< Back to H.Con.Res. 227 (104th Congress, 1995–1996)

Text of Expressing the sense of Congress that the technology program at the National Institue of Justice of the Department of Justice, ...

...Department of Justice, should be designated as the national focal point for law enforcement technology programs.

This resolution was introduced on September 27, 1996, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Sep 27, 1996 (Introduced).

Download PDF

Source: GPO

HCON 227 IH

104th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. CON. RES. 227

Expressing the sense of Congress that the technology program at the National Institute of Justice of the Department of Justice, should be designated as the national focal point for law enforcement technology programs.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

September 27, 1996

Mr. SCHIFF (for himself, Mrs. SCHROEDER, Mr. BOEHLERT, Ms. HARMAN, Mr. HEINEMAN, Mr. SCHUMER, Mrs. KENNELLY, and Mr. WAMP) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of Congress that the technology program at the National Institute of Justice of the Department of Justice, should be designated as the national focal point for law enforcement technology programs.

Whereas law enforcement is primarily a function carried out by over 17,000 State and local jurisdictions, the Federal Government has a legitimate role in supporting State and local law enforcement;

Whereas most State and local law enforcement agencies do not have the resources to invest in many of the functions that are necessary to promote the development of new technologies for law enforcement such as research and development, testing and evaluation, or the development and enforcement of standards for law enforcement equipment and technology;

Whereas the jobs of dedicated officers in law enforcement have become more dangerous and complex as criminals have increasing knowledge of and access to advanced technologies;

Whereas many State and local law enforcement agencies lack state-of-the-art technical tools to ensure officer safety, protect the public, and do their jobs more effectively and efficiently;

Whereas a critical problem in the criminal justice research community is the inadequate evaluation of law enforcement technologies and programs;

Whereas it is difficult for individual State and local law enforcement agencies to find, evaluate, and procure new technologies that might meet their needs;

Whereas the National Institute of Justice has already been asked by Congress to support law enforcement activities at Federal, State, and local levels;

Whereas the National Institute of Justice technology program is successfully developing and catalyzing the development of new technologies for law enforcement in many areas, including officer safety, equipment, investigative tools, and forensics;

Whereas the National Institute of Justice has created the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Centers, which work closely with State and local law enforcement; and

Whereas the National Institute of Justice has created partnerships with the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to leverage already existing technologies for adaptation to law enforcement: Now, therefore, be it

    Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the National Institute of Justice technology program should ensure that Federal agencies are not duplicating one another’s work;

      (2) the National Institute of Justice technology program should develop a nationwide database to provide information on law enforcement equipment and technologies to State and local law enforcement agencies;

      (3) the National Institute of Justice technology program should promote testing and evaluation of law enforcement equipment and technologies and make available a list of product failures and shortcomings;

      (4) the National Institute of Justice technology program should promote establishment of standards for law enforcement equipment and technologies;

      (5) the National Institute of Justice technology program should maintain the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center system as the main clearinghouse for the research, development, testing, evaluation, and dissemination of law enforcement technologies and standards;

      (6) the National Institute of Justice technology program should develop a program to improve forensics technology and work with the Nation’s crime labs;

      (7) the National Institute of Justice should be designated as the law enforcement partner in surplus Federal property and equipment transfer programs;

      (8) if working with the private sector, the National Institute of Justice should be authorized to waive Government patent rights and assign exclusive use of a license; and

      (9) the National Institute of Justice should be exempted from many of the requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act.