H.R. 5258 (103rd): Health Fraud and Abuse Act of 1994

Introduced:
Oct 07, 1994 (103rd Congress, 1993–1994)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
John Conyers Jr.
Representative for Michigan's 14th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Oct 07, 1994
Length
18 pages
Related Bills
H.R. 3600 (Related)
Health Security Act

Reported by Committee
Last Action: Jun 23, 1994

 
Status

This bill was introduced on October 7, 1994, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Oct 07, 1994
Referred to Committee Oct 07, 1994
 
Full Title

To improve Federal enforcement against health care fraud and abuse.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
none
Committees

House Oversight and Government Reform

National Security

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


10/7/1994--Introduced.
Health Fraud and Abuse Act of 1994 - Directs the Inspector General (IG) of each of the Departments of Health and Human Services, Defense, Labor, and Veterans Affairs and the Office of Personnel Management to conduct audits, civil and criminal investigations, inspections, and evaluations relating to the prevention, detection, and control of health care fraud and abuse in violation of any Federal law, with exceptions.
Sets forth provisions regarding the powers of IGs. Directs the IGs to:
(1) jointly establish a program to prevent, detect, and control health care fraud and abuse which considers the activities of Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies (LEAs), Federal and State agencies responsible for the licensing and certification of health care providers, and State agencies designated under this Act;
(2) develop an annual investigative plan; and
(3) regularly consult with each other, such LEAs, Federal and State agencies responsible for the licensing and certification of health care providers, and Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Units. Requires the Governor of each State to designate State agencies which conduct, supervise, and coordinate audits, civil and criminal investigations, inspections, and evaluations relating to such prevention, detection, and control.
Authorizes each Governor to establish and maintain a State agency to act as a Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Unit. Requires that each Unit be a single identifiable entity of State government which is separate and distinct from any State agency with principal responsibility for the administration of health care programs and which meets specified requirements, such as being a unit of the State Attorney General or other State department that possesses statewide authority to prosecute individuals for criminal violations.
Authorizes each Unit to submit each year to the IG a plan for preventing, detecting, and controlling health care fraud and abuse.
Sets forth provisions regarding:
(1) IG approval of annual plans;
(2) reporting requirements;
(3) payments to States; and
(4) data sharing.
Establishes:
(1) within the Treasury the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Account; and
(2) the Account Payments Advisory Board, which shall make recommendations to the IGs regarding the equitable allocation of payments from the Account.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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