H.R. 5194 (102nd): Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs Act

Introduced:
May 18, 1992 (102nd Congress, 1991–1992)
Status:
Signed by the President
Slip Law:
This bill became Pub.L. 102-586.
Sponsor
Matthew Martínez
Representative for California's 30th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Text
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Last Updated
Nov 04, 1992
Length
Related Bills
H.Res. 594 (Related)
Relating to the consideration of the Senate amendment to H.R. 5194.

Agreed To (Simple Resolution)
Oct 02, 1992

S. 2792 (Included-In)
A bill to amend and authorize appropriations for the continued implementation of the Juvenile ...

Reported by Committee
Last Action: Jul 30, 1992

 
Status

This bill was enacted after being signed by the President on November 4, 1992.

Progress
Introduced May 18, 1992
Referred to Committee May 18, 1992
Reported by Committee May 20, 1992
Passed House Aug 03, 1992
Passed Senate with Changes Sep 25, 1992
Signed by the President Nov 04, 1992
 
Full Title

To amend the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1993, 1994, 1995, and 1996, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
6 cosponsors (3D, 3R) (show)
Committees

House Education and the Workforce

Senate Judiciary

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


10/2/1992--House agreed to Senate amendment with amendment.
Amends the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 (the Act) to:
(1) make findings, including that the incidence of juvenile delinquency can be reduced through public recreation programs and activities designed to provide youth with social skills, enhance self esteem, and encourage the constructive use of discretionary time; and
(2) include among the purposes of the Act the encouragement of parental involvement in treatment and alternative disposition programs, and the coordination of services between State, local, and community-based agencies, and the promotion of interagency cooperation in providing such services.
Provides that the Administrator of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) shall have the same reporting relationship with the Attorney General as the directors of other offices and bureaus within the Office of Justice Programs. Revises provisions regarding the rates of compensation for special personnel, experts, and consultants.
Directs the Administrator to:
(1) develop objectives, priorities, and a long-term plan, and implement overall policy and a strategy to carry out such plan (currently, implement overall policy and develop objectives and priorities) for Federal juvenile delinquency programs and activities;
(2) review the plan annually, revise it as the Administrator deems appropriate, and publish the plan in the Federal Register according to a specified timetable; and
(3) issue model standards, within a year, for providing health care to incarcerated juveniles.
Requires that such plan contain specific goals and criteria for making grants and contracts, conducting research, and carrying out other activities, and provide for coordinating the administration of programs and activities, including proposals for joint funding to be coordinated by the Administrator. Repeals provisions authorizing the Administrator to:
(1) transfer funds appropriated for Federal juvenile delinquency programs and activities to other Federal agencies under specified circumstances; and
(2) make grants and contracts to other agencies, institutions, and individuals.
Revises provisions regarding the composition of the Coordinating Council on Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention to:
(1) repeal the requirement that specified individuals, including the Director of the Office of Community Services, be on the Council; and
(2) include the Administrator of OJJDP, the Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization, such other officers of Federal agencies who hold significant decisionmaking authority as the President may designate, and individuals appointed to the Council from among nine appointees (practitioners in the juvenile justice field who are not Federal officers or employees).
Directs such appointees, in addition to performing their functions as members of the Council, to collectively:
(1) make recommendations regarding the development of the objectives, priorities, and long-term plan, and implementation of overall policy and strategy to carry out such plan; and
(2) report such recommendations to the Administrator and to the chairmen of specified congressional committees.
Requires the Administrator to include in his annual report a detailed summary and analysis addressing the educational status of juveniles, including information relating to learning disabilities, failing performance, grade retention, and dropping out of school.
Raises the allocation formula limits with respect to Federal assistance for State and local programs concerning juvenile delinquency and programs to improve the juvenile justice system, subject to certain requirements.
Makes a portion of a State's allotment available for one full-time staff position.
Limits the amount available for State plan development and other preaward activities associated with such State plan and for administration to ten (currently, seven and a half) percent of the total annual allotment of a State. Requires States to include part E challenge activities in the plans they submit to OJJDP in order to receive formula grants.
Revises provisions with respect to the composition and functions of the advisory group required under each State plan.
Specifies that such advisory group shall consist of not more than 33 members:
(1) who have training, experience, or special knowledge concerning the prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency or the administration of juvenile justice;
(2) including at least one locally elected official representing general purpose local government, representatives of law enforcement and juvenile agencies, public agencies concerned with delinquency prevention or treatment, private nonprofit organizations, volunteers who work with delinquents or potential delinquents, youth workers involved with programs that are alternatives to incarceration (including programs providing organized recreation activities), persons with special experience and competence in addressing problems related to school violence, vandalism, and alternatives to suspension and expulsion, and in addressing problems related to learning disabilities, emotional difficulties, child abuse and neglect, and youth violence;
(3) a majority of whom (including the chairperson) shall not be full-time employees of the Federal, State, or local government;
(4) at least one-fifth of whom shall be under age 24 at the time of appointment; and
(5) at least three of whom have been under the jurisdiction of the system at some time.
Sets forth additional requirements with respect to such advisory group.
Requires State plans to contain an analysis of and a plan for providing:
(1) gender-specific services for the prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency;
(2) services for the prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency in rural areas; and
(3) mental health services to juveniles in the juvenile justice system.
Earmarks funds for programs and services such as:
(1) community-based alternatives to incarceration and institutionalization, including specified programs and services for youth who can remain at home with assistance, need temporary placement, and need residential placement;
(2) community-based programs and services to work with parents and other family members to strengthen families, including parent self-help groups; with juveniles during their incarceration and their families; and with parents with limited English-speaking ability;
(3) educational programs or supportive services for delinquent or other juveniles, provided equitably regardless of sex, race, or family income, designed to encourage juveniles to remain in elementary and secondary schools or in alternative learning situations, and to enhance coordination with the local schools that such juveniles would otherwise attend;
(4) expanded use of home probation;
(5) youth-initiated outreach programs designed to assist youth (including youth with limited proficiency in English) who otherwise would not be reached by traditional youth assistance programs;
(6) programs and projects designed to provide for the treatment of youths' dependence on or abuse of alcohol or other drugs;
(7) programs for positive youth development that assist delinquent and other at-risk youth in obtaining a sense of safety and structure, of belonging, of self-worth, of independence and control over one's life, of closeness in interpersonal relationships, and of competence;
(8) programs designed to encourage courts to develop and implement a continuum of post-adjudication restraints that bridge the gap between traditional probation and confinement in a correctional setting, including expanded use of probation, restitution, community service, treatment, home detention, intensive supervision, electronic monitoring, boot camps and similar programs, and secure community-based treatment facilities linked to other support services; and to assist in the provision by the Administrator of information and technical assistance, including technology transfer, to States in the design and utilization of risk assessment mechanisms to aid juvenile justice personnel in determining appropriate sanctions for delinquent behavior;
(9) programs designed to prevent and reduce hate crimes committed by juveniles; and
(10) programs (including referral to literacy and social service programs) to assist families with limited English-speaking ability that include delinquent juveniles to overcome language and cultural barriers that may prevent the complete treatment of such juveniles and the preservation of their families.
Includes alien juveniles in custody in the group of status offenders to be removed from secure detention or correctional facilities.
Requires State plans to prohibit the detention or confinement of juveniles alleged or found to be delinquent and certain other youth in any institution in which they have contact with adults incarcerated because they have been convicted of a crime or are awaiting trial on criminal charges (currently, regular contact, and excludes the following), or with the part- or full-time security staff (including management) or direct-care staff of a jail or lockup for adults.
Extends through 1997 (currently, 1993) the requirement that the Administrator promulgate regulations which make exceptions to a prohibition against the detention or confinement of juveniles in any jail or lockup for adults with respect to the detention of juveniles accused of non-status offenses who are awaiting an initial court appearance pursuant to an enforceable State law requiring such appearances within 24 hours after being taken into custody, subject to specified exceptions.
Includes among such exceptions situations where conditions of:
(1) distance to be traveled or the lack of highway, road, or other ground transportation do not allow for court appearances within 24 hours, so that a brief delay (not to exceed 48 hours) is excusable; and
(2) safety exist (such as severely adverse weather conditions that do not allow for reasonably safe travel), in which case the time for an appearance may be delayed until 24 hours after the time that such conditions allow for reasonably safe travel.
Requires State plans to provide:
(1) assurance that youth in the system are treated equitably on the basis of gender, race, family income, and mentally, emotionally, or physically handicapping conditions;
(2) for family counseling during the incarceration of juvenile family members and coordination of family services when appropriate and feasible; and
(3) assurance that if the State receives Federal assistance for State and local juvenile justice programs for any fiscal year that exceeds 105 percent of that received by the State for such programs for FY 1992, all of such excess shall be expended through or for programs that are part of a comprehensive and coordinated community system of services.
Specifies that failure to achieve compliance with the requirement that State plans provide that juveniles who are charged with or who have committed offenses that would not be criminal if committed by an adult or offenses which do not constitute violations of valid court orders, or such nonoffenders as dependent or neglected children, not be placed in secure detention or correctional facilities, within the three-year time limitation, shall terminate a State's eligibility for juvenile justice funding for a fiscal year beginning before January 1, 1993, unless the Administrator determines that the State is in substantial compliance (through deinstitutionalization of not less than 75 percent of such juveniles or through removal of 100 percent of such juveniles from secure correctional facilities) and has made, through appropriate executive or legislative action, an unequivocal commitment to achieving full compliance within a reasonable time not exceeding two additional years.
Provides for the reduction of funds by 25 percent for each paragraph with respect to which noncompliance with requirements of the Act occurs.
Revises provisions with regard to ineligibility of such States to receive allotments.
Directs that a provision regarding the termination of a State's eligibility for funding for noncompliance remain in effect to the extent that it provides the Administrator authority to grant a waiver with respect to a fiscal year prior to 1993.
Includes among the purposes of the National Institute for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention to provide appropriate training for recreation and park personnel, prosecutors, and defense attorneys.
Revises provisions regarding compensation of consultants and members of technical advisory councils who are not in the regular full-time employ of the United States. Authorizes the Administrator to:
(1) establish or expand programs designed to encourage courts to develop and implement a continuum of post-adjudication restraints that bridge the gap between traditional probation and confinement in a correctional setting, and to assist in the provision by the Administrator of information and technical assistance, including technology transfer, to States in the design and utilization of risk assessment mechanisms to aid juvenile justice personnel in determining appropriate sanctions for delinquent behavior;
(2) encourage the development of programs which, in addition to helping youth take responsibility for their behavior, take into consideration life experiences which may have contributed to their delinquency when developing intervention and treatment programs;
(3) encourage the development and establishment of programs to enhance the States' ability to identify chronic serious and violent juvenile offenders;
(3) support independent and collaborative research, research training, and consultation on social, psychological, educational, economic, and legal issues affecting children and families;
(4) support research related to achieving a better understanding of the commission of hate crimes by juveniles and designed to identify educational programs best suited to prevent and reduce the incidence of hate crimes committed by juveniles;
(5) routinely collect, analyze, compile, publish, and disseminate uniform national statistics concerning: all aspects of juveniles as victims and offenders; the processing and treatment in the juvenile justice system of juveniles who are status offenders, delinquent, neglected, or abused; and the processing and treatment of such juveniles who are treated as adults for purposes of the criminal justice system; and
(6) provide technical assistance and training to assist States and units of general local government to adopt model standards for providing health care to incarcerated juveniles.
Directs the Administrator to make available to the public the results of specified evaluations, research, and demonstration activities, and data and studies, referred to in the Act. Modifies provisions regarding:
(1) the establishment of a training program with respect to the prevention and treatment of juvenile delinquency to include methods and techniques specifically designed to prevent and reduce the incidence of hate crimes committed by juveniles; and
(2) curricula for such program to include training designed to prevent juveniles from committing hate crimes.
Directs the Comptroller General, not later than one year after enactment of this Act, to conduct studies with respect to:
(1) juveniles waived to adult court;
(2) admissions of juveniles for behavior disorders to private psychiatric hospitals and to other residential and nonresidential programs that serve such juveniles;
(3) gender bias within State juvenile justice systems;
(4) the Native American pass-through grant program that reviews the cost-effectiveness of the funding formula utilized; and
(5) access to counsel in juvenile court proceedings.
Directs the Administrator to study:
(1) the incidence of violence committed by or against juveniles in urban and rural areas of the United States; and
(2) the characteristics of juveniles who commit hate crimes.
Sets forth reporting requirements.
Includes:
(1) home-based treatment programs among the community-based alternatives to traditional forms of institutionalization of juvenile offenders to be established or maintained by the Administrator; and
(2) self-help programs for parents, and programs that work with families during the incarceration of juvenile family members and which take into consideration the special needs of families with limited-English speaking ability, among special emphasis prevention and treatment programs related to juveniles who commit serious crimes to be established or implemented by the Administrator. Directs the Administrator to address efforts to reduce the proportion of juveniles detained or confined who are members of minority groups if such proportion exceeds the proportion such groups represent in the general population (as under current law) that target juveniles who have had, or are likely to have, contact with the juvenile justice system.
Requires the Administrator to provide for the establishment or support of:
(1) programs and services that encourage the improvement of due process available to juveniles in the system and the quality of legal representation for such juveniles;
(2) programs stressing advocacy activities aimed at improving services to juveniles affected by the juvenile justice system, including services that provide for the appointment of special advocates by courts for such juveniles; and
(3) programs designed to prevent and reduce the incidence of hate crimes by juveniles.
Authorizes the Administrator to develop new approaches to develop and implement on-the-job training programs to assist community service personnel to more effectively recognize and provide for learning disabled and other handicapped juveniles.
Prohibits the Administrator from making grants or contracts pursuant to Special Emphasis Prevention and Treatment Programs under the Act to the Department of Justice (DOJ) or to any administrative unit or other entity that is part of DOJ. Specifies that the competitive process regarding consideration of grant applications shall not be required if the Administrator makes a written determination waiving the competitive process for programs to be carried out in areas with respect to which the President declares under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act that a major disaster or emergency exists, or for particular programs that are uniquely qualified (but repeals other exceptions, and reporting requirements related to such exceptions, to the competitive process).
Directs the Administrator to make grants to, or enter into contracts with, public and private nonprofit agencies, organizations, and institutions to establish and support programs and activities that involve families and communities and that are designed to:
(1) prevent and reduce juvenile participation in the activities of gangs that commit crimes;
(2) develop within the juvenile adjudicatory and correctional systems new and innovative means to address the problems of juveniles convicted of serious drug- and gang-related offenses;
(3) target elementary school students to steer them away from gang involvement;
(4) provide treatment to juveniles who are members of such gangs;
(5) promote the involvement of juveniles in lawful activities in geographical areas in which gangs commit crimes;
(6) promote and support the development of policies and activities in public elementary and secondary schools which will assist such schools in maintaining a safe environment conducive to learning;
(7) assist juveniles who are or may become gang members to obtain appropriate educational instruction, in or outside a regular school program, including counseling and other services to promote and support their continued participation in such instructional programs;
(8) expand the availability of prevention and treatment services relating to the illegal use of controlled substances and controlled substances analogues by juveniles;
(9) provide services to prevent juveniles from coming into contact with the juvenile justice system again as a result of gang-related activity;
(10) provide services authorized at a special location in a school or housing project; and
(11) support activities to inform juveniles of the availability of treatment and services for which financial assistance is available.
Authorizes the Administrator, from not more than 15 percent of the amount appropriated to carry out such provisions in each fiscal year, to make grants to and enter into contracts with public agencies and private nonprofit agencies, organizations, and institutions to:
(1) conduct research on issues related to juvenile gangs;
(2) evaluate the effectiveness of specified programs and activities funded under the Act; and
(3) increase the knowledge of the public (including public and private agencies that operate, or desire to operate, gang prevention and intervention programs) by disseminating information on research and on effective programs and activities funded under the Act. Sets forth provisions regarding:
(1) grant applications; and
(2) criteria for approval.
Directs the Administrator to make grants to, or enter into contracts with, public and private nonprofit agencies, organization, and institutions to carry out programs and activities to:
(1) reduce the participation of juveniles in illegal gang activities;
(2) develop regional task forces involving State, local, and community-based organizations to coordinate enforcement, intervention, and treatment efforts for juvenile gang members and to curtail interstate gang activities;
(3) facilitate coordination and cooperation among local education, juvenile justice, employment, and social service agencies, and community-based programs with a proven record of effectively providing intervention services to juvenile gang members to reduce juvenile participation in illegal gang activities; and
(4) support programs designed to encourage courts to develop and implement a continuum of post-adjudication restraints that bridge the gap between traditional probation and confinement in a correctional setting, and assist in the provision by the Administrator of information and technical assistance to States in the design and utilization of risk assessment mechanisms to aid juvenile justice personnel in determining appropriate sanctions for delinquent behavior.
Sets forth provisions regarding:
(1) application requirements; and
(2) criteria for approval.
Authorizes the Administrator to make grants, in the amount of ten percent of the amount of the State allocation, for challenge activities in which the State participates.
Defines "challenge activity" as a program maintained for one of specified purposes, such as:
(1) developing and adopting policies and programs to provide: basic health and appropriate education services for youth in the system as specified in standards developed by the National Advisory Committee for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention prior to October 12, 1984; access to counsel for all juveniles in the justice system to ensure that juveniles consult with counsel before waiving the right to counsel; and secure settings for the placement of violent juvenile offenders with capacities of no more than 50 youth with ratios of staff to youth great enough to ensure adequate supervision and treatment;
(2) increasing community-based alternatives to incarceration by establishing programs (such as expanded use of probation, restitution, community service, treatment, home detention, intensive supervision, and electronic monitoring) and developing and adopting objective criteria for the appropriate placement of juveniles in detention and secure confinement;
(3) developing and adopting policies to prohibit gender bias in placement and treatment, and establishing programs to ensure that female youth have access to the full range of health and mental health services, treatment for physical or sexual assault and abuse, self defense instruction, education in parenting, education in general, and other training and vocational services;
(4) establishing and operating a State ombudsman office for children, youth, and families to investigate and resolve complaints relating to action, inaction, or decisions of providers of out-of-home care to children and youth that may adversely affect the health, safety, welfare, or rights of resident children and youth;
(5) developing and adopting policies and programs designed to remove, where appropriate, status offenders from the jurisdiction of the juvenile court;
(6) developing and adopting policies and programs designed to serve as alternatives to suspension and expulsion from school;
(7) increasing aftercare services for juveniles involved in the justice system; and
(8) developing and adopting policies to establish a State administrative structure to coordinate program and fiscal policies for children who have emotional and behavioral problems and their families among the major child serving systems and a statewide case review system.
Directs the Administrator to make grants to public and nonprofit private organizations to develop, establish, and support projects that:
(1) provide treatment to juvenile offenders who are victims of child abuse or neglect and to their families so as to reduce the likelihood that the juvenile offenders will commit subsequent violations of law;
(2) based on the best interests of juvenile offenders who receive treatment for child abuse or neglect, provide transitional services (including individual, group, and family counseling) to juvenile offenders to strengthen the relationships of such offenders with their families and encourage the resolution of intrafamily problems related to the abuse or neglect, facilitate their alternative placement, prepare juveniles aged 16 and older to live independently, and carry out research (including surveys of existing transitional services, identification of exemplary treatment modalities, and evaluation of treatment and transitional services).
Establishes grant priorities.
Requires the Administrator to establish and support programs and activities for the purpose of implementing mentoring programs:
(1) designed to link at-risk children, particularly children living in high crime areas and children experiencing educational failure, with responsible adults; and
(2) intended to achieve one or more of the following goals with respect to at-risk youth: provide general guidance; promote personal and social responsibility; increase participation in, and enhance their ability to benefit from, elementary and secondary education; discourage use of illegal drugs, violence, and dangerous weapons, and other criminal activity; discourage involvement in gangs; and encourage participation in community service and community activities.
Directs the Administrator to develop and distribute to program participants specific model guidelines for the screening of prospective program mentors.
Sets forth:
(1) permitted and prohibited uses of grant awards;
(2) priorities in awarding grants;
(3) application requirements; and
(4) reporting requirements.
Authorizes the Administrator to make grants to the appropriate agencies of one or more States for the purpose of establishing up to ten military-style boot camps (camps) for juvenile delinquents.
Directs that such camps be located on existing or closed military installations on sites to be chosen by the agencies in one or more States, or in other facilities designated by the agencies on such sites.
Requires the Administrator to try to achieve, to the extent possible, equitable geographic distribution in approving camp sites and give priority to grants where more than one State enters into formal cooperative arrangements to jointly administer a camp.
Specifies that such camps shall provide:
(1) a highly regimented schedule of strict discipline, physical training, work, drill, and ceremony characteristic of military basic training;
(2) regular, remedial, special, and vocational education; and
(3) counseling and treatment for substance abuse and other health and mental health problems.
Directs that each camp be designed to accommodate between 150 and 250 juveniles for such time as the grant recipient agency deems appropriate.
Sets forth additional requirements regarding:
(1) eligibility;
(2) placement; and
(3) post-release supervision.
Authorizes the President to call and conduct a National White House Conference on Juvenile Justice to:
(1) increase public awareness of the problems of juvenile offenders and the juvenile justice system;
(2) examine the status of minors currently in the juvenile and adult justice systems;
(3) examine the increasing number of violent crimes committed by juveniles;
(4) examine the growing phenomenon of youth gangs, including the number of young women involved;
(5) assemble persons involved in policies and programs related to juvenile delinquency prevention and juvenile justice enforcement;
(6) examine the need for improving services for girls in the juvenile justice system;
(7) create a forum in which persons and organizations from diverse regions may share information regarding successes and failures of policy in their juvenile justice and juvenile delinquency prevention programs; and
(8) develop such specific and comprehensive recommendations for executive and legislative action as appropriate to address the problems of juvenile delinquency and juvenile justice.
Authorizes the President to appoint and compensate an Executive Director of the National White House Conference on Juvenile Justice and such other directors and personnel for the Conference as the President deems advisable, subject to specified requirements.
Specifies the duties of the Executive Director. Sets forth provisions regarding:
(1) schedule of conferences;
(2) prior State and regional conferences;
(3) selection of delegates;
(4) participant expenses;
(5) fees;
(6) detailees;
(7) planning and administration of the Conference; and
(8) reporting and oversight requirements.
Repeals provisions of the Crime Control Act of 1990 regarding grants for the treatment of juvenile offenders who are victims of child abuse or neglect, effective September 30, 1993.
Authorizes appropriations.
Amends the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act to:
(1) direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to make grants to public and private entities to establish and operate local runaway and homeless youth centers to provide services to deal primarily with the immediate needs of runaway or otherwise homeless youth and their families, in a manner which is outside the law enforcement, child welfare, mental health, and juvenile justice systems (currently, law enforcement structure and juvenile justice system); and
(2) increase allocations to States and territories.
Amends the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of 1974 to:
(1) revise findings with respect to runaway and homeless youth;
(2) repeal a provision authorizing the Secretary to provide on-the-job training to local runaway and homeless youth center and other personnel in recognizing and providing for learning disabled and other handicapped juveniles;
(3) authorize the Secretary to make grants to establish and operate street-based service projects for runaway and homeless youth, and home-based service projects for families that are separated or at risk of separation as a result of the physical absence of a runaway youth or youth at risk of family separation, subject to specified appropriations.
Modifies eligibility requirements with respect to grants under the Runaway and Homeless Youth Grant Program. Includes among such requirements that an applicant propose to establish, strengthen, or fund a locally controlled project, including a host family home (currently, a locally controlled facility), providing temporary shelter.
Requires that, to qualify for such assistance, the applicant submit a plan to the Secretary including specified assurances, such as that the applicant shall:
(1) use such assistance to establish, strengthen, or fund a runaway and homeless youth center, or a locally controlled facility providing temporary shelter, that has a maximum capacity of not more than 20 youth and a ratio of staff to youth that is sufficient to ensure adequate supervision and treatment;
(2) develop an adequate plan for ensuring proper relations with law enforcement, health, mental health, social service, school system, and welfare personnel; coordination with personnel of the schools to which runaway and homeless youth will return, to assist such youth to stay current with the curricula of those schools; and the return of runaway and homeless youth from correctional institutions; and
(3) develop an adequate plan for establishing or coordinating with outreach programs designed to attract persons (including, where applicable, persons who are members of a cultural minority and persons with limited ability to speak English) who are eligible to receive services for which a grant may be expended.
Sets forth requirements with respect to eligibility for assistance to fund:
(1) street-based service projects for runaway and homeless youth; and
(2) home-based service projects for runaway youth or youth at risk of family separation.
Gives priority to grants smaller than $200,000 (currently, $150,000) for runaway and homeless youth centers.
Requires applicants, to be eligible for transitional living grant assistance, to submit to the Secretary a plan in which such applicant agrees, as part of such project:
(1) to provide services including training in money management, budgeting, consumer education, and use of credit to homeless youth; and
(2) not to disclose records maintained on individual homeless youth without the informed consent of the individual youth (currently, and parent or legal guardian) to anyone other than an agency compiling statistical records (currently, or a government agency involved in the disposition of criminal charges against youth).
Directs the Secretary to make grants for a national communication system to assist runaway and homeless youth in communicating with their families and with service providers, giving priority to grant applicants that have experience in providing telephone services to runaway and homeless youth.
Authorizes the Secretary to make grants:
(1) to statewide and regional nonprofit organizations to provide technical assistance and training to eligible public and private entities;
(2) to States, localities, and private entities to carry out research, demonstration, and service projects designed to increase knowledge concerning, and improve services for, runaway and homeless youth (and sets criteria in selecting among applications); and
(3) on a competitive basis to States, localities, and private and homeless youth in rural areas.
Revises reporting requirements to require the Secretary to report to specified congressional committees on the status, activities, and accomplishments of the runaway and homeless youth centers funded under the Act. Authorizes appropriations.
Sets forth priorities in the use of appropriated funds.
Authorizes appropriations for grants relating to locating missing children.
Creates a new title V of the Act, which may be cited as the Incentive Grants for Local Delinquency Prevention Programs Act. Sets forth provisions regarding the duties and functions of the Administrator. Authorizes the Administrator to make grants to a State for delinquency prevention programs and activities for youth who have had, or who are likely to have, contact with the system, including the provision to children, youth, and families of recreation services, tutoring and remedial education, assistance in the development of work awareness skills, child and adolescent health and mental health services, alcohol and substance abuse prevention services, leadership development activities, and the teaching that people are and should be held accountable for their actions.
Sets forth requirements with respect to:
(1) eligibility requirements; and
(2) priorities in considering grant applications.
Authorizes appropriations.
Directs the General Accounting Office, after such program has been funded for two years, to prepare and submit to the Congress a study of the effects of the program in encouraging States and units of general local government to comply with requirements of the Act. Amends the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990 to include the following findings:
(1) traditionally, community agencies and professionals have different roles in the prevention, investigation, and intervention process; and
(2) there is a national need to enhance coordination among community agencies and professionals involved in the intervention system.
Directs the Administrator of OJJDP to establish a children's advocacy program to:
(1) focus attention on child victims;
(2) provide support for nonoffending family members;
(3) enhance coordination among community agencies and professionals; and
(4) train physicians and other health care and mental health care professionals in a multidisciplinary approach to child abuse.
Requires the Administrator, for the purpose of enabling grant recipients to provide information, services, and technical assistance to aid communities in establishing multidisciplinary programs that respond to child abuse, to:
(1) establish regional children's advocacy program centers;
(2) fund existing regional centers with expertise in the prevention, judicial handling, and treatment of child abuse and neglect; and
(3) fund the establishment of freestanding facilities in multidisciplinary programs within communities that have yet to establish such facilities.
Sets forth provisions regarding:
(1) requirements for grant recipients;
(2) operation of the regional children's advocacy program; and
(3) monitoring and evaluation of the activities of grant recipients.
Sets forth reporting requirements.
Requires the Administrator and the Director of the National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect to establish a children's advocacy advisory board to review the solicitation and selection of children's advocacy program proposals and make recommendations, and to review the program activities and management plan of each grant recipient and report its findings and recommendations to the Administrator and the Director. Sets forth additional reporting requirements.
Directs the Administrator (currently, the Director of the Office of Victims of Crime) to make grants to develop and implement multidisciplinary child abuse investigation and prosecution programs, to make grants to national organizations to provide technical assistance and training to attorneys and others instrumental to the criminal prosecution of child abuse cases in State or Federal courts, and to establish criteria for evaluating grant applications.
Requires a grant recipient to consult from time to time with regional children's advocacy centers in its census region that are grant recipients.
Authorizes appropriations.
Amends the Head Start Act to authorize the Secretary of HHS to provide training for specialized or other personnel needed in connection with Head Start programs (as under current law), including funds from programs authorized under such Act to support an organization to administer a centralized child development and national assessment program leading to recognized credentials for personnel working in early childhood development and child care programs, training for personnel providing services to non-English language background children, training for personnel in helping children cope with community violence, and resource access projects for personnel working with disabled children (currently, including a centralized child development training and national assessment program which may be administered at the State or local level leading to recognized credentials for such personnel, training for personnel providing services to non-English language background children, and resource access projects for personnel of handicapped children).
Directs the Secretary to:
(1) develop a systematic approach to training Head Start personnel, including specific goals and objectives for program improvement and continuing professional development, a process for continuing input from the Head Start community, and a strategy for delivering training and technical assistance; and
(2) report on the approach developed to specified congressional committees.
Authorizes the Secretary to provide training for Head Start personnel in the use of the performing and visual arts and interactive programs using electronic media to enhance the learning experience of Head Start children.
Amends the Child Care and Development Block Grant Act Amendments of 1992 to provide that payments to a State from its allotment under such Act for any fiscal year may be expended by the State in that fiscal year or in the succeeding three fiscal years (under current law, such payments may be obligated by the State in that fiscal year or in the succeeding fiscal year).
Excludes the value of child care provided or arranged (or any amount received as payment, or reimbursement for costs incurred, for such care) pursuant to the Child Care and Development Block Grant Program from income for purposes of any Federal or federally-assisted program that bases eligibility, or the amount of benefits, on need.
Amends the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to provide for:
(1) methods to preserve the confidentiality of all records in order to protect the rights of the child and of the child's parents or guardians (as under current law, which excludes all that follows), including methods to ensure that disclosure (and redisclosure) of information concerning child abuse or neglect involving specific individuals is made only to persons or entities that the State determines have a need for such information directly related to purposes of such Act; and
(2) requirements for the prompt disclosure of all relevant information to any Federal, State, or local governmental entity, or any agent of such entity, with a need for such information in order to carry out its responsibilities under law to protect children from abuse and neglect.
Expresses the sense of the Congress that each State should review and reform the system in the State for protecting against child abuse and neglect, including implementing formal interagency, multidisciplinary teams to:
(1) review all cases of child death in which the child was previously known by the State to have been abused or neglected and incidents of child abuse before a child dies when there is evidence of negligent handling by the State, in order to hold the State accountable; and
(2) make recommendations regarding the outcomes of individual cases and systematic changes in the State's procedures for protecting against child abuse and neglect.

House Republican Conference Summary

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House Democratic Caucus Summary

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