H.J.Res. 56 (104th): Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to restrict the requirement of citizenship at ...

...birth by virtue of birth in the United States to persons with a legal resident mother or father.

104th Congress, 1995–1996. Text as of Jan 19, 1995 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

HJ 56 IH

104th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. J. RES. 56

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to restrict the requirement of citizenship at birth by virtue of birth in the United States to persons with a legal resident mother or father.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

January 19, 1995

Mr. BEILENSON introduced the following joint resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary


JOINT RESOLUTION

Proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to restrict the requirement of citizenship at birth by virtue of birth in the United States to persons with a legal resident mother or father.

    Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, (two-thirds of each House concurring therein), That the following article is proposed as an amendment to the Constitution of the United States, which shall be valid to all intents and purposes as part of the Constitution when ratified by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years after the date of its submission for ratification:

‘Article--

    ‘SECTION 1. All persons born in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, of a mother or father who is a legal resident of the United States and all persons naturalized in the United States are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. The first sentence of section 1 of the fourteenth article of amendment to the Constitution of the United States is hereby repealed.

    ‘SECTION 2. The Congress shall have power to enforce before this article by appropriate legislation.

    ‘SECTION 3. This article shall apply to persons born after the date of its ratification.’.