S. 1281 (103rd): Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995

103rd Congress, 1993–1994. Text as of Jul 23, 1993 (Placed on Calendar in the Senate).

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S 1281 PCS

Calendar No. 159

103d CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 1281

[Report No. 103-107]

To authorize appropriations for the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 for the Department of State, the United States Information Agency, and related agencies, to provide for the consolidation of international broadcasting activities, and for other purposes.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

July 23 (legislative day, JUNE 30), 1993

Mr. PELL, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, reported the following original bill; which was read twice and placed on the calendar


A BILL

To authorize appropriations for the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 for the Department of State, the United States Information Agency, and related agencies, to provide for the consolidation of international broadcasting activities, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE AND TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) SHORT TITLE- This Act may be cited as the ‘Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995’.

    (b) TABLE OF CONTENTS- The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

      Sec. 1. Short title and table of contents.

TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Part A--Authorization of Appropriations

      Sec. 101. Administration of foreign affairs.

      Sec. 102. International organizations, programs, and conferences.

      Sec. 103. International commissions.

      Sec. 104. Migration and refugee assistance.

      Sec. 105. Other programs.

Part B--Authorities and Activities

      Sec. 111. Authorized strength of the Foreign Service.

      Sec. 112. Transfers and reprogrammings.

      Sec. 113. Child care facilities at certain posts abroad.

      Sec. 114. Expenses relating to certain international claims and proceedings.

      Sec. 115. Prohibition on discriminatory contracts.

      Sec. 116. Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service.

      Sec. 117. Consular authorities.

      Sec. 118. Visas.

      Sec. 119. Role of the Foreign Service Institute.

      Sec. 120. Report on consolidation of administrative operations.

      Sec. 121. Local guard contracts abroad.

      Sec. 122. Annual country reports on terrorism.

      Sec. 123. Rewards for information regarding acts of international terrorism within the United States.

      Sec. 124. Property agreements.

      Sec. 125. Capital Investment Fund.

      Sec. 126. Technical amendment.

Part C--Department of State Organization

      Sec. 131. Under Secretary and Assistant Secretary positions.

      Sec. 132. Redesignation of position as Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

      Sec. 133. Redesignation of position as Assistant Secretary for Narcotics, Terrorism, and Crime.

      Sec. 134. Administrative expenses for narcotics, terrorism, and crime.

      Sec. 135. Coordinator for international communications and information policy.

      Sec. 136. Inspector General of the Department of State and the Foreign Service.

      Sec. 137. Refugee affairs.

      Sec. 138. Office of foreign missions.

      Sec. 139. Women’s human rights protection.

      Sec. 140. Repeals.

Part D--Personnel

      Sec. 141. Labor-management relations.

      Sec. 142. Waiver of limitation for certain claims for personal property damage or loss.

      Sec. 143. Salaries of chiefs of mission.

      Sec. 144. Senior Foreign Service performance pay.

      Sec. 145. Reassignment and retirement of former Presidential appointees.

      Sec. 146. Report on classification of Senior Foreign Service positions.

      Sec. 147. Allowances.

      Sec. 148. Inapplicability of rollover authority for certain allowances and other payments.

      Sec. 149. Grievances.

      Sec. 150. Mid-Level Women and Minority Placement Program.

      Sec. 151. Employment assistance referral system for certain Department of State employees.

      Sec. 152. Foreign language competence within the Foreign Service.

      Sec. 153. Designation of Foreign Language Resources Coordinator.

      Sec. 154. Foreign Language Translator and Interpreter Career Service Program.

Part E--International Organizations

SUBPART A--UNITED NATIONS AND RELATED AGENCIES

      Sec. 161. Limitation on contributions to the United Nations and affiliated organizations.

      Sec. 162. United Nations Security Council membership.

      Sec. 163. Reforms in the World Health Organization.

      Sec. 164. Reforms in the Food and Agriculture Organization.

      Sec. 165. Reform in budget decisionmaking procedures of the United Nations and its specialized agencies.

      Sec. 166. United Nations budgetary and management reform.

      Sec. 167. Cost assessment report regarding any United States participation in action under Article 42 of the United Nations Charter.

      Sec. 168. Congressional notification regarding any United States implementation of Article 43 of the United Nations Charter.

      Sec. 169. Report on United Nations peacekeeping activities.

      Sec. 170. United States personnel and material contributions to peacekeeping operations.

      Sec. 170A. Policy with respect to the establishment of an international criminal court.

SUBPART B--OTHER INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

      Sec. 171. International Boundary and Water Commission.

      Sec. 172. United States membership in the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation Organization.

      Sec. 173. Extension of the International Organizations Immunities Act to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources.

      Sec. 174. Inter-American organizations.

      Sec. 175. Prohibition on contributions to the International Coffee Organization.

Part F--Other State Department-Related Provisions

      Sec. 181. Migration and refugee amendments.

      Sec. 182. United States policy concerning overseas assistance to refugees and displaced persons.

      Sec. 183. Interparliamentary exchanges.

      Sec. 184. Report on terrorist assets in the United States.

      Sec. 185. Coordination of counterterrorism activities.

      Sec. 186. Facilitating access to the Department of State building.

      Sec. 187. Record of place of birth for Taiwanese-Americans.

      Sec. 188. Repeal of reporting requirements.

TITLE II--UNITED STATES INFORMATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS

Part A--Authorization of Appropriations

      Sec. 201. Authorization of appropriations.

Part B--USIA and Related Agencies Authorities and Activities

      Sec. 211. Changes in administrative authorities.

      Sec. 212. Buying power maintenance account.

      Sec. 213. Contract authority.

      Sec. 214. Prohibition on discriminatory contracts.

      Sec. 215. United States transmitter in Kuwait.

      Sec. 216. Separate ledger accounts for grantees of the National Endowment for Democracy.

      Sec. 217. Limitation concerning participation in international expositions.

      Sec. 218. Authority to respond to public inquiries.

      Sec. 219. USIA office in Lhasa, Tibet.

      Sec. 220. Reports on United States Government exchange programs.

      Sec. 221. Scholarships for East Timorese students.

      Sec. 222. Cambodian scholarship and exchange programs.

      Sec. 223. Increasing African participation in USIA exchange programs.

      Sec. 224. Environment and Sustainable Development Exchange Program.

      Sec. 225. USIA vocational exchange program.

      Sec. 226. American studies collections.

      Sec. 227. Technical amendment relating to Near and Middle East research and training.

      Sec. 228. Distribution within the United States of United States information agency documentary film entitled ‘Crimes Against Humanity’.

Part C--Mike Mansfield Fellowships

      Sec. 231. Short title.

      Sec. 232. Establishment of Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program.

      Sec. 233. Program requirements.

      Sec. 234. Separation of Government personnel during the fellowships.

      Sec. 235. Program review and report.

      Sec. 236. Definitions.

TITLE III--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACT OF 1993

      Sec. 301. Short title.

      Sec. 302. Congressional findings and declaration of purposes.

      Sec. 303. Establishment of Broadcasting Board of Governors.

      Sec. 304. Functions of the Board.

      Sec. 305. Foreign policy guidance.

      Sec. 306. International Broadcasting Bureau.

      Sec. 307. Radio Free Asia.

      Sec. 308. Transition.

      Sec. 309. Preservation of American jobs.

TITLE IV--COMMISSION ON PROTECTING AND REDUCING GOVERNMENT SECRECY

      Sec. 401. Short title.

      Sec. 402. Purpose.

      Sec. 403. Findings.

      Sec. 404. Functions of the Commission.

      Sec. 405. Composition of the Commission.

      Sec. 406. Powers of the Commission.

      Sec. 407. Staff of the Commission.

      Sec. 408. Final report of Commission; termination.

TITLE V--SPOILS OF WAR ACT OF 1993

      Sec. 501. Short title.

      Sec. 502. Transfers of spoils of war.

      Sec. 503. Prohibition on transfers to countries which support terrorism.

      Sec. 504. Report on previous transfers.

      Sec. 505. Definitions.

      Sec. 506. Construction.

TITLE VI--THE KHMER ROUGE PROSECUTION AND EXCLUSION ACT

      Sec. 601. Short title.

      Sec. 602. Policy.

      Sec. 603. Establishment of State Department office.

      Sec. 604. Reporting requirement.

      Sec. 605. Exclusion from the United States.

TITLE VII--MISCELLANEOUS

      Sec. 701. Peace Corps.

      Sec. 702. Reporting requirements on occupied Tibet.

      Sec. 703. Policy on Middle East arms sales.

      Sec. 704. Technical amendments to Captive Nations Resolution.

      Sec. 705. Providing material support to terrorists.

      Sec. 706. Torture convention implementation.

      Sec. 707. Applicability of Taiwan Relations Act.

      Sec. 708. Reports on relations with Taiwan.

      Sec. 709. United States policy concerning Iraqi Kurdistan.

      Sec. 710. Additional sanctions against North Korea.

      Sec. 711. Waiver of sanctions with respect to the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Montenegro to promote democracy abroad.

      Sec. 712. Claims based on letters of credit for goods shipped but not paid for before imposition of national emergency.

      Sec. 713. Enforcement of nonproliferation treaties.

TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF STATE

PART A--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

SEC. 101. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State under ‘Administration of Foreign Affairs’ to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes authorized by law, including the diplomatic security program:

      (1) DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS- For ‘Diplomatic and Consular Programs’, of the Department of State $1,658,184,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $1,658,184,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (2) SALARIES AND EXPENSES- For ‘Salaries and Expenses’, of the Department of State $455,816,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $455,816,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (3) ACQUISITION AND MAINTENANCE OF BUILDINGS ABROAD- For ‘Acquisition and Maintenance of Buildings Abroad’, $294,850,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $294,850,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (4) BUYING POWER MAINTENANCE FUND- For ‘Buying Power Maintenance Fund’, $4,000,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $4,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (5) REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES- For ‘Representation Allowances’, $4,881,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $4,881,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (6) EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE- For ‘Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service’, $8,000,000 for the fiscal 1994 and $8,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (7) OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL- For ‘Office of the Inspector General’, $24,055,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $24,055,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (8) PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN- For ‘Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan’, $15,484,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $15,484,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (9) PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS- For ‘Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials’, $10,814,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $10,814,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (10) REPATRIATION LOANS- For ‘Repatriation Loans’, $817,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $817,000 for the fiscal year 1995, for administrative expenses.

    (b) LIMITATIONS- (1) Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for ‘Diplomatic and Consular Programs’ under subsection (a)(1)--

      (A) $10,000,000 is authorized to be available for each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 for grants, contracts, and other activities to conduct research and promote international cooperation on environmental and other scientific issues; and

      (B) $500,000 is authorized to be available for each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 to carry out the activities of the Office of Cambodian Genocide Investigations established under section 603 of this Act.

    (2) Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for ‘Salaries and Expenses’ under subsection (a)(2), $300,000 is authorized to be available for the fiscal year 1994 and $300,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for the Foreign Language Translator and Interpreter Career Service Program established by section 157.

    (3) Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for ‘Salaries and Expenses’ under subsection (a)(2), $950,000 is authorized to be available for each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 to carry out the activities of the Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy established under title IV of this Act.

SEC. 102. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS, PROGRAMS, AND CONFERENCES.

    (a) ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Contributions to International Organizations’, $865,885,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $1,000,053,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international organizations and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

    (b) CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities’, $422,744,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $487,472,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international peacekeeping activities and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

    (c) INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCES AND CONTINGENCIES- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘International Conferences and Contingencies’, $6,600,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $6,600,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international conferences and contingencies and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

    (d) FOREIGN CURRENCY EXCHANGE RATES- In addition to amounts otherwise authorized to be appropriated by subsections (a) and (b) of this section, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 to offset adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. Amounts appropriated under this subsection shall be available for obligation and expenditure only to the extent that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget determines and certifies to Congress that such amounts are necessary due to such fluctuations.

SEC. 103. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated under ‘International Commissions’ for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes authorized by law:

      (1) INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO- For ‘International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico’--

        (A) for ‘Salaries and Expenses’ $11,330,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $11,300,000 for the fiscal year 1995; and

        (B) for ‘Construction’ $14,790,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $17,790,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (2) INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA- For ‘International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada’, $760,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $760,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (3) INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION- For ‘International Joint Commission’, $3,643,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $3,643,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (4) INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS- For ‘International Fisheries Commissions’, $14,200,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $14,200,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

SEC. 104. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS-

      (1)(A) There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Migration and Refugee Assistance’ for authorized activities, $585,688,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $585,688,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (B) Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), $1,500,000 is authorized to be available for each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995 for humanitarian assistance, including, but not limited to, food, medicine, clothing, medical and vocational training to Burmese, including persons still within Burma, displaced as a result of civil conflict.

      (2) There are authorized to be appropriated $80,000,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $80,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for assistance for refugees resettling in Israel.

    (b) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Funds appropriated pursuant to subsection (a) are authorized to be available until expended.

SEC. 105. OTHER PROGRAMS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes authorized by law:

      (1) UNITED STATES BILATERAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AGREEMENTS- For ‘United States Bilateral Science and Technology Agreements’, $4,500,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $4,500,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (2) ASIA FOUNDATION- For ‘Asia Foundation’, $18,693,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $18,693,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

PART B--AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 111. AUTHORIZED STRENGTH OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

    (a) END FISCAL YEAR 1994 LEVELS- The number of members of the Foreign Service authorized to be employed as of September 30, 1994--

      (1) for the Department of State, shall not exceed 9,100, of whom not more than 820 shall be members of the Senior Foreign Service; and

      (2) for the United States Information Agency, shall not exceed 1,200, of whom not more than 175 shall be members of the Senior Foreign Service.

    (b) END FISCAL YEAR 1995 LEVELS- The number of members of the Foreign Service authorized to be employed as of September 30, 1995--

      (1) for the Department of State, shall not exceed 9,100, of whom not more than 770 shall be members of the Senior Foreign Service; and

      (2) for the United States Information Agency, not to exceed 1,200, of whom not more than 165 shall be members of the Senior Foreign Service.

    (c) DEFINITION- For the purposes of this section, the term ‘members of the Foreign Service’ is used within the meaning of such term under section 103 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C 3903), except that such term does not include--

      (1) members of the Service under paragraphs (6) and (7) of such section;

      (2) members of the Service serving under temporary resident appointments abroad;

      (3) members of the Service employed on less than a full-time basis;

      (4) members of the Service subject to involuntary separation in cases in which such separation has been suspended pursuant to section 1106(8) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980; and

      (5) members of the Service serving under non-career limited appointments.

    (d) WAIVER AUTHORITY- (1) Subject to paragraph (2), the Secretary of State and the Director of the United States Information Agency may waive any limitation under subsection (a) or (b) which applies to the Department of State or the United States Information Agency, as the case may be, to the extent that such waiver is necessary to carry on the foreign affairs functions of the United States.

    (2) Not less than 15 days before any agency head implements a waiver under paragraph (1), such agency head shall notify the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Such notice shall include an explanation of the circumstances and necessity for such waiver.

SEC. 112. TRANSFERS AND REPROGRAMMINGS.

    (a) AMENDMENTS TO THE STATE DEPARTMENT BASIC AUTHORITIES ACT OF 1956- Section 24 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2696) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (b)(7), by striking subparagraph (E);

      (2) in subsection (d)(1)--

        (A) by striking ‘the second’ and inserting ‘either’; and

        (B) by striking ‘such second’ and inserting ‘such’;

      (3) in subsection (d)(2) by amending the first sentence to read as follows: ‘Amounts appropriated for the ‘Diplomatic and Consular Programs’ account may not exceed by more than 5 percent the amount specifically authorized to be appropriated for such account for a fiscal year.’; and

      (4) by striking subsection (d)(4).

    (b) DIPLOMATIC CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM- Section 401 of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (22 U.S.C. 4851) is amended by striking subsections (c) and (h)(3).

    (c) REPROGRAMMING- Section 34 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2706) is amended in subsection (a)(7) by striking ‘$500,000’ and inserting ‘$1,000,000’.

SEC. 113. CHILD CARE FACILITIES AT CERTAIN POSTS ABROAD.

    Section 31 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2703) is amended in subsection (e) by striking ‘For the fiscal years 1992 and 1993, the’ and inserting ‘The’.

SEC. 114. EXPENSES RELATING TO CERTAIN INTERNATIONAL CLAIMS AND PROCEEDINGS.

    Section 38 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2710) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsections:

    ‘(c) PROCUREMENT OF SERVICES- The Secretary of State may use competitive procedures or procedures other than competitive procedures to procure the services of experts for use in preparing or prosecuting a proceeding before an international tribunal or a claim by or against a foreign government or other foreign entity, whether or not the expert is expected to testify, or to procure other support services for such proceedings or claims. The Secretary need not provide any written justification for the use of procedures other than competitive procedures when procuring such services under this subsection and need not furnish for publication in the Commerce Business Daily or otherwise any notice of solicitation or synopsis with respect to such procurement.

    ‘(d) INTERNATIONAL LITIGATION FUND-

      ‘(1) ESTABLISHMENT- In order to provide the Department of State with a dependable, flexible, and adequate source of funding for the expenses of the Department related to preparing or prosecuting a proceeding before an international tribunal, or a claim by or against a foreign government or other foreign entity, there is established an International Litigation Fund (hereafter in this subsection referred to as the ‘ILF’). The ILF shall be available to such extent and in such amounts as may be provided in advance in appropriations Acts. Amounts so provided are authorized to remain available without fiscal year limitation.

      ‘(2) REPROGRAMMING PROCEDURES- Funds credited to the ILF shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 34 and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures applicable to such reprogrammings. This paragraph shall not apply to the transfer of funds under paragraph (3).

      ‘(3) TRANSFERS OF FUNDS- Funds received by the Department of State from another agency of the United States Government or pursuant to the Department of State Appropriations Act of 1937 (49 Stat. 1321, 22 U.S.C. 2661) to meet costs of preparing or prosecuting a proceeding before an international tribunal, or a claim by or against a foreign government or other foreign entity, shall be credited to the ILF.

      ‘(4) USE OF FUNDS- Funds deposited in the ILF shall be available only for the purposes of paragraph (1).’.

SEC. 115. PROHIBITION ON DISCRIMINATORY CONTRACTS.

    (a) PROHIBITION-

      (1) Except for real estate leases and as provided in subsection (b), the Department of State may not enter into any contract that expends funds appropriated to the Department of State for an amount in excess of the small purchase threshold (as defined in section 4(11) of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act (41 U.S.C. 403(11))--

        (A) with a foreign person that complies with the Arab League boycott of Israel, or

        (B) with any foreign or United States person that discriminates in the award of subcontracts on the basis of religion.

      (2) For purposes of this section--

        (A) a foreign person complies with the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries when that foreign person takes or knowingly agrees to take any action, with respect to the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries, which section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)) prohibits a United States person from taking, except that for purposes of this paragraph, the term ‘United States person’ as used in subparagraphs (B) and (C) of section 8(a)(1) of such Act shall be deemed to mean ‘person’; and

        (B) the term ‘foreign person’ means any person other than a United States person as defined in section 16(2) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2415).

      (3) For purposes of paragraph (1), a foreign person shall be deemed not to comply with the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries if that person, or the Secretary of State or his designee on the basis of available information, certifies that the person violates or otherwise does not comply with the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries by taking any actions prohibited by section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)). Certification by the Secretary of State or his designee may occur only 30 days after notice has been given to the Congress that this certification procedure will be utilized at a specific overseas mission.

    (b) WAIVER BY SECRETARY OF STATE- The Secretary of State may waive the requirements of this section on a country-by-country basis for a period not to exceed one year upon certification to the Congress by the Secretary that such waiver is in the national interest and is necessary to carry on diplomatic functions on the United States. Each such certification shall include a detailed justification for the waiver with respect to each such country.

    (c) RESPONSES TO CONTRACT SOLICITATIONS- (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subsection, the Secretary of State shall ensure that any response to a solicitation for a bid or a request for a proposal, with respect to a contract covered by subsection (a), includes the following clause, in substantially the following form:

‘ARAB LEAGUE BOYCOTT OF ISRAEL

    ‘(a) DEFINITIONS- As used in this clause--

      ‘(1) the term ‘foreign person’ means any person other than a United States person as defined in paragraph (2); and

      ‘(2) the term ‘United States person’ means any United States resident or national (other than an individual resident outside the United States and employed by other than a United States person), any domestic concern (including any permanent domestic establishment of any foreign concern), and any foreign subsidiary or affiliate (including any permanent foreign establishment) of any domestic concern which is controlled in fact by such domestic concern, as determined under regulations of the President.

    ‘(b) CERTIFICATION- By submitting this offer, the Offeror certifies that it is not--

      ‘(1) taking or knowingly agreeing to take any action, with respect to the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries, which section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)) prohibits a United States person from taking; or

      ‘(2) discriminating in the award of subcontracts on the basis of religion.’.

    (2) An Offeror would not be required to include the certification required by paragraph (1), if the Offeror is deemed not to comply with the Arab League boycott of Israel by the Secretary of State or a designee on the basis of available information. Certification by the Secretary of State or a designee may occur only 30 days after notice has been given to the Congress that this certification procedure will be utilized at a specific overseas mission.

    (3) The Secretary of State shall ensure that all State Department contract solicitations include a detailed explanation of the requirements of section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)).

    (d) REVIEW OF TERMINATION- (1) The Department of State shall conduct reviews of the certifications submitted pursuant to this section for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of the certifications.

    (2) Upon complaint of any foreign or United States person of a violation of the certification as required by this section, filed with the Secretary of State, the Department of State shall investigate such complaint, and if such complaint is found to be correct and a violation of the certification has been found, all contracts with such violator shall be terminated for default as soon as practicable, and, for a period of two years thereafter, the State Department shall not enter into any contracts with such a violator.

SEC. 116. EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE.

    Section 4(c) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2671(c)) is amended by striking ‘an annual confidential’ and inserting ‘a periodic’.

SEC. 117. CONSULAR AUTHORITIES.

    (a) PERSONS AUTHORIZED TO ISSUE PASSPORTS ABROAD- The Act entitled ‘An Act to regulate the issue and validity of passports, and for other purposes’, approved July 3, 1926 (44 Stat. 887, 22 U.S.C. 211a), is amended by striking ‘by diplomatic representatives of the United States, and by such consul generals, consuls, or vice consuls when in charge,’ and inserting ‘by diplomatic and consular officers of the United States, and by other employees of the Department of State who are citizens of the United States,’.

    (b) NOTARIAL AUTHORITY- Section 7 of the Act entitled ‘An Act to provide for the reorganization of the consular service of the United States’, approved April 5, 1906 (34 Stat. 100; 22 U.S.C. 4221), is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: ‘Pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe, the Secretary may designate any other employee of the Department of State who is a citizen of the United States to perform any notarial function authorized to be performed by a consular officer of the United States under this Act.’.

SEC. 118. VISAS.

    (a) SURCHARGE FOR PROCESSING CERTAIN VISAS- (1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of State is authorized to charge a fee or surcharge for processing machine readable nonimmigrant visas and machine readable combined border crossing identification cards and nonimmigrant visas.

    (2) Fees collected under the authority of subsection (a) shall be deposited in the general fund of the Treasury and available to the Department of State, subject to amounts provided in advance in appropriations Acts, to recover the costs of providing consular services, which shall include the payment of any fees for access to the criminal history records of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for processing visa applications and making immigration eligibility determinations. Such fees shall remain available for obligation until expended.

    (3) For fiscal years 1994 and 1995, fees deposited under the authority of paragraph (2) may not exceed a total of $56,000,000.

    (b) AUTOMATED VISA LOOKOUT SYSTEM- Not later than 24 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall implement an upgrade of all overseas visa lookout operations to computerized systems with automated multiple-name search capabilities.

    (c) PROCESSING OF VISAS FOR ADMISSION TO THE UNITED STATES- (1)(A) Beginning 24 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, whenever a United States consular officer issues a visa for admission to the United States, that official shall certify, in writing, that a check of the Automated Visa Lookout System, or any other system or list which maintains information about the excludability of aliens under the Immigration and Nationality Act, has been made and that there is no basis under such system for the exclusion of such alien.

    (B) If, at the time an alien applies for an immigrant or nonimmigrant visa, the alien’s name is included in the Department of State’s visa lookout system and the consular officer to whom the application is made fails to follow the procedures in processing the application required by the inclusion of the alien’s name in such system, the consular officer’s failure shall be made a matter of record and shall be considered as a serious negative factor in the officer’s annual performance evaluation.

    (2) If an alien to whom a visa was issued as a result of a failure described in paragraph (1)(B) is admitted to the United States and there is thereafter probable cause to believe that the alien was a participant in a terrorist act causing serious loss of life or property in the United States, the Secretary of State shall convene an Accountability Review Board under the authority of title III of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986.

SEC. 119. ROLE OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE INSTITUTE.

    Section 701 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4021) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(d)(1) The Secretary of State is authorized to provide for special professional foreign affairs training and instruction of employees of foreign governments through the Institute.

    ‘(2) Training and instruction under paragraph (1) shall be on a reimbursable basis. Reimbursement to the Institute may be provided by an agency of the United States Government or by a foreign government.

    ‘(3) Training should be made available in the first instance to officials from newly emerging democratic nations, and then to other nations as deemed to be in the national interest of the United States.

    ‘(4) The authorities of section 704 shall apply to training and instruction provided under this section.’.

SEC. 120. REPORT ON CONSOLIDATION OF ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS.

    Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, jointly with the Director of the United States Information Agency and the Administrator of the Agency for International Development, shall submit to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House of Representatives a report concerning the feasibility of consolidating domestic administrative operations for the Department of State, the United States Information Agency, and the Agency for International Development. Such report shall include specific recommendations for implementation of such consolidation.

SEC. 121. LOCAL GUARD CONTRACTS ABROAD.

    Section 136(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (Public Law 101-246) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ‘due to their distance from the post’;

      (2) by redesignating paragraphs (2) and (3) as paragraphs (7) and (8), respectively; and

      (3) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following:

      ‘(2) absent compelling reasons, award such contracts through the competitive process;

      ‘(3) in evaluating and scoring proposals for such contracts, award not less than 60 percent of the total points on the basis of technical factors and subfactors;

      ‘(4) allow all solicitations to be bid in United States dollars;

      ‘(5) ensure that contracts awarded to United States firms are paid in United States dollars; and

      ‘(6) ensure that United States diplomatic and consular posts assist United States firms in obtaining local licenses and permits.’.

SEC. 122. ANNUAL COUNTRY REPORTS ON TERRORISM.

    Section 140 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 2656f) is amended in subsection (b)(2)--

      (1) by striking ‘and’ at the end of subparagraph (C);

      (2) by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (D) and inserting ‘; and’; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

        ‘(E) efforts by the United States to eliminate international financial support provided to those groups directly or provided in support of their activities.’.

SEC. 123. REWARDS FOR INFORMATION REGARDING ACTS OF INTERNATIONAL TERRORISM WITHIN THE UNITED STATES.

    Section 36 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2708) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (b)(1)(A), by striking ‘and is primarily outside the territorial jurisdiction of the United States’; and

      (2) in subsection (i)--

        (A) by striking ‘and’ at the end of paragraph (1);

        (B) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (2) and inserting ‘; and’; and

        (C) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      ‘(3) the term ‘international terrorism’ means activities that--

        ‘(A) involve violent acts or acts dangerous to human life that are a violation of the criminal laws of the United States or of any State, or that would be a criminal violation if committed within the jurisdiction of the United States or any State;

        ‘(B) appear to be intended--

          ‘(i) to intimidate or coerce a civilian population;

          ‘(ii) to influence the policy of a government by intimidation or coercion; or

          ‘(iii) to effect the conduct of a government by assassination or kidnapping; and

        ‘(C) occur totally outside the United States, or transcend national boundaries in terms of the means by which they are accomplished, the persons they appear intended to coerce or intimidate, or the locale in which their perpetrators operate or seek asylum.’.

SEC. 124. PROPERTY AGREEMENTS.

    Whenever the Department of State enters into lease-purchase agreements involving property in foreign countries pursuant to section 1 of the Foreign Service Buildings Act (22 U.S.C. 292), the Department shall account for such transactions in accordance with fiscal year obligations.

SEC. 125. CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- There is established within the Department of State a Capital Investment Fund to provide for the procurement of information technology and other related capital investments for the Department of State and to ensure the efficient management, coordination, operation, and utilization of such resources.

    (b) FUNDING- Funds otherwise available for the purposes of subsection (a) may be deposited in such Fund.

    (c) AVAILABILITY- Amounts deposited into the Fund are authorized to remain available until expended.

    (d) EXPENDITURES FROM THE FUND- Amounts deposited in the Fund shall be available for expenditure to procure capital equipment and information technology.

    (e) REPROGRAMMING PROCEDURES- Funds credited to the Capital Investment Fund shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 34 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2710) and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures applicable to such reprogrammings.

SEC. 126. TECHNICAL AMENDMENT.

    Section 2 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 is amended by striking ‘(l) pay’ and inserting ‘(m) pay’.

PART C--DEPARTMENT OF STATE ORGANIZATION

SEC. 131. UNDER SECRETARY AND ASSISTANT SECRETARY POSITIONS.

    (a) NUMBERS OF UNDER SECRETARIES AND ASSISTANT SECRETARIES- Section 1 of the Act of May 26, 1949, as amended (22 U.S.C. 2652), is further amended by striking everything after ‘Deputy Secretary of State’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘and not more than 5 Under Secretaries of State and not more than 20 Assistant Secretaries of State.’.

    (b) OTHER SENIOR OFFICIALS- In addition to such other officials of the Department of State who are authorized to be compensated at level IV of the Executive Schedule of section 5315 title 5, United States Code, not more than 4 other officers of the Department of State are authorized to be compensated at such level, and shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

    (c) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- (1) Section 9(a) of the Department of State Appropriations Authorization Act of 1973 (22 U.S.C. 2655a) is amended--

      (A) by striking ‘In addition to the positions provided under the first section of the Act of May 26, 1949, as amended (22 U.S.C. 2652), there’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘There’; and

      (B) by inserting before the period at the end of the subsection ‘and for such other related duties as the Secretary may from time to time designate’.

    (2) Section 122(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 2652b) is amended by striking ‘, which is in addition to the positions provided under the first section of the Act of May 26, 1949 (22 U.S.C. 2652)’.

    (3) Section 5314 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking:

    ‘Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs and Under Secretary of State for Economic and Agricultural Affairs and an Under Secretary of State for Coordinating Security Assistance Programs and Under Secretary of State for Management.

    ‘Counselor of the Department of State.’

    and inserting in lieu thereof:

    ‘Under Secretaries of State (5).’.

    (4) Section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking:

    ‘Assistant Secretary for Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, Department of State.’,

    ‘Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics Matters, Department of State.’,

    ‘Assistant Secretary for South Asian Affairs, Department of State.’,

    ‘Legal Adviser of the Department of State.’, and

    ‘Chief of Protocol, Department of State.’.

    (5) Section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, as amended, is further amended by striking:

    ‘Assistant Secretaries of State (15)’

    and inserting in lieu thereof:

    ‘Assistant Secretaries of State (20) and 4 other officers of the Department of State appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.’.

    (d) OFFICE OF COUNSELOR; LEGAL ADVISER- (1) The Act entitled ‘An Act to create the Office of Counselor of the United States’ (May 18, 1937; Public Law 75-91; 22 U.S.C. 2655) is repealed.

    (2) Section 30 of the Act entitled ‘An Act for the reorganization and improvement of the Foreign Service of the United States and for other purposes’ (May 24, 1924; Public Law 68-135; 22 U.S.C. 2654) is repealed.

    (e) ASSUMPTION OF DUTIES OF NEW OFFICE- The individual holding the Office of Counselor on the date of enactment of this Act shall assume the duties of an Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs and shall not be required to be reappointed by reason of the enactment of this section.

SEC. 132. REDESIGNATION OF POSITION AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND LABOR.

    (a) REDESIGNATION OF POSITION- The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended--

      (1) in section 116(c) (22 U.S.C. 2151n), by striking ‘Assistant Secretary for Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs’ and inserting ‘Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor’;

      (2) in sections 502B(b) (22 U.S.C. 2304(b)), 502B(c)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2304(c)), and 505(g)(4)(A) (22 U.S.C. 2314(g)(4)(A)) by striking ‘Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs’ each place it appears and inserting ‘Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor’;

      (3) in subsection 573(c) by striking ‘Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs’ and inserting ‘Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor’; and

      (4) in section 624(f) (22 U.S.C. 2384(f))--

        (A) by striking ‘Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs’ each place it appears and inserting ‘Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor’;

        (B) by striking ‘refugees, prisoners of war,’ each place it appears and inserting ‘prisoners of war’; and

        (C) in paragraph (1), by inserting before the period at the end of the first sentence ‘, and such other related duties as the Secretary may from time to time designate’.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- Section 5(d)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2755(d)(1)) is amended by striking ‘Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor’.

    (c) ASSUMPTION OF DUTIES- The individual holding the office of Assistant Secretary of State for Human Rights and Humanitarian Affairs on the date of enactment of this Act shall assume the duties of Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor and shall not be required to be reappointed by reason of the enactment of this section.

SEC. 133. REDESIGNATION OF POSITION AS ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR NARCOTICS, TERRORISM, AND CRIME.

    (a) REDESIGNATION OF OFFICE- Section 115(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1979 (22 U.S.C. 2652a) is amended--

      (1) in the section heading, by striking ‘INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS MATTERS’ and inserting in lieu thereof ‘NARCOTICS, TERRORISM, AND CRIME’; and

      (2) in the text--

        (A) by striking ‘, in addition to the positions provided under the first section of the Act of May 26, 1949 (22 U.S.C. 2652),’;

        (B) by striking ‘International Narcotics Matters’ and inserting ‘Narcotics, Terrorism and Crime’; and

        (C) by inserting before the period at the end ‘and such other related duties as the Secretary may from time to time designate’.

    (b) AMENDMENT TO TITLE 5, UNITED STATES CODE- Section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking:

    ‘Assistant Secretary for International Narcotics Matters, Department of State.’ and inserting:

    ‘Assistant Secretary for Narcotics, Terrorism, and Crime, Department of State.’.

    (c) ASSUMPTION OF DUTIES OF NEW OFFICE- The individual holding the office of Assistant Secretary of State for International Narcotics Matters on the date of enactment of this Act shall assume the duties of Assistant Secretary of State for Narcotics, Terrorism, and Crime and shall not be required to be reappointed by reason of the enactment of this section.

SEC. 134. ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES FOR NARCOTICS, TERRORISM, AND CRIME.

    Section 482 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291a) is amended by adding the following new subsection:

    ‘(d) ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE- (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), personnel funded pursuant to this section are authorized to provide administrative assistance to personnel assigned to the bureau designated by the Secretary of State to replace the Bureau for International Narcotics Matters.

    ‘(2) Paragraph (1) shall not apply if to do so would result in a reduction in funds available for antinarcotics assistance to foreign countries.’.

SEC. 135. COORDINATOR FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATIONS AND INFORMATION POLICY.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 35 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2707) is amended--

      (1) by striking subsection (a); and

      (2) in subsection (b)--

        (A) by striking the text above paragraph (1) and inserting the following: ‘The Secretary of State shall be responsible for formulation, coordination, and oversight of foreign policy related to international communications and information policy. The Secretary of State shall--’;

        (B) by striking paragraph (2);

        (C) by redesignating paragraph (1) as paragraph (2);

        (D) by inserting before redesignated paragraph (2) the following:

      ‘(1) exercise primary authority for the conduct of foreign policy with respect to such telecommunications functions, including the determination of United States positions and the conduct of United States participation in negotiations with foreign governments and international bodies. In exercising this responsibility, the Secretary shall coordinate with other agencies as appropriate, and, in particular, shall give full consideration to the authority vested by law or Executive order in the Federal Communications Commission, the Department of Commerce and the Office of the United States Trade Representative in this area;’.

        (E) in redesignated paragraph (2), by striking ‘with the bureaus and offices of the Department of State and’, and inserting before the semicolon ‘and with the Federal Communications Commission, as appropriate’; and

        (F) in paragraph (3), by striking ‘the Senior Interagency Group on International Communications and Information Policy’ and inserting ‘any senior interagency policymaking group on international telecommunications and information policy and chair such interagency meetings as may be necessary to coordinate actions on pending issues;’.

    (b) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION- Nothing in the amendments made by this section affects the nature or scope of the authority that is on the date of enactment of this Act vested by law or Executive order in the Department of Commerce, the Office of the United States Trade Representative, the Federal Communications Commission, or any officer thereof.

SEC. 136. INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

    (a) AMENDMENT OF THE FOREIGN SERVICE ACT OF 1980- The first sentence of section 209(a)(1) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3929) is amended to read as follows:

    ‘(a)(1) There shall be an Inspector General of the Department of State and the Foreign Service, who shall be appointed by the President for a term not to exceed six years, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, without regard to political affiliation from among individuals exceptionally qualified for the position by virtue of their integrity and their demonstrated ability in accounting, auditing, financial analysis, law, management analysis, public administration, or investigations, or their knowledge and experience in the conduct of foreign affairs.’.

    (b) STATUS OF INCUMBENT INSPECTOR GENERAL- Notwithstanding section 209(a)(1) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980, as amended by subsection (a), the individual occupying the position of Inspector General of the Department of State and the Foreign Service on the date of enactment of this Act may continue to occupy such position until December 31, 1993.

SEC. 137. REFUGEE AFFAIRS.

    (a) REPEAL- Part A of title III of the Refugee Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-212) is hereby repealed.

    (b) AMENDMENT TO THE REFUGEE ACT OF 1980- Title III of the Refugee Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-212) is amended in the heading for title III by striking ‘UNITED STATES COORDINATOR FOR REFUGEE AFFAIRS AND’.

    (c) AMENDMENT TO THE MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE ACT- Section 5 of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act (22 U.S.C. 2605) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(c) Personnel funded pursuant to this section are authorized to provide administrative assistance to personnel assigned to the bureau charged with carrying out this Act.’.

    (d) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- (1) Section 411(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1521(b)) is amended by striking ‘and under the general policy guidance of the United States Coordinator for Refugee Affairs (hereinafter in this chapter referred to as the ‘Coordinator’)’ and inserting ‘the Secretary of State’;

    (2) Section 412 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1522) is amended--

      (A) in subsection (a)(2)(A), by striking ‘, together with the Coordinator,’;

      (B) in subsections (b)(3) and (b)(4), by striking ‘in consultation with the Coordinator,’; and

      (C) in subsection (e)(7)(C), by striking ‘, in consultation with the United States Coordinator for Refugee Affairs,’.

    (3) Section 413(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1523) is amended by striking ‘, in consultation with the Coordinator,’.

    (e) TRANSFER OF DUTIES- If there is an individual who has been confirmed by the Senate as Ambassador at Large for Population, Refugees and Migration on the date of enactment of this Act, that person shall assume on such date the duties of Assistant Secretary of State for Population, Refugees and Migration which were vested in the Assistant Secretary before such date. Such individual shall not be required to be reappointed by reason of the enactment of this section.

SEC. 138. OFFICE OF FOREIGN MISSIONS.

    Title II of the State Department Basic Authorities Act (22 U.S.C. 4301 et seq.) is amended--

      (1) in section 202(a)--

        (A) by striking paragraph (3); and

        (B) by redesignating paragraphs (4) through (8) as paragraphs (3) through (7), respectively;

      (2) in section 203--

        (A) by amending the section heading to read as follows: ‘AUTHORITIES OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE’;

        (B) by striking subsections (a) and (b);

        (C) in subsection (c)--

          (i) by striking ‘(c) The Secretary may authorize the Director to’ and inserting ‘(a) The Secretary is authorized to’;

          (ii) by striking ‘and’ at the end of paragraph (3);

          (iii) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph (5); and

          (iv) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following:

      ‘(4) designate an office within the Department of State to carry out the purposes of this title. In the event such an office is established, the President may appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, a Director, who shall have the rank of ambassador.’; and

        (D) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(b) In the case of an office designated under subsection (a)(4), either the Director or the next most senior official of the office should be an individual who has served in the United States Foreign Service while the other should be an individual who has served in the United States Intelligence Community; and’;

      (3) in section 204--

        (A) in subsections (a), (b), and (c) by striking ‘Director’ each place it appears and inserting ‘Secretary’; and

        (B) in subsection (d), by striking ‘the Director or any other’ and inserting ‘any’;

      (4) in section 204A, by striking ‘Director’ each place it appears and inserting ‘Secretary’;

      (5) in section 205--

        (A) in subsection (a), by striking ‘Director’ and inserting ‘Secretary’; and

        (B) in subsection (c)(2), by striking ‘authorize the Director to’; and

      (6) in section 208--

        (A) in subsection (d), by striking ‘Director’ and inserting ‘Secretary’;

        (B) in subsections (c), (e), and (f) by striking ‘Office of Foreign Missions’ each place it appears and inserting ‘Department of State’; and

        (C) in subsection (h)(2), by striking ‘Director or the’.

SEC. 139. WOMEN’S HUMAN RIGHTS PROTECTION.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--

      (1) issues of gender-based discrimination and violence against women have long been ignored or overlooked; and

      (2) abuses against women should have greater visibility in the policymaking formulation.

    (b) POLICY- It is the sense of Congress that the Department of State should designate within the appropriate bureau a special assistant to the Assistant Secretary to assure that women’s human rights issues are considered in the overall development of international human rights policy.

SEC. 140. REPEALS.

    (a) ENVOY TO THE AFGHAN RESISTANCE- Section 306 of the Department of State Appropriations Act, 1989 (Public Law 100-459) is repealed.

    (b) BURDENSHARING- Section 8125(c) of the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, Fiscal Year 1989 (Public Law 100-463) is repealed.

PART D--PERSONNEL

SEC. 141. LABOR-MANAGEMENT RELATIONS.

    Section 1017(e) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4117) is amended to read as follows:

    ‘(e)(1) Notwithstanding any other provision of this chapter, participation in the management of a labor organization for purposes of collective bargaining or acting as a representative of a labor organization for such purpose is prohibited under this chapter--

      ‘(A) on the part of any management official or confidential employee;

      ‘(B) on the part of any individual who has served as a management official or confidential employee during the preceding two years; or

      ‘(C) on the part of any other employee if the participation or activity would result in a conflict of interest or apparent conflict of interest or would otherwise be incompatible with law or with the official functions of such employee.

    ‘(2) For the purposes of paragraph (1)(B) the term ‘management official’ does not include any chief of mission, principal officer, or deputy thereof, or any administrative or personnel officer abroad.’.

SEC. 142. WAIVER OF LIMITATION FOR CERTAIN CLAIMS FOR PERSONAL PROPERTY DAMAGE OR LOSS.

    (a) CLAIMS RESULTING FROM EMERGENCY EVACUATION IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY- Subsection 3721(b) of title 31 of the United States Code is amended--

      (1) by inserting ‘(1)’ after ‘(b)’; and

      (2) by adding after paragraph (1), as so designated, the following:

    ‘(2) The Secretary of State may waive the settlement and payment limitation referred to in paragraph (1) for claims for damage or loss by United States Government personnel under the jurisdiction of a chief of mission in a foreign country if such claims arise from a departure from the country authorized or ordered under circumstances described in section 5522(a) of title 5, if the Secretary determines that there exists exceptional circumstances that warrant such a waiver.’.

    (b) RETROACTIVE APPLICATION- The amendments made by subsection (a) shall apply with respect to claims arising on or after October 31, 1988.

SEC. 143. SALARIES OF CHIEFS OF MISSION.

    Section 401(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3961(a)) is amended by striking ‘, exclusive of danger pay,’.

SEC. 144. SENIOR FOREIGN SERVICE PERFORMANCE PAY.

    (a) PROHIBITION ON AWARDS- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of State may not award or pay performance payments for fiscal years 1994 and 1995 under section 405 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3965), until the Director of the Office of Personnel Management issues regulations or otherwise authorizes or recommends the payment of rank awards or performance awards to other Federal employees for such fiscal years under section 4507 or 5384 of title 5, United States Code.

    (b) AWARDS IN SUBSEQUENT FISCAL YEARS- The Secretary may not make a performance award or payment in any fiscal year after a fiscal year referred to in subsection (a) for the purpose of providing an individual with a performance award or payment to which the individual would otherwise have been entitled in a fiscal year referred to such subsection but for the prohibition described in such subsection.

    (c) AMENDMENT TO FOREIGN SERVICE ACT OF 1980- Section 405(b)(4) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3965(b)(4)) is amended to read as follows:

      ‘(4) Any award under this section shall be subject to the limitation on certain payments under section 5307 of title 5, United States Code.’.

SEC. 145. REASSIGNMENT AND RETIREMENT OF FORMER PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES.

    Section 813 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4053) is amended to read as follows:

    ‘SEC. 813. REASSIGNMENT AND RETIREMENT OF FORMER PRESIDENTIAL APPOINTEES- (a) If a participant completes an assignment under section 302(b) in a position to which the participant was appointed by the President, and is not otherwise eligible for retirement, the participant shall be reassigned in the Service within 90 days after the completion of such assignment and any period of authorized leave.

    ‘(b) If a participant completes an assignment under section 302(b) in a position to which the participant was appointed by the President, and is eligible for retirement, and is not reassigned within 90 days after the completion of such assignment and any period of authorized leave, the participant shall be retired from the Service and receive retirement benefits in accordance with section 806 or section 855, as appropriate.’.

SEC. 146. REPORT ON CLASSIFICATION OF SENIOR FOREIGN SERVICE POSITIONS.

    (a) AUDIT AND REVIEW- Within 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall conduct a classification audit of all Senior Foreign Service positions in Washington, District of Columbia, assigned to the Department of State, the Agency for International Development, and the United States Information Agency and shall review the methods for classification of such positions.

    (b) REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General shall submit a report of such audit and review to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 147. ALLOWANCES.

    (a) AWAY-FROM-POST EDUCATION ALLOWANCE- Section 5924(4)(A) of title 5, United States Code, is amended by inserting after the first sentence the following: ‘When travel from school to post is infeasible, travel may be allowed between the school attended and the home of a designated relative or family friend or to join a parent at any location, with the allowable travel expense not to exceed the cost of travel between the school and the post.’.

    (b) EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS STUDYING ABROAD- Section 5924(4)(B) of title 5, United States Code, is amended in the first sentence after ‘in the United States’ by inserting ‘(or to and from a school outside the United States if the dependent is attending that school for less than one year under a program approved by the school in the United States at which the dependent is enrolled)’.

SEC. 148. INAPPLICABILITY OF ROLLOVER AUTHORITY FOR CERTAIN ALLOWANCES AND OTHER PAYMENTS.

    Section 5307(b) of title 5, United States Code (relating to rollover authority for the making of certain payments to Federal employees) shall not apply to employees of the Department of State.

SEC. 149. GRIEVANCES.

    (a) GRIEVANCE BOARD PROCEDURES- Section 1106 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4136) is amended in the first sentence of paragraph (8) by striking ‘until the Board has ruled upon the grievance.’ and inserting ‘until the date which is one year after such determination or until the Board has ruled upon the grievance, whichever comes first. The Board shall extend the one-year limitation under the preceding sentence and the Department shall continue to suspend such action, if the Board determines that the agency or the Board is responsible for the delay in the resolution of the grievance. The Board may also extend the 1-year limit if it determines that the delay is due to the complexity of the case, the unavailability of witnesses or to circumstances beyond the control of the agency, the Board or the grievant.’.

    (b) TIME LIMITATION ON REQUESTS FOR JUDICIAL REVIEW- Section 1110 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4140) is amended in the first sentence by inserting before the period ‘, if the request for judicial review is filed not later than 180 days after the final action of the Secretary or the Board (or in the case of an aggrieved party who is posted abroad at the time of the final action of the Secretary or the Board, if the request for judicial review is filed not later than 180 days after the aggrieved party’s return to the United States)’.

SEC. 150. MID-LEVEL WOMEN AND MINORITY PLACEMENT PROGRAM.

    (a) PURPOSE- It is the purpose of this section to promote the acquisition and retention of highly qualified, trained and experienced women and minority personnel within the Foreign Service and to provide the maximum opportunity for the Foreign Service to meet staffing needs and to acquire the services of experienced and talented women and minority personnel and to help alleviate the impact of downsizing, reduction-in-force, and budget restrictions occurring in the defense and national security-related agencies of the United States.

    (b) ESTABLISHMENT- For each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995, the Secretary of State shall to the maximum extent practicable appoint as Foreign Service officers qualified women and minority applicants who are participants in the priority placement program of the Department of Defense, the Department of Defense out-placement referral program, or the Automated Applicant Referral System. The Secretary shall make such appointments through the mid-level entry program of the Department of State under section 306 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980.

    (c) REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report concerning the implementation of subsection (a) to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Such report shall include recommendations on methods to improve implementation of the purpose of this section.

SEC. 151. EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE REFERRAL SYSTEM FOR CERTAIN DEPARTMENT OF STATE EMPLOYEES.

    (a) REFERRAL SYSTEM- (1) The Secretary of State, in consultation with the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, shall establish and operate a system that provides job placement assistance to eligible personnel of the Department of State.

    (2) The system established under this section shall--

      (A) permit eligible personnel to register for job placement assistance under the system;

      (B) contain information on vacancies in employment positions throughout the Department;

      (C) facilitate the provision of information on the positions referred to in subparagraph (B) to the personnel who register for assistance under subparagraph (A); and

      (D) assist, by referral or other means, the personnel referred to in subparagraph (C) in seeking employment in such position.

    (3) The Secretary of State shall, to the maximum extent practicable, ensure that the system operated under this section is automated.

    (4) The system shall operate from a single location within the continental United States.

    (b) ELIGIBLE PERSONNEL- Personnel eligible for participation in the job placement assistance system established under this section include the following:

      (1) Personnel of the Department of State who are involuntarily separated from employment in the Department by reason of a reduction in force of such personnel.

      (2) Personnel of the Department who decline to accept a transfer to another position in the Department under such a reduction in force or other program for the consolidation of employment positions within the Department.

      (3) Former personnel of the Department whose employment with the Department was terminated for a reason described in paragraph (1) or (2).

      (4) Such other personnel of the Department as the Secretary of State determines to be eligible for such participation.

    (c) IMPLEMENTATION- The Secretary of State shall commence operation of the system required under this section not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

    (d) REPORT- Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report concerning the implementation of subsection (a) to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Such report shall include recommendations on methods to improve implementation of the job placement assistance system established under this section.

SEC. 152. FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE WITHIN THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

    (a) MODEL FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE POSTS PROGRAM- Section 161(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (22 U.S.C. 4171 note) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: ‘Implementation of this program shall not deny other posts, not so designated, of required language-qualified personnel.’.

    (b) ADDITIONS TO LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY IN THE EMPLOYEE EVALUATION REPORT- Section 164(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (22 U.S.C. 4001(a) note) is amended--

      (1) by inserting ‘(1)’ immediately after ‘Competence- ’; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following:

    ‘(2)(A) In any assessment under paragraph (1), if a supervisor believes that an employee’s proficiency in a foreign language has declined below the minimum proficiency level required for the employee’s current assignment, the supervisor shall recommend that the employee seek remedial language refresher training and, within reasonable limitations, excuse the employee from a portion of his or her regular responsibilities to do so.

    ‘(B) In the event the employee identified under subparagraph (A) is assigned to a language-designated position and is receiving a language differential for having achieved a required level of foreign language proficiency, the supervisor may also require that the employee’s current proficiency in the foreign language be reevaluated at the earliest opportunity. In this case the employee’s proficiency shall be evaluated by reference to the standards and practices employed by the Foreign Service Institute. If the Foreign Service Institute determines that the employee has failed to maintain the required level of proficiency, the Department of State shall suspend the differential until the required proficiency level is regained.

    ‘(C) For purposes of this section, the earliest opportunity for reevaluation of an employee’s foreign language proficiency by the Foreign Service Institute shall be, for employees not already in the Washington, D.C. area, the next time the employee travels to the Washington, D.C. area on official travel orders, or the next time a Foreign Service Institute examiner visits the employee’s post of assignment on regularly scheduled travel. No additional travel funds may be expended for this purpose.’.

SEC. 153. DESIGNATION OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE RESOURCES COORDINATOR.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--

      (1) the post-Cold War era is placing increasing demands on limited Federal foreign language resources available to support diplomacy, intelligence, military preparedness, international security, and global economic competitiveness goals;

      (2) the absence of a single interagency mechanism to coordinate Federal foreign language resources represents a significant weakness in the United States Government’s ability to mobilize and direct existing foreign language assets in support of national foreign policy goals; and

      (3) there is a growing need for coordination of all Federal agencies maintaining and utilizing foreign language resources--

        (A) to increase cost-effectiveness through sharing of resources;

        (B) to identify foreign language needs and priorities required to support foreign policy objectives; and

        (C) to identify foreign language resources capable of supporting global economic competitiveness goals and to facilitate private sector access to those resources.

    (b) POLICY- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the Secretary of State, by virtue of his overall responsibility under section 701(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4011(a)) for training and instruction in the field of foreign relations to meet the needs of all Federal agencies, should take the lead in this effort; and

      (2) in order to avoid other Federal agencies duplicating the facilities and training provided by the Secretary of State, a goal set out in section 701(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4011(b)), the Secretary of State should call upon other Federal agencies to share in the joint management and coordination of Federal foreign language resources.

    (c) DESIGNATION OF POSITION AND DUTIES- (1) The Secretary of State shall appoint a Foreign Language Resources Coordinator (in this subsection referred to as the ‘Coordinator’) who shall be responsible--

      (A) for coordinating the efforts of the appropriate agencies of Government--

        (i) to strengthen mechanisms for sharing of foreign language resources; and

        (ii) to identify Federal foreign language resource requirements in the areas of diplomacy, intelligence, military preparedness, international security, and other foreign policy objectives; and

      (B) for making recommendations to the Secretary of State as to which Federal foreign language assets, if any, should be made available to the private sector in support of national global economic competitiveness goals.

    (2) All United States Government agencies maintaining and utilizing Federal foreign language training and related resources shall cooperate fully with the Coordinator.

SEC. 154. FOREIGN LANGUAGE TRANSLATOR AND INTERPRETER CAREER SERVICE PROGRAM.

    (a) PURPOSE- It is the purpose of this section--

      (1) to enhance the capability of the Department of State to provide cost-effective, timely, and reliable translation and interpretation services for Government use;

      (2) to obtain the services of professionally trained translators and interpreters of foreign languages for which the Secretary of State determines there is a shortage of qualified Government personnel which cannot otherwise be filled; and

      (3) to stimulate United States institutions of higher education to dedicate more resources to higher levels of proficiency in their foreign language translation and interpretation programs.

    (b) PROGRAM- (1)(A) The Secretary shall establish a program whereby the Department of State would obtain the services of additional translators and interpreters trained at institutions of higher education in the United States.

    (B) Such program shall be referred to as the ‘Foreign Language Translator and Interpreter Career Service Program’.

    (2)(A) Under such program, the Secretary shall pay the costs of tuition for eligible United States citizens who pursue professional training in translation or interpretation in foreign languages for which the Secretary determines there is a shortage of qualified Government personnel. In exchange, individuals who successfully complete training shall agree to perform such services at an entry-level rate of pay in the Department of State for a period of not less than one year for each year of academic tuition paid.

    (B) Such individuals may be detailed or referred for direct employment to other Government agencies in accordance with practices and procedures established by the Secretary.

    (c) ELIGIBILITY- A United States citizen shall be eligible for participation in the program under this section if--

      (1) the individual--

        (A) is enrolled as a full-time student at an institution of higher education in the United States; and

        (B) is pursuing a full-time program in a foreign language translation or interpretation;

      (2) the institution and the program meet the accreditation, curriculum, certification, and other standards prescribed by the Secretary; and

      (3) the individual submits a written application to the Secretary and meets the minimum criteria prescribed by the Secretary.

    (d) NONCOMPLIANCE- Any individual participating in the program who fails to complete a program meeting the standards prescribed in subsection (c)(2) shall reimburse the Department of State for the Federal funds expended for such individual’s tuition, together with interest on such funds (calculated at the prevailing rate).

    (e) SURCHARGE FOR CERTAIN FOREIGN LANGUAGE SERVICES- (1) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary of State is authorized to levy a surcharge, or otherwise solicit funds, for providing other executive branch agencies with foreign language translation and interpretation services for which the Secretary of State has determined for purposes of subsection (b)(2) there is a shortage of qualified Government personnel.

    (2) Funds collected under the authority of subsection (e) shall be deposited as an offsetting collection to any Department of State appropriation to recover the cost of providing translation or interpretation services in any foreign language for which the Secretary has determined there is a shortage of qualified Government personnel, including the cost of training translators or interpreters pursuant to subsection (b).

    (f) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Amounts authorized to be appropriated under this section are authorized to remain available until expended.

    (g) DEFINITIONS- For the purposes of this section--

      (1) the term ‘institution of higher education’ has the same meaning given to such term by section 1201(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965;

      (2) the term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of State, acting through the Office of Language Services or any successor office; and

      (3) the term ‘shortage of qualified Government personnel’ means a shortage or absence of sufficiently trained and qualified personnel to meet minimum requirements for permanent Government employment as translators or interpreters by reference to the standards employed by the Office of Language Services (or successor office), which cannot otherwise be filled from contract rosters or other sources.

PART E--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

Subpart A--United Nations and Related Agencies

SEC. 161. LIMITATION ON CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS AND AFFILIATED ORGANIZATIONS.

    The United States shall not make any voluntary or assessed contribution--

      (1) to any affiliated organization of the United Nations which grants full membership as a state to any organization or group that does not have the internationally recognized attributes of statehood, or

      (2) to the United Nations, if the United Nations grants full membership as a state in the United Nations to any organization or group that does not have the internationally recognized attributes of statehood, during any period in which such membership is effective.

SEC. 162. UNITED NATIONS SECURITY COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The effectiveness of the United Nations Security Council in maintaining international peace and security depends on its being representative of the membership of the United Nations.

      (2) The requirement of equitable geographic distribution in Article 23 of the United Nations Charter requires that the members of the Security Council of the United Nations be chosen by nondiscriminatory means.

      (3) The use of informal regional groups of the General Assembly as the sole means for election of the nonpermanent members of the Security Council is inherently discriminatory in the absence of guarantees that all member states will have the opportunity to join a regional group, and has resulted in discrimination against Israel.

    (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that the President should direct the Secretary of State to request the Secretary-General of the United Nations to seek immediate resolution of the problem described in this section. The President shall inform the Congress of any progress in resolving this situation, together with the submission to Congress of the request for funding for the ‘Contributions to International Organizations’ account of the Department of State for the fiscal year 1995.

SEC. 163. REFORMS IN THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION.

    (a) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that United States contributions to the World Health Organization (WHO) should be utilized in the most effective and efficient manner possible, particularly for the reduction of diseases and disabilities in developing countries. The President shall direct the United States representatives to the World Health Assembly, the Executive Board, and the World Health Organization to monitor the activities of the World Health Organization to ensure that such organizations achieve--

      (1) the timely implementation of reforms and management improvements, including those outlined in the resolutions of the 46th World Health Assembly related to the external Auditor (WHA 46.21), the Report of the Executive Board on the WHO Response to Global Change (WHA 46.16) and actions for Budgetary Reform (WHA 46.35); and

      (2) the effective and efficient utilization and monitoring of resources, including--

        (A) the determination of strategic and financial priorities; and

        (B) the establishment of realistic and measurable targets in accordance with the established health priorities.

    (b) REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives a report assessing the World Health Organization’s progress in implementing the reforms identified in subsection (a)(1) and (2).

SEC. 164. REFORMS IN THE FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION.

    In view of the longstanding efforts of the United States and the other major donor nations to reform the Food and Agriculture Organization and in view of the findings of the ongoing investigation of the General Accounting Office, it is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the United States should use the opportunity of the 1993 election of a new Director General of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to press for long-needed organizational and management reforms; and

      (2) it should be the policy of the United States to promote the following reforms in the Food and Agriculture Organization:

        (A) Decentralization of the administrative structure of FAO, including eliminating redundant or unnecessary headquarters staff, increased responsibilities of regional offices, increased time for consideration of budget issues by member states, and a more meaningful and direct role for member states in the decision-making process.

        (B) Reform of the FAO Council, including formation of an executive management committee to provide oversight of management.

        (C) Limitation of the term of the Director General and the number of terms which an individual may serve.

        (D) Restructuring of the Technical Cooperation Program (TCP), including reducing the number of nonemergency projects funds through the TCP and establishing procedures to deploy TCP consultants, supplies, and equipment in a timely manner.

SEC. 165. REFORM IN BUDGET DECISIONMAKING PROCEDURES OF THE UNITED NATIONS AND ITS SPECIALIZED AGENCIES.

    (a) ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS- For assessed contributions authorized to be appropriated by section 102(a) of this Act, the President may withhold 20 percent of the funds appropriated for the United States assessed contribution to the United Nations or to any of its specialized agencies for any calendar year if the United Nations or any such agency has failed to implement or to continue to implement consensus-based decisionmaking procedures on budgetary matters which assure that sufficient attention is paid to the views of the United States and other member states that are the major financial contributors to such assessed budgets.

    (b) NOTICE TO CONGRESS- The President shall notify the Congress when a decision is made to withhold any share of the United States assessed contribution to the United Nations or its specialized agencies pursuant to subsection (a) and shall notify the Congress when the decision is made to pay any previously withheld assessed contribution. A notification under this subsection shall include appropriate consultation between the President (or his representative) and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

    (c) CONTRIBUTIONS FOR PRIOR YEARS- Subject to the availability of appropriations, payment of assessed contributions for prior years may be made to the United Nations or any of its specialized agencies notwithstanding subsection (a) of this section, section 162(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138), section 405 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (Public Law 101-246) and section 143 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (Public Law 99-93) if such payment would further United States interests in that organization.

    (d) REPORT TO CONGRESS- Not later than February 1 of each year, the President shall submit a report to the Congress concerning the payment of assessed contributions to the United Nations and any of its specialized agencies during the preceding calendar year.

    (e) REPEAL OF EXISTING LAW- Subsections (a) through (d) of section 162 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993, are repealed.

SEC. 166. UNITED NATIONS BUDGETARY AND MANAGEMENT REFORM.

    (a) POLICY- The President, acting through the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations, shall propose that the Secretary-General of the United Nations establish an advisory committee to assist in the creation within the United Nations of a mechanism, process, or office--

      (1) to conduct and supervise audits and investigations of United Nations operations;

      (2) to provide leadership and coordination, and to recommend policies, for activities designed--

        (A) to promote economy, efficiency, and effectiveness in the administration of, and

        (B) to prevent and detect fraud and abuse in,

      such operations; and

      (3) to provide a means for keeping the Secretary-General fully and currently informed about problems and deficiencies relating to the administration of such operations and the necessity for and progress of corrective action.

    (b) ADVISORY COMMITTEE- An advisory committee established consistent with subsection (a) should be comprised of the permanent representative of each country which is a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council and one official designated by the Secretary-General from the United Nations Secretariat, who shall serve as chair.

    (c) FUNCTIONS- Such advisory committee should evaluate and make recommendations regarding the efforts of the United Nations and its specialized agencies--

      (1) to establish a system of cost-based accounting;

      (2) to continue the practice of conducting internal audits;

      (3) to remedy any irregularities found by such audits; and

      (4) to make arrangements for regular, independent audits of United Nations operations.

    (d) REPORT- Not later than October 1, 1994, the President shall submit a report to the Congress stating--

      (1) whether the Secretary-General has established the advisory committee described in subsection (b);

      (2) whether the advisory committee is carrying out its functions under subsection (c); and

      (3) whether a mechanism, process, or office described in subsection (a) has been established and is carrying out paragraphs (1) through (3) of that subsection.

    (e) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘United Nations operations’ includes any program, project, or activity conducted or supported, in whole or in part, by the United Nations or any of its specialized agencies.

SEC. 167. COST ASSESSMENT REPORT REGARDING ANY UNITED STATES PARTICIPATION IN ACTION UNDER ARTICLE 42 OF THE UNITED NATIONS CHARTER.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Except as provided in subsection (b), at least 15 days before--

      (1) any obligation of funds for United States participation in international peace operations, or

      (2) any vote by the Security Council to take action under Article 42 of the Charter of the United Nations which would involve the use of United States Armed Forces,

    the President shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report containing a cost assessment of the participation of the United States Armed Forces in those operations.

    (b) EXCEPTION- The period for submission of the report specified in subsection (a) shall not apply if the President determines that an emergency exists which prevents submission of the report in a timely manner.

    (c) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘United States participation in international peace operations’ means the use of the United States Armed Forces--

      (1) pursuant to, or consistent with, action taken by the Security Council under Article 42 of the Charter of the United Nations; or

      (2) consistent with the United Nations Participation Act of 1945.

SEC. 168. CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION REGARDING ANY UNITED STATES IMPLEMENTATION OF ARTICLE 43 OF THE UNITED NATIONS CHARTER.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Except as provided in subsection (b), at least 15 days before any agency or entity of the United States Government makes available armed forces, assistance, or facilities to the United Nations under Article 43 of the United Nations Charter, the President shall so notify the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives.

    (b) EXCEPTION- The period for notifying Congress in subsection (a) shall not apply if the President determines that an emergency exists which prevents making a notification in a timely manner.

    (c) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘assistance’ means assistance of any kind, including the provision of logistical support and the grant of rights of passage.

SEC. 169. REPORT ON UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES.

    Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and each year thereafter at the time of the President’s budget submission to Congress, the Secretary of State, after consultation with the heads of other relevant Federal agencies (including the Department of Defense), shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report on United States contributions to United Nations peacekeeping activities. Such report shall include--

      (1) the overall cost of all peacekeeping operations as of the date of the report;

      (2) the costs of each peacekeeping operation;

      (3) the amount of United States contributions (assessed and voluntary) on an operation-by-operation basis; and

      (4) an assessment of the effectiveness of ongoing peacekeeping operations, their relevance to United States national interests, the efforts by the United Nations to resolve the relevant armed conflicts, and the projected termination dates for such operations.

SEC. 170. UNITED STATES PERSONNEL AND MATERIAL CONTRIBUTIONS TO PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    (a) PERSONNEL- (1) The United Nations should reimburse the United States for use of personnel of the Armed Forces of the United States in United Nations peacekeeping operations. The amount of the reimbursement should be the full United Nations reimbursement determined on a per-person-per-month basis.

    (2) To the extent that funds are made available under law to the Department of Defense for peacekeeping activities, the Secretary of State may accept the United Nations reimbursement in the form of a credit against the amount of an assessment by the United Nations against the United States. If no such funds are available, the Secretary of State shall accept payment of the United Nations reimbursement and, out of the amount received, reimburse the Department of Defense for the incremental costs of use of the Armed Forces personnel in the United Nations peacekeeping operation.

    (b) GOODS AND SERVICES- The United Nations should reimburse the Department of Defense directly for goods and services provided to a United Nations peacekeeping operation. The Secretary of Defense may waive reimbursement for such goods and services if the Secretary determines that the waiver is justified by exceptional circumstances.

    (c) VALUE OF GOODS AND SERVICES- The Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations should use the voice and vote of the United States to ensure that goods and services provided by the United States to United Nations peacekeeping operations are reimbursed at the appropriate value.

    (d) REPORT- Not later than one year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations shall submit a report to the Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House of Representatives on all actions taken by the United States mission to the United Nations to ensure that contributions of personnel, goods, and services to United Nations peacekeeping operations are reimbursed at their appropriate values.

    (e) REVIEW AND REASSESSMENT OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS TO UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS- (1) The Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations should make every effort to ensure the United Nations completes an overall review and reassessment of each nation’s assessed contribution for international peacekeeping operations.

    (2) As part of the overall review and assessment, the Permanent Representative should make every effort to advance the concept that host governments and other governments in the region where a peacekeeping operation is deployed should bear a greater burden of its financial cost.

    (3) The Permanent Representative should further make every effort to seek a United States contribution to United Nations peacekeeping operations that matches the United States share of assessed contributions.

SEC. 170A. POLICY WITH RESPECT TO THE ESTABLISHMENT OF AN INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT.

    (a) CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the freedom and security of the international community rests on the sanctity of the rule of law;

      (2) the international community is increasingly threatened by unlawful acts such as war crimes, genocide, aggression, crimes against humanity, terrorism, drug trafficking, money laundering, and other crimes of an international character;

      (3) the prosecution of individuals suspected of carrying out such acts is often impeded by political and legal obstacles such as amnesties, disputes over extradition, differences in the structure and capabilities of national courts, and the lack of uniform guidelines under which to try such individuals;

      (4) the war crimes trials held in the aftermath of World War II at Nuremberg, Germany, and Tokyo, Japan, demonstrated that fair and effective prosecution of war criminals could be carried out in an international forum;

      (5) since its inception in 1945 the United Nations has sought to build on the precedent established at the Nuremberg and Tokyo trials by establishing a permanent international criminal court with jurisdiction over crimes of an international character;

      (6) United Nations General Assembly Resolution 44/39, adopted on December 4, 1989, called on the International Law Commission to study the feasibility of an international criminal court;

      (7) in the years after passage of that resolution the International Law Commission has taken a number of steps to advance the debate over such a court, including--

        (A) the provisional adoption of a draft Code of Crimes Against the Peace and Security of Mankind;

        (B) the creation of a Working Group on an International Criminal Jurisdiction and the formulation by that Working Group of several concrete proposals for the establishment and operation of an international criminal court; and

        (C) the determination that an international criminal court along the lines of that suggested by the Working Group is feasible and that the logical next step would be to proceed with the formal drafting of a statute for such a court;

      (8) United Nations General Assembly Resolution 47/33, adopted on November 25, 1992, called on the International Law Commission to begin the process of drafting a statute for an international criminal court at its next session; and

      (9) given the developments of recent years, the time is propitious for the United States to lend its support to this effort.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the establishment of an international criminal court with jurisdiction over crimes of an international character would greatly strengthen the international rule of law;

      (2) such a court would thereby serve the interests of the United States and the world community; and

      (3) the United States delegation should make every effort to advance this proposal at the United Nations.

    (c) REQUIRED REPORT- Not later than February 1, 1994, the President shall submit to Congress a detailed report on developments relating to, and United States efforts in support of, the establishment of an international criminal court with jurisdiction over crimes of an international character.

Subpart B--Other International Organizations

SEC. 171. INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION TO RECEIVE PAYMENTS- Section 2 of the American-Mexican Chamizal Convention Act of 1964 (22 U.S.C. 277d-18) is amended--

      (1) by inserting ‘(a)’ before ‘The’; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following new subsections:

    ‘(b) The United States Commissioner is authorized to receive funds from public or private sources in the United States or Mexico for the purpose of sharing in the cost of replacement of the Bridge of the Americas, which crosses the Rio Grande between El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, such payments of money shall be credited to any appropriation to the Commission which is currently available. Funds received under this subsection shall be available only for the replacement of such bridge.

    ‘(c) The authority of subsection (b) may be exercised only to the extent or in such amounts as are provided in advance in appropriation Acts.’.

    (b) EXPENDITURES FOR WATER POLLUTION PROBLEMS- Title I of the Act of June 20, 1956 (70 Stat. 302; 22 U.S.C. 277d-12), is amended in the fourth undesignated paragraph under the heading ‘INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO’ by striking ‘Tijuana Rivers,’ and all that follows before the period and inserting ‘Tijuana Rivers, or other streams running across or near the boundary, and for taking emergency actions to protect against health-threatening surface and ground water pollution problems along the United States-Mexico boundary’.

    (c) FALCON AND AMISTAD DAMS MAINTENANCE FUND- Section 2 of the Act of June 18, 1954 (68 Stat. 255), as amended by the Act of December 23, 1963 (77 Stat. 475), is further amended to read as follows:

    ‘SEC. 2. (a) There is created within the Treasury of the United States a separate fund, which shall be known as the ‘Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund’ (in this section referred to as the ‘Maintenance Fund’). The Maintenance Fund shall be administered by the Administrator of the Western Area Power Administration for use by the Commissioner of the United States Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission to defray the operation, maintenance, and emergency costs of the hydroelectric facilities at the Falcon and Amistad dams.

    ‘(b) All revenues collected in connection with the disposition of electric power generated at the Falcon and Amistad dams, except those revenues paid pursuant to subsection (d) to the general fund of the Treasury of the United States, shall be credited to the Maintenance Fund and shall remain available until expended for defraying the operation, maintenance, and emergency costs of the hydroelectric facilities at the dams.

    ‘(c) The authority of subsection (b) may be exercised only to the extent or in such amounts as are provided in advance in appropriation Acts.

    ‘(d) Revenues in the Maintenance Fund in excess of the operation, maintenance, and emergency needs shall be paid annually to the general fund of the Treasury of the United States to return the costs of replacements and the original investments, with interest.

    ‘(e) All funds received from the Government of Mexico for any energy which might be delivered to that Government by the United States Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission pursuant to any special agreement concluded in accordance with Article 19 of the treaty of February 3, 1944, between the United States and Mexico (Treaty Series 994) shall be credited to the General Fund of the Treasury of the United States.’.

SEC. 172. UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASIAN-PACIFIC ECONOMIC COOPERATION ORGANIZATION.

    (a) UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP- The President is authorized to maintain membership of the United States in the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

    (b) PAYMENT OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS- For fiscal year 1994 and for each fiscal year thereafter, the United States assessed contributions to APEC may be paid from funds appropriated for ‘Contributions to International Organizations’.

SEC. 173. EXTENSION OF THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS IMMUNITIES ACT TO THE INTERNATIONAL UNION FOR CONSERVATION OF NATURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES.

    The International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

    ‘SEC. 14. The International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources shall be considered to be an international organization for the purposes of this title and may be extended the provisions of this title in the same manner, to the same extent, and subject to the same conditions, as such provisions may be extended to a public international organization in which the United States participates pursuant to any treaty or under the authority of any Act of Congress authorizing such participation or making an appropriation for such participation.’.

SEC. 174. INTER-AMERICAN ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) FINDING- The Congress finds that the work done by the Inter-American organizations has been of great benefit to the Hemisphere, and the United States itself has experienced a positive return from their efforts.

    (b) POLICY- Taking into consideration the long-term commitment by the United States to the affairs of this Hemisphere and the need to build further upon the linkages between the United States and its neighbors, it is the sense of the Congress that the Secretary of State, in allocating the level of resources for international organizations, should pay particular attention to funding levels of the Inter-American organizations.

SEC. 175. PROHIBITION ON CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL COFFEE ORGANIZATION.

    None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or any other Act may be used to fund any United States contribution to the International Coffee Organization.

PART F--OTHER STATE DEPARTMENT-RELATED PROVISIONS

SEC. 181. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE AMENDMENTS.

    (a) MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE ACT AMENDMENTS- Section 2 of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (22 U.S.C. 2601) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘the Intergovernmental Committee for European Migration’ each place it appears and inserting ‘the International Organization for Migration’;

      (2) in subsection (a)--

        (A) by striking ‘the Committee’ and inserting ‘the Organization’ each place it appears; and

        (B) in the first sentence, by inserting before the period ‘, as amended in Geneva, Switzerland, on May 20, 1987’; and

      (3) in subsection (c)(2), by striking ‘$50,000,000’ and inserting ‘$100,000,000’.

    (b) REPEAL- Section 745 of Public Law 100-204 (22 U.S.C. 2601 note) is repealed.

SEC. 182. UNITED STATES POLICY CONCERNING OVERSEAS ASSISTANCE TO REFUGEES AND DISPLACED PERSONS.

    (a) STANDARDS FOR REFUGEE WOMEN AND CHILDREN- The United States Government, in providing for overseas assistance and protection of refugees and displaced persons, should seek to address the protection and provision of basic needs of refugee women and children who represent 80 percent of the world’s refugee population. As called for in the 1991 United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) ‘Guidelines on the Protection of Refugee Women,’ whether directly, or through international organizations, the Secretary of State should seek to ensure--

      (1) specific attention on the part of the United Nations and relief organizations to recruit and employ female protection officers;

      (2) implementation of gender awareness training and field staffing including, but not limited to, security personnel;

      (3) the protection of refugee women and children from violence and other abuses on the part of governments or insurgent groups;

      (4) full involvement of women refugees in the planning and implementation of--

        (A) the delivery of services and assistance; and

        (B) the repatriation process;

      (5) incorporation of maternal and child health needs into refugee health services and education, specifically to include education on and access to services in reproductive health and birth spacing;

      (6) the availability of counseling and other services, grievance processes, and protective services to victims of violence and abuse, including but not limited to rape and domestic violence;

      (7) the provision of educational programs, particularly literacy and numeracy, vocational and income generation skills training, and other training efforts promoting self sufficiency for refugee women, with special emphasis on women heads of household;

      (8) education for all refugee children, ensuring equal access for girls, and special services and family tracing for unaccompanied refugee minors;

      (9) the collection of data that clearly enumerate age and gender so that appropriate health, education, and assistance programs can be planned;

      (10) the recruitment, hiring, and training of more women program professionals in the international humanitarian field; and

      (11) gender awareness training for program staff of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and nongovernmental voluntary organizations on implementation of the 1991 UNHCR ‘Guidelines on the Protection of Refugee Women’.

    (b) PROCEDURES- The Secretary of State should adopt specific procedures to ensure that all recipients of United States Government refugee and migration assistance funds implement the standards outlined in subsection (a).

    (c) REQUIREMENTS FOR REFUGEE AND MIGRATION ASSISTANCE- The Secretary of State, in providing migration and refugee assistance, should support the protection efforts set forth under this section by raising at the highest levels of Government the issue of abuses against refugee women and children by governments and insurgent groups that engage in, permit, or condone--

      (1) a pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights, such as torture or cruel, inhumane, or degrading treatment or punishment, prolonged detention without charges, or other flagrant denial to life, liberty, and the security of persons;

      (2) the blockage of humanitarian relief assistance;

      (3) gender-specific persecution such as systematic individual or mass rape, forced pregnancy, forced abortion, enforced prostitution, any form of indecent assault or act of violence against refugee women, girls, and children; or

      (4) continuing violations of the integrity of the person against refugee women and children on the part of armed insurgents, local security forces, or camp guards.

    (d) INVESTIGATION OF REPORTS- Upon receipt of credible reports of abuses under subsection (c), the Secretary of State should immediately investigate such reports through emergency factfinding missions or other means of investigating such reports and help identify appropriate remedial measures.

    (e) MULTILATERAL IMPLEMENTATION OF THE 1991 UNHCR ‘GUIDELINES ON THE PROTECTION OF REFUGEE WOMEN’- The Secretary of State should work to ensure that multilateral organizations fully incorporate the needs of refugee women and children into all elements of refugee assistance programs and work to encourage other governments that provide refugee assistance to adopt refugee assistance policies designed to encourage full implementation of the UNHCR’s ‘Guidelines on the Protection of Refugee Women’.

SEC. 183. INTERPARLIAMENTARY EXCHANGES.

    (a) MEXICO-UNITED STATES INTERPARLIAMENTARY GROUP- Section 2 of the Act of April 9, 1960 (22 U.S.C. 276i) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘$100,000’ and inserting ‘$80,000’; and

      (2) by striking ‘$50,000’ both places it appears and inserting ‘$40,000’.

    (b) CANADA-UNITED STATES INTERPARLIAMENTARY GROUP- Section 2 of the Act of June 11, 1959 (22 U.S.C. 276e) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘$50,000’ and inserting ‘$70,000’; and

      (2) by striking ‘$25,000’ both places it appears and inserting ‘$35,000’.

    (c) DEPOSIT OF FUNDS IN INTEREST-BEARING ACCOUNTS- Funds appropriated and disbursed pursuant to section 303 of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriation Act, 1988 (as added by section 101(a) of Public Law 100-202) (101 Stat. 1329-23; 22 U.S.C. 276 note) are authorized to be deposited in interest-bearing accounts and any interest which accrues shall be deposited, periodically, in the miscellaneous receipts account of the Treasury.

SEC. 184. REPORT ON TERRORIST ASSETS IN THE UNITED STATES.

    Section 304(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘Treasury’ and inserting ‘Treasury, in consultation with the Attorney General and the heads of the other appropriate investigative agencies,’; and

      (2) by inserting at the end ‘Each such report shall provide a detailed list and description of specific assets.’.

SEC. 185. COORDINATION OF COUNTERTERRORISM ACTIVITIES.

    (a) FINDINGS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) international terrorism continues to be a serious threat to the peace and security of democratic nations, the United States included;

      (2) international terrorist acts against the United States or its people can only be combatted through a vigorous coordination of efforts on the part of responsible United States Federal agencies; and

      (3) United States citizens have continued to be targets of terrorism both at home and abroad.

    (b) COORDINATION- The Congress strongly urges the Secretary of State to take steps to ensure that coordination of counterterrorism activities occupies a high priority within the Department of State by a demonstrated dedication to the assignment of both personnel and resources to the issue of counterterrorism.

SEC. 186. FACILITATING ACCESS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE BUILDING.

    (a) PROCEDURES TO FACILITATE ACCESS- The Office of Diplomatic Security shall establish procedures to ensure that the members and staff of the congressional committees of jurisdiction are granted easy access to the Department of State in the conduct of their duties. Such procedures shall enable an individual employed by any such committee to be granted immediate access to the Department of State building upon the presentation of a valid United States Senate or House of Representatives identification card, if such individual’s name appears on a list of staff members provided in advance in writing to the Office of Diplomatic Security by the chairman and ranking member of the committee employing such staff. A copy of such list shall be made available to the reception desk at the Department of State.

    (b) PARKING PERMITS- The Office of Diplomatic Security shall also make available a reasonable number of parking permits to each committee in order to facilitate attendance of meetings at the Department of State.

    (c) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘congressional committees of jurisdiction’ means the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 187. RECORD OF PLACE OF BIRTH FOR TAIWANESE-AMERICANS.

    For purposes of the registration of birth or certification of nationality of a United States citizen born in Taiwan, the Secretary of State shall permit the place of birth to be recorded as Taiwan.

SEC. 188. REPEAL OF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.

    The following provisions of law are hereby repealed:

      (1) Section 37(d) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2709), relating to firearms regulations for special agents.

      (2) Section 214(c) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 4314), relating to extraordinary protective services to foreign missions.

      (3) Section 216(d) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 4316(d)), relating to application of travel restrictions to personnel of certain countries and organizations.

      (4) Section 108 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1978 (22 U.S.C. 2151n-1), relating to Americans incarcerated abroad.

      (5) Section 512(b)(2) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1978 (22 U.S.C. 2428a(b)), relating to withdrawal of United States troops from Korea.

      (6) Section 412(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3972(b)), relating to special differentials for Foreign Service officers.

      (7) The second sentence of section 2207(c) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4171(c)), relating to foreign language competence requirements: exceptions.

      (8) The second sentence of section 103(b) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1982 and 1983 (22 U.S.C. 2656 note), relating to status of certain consulates to be reopened.

      (9) Section 9 of the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465g), relating to evaluation of Cuba service programming.

      (10) Section 130(c) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 (22 U.S.C. 3982 note), relating to merger of Foreign Service Information Corps into the Foreign Service Corps.

      (11) Section 207(b) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 (22 U.S.C. 2460 note), relating to foreign travel financed from the United States Information Agency’s private sector program.

      (12) Section 120(d) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (Public Law 99-93), relating to Foreign Service associates pilot project.

      (13) Section 611 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (22 U.S.C. 4711), relating to United States scholarship program for developing countries.

      (14) Section 812(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (Public Law 99-93), relating to Japan’s fulfillment of its common defense commitments.

      (15) Section 153(d) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 4301 note; Public Law 100-204), relating to United States-Soviet reciprocity in matters relating to embassies.

      (16) Section 701(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 287e note; Public Law 100-204), relating to status of secondment within the United Nations.

      (17) Section 804(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 (Public Law 101-246), relating to compliance with commitments by the Palestine Liberation Organization.

      (18) Section 1(5) of the joint resolution entitled ‘Joint resolution relating to NASA and the International Space Year’, approved July 31, 1990 (Public Law 101-339), relating to the international space year--1992.

      (19) Section 232 of the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty Implementation Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-228), relating to activities to reduce Soviet military threat.

      (20) Section 401(c) of the Conventional Forces in Europe Treaty Implementation Act of 1991 (22 U.S.C. 2551 note), relating to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency’s revitalization report.

TITLE II--UNITED STATES INFORMATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS

PART A--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

SEC. 201. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated to carry out international information activities, and educational and cultural exchange programs under the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, Reorganization Plan Number 2 of 1977, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act, the Board for International Broadcasting Act, the Inspector General Act of 1978, the National Endowment for Democracy Act, and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes:

      (1) SALARIES AND EXPENSES- For ‘Salaries and Expenses’ for the United States Information Agency, $478,854,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $478,854,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (2) EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS-

        (A) FULBRIGHT ACADEMIC EXCHANGE PROGRAMS- For the ‘Fulbright Academic Exchange Programs’, $141,043,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $141,043,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

        (B) OTHER EXISTING PROGRAMS- For ‘Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program’, ‘Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program’, ‘International Visitors Program’, ‘Israeli-Arab Scholarship Program’, ‘Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program’, ‘Claude and Mildred Pepper Scholarship Program of the Washington Workshops Foundation’, ‘Citizen Exchange Programs’, ‘Congress-Bundestag Exchange Program’, ‘Newly Independent States and Eastern Europe Training’, ‘Institute for Representative Government’, ‘Freedom Support Act Secondary School Exchanges’, and ‘Arts America’, $105,879,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $105,879,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

        (C) NEW PROGRAMS-

          (i) GOODWILL GAMES- For the Goodwill Games, $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 1994.

          (ii) EAST TIMOR- For scholarships for East Timorese students established by section 222, $150,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $150,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

          (iii) CAMBODIA- For scholarships for Cambodians established by section 223, $500,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $500,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

          (iv) WORLD CUP- For events associated with the 1994 World Cup soccer finals, $4,500,000 for the fiscal year 1994.

      (3) BROADCASTING TO CUBA- For ‘Broadcasting to Cuba’, $28,351,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $28,351,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (4) INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACTIVITIES- For ‘International Broadcasting Activities’ $560,790,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $560,790,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (5) OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL- For the ‘Office of the Inspector General’, $4,390,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $4,390,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (6) NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY- For the ‘National Endowment for Democracy’, $50,000,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $50,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (7) CENTER FOR CULTURAL AND TECHNICAL INTERCHANGE BETWEEN EAST AND WEST- For the ‘Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange between East and West’, $26,000,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $26,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995.

      (8) INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS- For ‘International Broadcasting Operations’, $395,356,000 for the fiscal year 1996 and $400,784,000 for the fiscal year 1997.

      (9) RADIO CONSTRUCTION- For ‘Radio Construction’, $108,874,000 for the fiscal year 1996 and $111,528,000 for the fiscal year 1997.

    (b) AUTHORIZATION WITHIN ‘SALARIES AND EXPENSES ACCOUNT’- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a)(1), $350,000 is authorized for the fiscal year 1994 for the establishment and operation of a United States Information Agency office in Lhasa, Tibet, under section 219 of this Act and $350,000 is authorized for the fiscal year 1995 for the continued operation of such office.

    (c) AUTHORIZATIONS WITHIN ‘FULBRIGHT ACADEMIC EXCHANGE PROGRAMS’-

      (1) Of the amount authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a)(2)(A), $3,000,000 is authorized for the fiscal year 1994 and $3,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for the Vietnam scholarship program established by section 229 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138).

      (2) Of the amount authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a)(2)(A), $2,000,000 is authorized for the fiscal year 1994 and $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 1995 for the ‘Environment and Sustainable Development Exchange Program’ established by section 224 of this Act.

PART B--USIA AND RELATED AGENCIES AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 211. CHANGES IN ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES.

    Section 801 of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1471) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (5), by striking ‘and’ after the semicolon;

      (2) in paragraph (6), by striking the period at the end and inserting ‘; and’; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      ‘(7) notwithstanding any other provision of law, to carry out projects involving security construction and related improvements for Agency facilities not physically located together with Department of State facilities abroad.’.

SEC. 212. BUYING POWER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT.

    Section 704(c) of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1477b(c)) is amended--

      (1) by redesignating clauses (1) and (2) as clauses (A) and (B), respectively;

      (2) by inserting ‘(1)’ after ‘(c)’; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:

    ‘(2) In carrying out this subsection, there may be established a Buying Power Maintenance account.

    ‘(3) In order to eliminate substantial gains to the approved levels of overseas operations for the United States Information Agency, the Director shall transfer to the Buying Power Maintenance account such amounts appropriated for ‘Salaries and Expenses’ as the Director determines are excessive to the needs of the approved level of operations under that appropriation account because of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates or changes in overseas wages and prices.

    ‘(4) In order to offset adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates or foreign wages and prices, the Director may transfer from the Buying Power Maintenance account to the ‘Salaries and Expenses’ appropriations account such amounts as the Director determines are necessary to maintain the approved level of operations under that appropriation account.

    ‘(5) Funds transferred by the Director from the Buying Power Maintenance account to another account shall be merged with and be available for the same purpose, and for the same time period, as the funds in that other account. Funds transferred by the Director from another account to the Buying Power Maintenance account shall be merged with the funds in the Buying Power Maintenance account and shall be available for the purposes of that account until expended.

    ‘(6) Any restriction contained in an appropriation Act or other provision of law limiting the amounts that may be obligated or expended by the United States Information Agency shall be deemed to be adjusted to the extent necessary to offset the net effect of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates or overseas wage and price changes in order to maintain approved levels.

    ‘(7)(A) Subject to the limitations contained in this paragraph, not later than the end of the 5th fiscal year after the fiscal year for which funds are appropriated or otherwise made available for the ‘Salaries and Expenses’ account, the Director may transfer any unobligated balance of such funds to the Buying Power Maintenance account.

    ‘(B) The balance of the Buying Power Maintenance account may not exceed $50,000,000 as a result of any transfer under this paragraph.

    ‘(C) Any transfer pursuant to this paragraph shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 705 and shall be available for obligation or expenditure only in accordance with the procedures under such section.

    ‘(D) The authorities contained in this section may only be exercised to such an extent and in such amounts as specifically provided in advance in appropriation Acts.’.

SEC. 213. CONTRACT AUTHORITY.

    Section 802(b) of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1472(b)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

    ‘(4)(A) Notwithstanding the other provisions of this subsection, the United States Information Agency is authorized to enter into contracts for periods not to exceed 7 years for circuit capacity to distribute radio and television programs.

    ‘(B) The authority of this paragraph may be exercised for a fiscal year only to such extent or in such amounts as are provided in advance in appropriations Acts.’.

SEC. 214. PROHIBITION ON DISCRIMINATORY CONTRACTS.

    (a) PROHIBITION-

      (1) Except for real estate leases and as provided in subsection (b), the United States Information Agency may not enter into any contract that expends funds appropriated to the United States Information Agency for an amount in excess of the small purchase threshold (as defined in section 4(11) of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act (41 U.S.C. 403(11))--

        (A) with a foreign person that complies with the Arab League boycott of Israel, or

        (B) with any foreign or United States person that discriminates in the award of subcontracts on the basis of religion.

      (2) For purposes of this section--

        (A) a foreign person complies with the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries when that foreign person takes or knowingly agrees to take any action, with respect to the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries, which section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)) prohibits a United States person from taking, except that for purposes of this paragraph, the term ‘United States person’ as used in subparagraphs (B) and (C) of section 8(a)(1) of such Act shall be deemed to mean ‘person’; and

        (B) the term ‘foreign person’ means any person other than a United States person as defined in section 16(2) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2415).

      (3) For purposes of paragraph (1), a foreign person shall be deemed not to comply with the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries if that person, or the Director of the United States Information Agency or his designee on the basis of available information, certifies that the person violates or otherwise does not comply with the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries by taking any actions prohibited by section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)). Certification by the Director of the United States Information Agency or his designee may occur only 30 days after notice has been given to the Congress that this certification procedure will be utilized at a specific overseas mission.

    (b) WAIVER BY THE DIRECTOR OF THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY- The Director of the United States Information Agency may waive the requirements of this section on a country-by-country basis for a period not to exceed one year upon certification to the Congress by the Director that such waiver is in the national interest and is necessary to carry on diplomatic functions on the United States. Each such certification shall include a detailed justification for the waiver with respect to each such country.

    (c) RESPONSES TO CONTRACT SOLICITATIONS- (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2) of this subsection, the Director of the United States Information Agency shall ensure that any response to a solicitation for a bid or a request for a proposal, with respect to a contract covered by subsection (a), includes the following clause, in substantially the following form:

‘ARAB LEAGUE BOYCOTT OF ISRAEL

    ‘(a) DEFINITIONS- As used in this clause--

      ‘(1) the term ‘foreign person’ means any person other than a United States person as defined in paragraph (2); and

      ‘(2) the term ‘United States person’ means any United States resident or national (other than an individual resident outside the United States and employed by other than a United States person), any domestic concern (including any permanent domestic establishment of any foreign concern), and any foreign subsidiary or affiliate (including any permanent foreign establishment) of any domestic concern which is controlled in fact by such domestic concern, as determined under regulations of the President.

    ‘(b) CERTIFICATION- By submitting this offer, the Offeror certifies that it is not--

      ‘(1) taking or knowingly agreeing to take any action, with respect to the boycott of Israel by Arab League countries, which section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)) prohibits a United States person from taking; or

      ‘(2) discriminating in the award of subcontracts on the basis of religion.’.

    (2) An Offeror would not be required to include the certification required by paragraph (1), if the Offeror is deemed not to comply with the Arab League boycott of Israel by the Director of the United States Information Agency or a designee on the basis of available information. Certification by the Director of the United States Information Agency or a designee may occur only 30 days after notice has been given to the Congress that this certification procedure will be utilized at a specific overseas mission.

    (3) The Director of the United States Information Agency shall ensure that all State Department contract solicitations include a detailed explanation of the requirements of section 8(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2407(a)).

    (d) REVIEW OF TERMINATION- (1) The United States Information Agency shall conduct reviews of the certifications submitted pursuant to this section for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of the certifications.

    (2) Upon complaint of any foreign or United States person of a violation of the certification as required by this section, filed with the Director of the United States Information Agency, the United States Information Agency shall investigate such complaint, and if such complaint is found to be correct and a violation of the certification has been found, all contracts with such violator shall be terminated for default as soon as practicable, and, for a period of two years thereafter, the Agency shall not enter into any contracts with such a violator.

SEC. 215. UNITED STATES TRANSMITTER IN KUWAIT.

    None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this or any other Act may be obligated or expended for the design, development, or construction of a United States radio transmitter in Kuwait.

SEC. 216. SEPARATE LEDGER ACCOUNTS FOR GRANTEES OF THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY.

    Section 504(h)(1) of the National Endowment for Democracy Act (22 U.S.C. 4413(h)(1)) is amended by striking ‘accounts’ and inserting ‘bank accounts or separate self-balancing ledger accounts’.

SEC. 217. LIMITATION CONCERNING PARTICIPATION IN INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITIONS.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the United States Information Agency shall not obligate or expend any funds for a United States Government funded pavilion or other major exhibit at any international exposition or world’s fair registered by the Bureau of International Expositions in excess of amounts expressly authorized and appropriated for such purpose.

SEC. 218. AUTHORITY TO RESPOND TO PUBLIC INQUIRIES.

    Section 208 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987 (22 U.S.C. 1461-1a) is amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: ‘The provisions of this section shall not prohibit the United States Information Agency from responding to inquiries from members of the public about its operations, policies, or programs.’.

SEC. 219. USIA OFFICE IN LHASA, TIBET.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE- The Director of the United States Information Agency shall establish an office in Lhasa, Tibet, for the purpose of--

      (1) disseminating information about the United States;

      (2) promoting discussions on conflict resolution and human rights;

      (3) facilitating United States private sector involvement in educational and cultural activities in Tibet; and

      (4) advising the United States Government with respect to Tibetan public opinion.

    (b) APPLICABLE LAWS- Activities under subsection (a) shall be carried out in accordance with the provisions of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 and the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961.

SEC. 220. REPORTS ON UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    (a) PRESIDENTIAL REPORT- Section 112 of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2460) is amended by adding at the end the following:

    ‘(f)(1) The President shall ensure that all exchange programs conducted by the United States Government, its departments, and agencies, directly or through agreements with other parties, are reported to the Bureau at a time and in a format prescribed by the Bureau.

    ‘(2) Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this subsection, and annually thereafter, the President shall submit to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Speaker of the House of Representatives a report containing the information required to be reported under paragraph (1). Such report shall include information concerning the objectives of each exchange program supported by the United States, the number of exchange participants, the types of exchange activities, and the total amount of Federal expenditures for such exchanges.’.

    (b) REPORT BY THE DIRECTOR OF USIA- Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Director of the United States Information Agency shall submit to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Speaker of the House of Representatives a report--

      (1) outlining the range of exchange programs administered by the Agency;

      (2) identifying possible areas of duplication or inefficiency; and

      (3) recommending program consolidation and administrative restructuring as warranted.

SEC. 221. SCHOLARSHIPS FOR EAST TIMORESE STUDENTS.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Information Agency shall make available for each of the fiscal years 1994 and 1995, scholarships for East Timorese students qualified to study in the United States for the purpose of studying at the undergraduate level in a United States college or university. Each scholarship made available under this subsection shall be for not less than one semester of study.

SEC. 222. CAMBODIAN SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    (a) PURPOSE- It is the purpose of this section to provide financial assistance--

      (1) to establish a scholarship program for Cambodian college and post-graduate students to study in the United States; and

      (2) to expand Cambodian participation in exchange programs of the United States Information Agency.

    (b) PROGRAM- (1) The Director of the United States Information Agency shall establish a scholarship program to enable Cambodian college students and post-graduate students to study in the United States.

    (2) The Director of the United States Information Agency shall also include qualified Cambodian citizens in exchange programs funded or otherwise sponsored by the Agency, in particular the Fulbright Academic Program, the International Visitor Program, and the Citizen Exchange Program.

    (c) DEFINITION- For the purposes of this section, the term ‘scholarship’ means an amount to be used for full or partial support of tuition and fees to attend an educational institution, and may include fees, books, and supplies, equipment required for courses at an educational institution, living expenses at a United States educational institution, and travel expenses to and from, and within, the United States.

SEC. 223. INCREASING AFRICAN PARTICIPATION IN USIA EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--

      (1) United States Information Agency (USIA) programs with African countries have continued to decrease over the past three years, occurring at a time when economic reform and the expansion of democratic governments and institutions are taking place in more than 25 countries across Africa;

      (2) African institutions are now attempting to reform their education sector to adjust to population and budget pressures, and to revitalize existing infrastructure to restore quality;

      (3) higher education is the cornerstone of economic and political development, and will help improve the well-being of Africans citizens; and

      (4) USIA programs in Africa are insufficient to meet the expanding needs for educational development and to help strengthen democratic, educational, and free market institutions in Africa.

    (b) POLICY- The Director of United States Information Agency shall expand exchange program allocations to Africa, in particular Fulbright Academic Exchanges, International Visitor Programs, and Citizen Exchanges, and shall further encourage a broadening of affiliations and links between American and African institutions.

SEC. 224. ENVIRONMENT AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM.

    (a) PURPOSE- The purpose of this section is to establish an exchange program to bring students and teachers to the United States for training in the fields of environment and development, with particular emphasis on sustainable development.

    (b) PROGRAM AUTHORITY- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Director of the United States Information Agency, through the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, shall provide scholarships beginning in the fiscal year 1994, and for each fiscal year thereafter, for study at United States institutions of higher education in furtherance of the purpose of this section for foreign students who have completed their undergraduate education and for postsecondary educators.

    (c) GUIDELINES- The scholarship program under this section shall be carried out in accordance with the following guidelines:

      (1) Consistent with section 112(b) of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2460(b)), all programs created pursuant to this Act shall be nonpolitical and balanced, and shall be administered in keeping with the highest standards of academic integrity and cost-effectiveness.

      (2) The United States Information Agency shall administer this program under the auspices of the Fulbright Academic Exchange Program.

      (3) The United States Information Agency shall ensure the regional diversity of this program through the selection of candidates from Asia, Africa, Latin America, as well as Europe and the Middle East.

    (d) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘institution of higher education’ has the same meaning given to such term by section 1201(a) of the Higher Education Act of 1965.

SEC. 225. USIA VOCATIONAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM.

    (a) AUTHORITY- Section 102(a) of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2452) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      ‘(4) vocational exchanges, by financing visits and interchanges of professionals and skilled workers in the fields of government, public administration, infrastructure planning and development, business, and finance for the purpose of increasing practical understanding, management, and problem-solving skills in--

        ‘(A) the institution and improvement of public administration and infrastructure at the national, intergovernmental, regional and local level; and

        ‘(B) the creation and development of private enterprise and free market systems based on the principle of private ownership of property.’.

    (b) REPORT- Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of the United States Information Agency shall submit a detailed report to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives on the action taken by the United States Information Agency to carry out section 102(a)(4) of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961.

SEC. 226. AMERICAN STUDIES COLLECTIONS.

    (a) AUTHORITY- In order to promote a thorough understanding of the United States among emerging elites abroad, the Director of the United States Information Agency is authorized to enter into agreements with universities for the establishment and support of collections at appropriate university libraries located abroad to further the study of the United States.

    (b) DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT- Such collections--

      (1) shall be developed in consultation with United States associations and organizations of scholars in the principal academic disciplines in which American studies are conducted; and

      (2) shall be designed primarily to meet the needs of undergraduate and graduate students of American studies.

    (c) SITE SELECTION- In selecting universities abroad as sites for such collections, the Director shall--

      (1) ensure that such universities are able, within a reasonable period of the establishment of such collections, to assume responsibility for their maintenance in current form;

      (2) ensure that undergraduate and graduate students shall enjoy reasonable access to such collections; and

      (3) include in any agreement entered into between the United States Information Agency and a university abroad, terms embodying a contractual commitment of such maintenance and access under this subsection.

SEC. 227. TECHNICAL AMENDMENT RELATING TO NEAR AND MIDDLE EAST RESEARCH AND TRAINING.

    Section 228(d) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 2452 note) is amended by inserting ‘and includes the Republic of Turkey’ before the period at the end thereof.

SEC. 228. DISTRIBUTION WITHIN THE UNITED STATES OF UNITED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY DOCUMENTARY FILM ENTITLED ‘CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY’.

    Notwithstanding the second sentence of section 501 of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1461), nor any other provision of law, the Director of the United States Information Agency may make available for distribution within the United States the documentary entitled ‘Crimes Against Humanity’, a film about the ensuing conflict in the former Yugoslavia.

PART C--MIKE MANSFIELD FELLOWSHIPS

SEC. 231. SHORT TITLE.

    This part may be cited as the ‘Mike Mansfield Fellowship Act’.

SEC. 232. ESTABLISHMENT OF MIKE MANSFIELD FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- (1) There is hereby established the ‘Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program’ pursuant to which the Director of the United States Information Agency will make grants, subject to the availability of appropriations, to the Mansfield Center for Pacific Affairs to award fellowships to eligible United States citizens for periods of 2 years each (or, pursuant to section 233(5)(C), for such shorter period of time as the Center may determine based on a Fellow’s level of proficiency in the Japanese language or knowledge of the political economy of Japan) as follows:

      (A) During the first year each fellowship recipient will study the Japanese language as well as Japan’s political economy.

      (B) During the second year each fellowship recipient will serve as a Fellow in a parliamentary office, ministry, or other agency of the Government of Japan or, subject to the approval of the Center, a nongovernmental Japanese institution associated with the interests of the fellowship recipient, consistent with the purposes of this part.

    (2) Fellowships under this part may be known as ‘Mansfield Fellowships’, and individuals awarded such fellowships may be known as ‘Mansfield Fellows’.

    (b) ELIGIBILITY OF CENTER FOR GRANTS- Grants may be made to the Center under this section only if the Center agrees to comply with the requirements of section 233.

    (c) INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENT- The Director of the United States Information Agency should enter into negotiations for an agreement with the Government of Japan for the purpose of placing Mansfield Fellows in the Government of Japan.

    (d) PRIVATE SOURCES- The Center is authorized to accept, use, and dispose of gifts or donations of services or property in carrying out the fellowship program.

SEC. 233. PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS.

    The program established under this part shall comply with the following requirements:

      (1) United States citizens who are eligible for fellowships under this part shall be employees of the Federal Government having at least two years experience in any branch of the Government, a strong career interest in United States-Japan relations, and a demonstrated commitment to further service in the Federal Government.

      (2) Not less than 10 fellowships shall be awarded each year.

      (3) Mansfield Fellows shall agree--

        (A) to maintain satisfactory progress in language training as a condition of continued receipt of Federal funds; and

        (B) to return to the Federal Government for further employment for a period of at least 2 years following the end of their fellowships, unless, in the determination of the Center, the Fellow is unable (for reasons beyond the Fellow’s control and after receiving assistance from the Center as provided in paragraph (8)) to find reemployment for such period.

      (4) During the period of the fellowship, the Center shall provide each Mansfield Fellow--

        (A) a stipend at a rate of pay equal to the rate of pay that individual was receiving when he or she entered the program, plus a cost-of-living adjustment calculated at the same rate of pay, and for the same period of time, for which such adjustments were made to the salaries of individuals occupying competitive positions in the civil service during the same period as the fellowship; and

        (B) certain allowances and benefits as that individual would have been entitled to, but for his or her separation from Government service, as a United States Government civilian employee overseas under the Standardized Regulations (Government Civilians, Foreign Areas) of the Department of State, as follows: a living quarters allowance to cover the cost of housing in Japan, a post allowance to cover the significantly higher costs of living in Japan, a temporary quarters subsistence allowance for up to 7 days for Fellows unable to find housing immediately upon arrival in Japan, an education allowance to assist parents in providing their children with educational services ordinarily provided without charge by United States public schools, moving expenses of up to $3,000 for personal belongings of Fellows and their families in their move to Japan and up to $500 for Fellows residing outside the Washington, D.C. area in moving to the Washington, D.C. area, and one-round-trip economy-class airline ticket to Japan for each Fellow and the Fellow’s immediate family.

      (5)(A) For the first year of each fellowship, the Center shall provide Fellows with intensive Japanese language training in the Washington, D.C., area, as well as courses in the political economy of Japan.

      (B) Such training shall be of the same quality as training provided to Foreign Service officers before they are assigned to Japan.

      (C) The Center may waive any or all of the training required by subparagraph (A) to the extent that a Fellow has Japanese language skills or knowledge of Japan’s political economy, and the 2 year fellowship period shall be shortened to the extent such training is less than one year.

      (6) Any Mansfield Fellow not complying with the requirements of this section shall reimburse the United States Information Agency for the Federal funds expended for the Fellow’s participation in the fellowship, together with interest on such funds (calculated at the prevailing rate), as follows:

        (A) Full reimbursement for noncompliance with paragraph (3)(A) or (9); and

        (B) pro rata reimbursement for noncompliance with paragraph (3)(B) for any period the Fellow is reemployed by the Federal Government that is less than the period specified in paragraph (3)(B), at a rate equal to the amount the Fellow received during the final year of the fellowship for the same period of time, including any allowances and benefits provided under paragraph (4).

      (7) The Center shall select Mansfield Fellows based solely on merit. The Center shall make positive efforts to recruit candidates reflecting the cultural, racial, and ethnic diversity of the United States.

      (8) The Center shall assist any Mansfield Fellow in finding employment in the Federal Government if such Fellow was not able, at the end of the fellowship, to be reemployed in the agency from which he or she separated to become a Fellow.

      (9) No Mansfield Fellow may engage in any intelligence or intelligence-related activity on behalf of the United States Government.

SEC. 234. SEPARATION OF GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL DURING THE FELLOWSHIPS.

    (a) SEPARATION- Under such terms and conditions as the agency head may direct, any agency of the United States Government may separate from Government service for a specified period any officer or employee of that agency who accepts a fellowship under the program established by this part.

    (b) REEMPLOYMENT- Any Mansfield Fellow, at the end of the fellowship, is entitled to be reemployed in the same manner as if covered by section 3582 of title 5, United States Code.

    (c) RIGHTS AND BENEFITS- Notwithstanding section 8347(o), 8713, or 8914 of title 5, United States Code, and in accordance with regulations of the Office of Personnel Management, an employee, while serving as a Mansfield Fellow, is entitled to the same rights and benefits as if covered by section 3582 of title 5, United States Code. The Center shall reimburse the employing agency for any costs incurred under section 3582 of title 5, United States Code.

    (d) COMPLIANCE WITH BUDGET ACT- Funds are available under this section to the extent and in the amounts provided in appropriation Acts.

SEC. 235. PROGRAM REVIEW AND REPORT.

    (a) PROGRAM REVIEW- The Director of the United States Information Agency shall review the administration of the program assisted under this part.

    (b) ANNUAL REPORT- Each year at the time of the submission of the President’s budget request to the Congress, the Director of the United States Information Agency shall submit to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Speaker of the House of Representatives a report completed by the Center on the conduct of the program during the preceding year. Each such report shall contain--

      (1) an analysis of the assistance provided under the program for the previous fiscal year and the nature of the assistance provided;

      (2) an analysis of the performance of the individuals who received assistance under the program during the previous fiscal year, including the degree to which assistance was terminated under the program and the extent to which individual recipients failed to meet their obligation under the program; and

      (3) an analysis of the results of the program for the previous fiscal year, including, at a minimum, the cumulative percentage of individuals who received assistance under the program who subsequently became employees of the United States Government and, in the case of individuals who did not subsequently become employees of the United States Government, an analysis of the reasons why they did not become employees and an explanation as to what use, if any, was made of the assistance given to those recipients.

SEC. 236. DEFINITIONS.

    For purposes of this part--

      (1) the term ‘agency of the United States Government’ includes any agency of the legislative branch and any court of the judicial branch as well as any agency of the executive branch;

      (2) the term ‘agency head’ means--

        (A) in the case of the executive branch of Government or an agency of the legislative branch other than the House of Representatives or the Senate, the head of the respective agency;

        (B) in the case of the judicial branch of Government, the chief judge of the respective court;

        (C) in the case of the Senate, the President pro tempore, in consultation with the Majority Leader and Minority Leader of the Senate; and

        (D) in the case of the House of Representatives, the Speaker of the House, in consultation with the Majority Leader and Minority Leader of the House; and

      (3) the term ‘Center’ means the Mansfield Center for Pacific Affairs.

TITLE III--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACT OF 1993

SEC. 301. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ‘United States International Broadcasting Act of 1993’.

SEC. 302. CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS AND DECLARATION OF PURPOSES.

    The Congress hereby finds and declares that--

      (1) it is the policy of the United States to promote the right of opinion and expression, including the freedom ‘to seek, receive, and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers,’ in accordance with Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights;

      (2) open communication of information and ideas among the peoples of the world contributes to international peace and stability, and that the promotion of such communication is in the interests of the United States;

      (3) prominent in the implementation of this policy has been United States support for the Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty, and Broadcasting to Cuba, which have demonstrated their effectiveness in providing accurate and timely information to the people of the world;

      (4) the continuation of these broadcasting entities, and the creation of a new broadcasting service to the people of the People’s Republic of China and the other communist countries of Asia, would continue the promotion of information and ideas, while advancing the goals of United States foreign policy; and

      (5) the reorganization and consolidation of these services under a single administrative structure will achieve important economies and strengthen the capability of the United States to utilize these instrumentalities to support freedom and democracy in a rapidly changing international environment.

SEC. 303. ESTABLISHMENT OF BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- There is hereby established within the United States Information Agency a Broadcasting Board of Governors (hereafter in this title referred to as the ‘Board’).

    (b) COMPOSITION OF THE BOARD- (1) The Board shall consist of 8 members, as follows:

      (A) Six voting members who shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.

      (B) The Director of the United States Information Agency who shall also be a voting member.

      (C) The Director of the International Broadcasting Bureau, who shall be an ex officio member of the Board and may not vote in the determinations of the Board.

    (2) The President shall designate one member (other than the Director of the United States Information Agency) as Chairman of the Board.

    (3) Exclusive of the Director of the United States Information Agency, not more than three of the members of the Board appointed by the President shall be of the same political party.

    (c) TERM OF OFFICE- The term of office of each member of the Board shall be three years, except that the Director of the United States Information Agency and the Director of the International Broadcasting Bureau of the United States Information Agency shall remain members of the Board during their respective terms of service. Of the other six voting members, the initial terms of office of two members shall be one year, and the initial terms of office of two other members shall be two years, so that the terms of one-third of these voting members of the Board expire each year. The President shall appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, Board members to fill vacancies occurring prior to the expiration of a term, in which case the members so appointed shall serve for the remainder of such term. Any member whose term has expired may serve until his or her successor has been appointed and qualified.

    (d) SELECTION OF BOARD- Members of the Board appointed by the President shall be citizens of the United States who are not currently regular full-time employees of the United States Government, except the Director of the United States Information Agency. Such members shall be selected by the President from among Americans distinguished in the fields of mass communications, print, broadcast media or foreign affairs.

    (e) COMPENSATION- Members of the Board, while attending meetings of the Board or while engaged in duties relating to such meetings or in other activities of the Board pursuant to this section, including travel time, shall be entitled to receive compensation equal to the daily equivalent of the compensation prescribed for level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code. While away from their homes or regular places of business they may be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law (5 U.S.C. 5703) for persons in the Government service employed intermittently. The Director of the United States Information Agency and the Director, International Broadcasting Bureau, United States Information Agency, shall not be entitled to any compensation under this title, but may be allowed travel expenses as provided in the preceding sentence.

SEC. 304. FUNCTIONS OF THE BOARD.

    (a) AUTHORITIES- The Board is authorized--

      (1) to provide guidance and oversight to the International Broadcasting Bureau which is authorized to administer Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty, Voice of America, the Office of Cuban Broadcasting, Radio Free Asia, and such services of WORLDNET Television and Film Service as determined by the Board with the concurrence of the Director of the United States Information Agency;

      (2) to review and evaluate the mission and operation of the International Broadcasting Bureau and to assess the quality, effectiveness and professional integrity of its programming within the context of the broad foreign policy objectives of the United States;

      (3) to review and evaluate, at least annually, the mix of traditional Voice of America programming and surrogate programming and make recommendations to the President, through the Director of the United States Information Agency, regarding the addition or deletion of language services;

      (4) to review engineering activities to ensure that all broadcasting elements receive the highest quality and cost-effective delivery services;

      (5) to undertake such studies as may be necessary to identify areas in which the operations of the International Broadcasting Bureau could be made more efficient and economical;

      (6) to submit to the President, through the Director of the United States Information Agency, an annual report which summarizes the activities of the Board and evaluates the operations of the International Broadcasting Bureau;

      (7) to the extent it deems necessary to carry out the functions under this title, procure supplies, services and other personal property;

      (8) to appoint such staff personnel for the Board as may be necessary, subject to the provisions of title 5, United States Code, governing appointments in the competitive service, and to fix their compensation in accordance with the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such title relating to classification and General Schedule pay rates; and

      (9) to make available for its own use, for official reception and representation expenses, such amount as provided for in an annual appropriations which shall not exceed the amount appropriated to the Board for International Broadcasting for such purposes in fiscal year 1993.

    (b) IMPLEMENTATION- In carrying out the functions of subsection (a), the Board and the Director of the United States Information Agency shall respect the professional independence and integrity of the International Broadcasting Bureau and its broadcasting services.

SEC. 305. FOREIGN POLICY GUIDANCE.

    To assist the Board in carrying out its functions, the Secretary of State shall provide information and guidance on foreign policy issues to the Director of the United States Information Agency. The Director of the United States Information Agency shall provide that guidance to the Board.

SEC. 306. INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING BUREAU.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- There is hereby established an International Broadcasting Bureau within the United States Information Agency (hereafter in this title referred to as the ‘Bureau’).

    (b) ORGANIZATION OF THE BUREAU- The Bureau, in recognition of and to implement the purposes of this title, shall consist of the following separate elements:

      (1) The Voice of America.

      (2) The Office of Surrogate Broadcasting.

      (3) Such services of the WORLDNET Television and Film Service as determined by the Board with the concurrence of the Director of the United States Information Agency.

      (4) Engineering and Technical Operations.

      (5) Such other elements as the Director of the International Broadcasting Bureau may from time to time establish with the concurrence of the Director of the United States Information Agency and the Board.

    (c) ORGANIZATION OF THE OFFICE OF SURROGATE BROADCASTING- The Office of Surrogate Broadcasting shall administer and oversee Radio Free Europe, Radio Liberty, the Office of Cuba Broadcasting (including Radio Marti and TV Marti), and Radio Free Asia, and such other surrogate services as may from time to time be established.

    (d) SELECTION OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE BUREAU- The Director of the Bureau shall be appointed by the Chairman of the Board, in consultation with the Director of the United States Information Agency and with the concurrence of a majority of the Board. The Director of the Bureau shall be entitled to receive compensation at the rate now or hereafter prescribed by law for level IV of the Executive Schedule.

    (e) SEPARATELY IDENTIFIED APPROPRIATION ACCOUNT- Funding for the Bureau and the Board shall be provided in a separately identified appropriation account and be authorized as a separate category by the Congress. The Director of the Bureau shall submit proposals on appropriation of broadcasting funds to the Board. The Board will forward its recommendations concerning the proposed budget for the Board and the Bureau to the Director of the United States Information Agency for his consideration as a part of the Agency’s budget submission to the Office of Management and Budget. The Director of the United States Information Agency shall include in the Agency’s submission to the Office of Management and Budget, the comments and recommendations of the Board concerning the proposed broadcasting budget. Funds appropriated to the Board shall be allocated among the separate elements of the International Broadcasting Bureau by the Board.

SEC. 307. RADIO FREE ASIA.

    The Director of the United States Information Agency is authorized to create and support within the Office of Surrogate Broadcasting of the International Broadcasting Bureau a surrogate broadcasting service to be known as ‘Radio Free Asia’, which shall--

      (1) provide accurate and timely information, news, commentary about events in the respective countries of Asia and elsewhere to promote the cause of freedom and democracy in those countries of Asia where communications media are not fully developed or free; and

      (2) be a source of information about developments in Asia and a forum for a variety of opinions and voices from within Asian nations whose people do not fully enjoy freedom of expression.

SEC. 308. TRANSITION.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION- (1) The President is authorized to direct the transfer of all functions and authorities from the Board for International Broadcasting to the United States Information Agency, the Board, or the Bureau as may be necessary to implement this title.

    (2) Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Director of the United States Information Agency and the Chairman of the Board for International Broadcasting shall jointly prepare and submit to the President for approval and implementation a plan to accomplish the orderly dissolution of RFE/RL, Inc., on September 30, 1995, the creation of the Office of Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty within the Office of Surrogate Broadcasting of the International Broadcasting Bureau, and the reorganization and consolidation of United States nonmilitary international broadcasting services for the purpose of achieving a more efficient utilization of scarce national resources. The plan shall provide, at a minimum, for the transfer of assets and liabilities, unexpended balances of appropriations and other funds, and set forth the maximum number of RFE/RL, Inc., personnel to be appointed under the provisions of subsection (b) on September 30, 1995. The President shall transmit copies of the approved plan, together with any recommendations for legislative changes that may be necessary, to the appropriate committees of Congress.

    (b) EXCEPTED SERVICE APPOINTMENT AUTHORITY- Notwithstanding the provisions of section 607 of the Treasury, Postal Service, and General Government Appropriations Act, 1993 (Public Law 102-393) or any other Act in effect as of the date of enactment of this Act, or hereafter enacted, barring employment or compensation on the basis of citizenship, the Director of the United States Information Agency shall appoint to the United States Information Agency, the Bureau, or the Board, any personnel of RFE/RL, Inc., not to exceed the number of RFE/RL, Inc., personnel designated in the transition plan provided for in subsection (a)(2), who were permanent employees as of the date of enactment of this Act and as of September 30, 1995, without regard to the provisions of title 5 of the United States Code governing appointments in the competitive service, and fix their compensation without regard to the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such title 5, governing classification and General Schedule pay rates. To the extent permitted by law, compensation, benefits, and personnel rules shall be modeled after existing RFE/RL, Inc., personnel and compensation systems until the employees leave or retire. Nothing in this section shall preclude termination of such employees for reasons other than the reorganization and consolidation provided for under this title.

    (c) NEW APPOINTEES- The Director of the United States Information Agency may assign personnel for service with RFE/RL, Inc., with the concurrence of the president of RFE/RL, Inc., between the date of enactment of this title and September 30, 1995. Such assignment shall not affect the rights and benefits of such personnel as employees of the United States Information Agency.

    (d) BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING PERSONNEL- All Board for International Broadcasting full-time United States Government personnel (except special Government employees) and part-time United States Government personnel holding permanent positions shall be transferred to the United States Information Agency, the Board, or the Bureau. Such transfer shall not cause any such employee to be separated or reduced in grade or compensation.

    (e) OTHER AUTHORITIES- The Director of the United States Information Agency is authorized to utilize the provisions of titles VIII and IX of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, and any other authority available to the Director on the effective date of this title, to the extent that the Director deems necessary in carrying out the provisions and purposes of this title.

    (f) REPEAL- The Board for International Broadcasting Act of 1973 (22 U.S.C. 2871, et seq.) is repealed effective September 30, 1995, but in no event shall the Act be repealed before the appointment and confirmation of all members to the Broadcasting Board of Governors.

    (g) APPROPRIATED FUNDS- No appropriated funds shall be available for grants to RFE/RL, Inc. after September 30, 1995.

    (h) SAVINGS PROVISIONS-

      (1) CONTINUING EFFECT OF LEGAL DOCUMENTS- All orders, determinations, rules, regulations, permits, agreements, grants, contracts, certificates, licenses, registrations, privileges, and other administrative actions--

        (A) which have been issued, made, granted, or allowed to become effective by the President, any Federal agency or official thereof, or by a court of competent jurisdiction, in the performance of functions which are transferred under this title; and

        (B) which are in effect at the time this title takes effect, or were final before the effective date of this title and are to become effective on or after the effective date of this title,

      shall continue in effect according to their terms until modified, terminated, superseded, set aside, or revoked in accordance with law by the President, the Director of the United States Information Agency or other authorized official, a court of competent jurisdiction, or by operation of law.

      (2) PROCEEDINGS NOT AFFECTED- The provisions of this title shall not affect any proceedings pending before the Board for International Broadcasting at the time this title takes effect, with respect to functions transferred by this title, but such proceedings shall be continued. Orders shall be issued in such proceedings, appeals shall be taken therefrom, and payments shall be made pursuant to such orders, as if this title had not been enacted, and orders issued in any such proceedings shall continue in effect until modified, terminated, superseded, or revoked by a duly authorized official, by a court of competent jurisdiction, or by operation of law. Nothing in this subsection shall be deemed to prohibit the discontinuance or modification of any such proceeding under the same terms and conditions and to the same extent that such proceeding could have been discontinued or modified if this title had not been enacted.

      (3) SUITS NOT AFFECTED- The provisions of this title shall not affect suits commenced before the effective date of this title, and in all such suits, proceedings shall be had, appeals taken, and judgments rendered in the same manner and with the same effect as if this title had not been enacted.

      (4) NONABATEMENT OF ACTIONS- No suit, action, or other proceeding commenced by or against the Board for International Broadcasting or by or against any individual in the official capacity of such individual as an officer of the Board for International Broadcasting shall abate by reason of the enactment of this title.

      (5) ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS RELATING TO PROMULGATION OF REGULATIONS- Any administrative action relating to the preparation or promulgation of a regulation by the Board for International Broadcasting relating to a function transferred under this title may be continued by the United States Information Agency with the same effect as if this title had not been enacted.

      (6) REFERENCES- A reference in any provision of law, reorganization plan, or other authority to the Associate Director for Broadcasting of the United States Information Agency shall be considered to be a reference to the Director of the International Broadcasting Bureau of the United States Information Agency.

      (7) EFFECT ON OTHER LAWS- The provisions of, and authorities contained in or transferred pursuant to, this title are not intended to repeal, limit, or otherwise derogate from the authorities or functions of or available to the Director of the United States Information Agency or the Secretary of State under law, reorganization plan, or otherwise, unless such provision hereof--

        (A) specifically refers to the provision of law or authority existing on the effective date of this title, so affected; or

        (B) is in direct conflict with such law or authority existing on the effective date of this title.

SEC. 309. PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN JOBS.

    It is the sense of the Congress that the Director of the United States Information Agency and the Chairman of the Board for International Broadcasting should, in developing the plan for consolidation and reorganization of overseas international broadcasting services, limit, to the maximum extent feasible, consistent with the purposes of the consolidation, elimination of any United States-based positions and should affirmatively seek to transfer as many positions as possible to the United States.

TITLE IV--COMMISSION ON PROTECTING AND REDUCING GOVERNMENT SECRECY

SEC. 401. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ‘Protection and Reduction of Government Secrecy Act’.

SEC. 402. PURPOSE.

    It is the purpose of this title to establish for a two year period a Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy which will examine the implications of the extensive classification of information and to make recommendations to reduce the volume of information classified and to thereby strengthen the protection of legitimately classified information.

SEC. 403. FINDINGS.

    The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) During the Cold War an extensive secrecy system developed which limited the public’s access to information and reduced the ability of the public to participate with full knowledge in the process of governmental decision-making;

      (2) In 1992 alone 6,349,532 documents were classified and approximately three million persons held some form of security clearance;

      (3) The burden of managing more than 6 million newly classified documents every year has led to tremendous administrative expense, reduced communication within the government and within the scientific community, reduced communication between the government and the people of the United States, and the selective and unauthorized public disclosure of classified information;

      (4) It has been estimated that private industries spend over $14 billion per year implementing government mandated regulations for protecting classified information;

      (5) If a smaller amount of truly sensitive information was classified the information could be held more securely;

      (6) In 1970 a Task Force organized by the Defense Science Board and headed by Dr. Frederick Seitz concluded that ‘more might be gained than lost if our Nation were to adopt--unilaterally, if necessary--a policy of complete openness in all areas of information;’ and

      (7) A bipartisan study commission specially constituted for the purpose of examining the consequences of the secrecy system will be able to offer comprehensive proposals for reform.

SEC. 404. FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION.

    The functions of the Commission shall be--

      (1) to conduct, for not more than a period of 2 years, an investigation into all matters in any way related to any legislation, executive order, regulation, practice, or procedure relating to the access to or the classification of information or involving security clearances; and

      (2) to make such recommendations concerning the classification of national security information as the Commission shall deem necessary, including proposing new legislation.

SEC. 405. COMPOSITION OF THE COMMISSION.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- To carry out the purposes of this title, there is established a Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy (in this title referred to as the ‘Commission’).

    (b) COMPOSITION- The Commission shall be composed of twelve members, as follows:

      (1) Four members appointed by the President, two from the executive branch of the Government and two from private life.

      (2) Four members appointed by the President of the Senate, two from Members of the Senate (one from each of the two major political parties) and two from private life.

      (3) Four members appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, two from Members of the House of Representatives (one from each of the two major political parties) and two from private life.

    (c) CHAIRMAN AND VICE CHAIRMAN- The Commission shall elect a Chairman and a Vice Chairman from among its members.

    (d) QUORUM; VACANCIES- Seven members of the Commission shall constitute a quorum. Any vacancy in the Commission shall not affect its powers, but shall be filled in the same manner in which the original appointment was made.

    (e) COMPENSATION AND TRAVEL EXPENSES- (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), each member of the Commission may be compensated at not to exceed the daily equivalent of the annual rate of basic pay in effect for a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, for each day during which that member is engaged in the actual performance of the duties of the Commission.

    (2) Members of the Commission who are full-time officers or employees of the United States or Members of Congress shall receive no additional pay on account of their service on the Commission.

    (3) While away from their homes or regular places of business in the performance of services for the Commission, members of the Commission shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in the same manner as persons employed intermittently in the Government service are allowed expenses under section 5703(b) of title 5, United States Code.

SEC. 406. POWERS OF THE COMMISSION.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The Commission or, on the authorization of the Commission, any subcommittee or member thereof, may, for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this title, hold such hearings and sit and act at such times and places, administer such oaths, and require, by subpena or otherwise, the attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the production of such books, records, correspondence, memoranda, papers, and documents as the Commission or such subcommittee or member may deem advisable. Subpenas may be issued under the signature of the Chairman of the Commission, of any such subcommittee, or any designated member, and may be served by any person designated by such Chairman or member. The provisions of sections 102 through 104 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (2 U.S.C. 192-194) shall apply in the case of any failure of any witness to comply with any subpena or to testify when summoned under authority of this section.

    (b) COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES- The Commission is authorized to secure directly from any executive department, bureau, agency, board, commission, office, independent establishment, or instrumentality of the Government information, suggestions, estimates, and statistics for the purposes of this title. Each such department, bureau, agency, board, commission, office, establishment, or instrumentality shall, to the extent authorized by law, furnish such information, suggestions, estimates, and statistics directly to the Commission, upon request made by the Chairman or Vice Chairman.

SEC. 407. STAFF OF THE COMMISSION.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The Commission shall have power to appoint and fix the compensation of such personnel as it deems advisable, without regard to the provisions of title 5, United States Code, governing appointments in the competitive service, and without regard to the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such title relating to classification and General Schedule pay rates.

    (b) CONSULTANT SERVICES- The Commission is authorized to procure the services of experts and consultants in accordance with section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, but at rates not to exceed the daily rate paid a person occupying a position at level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code.

SEC. 408. FINAL REPORT OF COMMISSION; TERMINATION.

    (a) FINAL REPORT- Not later than two years after the date of enactment of this title, the Commission shall submit to the President and to the Congress its final report and recommendations.

    (b) TERMINATION- The Commission, and all the authorities of this title, shall terminate two years after the date of enactment of this Act, or upon the submission of the final report and recommendations in accordance with subsection (a), whichever comes first.

TITLE V--SPOILS OF WAR ACT OF 1993

SEC. 501. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ‘Spoils of War Act of 1993’.

SEC. 502. TRANSFERS OF SPOILS OF WAR.

    (a) ELIGIBILITY FOR TRANSFER- Spoils of war in the possession, custody, or control of the United States may be transferred to any other party, including any government, group, or person, by sale, grant, loan or in any other manner, only to the extent and in the same manner that property of the same type, if otherwise owned by the United States, may be so transferred.

    (b) TERMS AND CONDITIONS- Any transfer pursuant to subsection (a) shall be subject to all of the terms, conditions, and requirements applicable to the transfer of property of the same type otherwise owned by the United States.

SEC. 503. PROHIBITION ON TRANSFERS TO COUNTRIES WHICH SUPPORT TERRORISM.

    Spoils of war in the possession, custody, or control of the United States may not be transferred to any country determined by the Secretary of State, for purposes of section 40 of the Arms Export Control Act, to be a nation whose government has repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism.

SEC. 504. REPORT ON PREVIOUS TRANSFERS.

    Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report describing any spoils of war obtained subsequent to August 2, 1990 that were transferred to any party, including any government, group, or person, before the date of enactment of this Act. Such report shall be submitted in unclassified form to the extent possible.

SEC. 505. DEFINITIONS.

    As used in this title--

      (1) the term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, or, where required by law for certain reporting purposes, the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives;

      (2) the term ‘enemy’ means any country, government, group, or person that has been engaged in hostilities, whether or not lawfully authorized, with the United States;

      (3) the term ‘person’ means--

        (A) any natural person;

        (B) any corporation, partnership, or other legal entity; and

        (C) any organization, association, or group; and

      (4) the term ‘spoils of war’ means enemy movable property lawfully captured, seized, confiscated, or found which has become United States property in accordance with the laws of war.

SEC. 506. CONSTRUCTION.

    Nothing in this title shall apply to--

      (1) the abandonment or failure to take possession of spoils of war by troops in the field for valid military reasons related to the conduct of the immediate conflict, including the burden of transporting such property or a decision to allow allied forces to take immediate possession of certain property solely for use during an ongoing conflict;

      (2) the abandonment or return of any property obtained, borrowed, or requisitioned for temporary use during military operations without intent to retain possession of such property;

      (3) the destruction of spoils of war by troops in the field;

      (4) the return of spoils of war to previous owners from whom such property had been seized by enemy forces; or

      (5) minor articles of personal property which have lawfully become the property of individual members of the armed forces as war trophies pursuant to public written authorization from the Department of Defense.

TITLE VI--THE KHMER ROUGE PROSECUTION AND EXCLUSION ACT

SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ‘Khmer Rouge Prosecution and Exclusion Act’.

SEC. 602. POLICY.

    The Congress urges the President--

      (1) promptly and actively to assist appropriate organizations to collect relevant data on crimes against humanity committed by the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia between April 17, 1975 and January 7, 1979;

      (2) to carry out paragraph (1) consistent with the Agreement on a Comprehensive Political Settlement of the Cambodia Conflict, signed at Paris on October 23, 1991; and

      (3) to promote vigorously the establishment of a national or international criminal tribunal for the prosecution of those accused of genocide in Cambodia.

SEC. 603. ESTABLISHMENT OF STATE DEPARTMENT OFFICE.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- (1) There is established within the Department of State the Office of Cambodian Genocide Investigation (hereafter in this Act referred to as the ‘Office’).

    (2) The Office shall carry out its operations solely within Cambodia.

    (3) The Secretary of State shall designate an officer or employee of the Department of State to serve as Director of the Office.

    (b) ADMINISTRATION- (1) The Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs (or any successor Assistant Secretary) shall administer the Office.

    (2) The Secretary of State shall make available to the Office such personnel and office space in Cambodia as the Office may require.

    (c) PURPOSE- The purpose of the Office shall be--

      (1) to investigate crimes against humanity committed by national Khmer Rouge leaders in the period beginning on April 17, 1975 and ending January 7, 1979;

      (2) to provide the people of Cambodia with access to documents, records, and other evidence held by the Office as a result of such investigation;

      (3) to submit the relevant data to a national or international penal tribunal that may be convened to formally hear and judge the genocidal acts committed by the Khmer Rouge; and

      (4) to develop the United States proposal for the establishment of an international criminal tribunal for the prosecution of those accused of genocide in Cambodia.

SEC. 604. REPORTING REQUIREMENT.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Beginning 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act, and every 6 months thereafter, the President shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees--

      (1) that describes the activities of the Office, and sets forth new facts learned about past Khmer Rouge practices, during the preceding 6-month period; and

      (2) that describes the steps the President has taken during the preceding 6-month period to promote human rights, to support efforts to bring to justice the national political and military leadership of the Khmer Rouge, and to prevent the recurrence of human rights abuses in Cambodia through actions--

        (A) which are not related to United Nations activities in Cambodia; and

        (B) which are consistent with Article 15 of the Agreement on a Comprehensive Political Settlement of the Cambodia Conflict, signed at Paris on October 23, 1991.

    (b) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 605. EXCLUSION FROM THE UNITED STATES.

    (a) AMENDMENT TO THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT- Section 212(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)) is amended by adding at the end thereof the following new paragraph:

      ‘(10)(A) Any alien, who, at any time during the period beginning on April 17, 1975, and ending on January 7, 1979, was a member of the national military or political leadership of the Khmer Rouge, is excluded.

      ‘(B) For purposes of this paragraph, the national military and political leadership of the Khmer Rouge includes, but is not limited to, the following persons: Pol Pot, Khieu Samphan, Son Sen, Ieng Sary, Nuon Chea, Ke Pauk, Mok, Ieng Thirith, and Yun Yat.’.

    (b) POLICY REGARDING ADMISSION TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES- The Congress urges the President to encourage foreign governments similarly to exclude from their countries former and present Khmer Rouge leaders described in section 212(a)(10) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

TITLE VII--MISCELLANEOUS

SEC. 701. PEACE CORPS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated $219,745,000 for the fiscal year 1994 and $219,745,000 for the fiscal year 1995 to carry out the Peace Corps Act.

SEC. 702. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS ON OCCUPIED TIBET.

    (a) REPORT ON UNITED STATES-TIBET RELATIONS- Because Congress has determined that Tibet is an occupied sovereign country under international law and that its true representatives are the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Government-in-Exile:

      (1) it is the sense of the Congress that the United States should seek to establish a dialog with the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Government-in-Exile concerning the situation in Tibet and the future of the Tibetan people and to expand and strengthen United States-Tibet cultural and educational relations, including promoting bilateral exchanges arranged directly with the Tibetan Government-in-Exile; and

      (2) not later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act, and every 12 months thereafter, the Secretary of State shall transmit to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Speaker of the House of Representatives a report on the state of United States-Tibetan Government-in-Exile relations and on conditions in Tibet.

    (b) SEPARATE TIBET REPORTS- (1) Whenever a report is transmitted to the Congress on a country-by-country basis there shall be included in such report, where applicable, a separate report on Tibet listed alphabetically with its own state heading.

    (2) The reports referred to in paragraph (1) include, but are not limited to, reports transmitted under sections 116(d) and 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to human rights).

SEC. 703. POLICY ON MIDDLE EAST ARMS SALES.

    (a) BOYCOTT OF ISRAEL- Section 322 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (2), by striking ‘and’ at the end; and

      (2) in paragraph (3)--

        (A) by striking ‘and’ at the end of subparagraph (A);

        (B) by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (B) and inserting ‘; and’; and

        (C) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

        ‘(C) does not participate in the Arab League primary or secondary boycott of Israel.’.

    (b) REPORT TO CONGRESS- Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report concerning steps taken to ensure that the goals of section 322 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138) are being met.

SEC. 704. TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS TO CAPTIVE NATIONS RESOLUTION.

    The joint resolution entitled ‘Joint resolution providing for the designation of the third week of July as ‘Captive Nations Week’, approved July 17, 1959 (Public Law 86-90; 73 Stat. 212), is amended in the preamble--

      (1) in the third whereas clause, by striking ‘a substantial part of the world’s population by Communist imperialism’ and inserting ‘part of the world’s population by Communist and authoritarian regimes’;

      (2) in the fourth whereas clause, by striking ‘since 1918 the imperialistic and aggressive policies of Russian communism have resulted in the creation of a vast empire which poses’ and inserting ‘the aggressive policies of Soviet communism resulted in the creation of a vast empire which posed’;

      (3) striking the fifth whereas clause and inserting in lieu thereof the following whereas clauses:

‘Whereas the policies of successive Soviet governments led, through direct and indirect aggression, to the subjugation of numerous countries and millions of people; and

‘Whereas the United States supports the nations formerly subjugated by the Soviet Union and demonstrates its commitment to continued freedom and independence for these nations through strong bilateral diplomatic, economic, and cultural ties; and

‘Whereas millions of people who suffered under Communist rule in the countries of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are now free; and’;

      (4) in the eighth whereas clause (as the preamble was amended by paragraph (3)), by striking ‘these’; and

      (5) by amending the resolving clause to read as follows: ‘That the President of the United States is authorized and requested to issue a proclamation designating the third week in July of each year as ‘Captive Nations Week’, and inviting the people of the United States to observe such week with appropriate ceremonies and activities, until such time as freedom and independence shall have been achieved for all the captive nations of the world.’.

SEC. 705. PROVIDING MATERIAL SUPPORT TO TERRORISTS.

    (a) OFFENSE- Chapter 113A of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

‘SEC. 2339. PROVIDING MATERIAL SUPPORT TO TERRORISTS.

    ‘Whoever, within the United States, provides material support or resources or conceals or disguises the nature, location, source, or ownership of material support or resources, knowing or intending that they are to be used in preparation for, or in carrying out, a violation of section 32, 36, 351, 844 (f) or (i), 1114, 1116, 1203, 1361, 1363, 1751, 2280, 2281, 2332, or 2339A of this title or section 902(i) of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. App. 1472(i)), or in preparation for, or carrying out, the concealment or an escape from the commission of any of the foregoing, shall be fined under this title, imprisoned not more than 10 years, or both. For purposes of this section, the term ‘material support or resources’ includes currency or other financial securities, financial services, lodging, training, safehouses, false documentation or identification, communications equipment, facilities, weapons, lethal substances, explosives, personnel, transportation, and other physical assets, but does not include humanitarian assistance to persons not directly involved in such violations.’.

    (b) TECHNICAL AMENDMENT- The chapter analysis for chapter 113A of title 18, United States Code, as amended by section 601(b)(1), is amended by adding at the end the following new item:

      ‘2339. Providing material support to terrorists.’.

SEC. 706. TORTURE CONVENTION IMPLEMENTATION.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Part I of title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting after chapter 113A the following new chapter:

‘CHAPTER 113B--TORTURE

‘Sec.

      ‘2340. Definitions.

      ‘2340A. Torture.

      ‘2340B. Exclusive remedies.

‘SEC. 2340. DEFINITIONS.

    ‘As used in this chapter--

      ‘(1) ‘torture’ means an act committed by a person acting under the color of law specifically intended to inflict severe physical or mental pain or suffering (other than pain or suffering incidental to lawful sanctions) upon another person with custody or physical control;

      ‘(2) ‘severe mental pain or suffering’ means the prolonged mental harm caused by or resulting from--

        ‘(A) the intentional infliction or threatened infliction of severe physical pain or suffering;

        ‘(B) the administration or application, or threatened administration or application, of mind-altering substances or other procedures calculated to disrupt profoundly the senses or the personality;

        ‘(C) the threat of imminent death; or

        ‘(D) the threat that another person will imminently be subjected to death, severe physical pain or suffering, or the administration or application of mind-altering substances or other procedures calculated to disrupt profoundly the senses or personality; and

      ‘(3) ‘United States’ includes all areas under the jurisdiction of the United States including any of the places described in sections 5 and 7 of this title and section 101(38) of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. App. 1301(38)).

‘SEC. 2340A. TORTURE.

    ‘(a) OFFENSE- Whoever outside the United States commits or attempts to commit torture shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both, and if death results to any person from conduct prohibited by this subsection, shall be imprisoned for any term of years or for life.

    ‘(b) JURISDICTION- There is jurisdiction over the activity prohibited in subsection (a) if--

      ‘(1) the alleged offender is a national of the United States; or

      ‘(2) the alleged offender is present in the United States, irrespective of the nationality of the victim or alleged offender.

‘SEC. 2340B. EXCLUSIVE REMEDIES.

    ‘Nothing in this chapter shall be construed as precluding the application of State or local laws on the same subject, nor shall anything in this chapter be construed as creating any substantive or procedural right enforceable by law by any party in any civil proceeding.’.

    (b) TECHNICAL AMENDMENT- The part analysis for part I of title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting after the item relating to chapter 113A the following new item:

2340.’.

    (c) EFFECTIVE DATE- The amendments made by this section shall take effect on the later of--

      (1) the date of enactment of this Act; or

      (2) the date on which the United States has become a party to the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

SEC. 707. APPLICABILITY OF TAIWAN RELATIONS ACT.

    Section 3 of the Taiwan Relations Act (22 U.S.C. 3301) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(d) The provisions of subsections (a) and (b) of this section shall supersede any provision of the August 17, 1982, Joint United States-China Communique related to these matters and regulations, directives, and policies based thereon.’.

SEC. 708. REPORTS ON RELATIONS WITH TAIWAN.

    Section 12 of the Taiwan Relations Act (22 U.S.C. 3311(d)) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(d) Beginning February 1, 1994, and on February 1 of each year thereafter, the Secretary of State shall transmit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report describing and reviewing economic relations between the United States and Taiwan.’.

SEC. 709. UNITED STATES POLICY CONCERNING IRAQI KURDISTAN.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that--

      (1) the international community, pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution 688, and with the continuation of Operation Provide Comfort, supports the protection of Iraqi’s Kurdish and other ethnic and religious minorities;

      (2) notwithstanding the international community’s resolve, certain areas of Iraqi Kurdistan remain at risk of an Iraqi invasion;

      (3) despite the threat of an Iraqi invasion, the Kurds, along with other minority ethnic and religious groups, have initiated a drive toward self-sufficiency, including--

        (A) holding free and fair democratic elections to establish a parliament, which supports Iraq’s territorial integrity and the transition to a unified, democratic Iraq;

        (B) planning for and administering public services;

        (C) reconstructing and rehabilitating the basic infrastructure of Iraqi Kurdistan; and

        (D) establishing unified police and security forces;

      (4) despite the provision of substantial international humanitarian assistance, and despite the fact that the United Nations blockade on Iraq contains exceptions for humanitarian-related items, the inhabitants of Iraqi Kurdistan still face difficulties because of an internal Iraqi government blockade; and

      (5) the Kurds and other ethnic and religious minorities, with appropriate additional support, would have the ability to meet their goal of self-sufficiency and move beyond the need for international assistance.

    (b) POLICY- It is the sense of the Congress that the President should--

      (1) take steps to encourage the United Nations Security Council--

        (A) to reaffirm support for the protection of all Iraqi Kurdish and other minorities in Iraqi Kurdistan pursuant to Security Council Resolution 688; and

        (B) to consider lifting selectively the United Nations embargo on the areas under the administration of the democratically elected leadership of Iraqi Kurdistan, subject to the verifiable conditions that--

          (i) the inhabitants of such areas do not conduct trade with the Iraqi regime; and

          (ii) the partial lifting of the embargo will not materially assist the Iraqi regime;

      (2) continue to advocate the transition to a unified, democratic Iraq;

      (3) take steps to design a multilateral assistance program for the people of Iraqi Kurdistan that supports their efforts to attain self-sufficiency through the provision of--

        (A) financial and technical assistance through the democratically elected Kurdish administration to enable the exploitation of natural resources such as oil; and

        (B) financial assistance to support the legitimate self-defense and security needs of the people of Iraqi Kurdistan; and

      (4) take steps to intensify discussions with the Government of Turkey, whose support and cooperation in the protection of the people of Iraqi Kurdistan is critical, to ensure that the stability of both Turkey and the entire region is enhanced by the measures taken under this section.

SEC. 710. ADDITIONAL SANCTIONS AGAINST NORTH KOREA.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no license, instruction, rule, regulation, or order issued under section 5 of the Trading With the Enemy Act of 1917 (50 U.S.C. App. 5) may--

      (1) authorize any transaction involving the commercial sale of any good or technology to North Korea; or

      (2) authorize any transaction involving the provision of services for travel to North Korea which was not otherwise authorized as of January 2, 1989.

    (b) WAIVER- The President may waive the application of subsection (a) if the President determines that--

      (1) North Korea continues to maintain its status as a party to the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, done on July 1, 1968; and

      (2) North Korea is in full compliance with its obligations under the Treaty.

SEC. 711. WAIVER OF SANCTIONS WITH RESPECT TO THE REPUBLIC OF SERBIA AND THE REPUBLIC OF MONTENEGRO TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY ABROAD.

    (a) AUTHORITY- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President is authorized and encouraged to exempt from sanctions imposed against the Republic of Serbia and the Republic of Montenegro those United States-supported programs, projects, or activities involving reform of the electoral process, or the development of democratic institutions or democratic political parties, in these two countries.

    (b) POLICY- The President, acting through the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations, should propose that any action, past or future, by the Security Council pursuant to Article 41 of the United Nations Charter, with respect to the Republic of Serbia or the Republic of Montenegro, should take account of the exemption described in subsection (a).

SEC. 712. CLAIMS BASED ON LETTERS OF CREDIT FOR GOODS SHIPPED BUT NOT PAID FOR BEFORE IMPOSITION OF NATIONAL EMERGENCY.

    Title I of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 (22 U.S.C. 1621 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

    ‘SEC. 10. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds on deposit in United States banks that have been blocked under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act in accounts of foreign banks that issued or confirmed letters of credit for the benefit of United States nationals may be released to pay such letters of credit if the United States beneficiaries lawfully shipped goods or otherwise performed underlying contractual obligations based on such letters of credit before the declaration of a national emergency pursuant to that Act.’.

SEC. 713. ENFORCEMENT OF NONPROLIFERATION TREATIES.

    (a) POLICY- It is the sense of the Congress that the President should instruct the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations to enhance the role of that institution in the enforcement of nonproliferation treaties through the passage of a United Nations Security Council resolution which would state that, any non-nuclear weapon state that is found by the United Nations Security Council, in consultation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), to have terminated, abrogated, or materially violated an IAEA full-scope safeguards agreement would be subjected to international economic sanctions, the scope of which to be determined by the United Nations Security Council.

    (b) PROHIBITION- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no United States assistance, under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall be provided to any non-nuclear weapon state that is found by the President to have terminated, abrogated, or materially violated an IAEA full-scope safeguard agreement.