H.R. 4332 (103rd): To set forth the policy of the United States for nuclear nonproliferation.

103rd Congress, 1993–1994. Text as of May 03, 1994 (Introduced).

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HR 4332 IH

103d CONGRESS

2d Session

H. R. 4332

To set forth the policy of the United States for nuclear nonproliferation.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

May 3, 1994

Mr. MCCLOSKEY (for himself and Mr. STARK) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs


A BILL

To set forth the policy of the United States for nuclear nonproliferation.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. POLICY FOR NUCLEAR NON-PROLIFERATION.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds the following:

      (1) On September 27, 1993, the President declared to the United Nations that one of the world’s most urgent priorities must be to impede the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

      (2) In a joint statement issued on January 16, 1994, the President and the President of the Russian Federation declared that the proliferation of nuclear weapons creates a serious threat to the security of all States.

      (3) The President and the President of the Russian Federation further declared that the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is the basis for efforts to ensure the nonproliferation of nuclear weapons and called for its indefinite and unconditional extension at a conference of its participants in 1995, and they urged that all states that have not yet done so accede to this Treaty.

      (4) The principle obstacle to the indefinite and unconditional extension of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is the concern of the states without nuclear weapons that the states with nuclear weapons have not yet fulfilled their commitment (made 25 years ago in the Treaty) to pursue negotiations toward nuclear disarmament and, in particular, to end the testing of nuclear weapons.

      (5) In its report issued in 1994 and entitled Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium, the National Academy of Sciences reported that the risks posed by all forms of plutonium must be addressed and that further steps should be taken to reduce the proliferation risks posed by all of the world’s plutonium stocks, both military and civilian.

      (6) The National Academy of Sciences reported in the report that policy makers will have to take into account the fact that choosing to use weapons plutonium in reactors would be perceived by some as representing generalized United States approval of separated plutonium fuel cycles, thereby compromising the ability of the United States to oppose such fuel cycles elsewhere.

      (7) In section 1611 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1994 (Public Law 103-160; 107 Stat. 1848), the Congress called for a comprehensive policy to end the further spread of nuclear weapons capability, to roll back nuclear proliferation where it has occurred, and to prevent the use of nuclear weapons anywhere in the world, and set forth eleven objectives to achieve this goal.

      (8) One of the goals set forth in such section is to support the indefinite extension of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons at the 1995 conference of its participants in order to review and extend the treaty and to seek to ensure that all countries sign the treaty or participate in a comparable international regime for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear facilities and material.

      (9) The Congress has played a critical role in the formulation of United States nonproliferation policy and must express its views on the future of the nuclear weapons posture of the United States in order to ensure a complete review of that posture.

    (b) POLICY- The following shall be the policy of the United States:

      (1) To develop and maintain a nuclear weapons posture consistent with promoting United States nuclear nonproliferation policy objectives. To develop and maintain that posture, the United States shall--

        (A) withdraw from deployment and dismantle all of its tactical nuclear weapons in the context of a bilateral agreement with the Russian Federation to eliminate all tactical nuclear weapons;

        (B) adopt a policy of no-first-use of nuclear weapons against countries which are party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or a comparable international regime; and

        (C) declare its intention to reduce its strategic nuclear arsenal to levels below START II, in the context of similar reductions by the Russian Federation, and strategic nuclear reductions by the United Kingdom, France, and the People’s Republic of China.

      (2) To reduce the proliferation risks posed by the world’s large stockpile of plutonium from military and civilian sources. To achieve this objective, the United States shall--

        (A) choose a weapons-plutonium disposition option that cannot be perceived as representing United States approval of separated plutonium fuel cycles;

        (B) discourage the civil use of plutonium overseas by identifying alternatives to civilian reprocessing of plutonium and pursuing these alternatives with countries that have civilian plutonium programs; and

        (C) seek a nondiscriminatory, multilateral, and internationally and effectively verifiable treaty that ends production of weapons-usable fissile material for any other purpose.

    (c) REPORTS- Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to the Congress a report on the status of efforts by the United States to achieve the policy described in subsection (b).