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S. 474 (102nd): Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act

The Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act of 1992 (Pub.L. 102–559), also known as PASPA or the Bradley Act, is a judicially overturned law that was meant to define the legal status of sports betting throughout the United States. This act effectively outlawed sports betting nationwide, excluding a few states.

The sports lotteries conducted in Oregon, Delaware, and Montana were exempt, as well as the licensed sports pools in Nevada. In addition, Congress provided a one-year window of opportunity from the effective date of PASPA (January 1, 1993) for states which operated licensed casino gaming for the previous ten-year period to pass laws permitting sports wagering. The latter exception was clearly crafted with New Jersey in mind. However, New Jersey failed to take advantage of this opportunity. Excluded from the reach of PASPA are jai alai, as well as parimutuel horse and dog racing.

In a May 2018 decision in Murphy v. National Collegiate Athletic Association, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that PASPA conflicts with the Tenth Amendment.

This summary is from Wikipedia.

Last updated Oct 11, 2018. Source: Wikipedia

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


10/6/1992--Passed House amended. Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act - Makes it unlawful for a governmental entity, or a person acting pursuant to the law or compact of such an entity, to operate, sponsor, advertise, promote, license, or authorize a lottery, sweepstakes, or other betting, gambling, or wagering scheme based, directly or indirectly, on one or more competitive games in which amateur or professional athletes participate, or intend to participate, or on one or more performances of such athletes in such games. Authorizes the commencement of a civil action in district court to enjoin violations committed under this Act. Sets forth specified exceptions to such prohibitions.