< Back to H.Con.Res. 150 (103rd Congress, 1993–1994)

Text of Expressing the sense of the Congress that the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, should posthumously advance ...

...should posthumously advance Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel to the grade of admiral on the retired list of the Navy and Major Genera

This resolution was introduced on September 22, 1993, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Sep 22, 1993 (Introduced).

Source: GPO

HCON 150 IH

103d CONGRESS

1st Session

H. CON. RES. 150

Expressing the sense of the Congress that the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, should posthumously advance Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel to the grade of admiral on the retired list of the Navy and Major General Walter C. Short to the grade of lieutenant general on the retired list of the Army.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

September 22, 1993

Mrs. BENTLEY (for herself, Mr. SPRATT, Mr. BONILLA, Mr. SKEEN, Mr. STUMP, and Mr. WELDON) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Armed Services


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the Congress that the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, should posthumously advance Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel to the grade of admiral on the retired list of the Navy and Major General Walter C. Short to the grade of lieutenant general on the retired list of the Army.

Whereas Husband E. Kimmel was commander in chief of the United States Pacific Fleet and Walter C. Short was commander of the United States Army’s Hawaiian Department at the time of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941;

Whereas, at the time of the attack, Admiral Kimmel held the grade of admiral pursuant to a temporary designation, but following the attack was retired in his permanent grade of rear admiral;

Whereas, at the time of the attack, General Short held the grade of lieutenant general pursuant to a temporary designation, but following the attack was retired in his permanent grade of major general;

Whereas a naval court of inquiry found that, before and during the attack, no individual in the naval service committed any offense or incurred serious blame;

Whereas the naval court of inquiry specifically approved the judgments and actions of Rear Admiral Kimmel under the circumstances before and during the attack;

Whereas in 1946 a Joint Committee of the Congress specifically found that neither officer had been derelict in his duty;

Whereas the Officer Personnel Act of 1947 permits the President, in his discretion and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to advance certain naval and army officers to the highest grade in which they served while on active duty;

Whereas Rear Admiral Kimmel and Major General Short are both eligible for such advancement;

Whereas, when the Officer Personnel Act of 1947 was implemented, Rear Admiral Kimmel’s name and Major General Short’s name were not submitted by the Departments of the Navy and Army, respectively, for such advancement;

Whereas in November 1991 an Army Board for the Correction of Military Records recommended that Major General Short be posthumously advanced to the rank of lieutenant general; and

Whereas under the Act such advancement of Rear Admiral Kimmel and Major General Short is at the discretion of the President: Now, therefore, be it

    Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it is the sense of Congress that the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, should posthumously advance Rear Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, United States Navy, to the grade of admiral on the retired list of the Navy and should posthumously advance Major General Walter C. Short, United States Army, to the grade of lieutenant general on the retired list of the Army.