programs which have been carried out in accordance with section 202(c) of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1985 shall continue to be funded at a level of not less than $7,000,000 from funds appropriated under the heading ‘Economic Support Fund’.

    (b) Of the funds made available under the heading ‘Economic Support Fund’, $5,000,000 shall be available only for a grant to assist in capitalizing an endowment whose income will be used for scholarships to enable Israeli Arabs to attend institutions of higher education in the United States: Provided, That such endowment and scholarship program shall be administered by an organization located in the United States: Provided further, That a grant may be made to capitalize such endowment only if private sector contributions of at least $5,000,000 have been made by September 30, 1990, to assist in capitalizing the endowment: Provided further, That if the requirement for private sector contributions is not met, funds earmarked for the purpose of the endowment shall be reprogrammed within the Economic Support Fund account.

MEMBERSHIP DESIGNATION IN ASIAN DEVELOPMENT BANK

    SEC. 557. It is the sense of the Congress that the United States Government should use its influence in the Asian Development Bank to secure reconsideration of that institution’s decision to designate Taiwan (the Republic of China) as ‘Taipei, China’. It is further the sense of the Congress, that the Asian Development Bank should resolve this dispute in a fashion that is acceptable to Taiwan (the Republic of China).

DEPLETED URANIUM

    SEC. 558. None of the funds provided in this or any other Act may be made available to facilitate in any way the sale of M-833 antitank shells or any comparable antitank shells containing a depleted uranium penetrating component to any country other than (1) countries which are members of NATO, (2) countries which have been designated as a major non-NATO ally for purposes of section 1105 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1987 or, (3) Pakistan.

EARMARKS

    SEC. 559. Funds appropriated by this Act which are earmarked may be reprogrammed for other programs within the same account notwithstanding the earmark if compliance with the earmark is made impossible by operation of any provision of this or any other Act or, with respect to a country with which the United States has an agreement providing the United States with base rights or base access in that country, if the President determines that the recipient for which funds are earmarked has significantly reduced its military or economic cooperation with the United States since enactment of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989; however, before exercising the authority of this section with regard to a base rights or base access country which has significantly reduced its military or economic cooperation with the United States, the President shall consult with, and shall provide a written policy justification to the Committees on Appropriations: Provided, That any such reprogramming shall be subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations: Provided further, That assistance that is reprogrammed pursuant to this section shall be made available under the same terms and conditions as originally provided.

HAITI

    SEC. 560. (a) SUSPENSION OF ASSISTANCE- During fiscal year 1990, none of the funds made available by this Act or by any other Act or joint resolution may be obligated or expended to provide United States assistance (including any such assistance appropriated and previously obligated) for Haiti (other than the assistance described in subsection (b) of this section) unless the Government of Haiti has embarked upon a credible transition to democracy--

      (1) by restoring the 1987 Constitution;

      (2) by appointing a genuinely independent electoral commission to conduct free, fair, and open elections as soon as possible at all levels, and by giving that commission adequate support; and

      (3) by taking adequate steps to provide electoral security.

    (b) EXCEPTIONS- The term ‘United States assistance’ does not include--

      (1) assistance, provided through private and voluntary organizations or other nongovernmental agencies, to meet humanitarian and developmental needs or to promote respect for human rights and the transition to democracy;

      (2) disaster relief assistance (including any assistance under chapter 9 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961);

      (3) assistance for refugees;

      (4) assistance under the Inter-American Foundation Act; the Peace Corps Act; and under title IV, chapter 2 of part I, of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to the Overseas Private Investment Corporation);

      (5) assistance necessary for the continued financing of education for Haitians in the United States;

      (6) assistance provided in order to enable the continuation of migrant and narcotics interdiction operations;

      (7) assistance to a genuinely independent electoral commission that is responsible for the holding of elections consistent with the 1987 Constitution;

      (8) assistance for the prevention of HIV infection and the control of Haiti’s AIDS epidemic and for family planning assistance; or

      (9) assistance necessary for the control and eradication of swine flu.

    (c) NOTIFICATIONS- None of the funds appropriated in this Act shall be obligated or expended for Haiti except as provided through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

    (d) DETERMINATION- Funds may be obligated and expended notwithstanding subsection (a) if the President determines that it is in the national interest of the United States to do so.

ASSISTANCE FOR PANAMA

    SEC. 561. (a) Unless the President certifies to Congress that--

      (1) the Government of Panama has demonstrated substantial progress in assuring civilian control of the armed forces and that the Panama Defense Forces and its leaders have been removed from nonmilitary activities and institutions;

      (2) an impartial investigation into allegations of illegal actions by members of the Panama Defense Force is being conducted;

      (3) a satisfactory agreement has been reached between the governing authorities and representatives of the opposition forces on conditions for free and fair elections; and

      (4) freedom of the press and other constitutional guarantees, including due process of law, are being restored to the Panamanian people;

    then no United States assistance (including any such assistance appropriated and previously obligated) shall be obligated or expended for programs, projects, or activities which assist or lend support for the Noriega regime, or ministries of government under the control of the Noriega regime, or any successor regime that does not meet the criteria specified in subsection (a) of this section in this fiscal year and any fiscal year thereafter, and none of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available in this Act, or any other Act, shall be used to finance any participation of the United States in joint military exercises conducted in Panama during the fiscal year 1990.

    (b) It is the sense of the Congress that if the conditions described in paragraphs (1) through (4) of subsection (a) have been certified as having been met, then not only will United States assistance be restored, but increased levels of such assistance should be considered for Panama.

    (c) For purposes of this section, the term ‘United States assistance’ means assistance of any kind which is provided by grant, sale, loan, lease, credit, guaranty, or insurance, or by any other means, by any agency or instrumentality of the United States Government, including--

      (1) assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (including programs under title IV of chapter 2 of part I of such Act);

      (2) sales, credits, and guarantees under the Arms Export Control Act;

      (3) sales under title I or III and donations under title II of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 of nonfood commodities;

      (4) other financing programs of the Commodity Credit Corporation for export sales of nonfood commodities;

      (5) financing under the Export-Import Bank Act of 1945; and

      (6) assistance provided by the Central Intelligence Agency or assistance provided by any other entity or component of the United States Government if such assistance is carried out in connection with, or for purposes of conducting, intelligence or intelligence-related activities except that this shall not include activities undertaken solely to collect necessary intelligence;

    except that the term ‘United States assistance’ does not include (A) assistance under chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 insofar as such assistance is provided through private and voluntary organizations or other nongovernmental agencies, (B) assistance which involves the donations of food or medicine, (C) disaster relief assistance (including any assistance under chapter 9 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961), (D) assistance for refugees, (E) assistance under the Inter-American Foundation Act, (F) assistance necessary for the purpose of continuing participant training programs (including scholarships) already being supported as of the date of any prohibition of assistance otherwise applicable to Panama, or (G) assistance made available for termination costs arising from the requirements of this section.

    (d) The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Directors to the International Financial Institutions (the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Finance Corporation, and the Inter-American Development Bank) to vote against any loan to Panama, unless the President has certified in advance that the conditions set forth in subsection (a) of this section have been met.

ELIMINATION OF THE SUGAR QUOTA ALLOCATION OF PANAMA

    SEC. 562. (a) IN GENERAL- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no sugars, sirups, or molasses that are products of Panama may be imported into the United States after the date of enactment of this Act during any period for which a limitation is imposed by authorities provided under any other law on the total quantity of sugars, sirups, and molasses that may be imported into the United States: Provided, That such products may be imported after the beginning of the last week of any quota year if the President certifies that for the entire duration of the quota year, freedom of the press and other constitutional guarantees, including due process of law, have been restored to the Panamanian people.

    (b) REALLOCATION OF QUOTA AMOUNTS- For any quota year for which the President does not certify for the entire duration of the quota year, freedom of the press and all other constitutional guarantees, including due process of law, have been restored to the Panamanian people, no later than the last week of such quota year, the United States Trade Representative shall reallocate among other foreign countries (but, primarily, among beneficiary countries of the Caribbean Basin Initiative and Bolivia) the quantity of sugar, sirup, and molasses products of Panama that could have been imported into the United States before the date of enactment of this Act under any limitation imposed by other law on the total quantity of sugars, sirups, and molasses that may be imported into the United States during any period: Provided, That no one country may receive more than 20 per centum of such reallocation.

    (c) CERTIFICATION- The provisions of subsections (a) and (b), and the amendments made by subsection (c) of section 571 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs, Appropriations Act, 1988, shall cease to apply if the President certifies to Congress pursuant to section 561(a) of this Act.

OPPOSITION TO ASSISTANCE TO TERRORIST COUNTRIES BY INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    SEC. 563. (a) INSTRUCTIONS FOR UNITED STATES EXECUTIVE DIRECTORS- The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Director of each international financial institution to vote against any loan or other use of the funds of the respective institution to or for a country for which the Secretary of State has made a determination under section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act of 1979.

    (b) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘international financial institution’ includes--

      (1) the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Development Association, and the International Monetary Fund; and

      (2) wherever applicable, the Inter-American Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank, the African Development Bank, and the African Development Fund.

PROHIBITION ON BILATERAL ASSISTANCE TO TERRORIST COUNTRIES

    SEC. 564. (a) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds appropriated for bilateral assistance under any heading of this Act and funds appropriated under any such heading in a provision of law enacted prior to fiscal year 1990, shall not be made available to any country which the President determines--

      (1) grants sanctuary from prosecution to any individual or group which has committed an act of international terrorism, or

      (2) otherwise supports international terrorism.

    (b) The President may waive the application of subsection (a) to a country if the President determines that national security or humanitarian reasons justify such waiver. The President shall publish each waiver in the Federal Register and, at least fifteen days before the waiver takes effect, shall notify the Committees on Appropriations of the waiver (including the justification for the waiver) in accordance with the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

DETENTION OF CHILDREN

    SEC. 565. It is the sense of the Congress that the practice of detaining children without charge or trial is unjust, inhumane, and is an affront to civilized principles. The Congress further believes that it should be the policy of the United States to make the ending of the practice of detaining children without charge or trial a matter of the highest priority. Therefore, the Congress believes the Secretary of State should convey to all international organizations that ending the practice of detaining children without charge or trial should be a policy of the highest priority for those organizations.

MILITARY ASSISTANCE TO MOZAMBIQUE

    SEC. 566. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, none of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available pursuant to this Act may be used to provide military assistance to Mozambique.

HONDURAS--RAMIREZ CASE

    SEC. 567. It is the sense of the Congress that, pursuant to the procedures contained in section (j) under the heading ‘Assistance for Central America’ enacted in Public Law 100-71, the Honduran Government appears to have made a reasonable and good faith settlement offer based on a factual analysis by third parties, and the owner of the property in question is strongly encouraged to accept the proposed settlement. Therefore, notwithstanding the provisions of such section, $5,000,000 of the Economic Support Fund assistance made available by Public Law 100-71 for Honduras but withheld from expenditure shall be available for expenditure upon enactment of this Act: Provided, That if a settlement is reached on the property in question, then the additional $10,000,000 withheld from expenditure pursuant to such section shall then be available for expenditure.

south africa--scholarships

    SEC. 568. Of the funds made available by this Act under the heading ‘Economic Support Fund’, not less than $10,000,000 shall be made available for scholarships for disadvantaged South Africans.

narcotics control program

    SEC. 569. (a)(1) Of the funds appropriated by this Act under the heading ‘Economic Support Fund’ $69,000,000 may be made available for Bolivia, Ecuador, Jamaica, and Peru.

    (2) Of the funds appropriated by this Act under the heading ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’, $35,000,000 may be made available for Bolivia, Ecuador, Jamaica, and Colombia.

    (3) Of the funds appropriated by this Act under the heading ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’, $3,500,000 shall be made available in accordance with the general authorities contained in section 481(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, only for the procurement of weapons or ammunition for foreign law enforcement agencies, and paramilitary units organized for the specific purposes of narcotics enforcement, for use in narcotics control, eradication, and interdiction efforts: Provided, That funds made available under this paragraph shall be made available only for Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, and shall be in addition to any amounts provided for the countries contained in paragraph (2) of this subsection.

    (4) Of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out the provisions of section 481 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not less than $500,000 shall be made available to finance the testing and use of safe and effective herbicides for use in the aerial eradication of coca.

    (5) Of the funds appropriated by this Act under the heading ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’, $1,000,000 shall be made available to arm, for defensive purposes, aircraft used in narcotics control, eradication or interdiction efforts: Provided, That such funds may only be used to arm aircraft already in the inventory of the recipient country, and may not be used for the purchase of new aircraft.

    (6)(A) Of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out the provisions of section 541 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, up to $2,000,000, except through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations, may be made available for Bolivia, Peru, Colombia, and Ecuador, notwithstanding section 660 of such Act, for--

      (i) education and training in the operation and maintenance of equipment used in narcotics control interdiction and eradication efforts; and

      (ii) the expenses of deploying, upon the request of the government of such foreign country, Department of Defense mobile training teams in that foreign country to conduct training in military-related individual and collective skills that will enhance that country’s ability to conduct tactical operations in narcotics interdiction.

    (B) Education and training under this paragraph may be provided only for foreign law enforcement agencies, or other units, that are organized for the specific purpose of narcotics enforcement.

    (7) Funds made available under this subsection shall be available for obligation consistent with the provisions of section 481(h) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to International Narcotics Control) except as provided in paragraph (3) of this subsection.

    (b) None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available under this Act may be available for any country during any three-month period beginning on or after October 1, 1989, immediately following a certification by the President to the Congress that the government of such country is failing to take adequate measures (including satisfying the goals agreed to in applicable bilateral narcotics agreements as defined in section 481(h)(2)(B) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961) to prevent narcotic drugs or other controlled substances (as listed in the schedules in section 202 of the Comprehensive Drug Abuse and Prevention Control Act of 1971 (21 U.S.C. 812)) which are cultivated, produced, or processed illicitly, in whole or in part, in such country, or transported through such country from being sold illegally within the jurisdiction of such country to United States Government personnel or their dependents or from entering the United States unlawfully.

    (c) In making determinations with respect to Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru pursuant to section 481(h)(2)(A)(i) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the President shall take into account the extent to which the Government of each country is sufficiently responsive to United States Government concerns on coca control and whether the provision of assistance for that country is in the national interest of the United States.

    (d)(1) If any funds made available for any fiscal year for security assistance are not used for assistance for the country for which those funds were allocated because of any provision of law requiring the withholding of assistance for countries that have not taken adequate steps to halt illicit drug production of trafficking, the President shall use those funds for additional assistance for those countries which have met their illicit drug eradication targets or have otherwise taken significant steps to halt illicit drug production or trafficking, as follows:

      (A) Those funds may be transferred to and consolidated with the funds made available to carry out section 481 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 in order to provide additional narcotics control assistance for those countries. Funds transferred under this paragraph may only be used to provide increased funds for activities previously justified to the Congress. Transfers may be made under this paragraph without regard to the 20-percent increase limitation contained in section 610 of the Foreign Assistance Act.

      (B) Any such funds not used under subparagraph (A) shall be reprogrammed within the account for which they were appropriated (subject to the regular reprogramming procedures of the Committees on Appropriations) in order to provide additional security assistance for those countries.

    (2) As used in this section, the term ‘security assistance’ means economic support fund assistance, foreign military financing, and international military education and training.

    (e) Of the funds appropriated under title II of this Act for the Agency for International Development, up to $10,000,000 should be made available for narcotics education and awareness programs (including public diplomacy programs) of the Agency for International Development, and $40,000,000 of the funds appropriated under title II of this Act should be made available for narcotics related economic assistance activities.

    (f) In order to maximize the participation of other countries in the effort to promote international narcotics control, the Secretary of State is directed to urge the United Nations Fund for Drug Abuse Control to develop a more comprehensive program for enlisting greater multilateral support for coca control programs and related development activities in South America.

TURKISH AND GREEK MILITARY FORCES ON CYPRUS

    SEC. 570. Any agreement for the sale or provision of any article on the United States Munitions List (established pursuant to section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act) entered into by the United States after the enactment of this section shall expressly state that the article is being provided by the United States only with the understanding that it will not be transferred to Cyprus or otherwise used to further the severance or division of Cyprus. The President shall report to Congress any substantial evidence that equipment provided under any such agreement has been used in a manner inconsistent with the purposes of this section.

COMMERCIAL LEASING OF DEFENSE ARTICLES

    SEC. 571. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, and subject to the regular notification requirements of the Committees on Appropriations, the authority of section 23(a) of the Arms Export Control Act may be used to provide financing to Israel and Egypt and NATO and major non-NATO allies for the procurement by leasing (including leasing with an option to purchase) of defense articles from United States commercial suppliers, not including Major Defense Equipment (other than helicopters and other types of aircraft having possible civilian application), if the President determines that there are compelling foreign policy or national security reasons for those defense articles being provided by commercial lease rather than by government-to-government sale under such Act.

cambodian noncommunist resistance forces

    SEC. 572. If the President makes available funds appropriated by this Act for the Cambodian non-Communist resistance forces, not to exceed $7,000,000 may be made available for such purpose, and such funds shall be derived from funds appropriated under the headings ‘Foreign Military Financing Program’ and ‘Economic Support Fund’, and shall be made available notwithstanding any other provision of law: Provided, That funds made available for this purpose shall be obligated in accordance with the provisions of section 906 of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-83): Provided further, That, to the maximum extent possible, all funds made available under the authority of this section shall be administered directly by the United States Government.

MODERNIZATION OF MILITARY CAPABILITIES OF CERTAIN COUNTRIES

    SEC. 573. (a) Authority To Transfer Excess Defense Articles-

      (1) NATO SOUTHERN FLANK COUNTRIES- The President may transfer--

        (A) to any NATO southern flank country which is eligible for United States security assistance and which is integrated into NATO’s military structure; and

        (B) to any major non-NATO ally on the southern and southeastern flank of NATO which is eligible for United States security assistance, such excess defense articles as may be necessary to help modernize the defense capabilities of such country.

      (2) MAJOR ILLICIT DRUG PRODUCING COUNTRIES- Subject to subsection (f), the President may transfer to any country--

        (A) which is a major illicit drug producing country,

        (B) which has a democratic government, and

        (C) whose armed forces do not engage in a consistent pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights, such excess defense articles as may be necessary to carry out subsection (f)(1).

      (3) TERMS OF TRANSFERS- Excess defense articles may be transferred under this section without cost to the recipient country.

    (b) LIMITATIONS ON TRANSFERS- The President may transfer excess defense articles under this section only if--

      (1) they are drawn from existing stocks of the Department of Defense;

      (2) funds available to the Department of Defense for the procurement of defense equipment are not expended in connection with the transfer; and

      (3) the President determines that the transfer of the excess defense articles will not have an adverse impact on the military readiness of the United States.

    (c) Notification to Congress-

      (1) ADVANCE NOTICE- The President may not transfer excess defense articles under this section until thirty days after the President has provided notice of the proposed transfer to the committees specified in paragraph (2). This notification shall include--

        (A) a certification of the need for the transfer;

        (B) an assessment of the impact of the transfer on the military readiness of the United States; and

        (C) the value of the excess defense articles to be transferred.

      (2) COMMITTEES TO BE NOTIFIED- Notice shall be provided pursuant to paragraph (1) to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate.

    (d) WAIVER OF REQUIREMENT FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF DOD EXPENSES- Section 632(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 does not apply with respect to transfers of excess defense articles under this section.

    (e) Maintenance of Military Balance in Eastern Mediterranean-

      (1) UNITED STATES POLICY- The Congress intends that excess defense articles be made available under this section consistent with the United States policy, established by section 841 of the International Cooperation Act of 1989, of maintaining the military balance in the Eastern Mediterranean.

      (2) MAINTENANCE OF BALANCE- Accordingly, the President shall ensure that, over the three-year period beginning on October 1, 1989, the ratio of--

        (A) the value of excess defense articles made available for Turkey under this section, to

        (B) the value of excess defense articles made available for Greece under this section, closely approximates the ratio of--

          (i) the amount of foreign military financing provided for Turkey, to

          (ii) the amount of foreign military financing provided for Greece.

      (3) EXCEPTION TO REQUIREMENT- This subsection shall not apply if either Greece or Turkey ceases to be eligible to receive excess defense articles under subsection (a).

    (f) Major Illicit Drug Producing Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean-

      (1) PURPOSE- Excess defense articles shall be transferred under subsection (a)(2) for the purpose of encouraging the military forces of an eligible country in Latin America and the Caribbean to participate with local law enforcement agencies in a comprehensive national antinarcotics program, conceived and developed by the government of that country, by conducting activities within that country and on the high seas to prevent the production, processing, trafficking, transportation, and consumption of illicit narcotic or psychotrophic drugs or other controlled substances.

      (2) USES OF EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES- Excess defense articles may be furnished to a country under subsection (a)(2) only if that country ensures that those excess defense articles will be used only in support of antinarcotics activities.

      (3) ROLE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE- The Secretary of State shall determine the eligibility of countries to receive excess defense articles under subsection (a)(2) and insure that any transfer is coordinated with other antinarcotics enforcement programs assisted by the United States Government.

      (4) LIMITATION- The aggregate value of excess defense articles transferred to a country under subsection (a)(2) in any fiscal year may not exceed $10,000,000.

    (g) DEFINITIONS- As used in this section--

      (1) the term ‘excess defense article’ has the meaning given that term by section 644(g);

      (2) the term ‘made available’ means that a good faith offer is made by the United States to furnish the excess defense articles to a country;

      (3) the term ‘major non-NATO ally’ includes Australia, Egypt, Israel, Japan, and New Zealand;

      (4) the term ‘NATO’ means the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; and

      (5) the term ‘NATO southern flank countries’ means Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey.

COMPETITIVE INSURANCE

    SEC. 574. All Agency for International Development contracts and solicitations, and subcontracts entered into under such contracts, shall include a clause requiring that United States marine insurance companies have a fair opportunity to bid for marine insurance when such insurance is necessary or appropriate.

PAY RAISES

    SEC. 575. Such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 1990 pay raises for programs funded by this Act shall be absorbed within the levels appropriated in this Act.

IRELAND

    SEC. 576. It is the sense of the Congress that of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available for the International Fund for Ireland, the Board of the International Fund for Ireland should give great weight in the allocation of such funds to projects which will create permanent, full time jobs in the areas that have suffered most severely from the consequences of the instability of recent years. Areas that have suffered most severely from the consequences of the instability of recent years shall be defined as areas that have high rates of unemployment.

ASSISTANCE TO AFGHANISTAN

    SEC. 577. Funds appropriated by this Act may not be made available, directly or for the United States proportionate share of programs funded under the heading ‘International Organizations and Programs’, for assistance to be provided inside Afghanistan if that assistance would be provided through the Soviet-controlled government of Afghanistan. This section shall not be construed as limiting the United States contributions to international organizations for humanitarian assistance.

EL SALVADOR ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUNDS

    SEC. 578. Not less than 25 per centum of the Economic Support Funds made available for El Salvador by this Act shall be used for projects and activities in accordance with the provisions applicable to assistance under chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

disadvantaged enterprises

    SEC. 579. (a) Except to the extent that the Administrator of the Agency for International Development of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 determines otherwise, not less than 10 percent of the aggregate amount made available for the fiscal year 1990 for development assistance and assistance for famine recovery and development in Africa shall be made available only for activities of United States organizations and individuals that are--

      (1) business concerns owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals,

      (2) historically black colleges and universities,

      (3) colleges and universities having a student body in which more than 40 percent of the students are Hispanic American, and

      (4) private voluntary organizations which are controlled by individuals who are socially and economically disadvantaged.

    (b)(1) In addition to other actions taken to carry out this section, the actions described in paragraphs (2) through (5) shall be taken with respect to development assistance and assistance for famine recovery and development in Africa for fiscal year 1990.

    (2) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in order to achieve the goals of this section, the Administrator--

      (A) to the maximum extent practicable, shall utilize the authority of section 8(a) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 637(a));

      (B) to the maximum extent practicable, shall enter into contracts with small business concerns owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals--

        (i) using less than full and open competitive procedures under such terms and conditions as the Administrator deems appropriate, and

        (ii) using an administrative system for justifications and approvals that, in the Administrator’s discretion, may best achieve the purpose of this section; and

      (C) shall issue regulations to require that any contract in excess of $500,000 contain a provision requiring that no less than 10 percent of the dollar value of the contract be subcontracted to entities described in subsection (a), except--

        (i) to the extent the Administrator determines otherwise on a case-by-case or category-of-contract basis; and

        (ii) this subparagraph does not apply to any prime contractor that is an entity described in subsection (a).

    (3) Each person with contracting authority who is attached to the agency’s headquarters in Washington, as well as all agency missions and regional offices, shall notify the agency’s Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization at least 7 business days before advertising a contract in excess of $100,000, except to the extent that the Administrator determines otherwise on a case-by-case or category-of-contract basis.

    (4) The Administrator shall include, as part of the performance evaluation of any mission director of the agency, the mission director’s efforts to carry out this section.

    (5) The Administrator shall submit to the Congress annual reports on the implementation of this section. Each such report shall specify the number and dollar value or amount (as the case may be) of prime contracts, subcontracts, grants, and cooperative agreements awarded to entities described in subsection (a) during the preceding fiscal year.

    (6) The Administrator shall issue interim regulations to carry out this section within ninety days after the date of the enactment of this Act and final regulations within one hundred and eighty days after that date.

    (c) As used in this section, the term ‘socially and economically disadvantaged individuals’ has the same meaning that term is given for purposes of section 133(c)(5) of the International Development and Food Assistance Act of 1977, except that the term includes women.

stingers in the persian gulf region

    SEC. 580. Except as provided in section 581, the United States may not sell or otherwise make available any Stingers to any country bordering the Persian Gulf under the Arms Export Control Act or chapter 2 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

stingers for bahrain

    SEC. 581. (a) PREVIOUSLY TRANSFERRED STINGERS- Notwithstanding section 580, section 573(b)(4) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988, and section 566(b)(4) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989, shall cease to apply with respect to Stingers made available to Bahrain under those sections if the President determines, and notifies the Committees on Appropriations and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, that--

      (1) the Stingers are needed by Bahrain to counter an immediate air threat or to contribute to the protection of United States personnel, facilities, equipment, or operations;

      (2) no other appropriate system is available from the United States;

      (3) Bahrain has agreed, in writing, to such safeguards to protect against diversion of the Stingers as may be required by the United States; and

      (4) Bahrain has agreed in writing to return to the possession and control of the United States all Stingers made available under those sections and subsection (b) of this section, other than Stingers which have been fired or otherwise destroyed, at any time the United States determines, subject to subsection (c).

    (b) REPLACEMENT STINGERS- Notwithstanding section 580, Stingers may be made available to Bahrain under the Arms Export Control Act or the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 after September 30, 1989, in order to replace, on a one-for-one basis, Stingers previously made available under this subsection, section 573 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1988, or section 566 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989, that have been fired or otherwise destroyed, subject to the following conditions:

      (1) DETERMINATIONS- Replacement Stingers may be made available to Bahrain pursuant to this subsection only if the President makes the determinations specified in paragraphs (1) through (4) of subsection (a).

      (2) NOTICE TO CONGRESS BEFORE STINGERS ARE TRANSFERRED- At least 30 days before making any replacement Stingers available to Bahrain pursuant to this subsection, the President shall notify the committees designated in subsection (a) that he has made the determinations required by paragraph (1). Any such notification shall include the information required in a certification under section 36(b) of the Arms Export Control Act. This paragraph applies without regard to the value of the Stingers to be made available.

    (c) RETURN OF STINGERS TO THE UNITED STATES- All Stingers made available to Bahrain pursuant to subsections (a) and (b), other than those fired or otherwise destroyed, shall be returned to the possession and control of the United States not later than September 30, 1991, unless the President--

      (1) determines that each of the conditions specified in subsection (a) continues to apply; and

      (2) notifies the committees designated in subsection (a) not later than September 15, 1991, in accordance with the regular reprogramming procedures of such committees, that the United States intends to waive the requirement that the Stingers be returned to the United States by the date specified in the subsection.

PROHIBITION ON LEVERAGING AND DIVERSION OF UNITED STATES ASSISTANCE

    SEC. 582. (a) None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be provided to any foreign government (including any instrumentality or agency thereof), foreign person, or United States person in exchange for that foreign government or person undertaking any action which is, if carried out by the United States Government, a United States official or employee, expressly prohibited by a provision of United States law.

    (b) For the purposes of this section the term ‘funds appropriated by this Act’ includes only (1) assistance of any kind under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961; and (2) credits, and guaranties under the Arms Export Control Act.

    (c) Nothing in this section shall be construed to limit--

      (1) the ability of the President, the Vice President, or any official or employee of the United States to make statements or otherwise express their views to any party on any subject;

      (2) the ability of an official or employee of the United States to express the policies of the President; or

      (3) the ability of an official or employee of the United States to communicate with any foreign country government, group or individual, either directly or through a third party, with respect to the prohibitions of this section including the reasons for such prohibitions, and the actions, terms, or conditions which might lead to the removal of the prohibitions of this section.

APPROPRIATIONS OF EXCESS CURRENCIES

    SEC. 583. The provisions of section 1306 of title 31, United States Code, shall not be waived to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 by any provision of law enacted after the date of enactment of this Act unless such provision makes specific reference to this section.

DEBT-FOR-DEVELOPMENT

    SEC. 584. In order to enhance the continued participation of nongovernmental organizations in economic assistance activities under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, including debt-for-development and debt-for-nature exchanges, a nongovernmental organization may invest local currencies which accrue to that organization as a result of economic assistance provided under the heading ‘Agency for International Development’ and any interest earned on such investment may be used, including for the establishment of an endowment, for the purpose for which the assistance was provided to that organization.

LEBANON

    SEC. 585. Of the funds appropriated by this Act to carry out chapter 1 of part I and chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 not less than $7,500,000 shall be made available for Lebanon: Provided, That such funds may be provided in accordance with the general authorities contained in section 491 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

JOB-RELATED CRIMES

    SEC. 586. (a) Section 1106(8) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 is amended by inserting at the end thereof the following sentence: ‘Notwithstanding the first sentence of this paragraph, the Board’s authority to suspend such action shall not extend to instances where the Secretary, or his designee, has determined that there is reasonable cause to believe that a grievant has committed a job-related crime for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed and has taken action to suspend the grievant without pay pending a final resolution of the underlying matter.’.

    (b) Section 610(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 is amended by inserting the following new paragraphs:

      ‘(3) Notwithstanding the hearing required by this section, or procedures under any other provision of law, where there is reasonable cause to believe that a member has committed a crime for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed, and there is a nexus to the efficiency of the Service, the Secretary, or his designee, may suspend such member without pay pending final resolution of the underlying matter, subject to reinstatement with back pay if cause for separation is not established in a hearing before the Board.

      ‘(4) Any member suspended pursuant to subsection (a)(3) of this section shall be entitled to--

        ‘(A) advance written notice of the specific reasons for such suspension, including the grounds for reasonable cause to believe a crime has been committed;

        ‘(B) a reasonable time, not less than seven days, to answer orally and in writing;

        ‘(C) be represented by an attorney or other representative; and

        ‘(D) a final written decision.

      ‘(5) Any member suspended pursuant to subsection (a)(3) of this section shall be entitled to grieve such action in accordance with procedures applicable to grievances under chapter 11. The Board review, however, shall be limited only to a determination of whether there exists reasonable cause to believe a crime has been committed for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed, and whether there is a nexus between the conduct and the efficiency of the Service.’.

    (c) For purposes of the amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) of this section, reasonable cause to believe that a member has committed a crime for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed shall be defined as a member of the Service having been convicted of, and sentence of imprisonment having been imposed for, a job-related crime.

LOCATION OF STOCKPILES

    SEC. 587. (a) Except for stockpiles located in the Republic of Korea, Thailand, a country which is a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, or a country which is a major non-NATO ally, no stockpile may be located outside the boundaries of a United States military base or a military base used primarily by the United States.

    (b) Section 514 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (b)(1), by striking out ‘greater than’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘that’; and

      (2) in subsection (b)(2), by striking out ‘$77,000,000 for fiscal year 1989’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘$165,000,000 for fiscal year 1990’.

hong kong

    SEC. 588. It is the sense of the Congress that the President and Secretary of State should convey to the People’s Republic of China and the United Kingdom strong concerns over the absence of full direct elections in the colony and lack of independent human rights guarantees in the draft Basic Law, pending the colony’s scheduled reversion to China in 1997.

RESCISSION

    SEC. 589. Of the funds appropriated by the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1989, under the heading ‘Economic Support Fund’, $50,000,000 of such funds are hereby rescinded: Provided, That such rescission may be derived only from unearmarked funds and funds earmarked under such heading for Sub-Saharan Africa and allocated for Sudan, Somalia, and Liberia.

west bank schools

    SEC. 590. The United States Congress commends Israel’s decision to open schools on the West Bank beginning July 22, 1989.

    The Congress expresses the hope that all schools will be opened at an early date and will remain open, will not be used for political purposes, and will be respected and regarded as places of learning, not as places from which to further violent activity.

ASSISTANCE FOR PAKISTAN

    SEC. 591. Section 620E(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by striking out ‘April 1, 1990’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘April 1, 1991’.

SEPARATE ACCOUNTS

    SEC. 592. (a) SEPARATE ACCOUNTS FOR LOCAL CURRENCIES- (1) If assistance is furnished to the government of a foreign country under chapter 1 of part I (including assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa) or chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 under arrangements which result in the generation of local currencies of that country, the Administrator of the Agency for International Development shall--

      (A) require that local currencies be deposited in a separate account established by that government;

      (B) enter into an agreement with that government which sets forth--

        (i) the amount of the local currencies to be generated, and

        (ii) the terms and conditions under which the currencies so deposited may be utilized, consistent with this section; and

      (C) established by agreement with that government the responsibilities of the Agency for International Development and that government to monitor and account for deposits into and disbursements from the separate account.

    (2) USES OF LOCAL CURRENCIES- As may be agreed upon with the foreign government, local currencies deposited in a separate account pursuant to subsection (a), or an equivalent amount of local currencies, shall be used only--

      (A) to carry out chapter 1 of part I or chapter 4 of part II (as the case may be), or

      (B) for the administrative requirements of the United States Government.

    (3) PROGRAMMING ACCOUNTABILITY- The Agency for International Development shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that the equivalent of the local currencies disbursed pursuant to subsection (a)(2)(A) from the separate account established pursuant to subsection (a)(1) are used for the purposes agreed upon pursuant to subsection (a)(2).

    (4) TERMINATION OF ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS- Upon termination of assistance to a country under chapter 1 of part I or chapter 4 of part II (as the case may be), any unencumbered balances of funds which remain in a separate account established pursuant to subsection (a) shall be disposed of for such purposes as may be agreed to by the government of that country and the United States Government.

    (b) SEPARATE ACCOUNTS FOR CASH TRANSFERS- (1) If assistance is made available to the government of a foreign country, under chapter 1 of part I (including assistance for Sub-Saharan Africa) or chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as cash transfer assistance or as nonproject sector assistance, that country shall be required to maintain such funds in a separate account and not commingle them with any other funds.

    (2) APPLICABILITY OF OTHER PROVISIONS OF LAW- Such funds may be obligated and expended notwithstanding provisions of law which are inconsistent with the nature of this assistance including provisions which are referenced in the Joint Explanatory Statement of the Committee of Conference accompanying House Joint Resolution 648 (H. Report No. 98-1159).

    (3) NOTIFICATION- At least fifteen days prior to obligating any such cash transfer or nonproject sector assistance, the President shall submit a notification through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations, which shall include a detailed description of how the funds proposed to be made available will be used, with a discussion of the United States interests that will be served by the assistance (including, as appropriate, a description of the economic policy reforms that will be promoted by such assistance).

    (4) EXEMPTION- Nonproject sector assistance funds may be exempt from the requirements of subsection (b)(1) only through the notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

GLOBAL REDUCTION OF PROVERTY

    SEC. 593. (a) The Congress finds that the reduction of poverty on a global basis is a fundamental goal of United States foreign assistance. Therefore, to measure progress toward that goal, the Administrator of the Agency for International Development shall, in consultation with the Congress and other appropriate governmental agencies and nongovernmental agencies and nongovernmental organizations, establish a system of quantitative and qualitative indicators of poverty reduction, which shall be established on a country-by-country basis. These indicators shall include the percentage of persons living below the absolute poverty level, rates of infant and child mortality, rates of literacy for men and women, per capita income and purchasing power, rate of employment, and other factors measuring poverty reduction and economic growth as the Administrator of the Agency for International Development shall deem appropriate.

    (b) As part of its annual congressional presentation to Congress, the Agency for International Development shall identify those poverty reduction objectives that have been set for each country receiving development assistance, and the progress that has been achieved in past years and future steps to be taken to achieve them.

INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND

    SEC. 594. (a) The Secretary of the Treasury shall instruct the United States Executive Director to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to regularly and vigorously promote the following policy and staffing changes through formal initiatives before the Board and management of the IMF and through bilateral discussions with other member nations:

      (1) The addition to the IMF’s staff of natural resource experts, and development economists trained in analyzing the linkages between macro-economic conditions and the short- and long-term impacts on sustainable management of natural resources.

      (2) In a manner consistent with the purposes of the IMF, the establishment in the IMF of a systematic process to review in advance, and take into account in policy formation, projected impacts of each IMF lending agreement on the long-term sustainable management of natural resources, the environment, public health and poverty.

      (3) The creation of criteria to consider concessional and favorable lending terms to promote sustainable management of natural resources. Such capacity should seek the reduction of the debt burden of developing countries in recognition of domestic investments in conservation and environmental management.

    (b) The Secretary of the Treasury shall prepare an annual report to the Congress on the progress made by the United States Executive Director to the IMF in implementing the reforms encompassed in this section.

el salvador

    SEC. 595. With respect to the ongoing political unrest and armed conflict in El Salvador, the Congress hereby--

      (1) welcomes the negotiating process set in motion on September 13, 1989 in Mexico City by the Government of El Salvador and the leadership of the Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front and the expressed willingness of both parties to continue this process;

      (2) urges the parties to these negotiations to achieve, as quickly as possible--

        (A) a cessation of hostilities; and

        (B) an overall political settlement of the ten-year old conflict; and

      (3) calls upon the Secretary of State to consult frequently with the Congress on the status of the Salvadoran negotiations and on the efforts being undertaken by the President to support these negotiations.

CENTRAL AMERICAN DEVELOPMENT COORDINATION COMMISSION

    SEC. 596. (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that multi-donor foreign assistance funds made available to the Central America region should be channeled through regional institutions which have strong participation in decision-making by Central Americans to ensure adequate coordination among donors.

    (b) ASSISTANCE FOR CADCC- Upon the request of the governments of Central America, the President shall provide appropriate support and assistance in the development of a coordination mechanism agreed to by the governments of Central America, which shall be designated as the Central American Development Coordination Commission (CADCC). In providing such support and assistance, the President shall, in concert with the governments of Central America, with other nations providing assistance, with the United Nations, and with other concerned international and regional organizations--

      (1) encourage and participate in the creation of a multi-donor, multi-sectoral coordinating mechanism known as the CADCC; and

      (2) provide not less than $500,000 or more than $1,000,000 of funds appropriated to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to the Economic Support Fund) to be used to assist in the implementation of such Commission, and United States participation therein.

    (c) FACTORS IN ESTABLISHING CADCC- In establishing the CADCC, consideration should be given to:

      (1) involving representatives from both the public and private sectors, including representatives from the trade unions and business communities, and nongovernmental organizations at the regional level;

      (2) involving regional institutions and multilateral organizations such as the Inter-American Bank, the Central American Bank for Economic Integration (CABEI), the Central American Monetary Council (CMCA), the Economic Commission for Latin America (ECLAC), the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the United Nations in project design, implementation, and coordination; and

      (3) establishing in each country a National Recovery and Development Commission, modeled after the National Reconciliation Commissions called for in the Esquipulas II Accords agreed to by the presidents of the five countries of Central America in Guatemala on August 6-7, 1987.

    (d) SECRETARIAT OF THE CADCC- The United Nations Development Programme shall be designated as the social service and refugee and displaced persons technical assistance secretariat for the CADCC.

    (e) ELIGIBILITY FOR ASSISTANCE- The President is authorized to furnish assistance under this section to each country in Central America which is in compliance with the Esquipulas II Accords.

    (f)(1) ENCOURAGEMENT OF MULTILATERAL CONTRIBUTIONS- The Congress urges the President to take the necessary steps to encourage and secure greater international cooperation in, and support for, implementing the recommendations of the International Commission for Central American Recovery and Development.

    (2) It is the sense of the Congress that, in carrying out paragraph (1), the President should exert leadership in multilateral and regional forums, and at economic summits to further a multidonor, multisector solution to the crisis in Central America.

eligibility of poland and hungary for overseas private investment corporation

    SEC. 597. (a) PROGRAMS- Section 239(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by inserting ‘Poland, Hungary,’ after ‘Yugoslavia,’.

    (b) PARTICIPATION BY NONGOVERNMENTAL SECTOR- (1) In accordance with its mandate to foster private initiative and competition and enhance the ability of private enterprise to make its full contribution to the development process, the Overseas Private Investment Corporation shall support projects in Poland and Hungary which will result in enhancement of the nongovernmental sector and reduction of state involvement in the economy.

    (2) For purposes of this subsection, the term ‘nongovernmental sector’ in Poland and Hungary includes private enterprises, cooperatives (insofar as they are not administered by the Governments of Poland or Hungary), joint ventures (including partners which are not the Governments of Poland or Hungary or instrumentalities thereof), businesses in Poland or Hungary that are wholly or partly owned by United States citizens, including those of Polish or Hungarian descent, religious and ethnic groups (including the Catholic Church), and other independent social organizations.

    (c) DEFINITION OF ELIGIBLE INVESTOR- Notwithstanding subsection (b), the term ‘eligible investor’ with respect to OPIC’s programs in Poland and Hungary has the same meaning as contained in section 238(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

    (d) EFFECTIVE DATE- The authority of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation to issue insurance, reinsurance, guarantees, and to provide any assistance under its direct loan and equity programs with respect to projects undertaken in Poland and Hungary shall take effect upon the date of enactment of this Act and shall remain in effect until September 30, 1992.

INTERNATIONAL COFFEE AGREEMENT

    SEC. 598. It is the Sense of the Congress that the International Coffee Agreement is an important measure in promoting economic and political stability in many developing countries, including Colombia, that the collapse of the Agreement would seriously undermine Colombia’s efforts at fighting illegal drugs, and that the Administration should undertake every possible effort to successfully conclude a renewal of the Agreement.

LATVIA, ESTONIA, AND LITHUANIA

    SEC. 599. (a) The Congress finds that--

      (1) the Baltic states of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania gained their independence from the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic in 1918, a fact recognized by the government of the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic in 1920;

      (2) the governments of the Latvian Democratic Republic and the Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic (RSFSR) signed a Treaty of Peace in Riga, Latvia on August 11, 1920, in which the RSFSR ‘establishes the right of self-determination for all nations, even to the point of total separation from the States with which they have been incorporated’ and declares that ‘Russia unreservedly recognizes the independence, self-subsistency and sovereignty of the Latvian State and voluntarily and forever renounces all sovereign rights over the Latvian people and territory which formerly belonged to Russia’;

      (3) similar treaties were signed by both the Republic of Estonia and the Republic of Lithuania with the RSFSR on February 2, 1920 and July 12, 1920, respectively’;

      (4) the independent republics of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania swiftly recovered from the ravages of World War I and became active in the World community, gaining membership in the League of Nations on September 22, 1921 and full recognition by the United States on July 28, 1922;

      (5) the sovereign rights of the independent states of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania were violated by the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics in a Secret Protocol to the Nazi-Soviet Treaty of Nonaggression of August 23, 1939, which divided Eastern Europe into Nazi and Soviet ‘spheres of influence’;

      (6) the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics coerced the governments of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania to sign Pacts of Mutual Assistance in October 1939, which stipulated that the ‘contracting parties undertake not to enter into any alliances or to participate in any coalitions directed against one of the contracting parties’ and that ‘the carrying into effect of the present pact must in no way affect the sovereign rights of the contracting parties, in particular their political structure, their economic and social system, and their military measures’;

      (7) the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics violated not only those bilateral agreements with the independent Baltic states but also international conventions on the changing of international borders by force when the Soviet Union issued ultimatums to the three independent nations on June 15-16, 1940, demanding the formation of governments to their liking, followed by armed invasions of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia on June 16-17, 1940;

      (8) the occupation of the Baltic states was confirmed on July 14-15, 1940, with the irregular and illegal ‘election’ of new parliaments, which then petitioned for admission into the Soviet Union, and these petitions were accepted by the Soviet Union, as follows: Lithuania’s on August 3, 1940, Latvia’s on August 4, 1940, and Estonia’s on August 5, 1940;

      (9) the Government of the United States continues its policy of standing by the 1922 recognition of the de jure independent governments in the Baltic states, and of refusing to recognize the forced incorporation of the Baltic states into the Soviet Union;

      (10) the peoples of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania have never accepted the occupation of their native lands, and have demonstrated their resolve on numerous occasions since 1940, most notably in the last three years. The most striking demonstration of the desires of the Baltic people took place on August 23, 1989, the fiftieth anniversary of the Nazi-Soviet Treaty of Nonaggression, when nearly two million citizens of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania joined hands in a four-hundred-mile human chain stretching across the Baltic states from the Estonian capital of Tallinn, through the Latvian capital, Riga, to the Lithuanian capital of Vilninus;

      (11) the people of the Baltic states, through their elected representatives in the Popular Front of Latvia, the Popular Front of Estonia, and the Lithuanian Movement in Support of Perestroika ‘Sajudis’, have declared their desire for the restoration of independence in the Baltic states; and

      (12) even the Communist officials and regimes in each of the Baltic states have begun to respond to the drive for more autonomy.

    (b) The Congress urges the President--

      (1) to raise the issue of the political rights of the Baltic peoples in all diplomatic contacts with the Soviet Union including during the meeting between President Bush and President Gorbachev in December, 1989 and during the Presidential summit scheduled in 1990 between the United States and the Soviet Union; and

      (2) to call upon the Soviet Union--

        (A) to honor the international agreements it has voluntarily entered into, such as the Final Act of the Helsinki Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe and the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights, as well as the bilateral agreements it has voluntarily entered into with the independent governments of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania,

        (B) to allow the people of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania their right of self-determination, as guaranteed by the RSFSR in 1920 as well as by the current constitution of the Soviet Union,

        (C) to recognize the human rights of all peoples both within the Soviet Union and under Soviet influence, and

        (D) to replace the policy of aggressive industrialization in the Baltic states, which has poisoned the land, air, and water of Latvia, Estonia, and Lithuania, with one of environmental responsibility.

IMPORTATION OF CERTAIN DEFENSE ARTICLES FROM POLAND, CZECHOSLOVAKIA, AND HUNGARY

    SEC. 599A. Notwithstanding section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2278) or any other provision of law, any article that--

      (1) is a defense article for purposes of section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act,

      (2) is from Poland, Hungary, or Czechoslovakia,

      (3) was imported or temporarily imported into the United States before June 30, 1989, by, or on behalf of, a museum or educational institution that is described in section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and exempt from tax under section 501(a) of such Code,

      (4) was manufactured at least 20 years before its importation into the United States,

      (5) has been disabled so that no weapon or weapons system is functional, and

      (6) is to be used only for display to the public by the museum or educational institution for educational purposes,

    shall be considered to have been lawfully imported into the United States and shall be permitted to remain in the United States, and the museum or educational institution shall not be subject to any penalty by reason of such importation.

HUMAN RIGHTS IN CUBA

    SEC. 599B. (1) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--

      (A) the United Nations in 1989 issued its first report on humans rights in Cuba this year, the result of a year-long investigation that concluded on the 30th year of Fidel Castro’s rise to power;

      (B) the report extensively documented across-the-board human rights abuses that include cases of torture, missing people, religious persecution, violations of civil and political rights and violations of economic and social rights;

      (C) the United Nations received 137 complaints of ‘torture, cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment’;

      (D) among the abuses reported to the United Nations were sensory deprivation, immersion in a pit latrine, mock executions, overcrowding in special cells, deafening loudspeakers, keeping prisoners naked in front of relatives, and forcing a prisoner about to be executed to carry his own coffin or dig his own grave;

      (E) the United Nations commissioners also charged the Cuban regime with carrying out reprisals against Cuban citizens who offered testimony to the United Nations group, a clear violation of the Castro’s government’s promise not to harass those who complained about human rights;

      (F) at least 22 Cuban human rights activists who were arrested are currently serving prison sentences or being held without trial;

      (G) the Human Rights Commission approved a resolution on March 9, 1989, calling on the Cuban government to cooperate with the Secretary General of the United Nations in settling unresolved issues raised by the human rights study group;

      (H) since March 9, 1989, the United Nations has failed to take any substantive action to follow up on the March 9 resolution. The United Nations also has failed to intervene on behalf of those who are now imprisoned because of their attempts to testify before the United Nations human rights investigative group last fall.

    (2) STATEMENT OF POLICY- In the interest of promoting respect for human rights in Cuba, the Congress--

      (A) calls on the Secretary General of the United Nations to act upon the resolution approved by the Commission on Human Rights March 9, 1989, calling on the Secretary General to take appropriate follow up action on the Commission’s report;

      (B) calls on the Secretary General to specifically urge the Cuban government to release the 22 persons still being held in detention because of their human rights activities;

      (C) calls on the United States Ambassador to the United Nations to make known in the strongest terms the dissatisfaction of the United States with the failure by the United Nations to continue to act on its own resolution; and

      (D) calls on the Secretary of the United Nations to expand the United Nation’s investigation of Cuba to include an examination of labor rights in recognition of current Cuban law which prohibits the formation of independent unions and which has led to the imprisonment of those Cuban workers who have tried to organize themselves.

ASSISTANCE FOR POLAND AND HUNGARY

    SEC. 599C. (a) In addition to amounts appropriated under the heading ‘Trade and Development Program’, there is hereby appropriated $2,000,000, to remain available until expended, to carry out the provisions of section 661 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, notwithstanding any other provision of law.

    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, any funds made available by this Act for a specific activity for Poland or Hungary instead may be obligated for Poland or Hungary for an activity with a similar purpose. The authority of section 515 of this Act may also be used to deobligate such funds and reobligate them for Poland or Hungary for an activity with a similar purpose: Provided, That the authority of this subsection shall be exercised subject to the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

    (c) Funds made available by this Act and obligated for the Government of Poland shall not be expended if the President of Poland, or any other Polish official, initiates martial law without the consent of the Polish Senate and Sejm, or if members of the Polish Senate or the Sejm are removed from office or are arrested through extra-constitutional processes: Provided, That, notwithstanding the restriction on expenditures contained in this subsection, the President of the United States may continue to expend funds made available to Poland if he determines and certifies to Congress that it is in the foreign policy interest of the United States to do so.

ESTABLISHING CATEGORIES OF ALIENS FOR PURPOSES OF REFUGEE DETERMINATIONS

    SEC. 599D. (a) IN GENERAL- In the case of an alien who is within a category of aliens established under subsection (b), the alien may establish, for purposes of admission as a refugee under section 207 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, that the alien has a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion by asserting such a fear and asserting a credible basis for concern about the possibility of such persecution.

    (b) ESTABLISHMENT OF CATEGORIES-

      (1) For purposes of subsection (a), the Attorney General, in consultation with the Secretary of State and the Coordinator for Refugee Affairs, shall establish--

        (A) one or more categories of aliens who are or were nationals and residents of the Soviet Union and who share common characteristics that identify them as targets of persecution in the Soviet Union on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion, and

        (B) one or more categories of aliens who are or were nationals and residents of Vietnam, Laos, or Cambodia and who share common characteristics that identify them as targets of persecution in such respective foreign state on such an account.

      (2)(A) Aliens who are (or were) nationals and residents of the Soviet Union and who are Jews or Evangelical Christians shall be deemed a category of alien established under paragraph (1)(A).

      (B) Aliens who are (or were) nationals of the Soviet Union and who are current members of, and demonstrate public, active, and continuous participation (or attempted participation) in the religious activities of, the Ukrainian Catholic Church or the Ukrainian Orthodox Church, shall be deemed a category of alien established under paragraph (1)(A).

      (C) Aliens who are (or were) nationals and residents of Vietnam, Laos, or Cambodia and who are members of categories of individuals determined, by the Attorney General in accordance with ‘Immigration and Naturalization Service Worldwide Guidelines for Overseas Refugee Processing’ (issued by the Immigration and Naturalization Service in August 1983) shall be deemed a category of alien established under paragraph (1)(B).

      (3) Within the number of admissions of refugees allocated for fiscal year 1990 for refugees who are nationals of the Soviet Union under section 207(a)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President shall allocate one thousand of such admissions for such fiscal year to refugees who are within the category of aliens described in paragraph (2)(B).

    (c) WRITTEN REASONS FOR DENIALS OF REFUGEE STATUS- Each decision to deny an application for refugee status of an alien who is within a category established under this section shall be in writing and shall state, to the maximum extent feasible, the reason for the denial.

    (d) PERMITTING CERTAIN ALIENS WITHIN CATEGORIES TO REAPPLY FOR REFUGEE STATUS- Each alien who is within a category established under this section and who (after August 14, 1988, and before the date of the enactment of this Act) was denied refugee status shall be permitted to reapply for such status. Such an application shall be determined taking into account the application of this section.

    (e) PERIOD OF APPLICATION-

      (1) Subsections (a) and (b) shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and shall only apply to applications for refugee status submitted before October 1, 1990.

      (2) Subsection (c) shall apply to decisions made after the date of the enactment of this Act and before October 1, 1990.

      (3) Subsection (d) shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act and shall only apply to reapplications for refugee status submitted before October 1, 1990.

    (f) GAO REPORTS ON SOVIET REFUGEE PROCESSING-

      (1) The Comptroller General shall submit to the Committees on the Judiciary of the Senate and of the House of Representatives reports on the implementation of this section in Italy and the Soviet Union. Such reports shall include a review of--

        (A) the timeliness and length of individual interviews,

        (B) the adequacy of staffing and funding by the Department of State, the Immigration and Naturalization Service, and voluntary agencies, including the adequacy of staffing, computerization, and administration of the processing center in Washington,

        (C) the sufficiency of the proposed Soviet refugee processing system within the United States,

        (D) backlogs (if any) by ethnic or religious groups and the reasons any such backlogs exist,

        (E) the sufficiency of the means of distributing and receiving applications for refugee status in Moscow,

        (F) to the extent possible, a comparison of the cost of conducting refugee processing only in Moscow and such cost of processing in both Moscow and in Italy, and

        (G) an evaluation of efforts to phase out Soviet refugee processing in Italy.

      (2) The Comptroller shall submit a preliminary report under paragraph (1) by December 31, 1989, and a final report by March 31, 1990. The final report shall include any recommendations which the Comptroller General may have regarding the need, if any, to revise or extend the application of this section.

ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS FOR CERTAIN SOVIET AND INDOCHINESE PAROLEES

    SEC. 599E. (a) IN GENERAL- The Attorney General shall adjust the status of an alien described in subsection (b) to that of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if the alien--

      (1) applies for such adjustment,

      (2) has been physically present in the United States for at least 1 year and is physically present in the United States on the date the application for such adjustment is filed,

      (3) is admissible to the United States as an immigrant, except as provided in subsection (c), and

      (4) pays a fee (determined by the Attorney General) for the processing of such application.

    (b) ALIENS ELIGIBLE FOR ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS- The benefits provided in subsection (a) shall only apply to an alien who--

      (1) was a national of the Soviet Union, Vietnam, Laos, or Cambodia, and

      (2) was inspected and granted parole into the United States during the period beginning on August 15, 1988, and ending on September 30, 1990, after being denied refugee status.

    (c) WAIVER OF CERTAIN GROUNDS FOR INADMISSIBILITY- The provisions of paragraphs (14), (15), (20), (21), (25), (28) (other than subparagraph (F)), and (32) of section 212(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act shall not apply to adjustment of status under this section and the Attorney General may waive any other provision of such section (other than paragraph (23)(B), (27), (29), or (33)) with respect to such an adjustment for humanitarian purposes, to assure family unity, or when it is otherwise in the public interest.

    (d) DATE OF APPROVAL- Upon the approval of such an application for adjustment of status, the Attorney General shall create a record of the alien’s admission as a lawful permanent resident as of the date of the alien’s inspection and parole described in subsection (b)(2).

    (e) NO OFFSET IN NUMBER OF VISAS AVAILABLE- When an alien is granted the status of having been lawfully admitted for permanent residence under this section, the Secretary of State shall not be required to reduce the number of immigrant visas authorized to be issued under the Immigration and Nationality Act.

REPEAL OF PROVISION

    SEC. 599F. (a) The following provision under the heading ‘Salaries and Expenses, General Legal Activities’, contained in the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1990 (H.R. 2991), as enacted into law, is hereby repealed: ‘: Provided further, That for fiscal year 1990 and hereafter the Attorney General may establish and collect fees to cover the cost of identifying, copying and distributing copies of tax decisions rendered by the Federal Judiciary and that any such fees shall be credited to this appropriation notwithstanding the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3302’.

    (b) The provisions of subsection (a) shall take effect upon the date of the enactment into law of the Department of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1990 (H.R. 2991).

CONDITIONAL ASSISTANCE FOR EL SALVADOR FOR POLICE TRAINING

    SEC. 599G. (a) CONDITIONAL ASSISTANCE- In order to promote the professional development of the security forces of El Salvador and to encourage the separation of the law enforcement forces from the armed forces of El Salvador, funds made available under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 which are allocated to El Salvador may, notwithstanding section 660 of that Act, be provided to El Salvador for fiscal year 1990 for purposes otherwise prohibited by section 660 of the Act, if the following conditions are met:

      (1) The training provided with such assistance is provided by United States civilian law enforcement personnel.

      (2)(A) The assistance is to be used for the purposes of professional development and training of the security forces of El Salvador in such areas as human rights, civil law, investigative and civilian law enforcement techniques, and urban law enforcement training.

      (B) Any such assistance that is made available for equipment for these forces is intended to be used for the purchase of equipment such as communication devices, transportation equipment, forensic equipment, and personal protection gear. No such assistance may be used for the purchase of any lethal equipment, except for small arms ammunition and rifle ammunition solely for training purposes.

      (3) At least thirty days before obligating such assistance, the President certifies to the Committee of Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Committee of Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate that the Government of El Salvador has made significant progress during the preceding 6 months in eliminating any human rights violations, including torture, incommunicado detention, detention of persons solely for their political views, or prolonged detention without trial. Any such certification shall include a full description of the assistance which is proposed to be provided and of the purposes to which it is to be directed. Any such certification shall also include a report on the status of all investigative action and prosecutions with respect to those responsible for the 1980 murders of Archbishop Oscar Romero and the four American churchwomen, the recent murder of Ana Casanova, the recent bombings of the headquarters of the FENASTRAS union and the office of COMADRES, a human rights organization, and the recent murder of six Jesuit priests and their associates.

      (4) REPROGRAMMING- Funds made available under this subsection shall be subject to the regular reprogramming procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

    (b) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘civilian law enforcement personnel’ means individuals who are not members of the United States Armed Forces.

    (c) Not more than $5,000,000 shall be made available in fiscal year 1990 to carry out the provisions of this section. Not less than $7,000,000 of the funds made available to carry out the provisions of chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for fiscal year 1990 shall be made available for the purposes of subsection 534(b)(3) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.

CROPS IN PERU, BOLIVIA AND JAMAICA

    SEC. 599H. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President may provide assistance under chapter 1 of part I or chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for Peru, Bolivia and Jamaica to promote the production, processing, or marketing of all crops which can be economically grown in areas of those countries which currently produce crops from which narcotic and psychotropic drugs are derived.

LAND REFORM IN EL SALVADOR

    SEC. 599I. (a) It is the sense of the Congress that the success and continuation of land reform in El Salvador is vital to United States policy and to political stability, economic development and maintenance of democratic institutions in that country.

    (b) Therefore, when allocating Economic Support Funds to El Salvador, the President shall take into consideration progress in the Salvadoran Land Reform Program.

TITLE VI--FUNDING ADJUSTMENTS

REDUCTION OF APPROPRIATIONS

    SEC. 601. Each appropriation item, direct loan obligation limit, loan guarantee commitment limit, or obligation limit provided by this Act shall be reduced by 0.43 per centum: Provided, That such reduction shall be applied proportionally to each program, project, and activity as set forth in section 543 of this Act: Provided further, That programs and activities exempt from sequestration under section 255 of the Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be exempt from the uniform reduction required by this paragraph.

COUNTER-NARCOTICS PROGRAMS

    SEC. 602. For expenses necessary to enable the President to carry out the provisions of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and the Arms Export Control Act, $125,000,000, which shall be made available only for counter-narcotics programs: Provided, That none of the funds appropriated under this heading shall be made available except as provided through the regular notification procedures of the Committees on Appropriations.

    This Act may be cited as the ‘Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990’.

Speaker of the House of Representatives,

Vice President of the United States and

President of the Senate.