< Back to H.Res. 152 (104th Congress, 1995–1996)

Text of Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the President should develop a strategy to bring the United States ...

...the United States back into active and full membership in the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

This resolution was introduced on May 17, 1995, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of May 17, 1995 (Introduced).

Source: GPO

HRES 152 IH

104th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. RES. 152

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the President should develop a strategy to bring the United States back into active and full membership in the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

May 17, 1995

Mr. TORRES submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations


RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the President should develop a strategy to bring the United States back into active and full membership in the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

Whereas the House of Representatives recognizes that the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) was created in 1946 as an integral part of the United Nations system, designed to promote international cooperation and exchanges in the fields of education, science, culture, and communication with the larger purpose of constructing ‘the defenses of peace’ against intolerance and incitements to war;

Whereas in 1984 the United States withdrew from the organization over questions of internal management and political polarization;

Whereas in 1993 the General Accounting Office, after conducting an extensive review of the organization’s activities, reported to the Congress that UNESCO has implemented changes to remedy the problems cited by the United States as reasons for its withdrawal in 1984;

Whereas the interagency review undertaken with all relevant Federal departments and agencies in 1993 concluded unanimously in a report to the President that, in the President’s words, ‘UNESCO’s current programs provide valuable services in a range of fields that reinforce our Nation’s foreign policy agenda’;

Whereas the organization’s current and projected plans offer means for advancing the foreign policy interests of the United States in promoting democracy, sustainable development, and tolerance in order to prevent ethnic, national, and religious conflicts;

Whereas the four interrelated areas of expertise of the organization, which are education, science, culture, and communication, represent important areas of American competitive advantage, and participation in global programs and policymaking in these fields advances the interests of the United States;

Whereas UNESCO-related United States policy interests include reducing illiteracy and improving education, including education for immigrant populations coming from other nations and cultures, increasing tolerance among ethnic and racial minority groups, protecting cultural freedom and the free flow of information, widening access to communications technology markets in developing countries by American businesses, providing broader channels for international collaboration on scientific research, and understanding environmental change and preservation;

Whereas multilateral initiatives in such politically sensitive activities offer advantages and prospects for success in many countries that cannot be easily realized by bilateral initiatives;

Whereas the United States is unable to participate fully in the important policy-setting work of most UNESCO bodies notwithstanding that it remains engaged in some UNESCO programs, such as the International Oceanographic Commission and the Man and the Biosphere;

Whereas it ill serves the United States to pursue an isolationist course in education, science, culture, and communication; and

Whereas the President has declared that the sole impediment to full reengagement by the United States as a member state of UNESCO is budgetary: Now, therefore, be it

    Resolved, That it is the sense of the House of Representatives that--

      (1) the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) has satisfactorily overcome the problems cited by the United States as the reasons for its withdrawal from the organization in 1984;

      (2) UNESCO’s mission in promoting international cooperation in the intellectual sectors is intrinsically important to promoting the ‘defenses of peace’; and

      (3) the President should--

        (A) develop a strategy to reengage the United States in UNESCO’s work, with an eye towards resumption of full membership in the organization when funding is made available;

        (B) direct the Secretary of State--

          (i) to consult with government agencies, nongovernmental organizations, and other interested parties that had substantial involvement with the work of the organization before the withdrawal of the United States in order to formulate goals the United States should seek at the organization as part of the strategy;

          (ii) to reexamine the frameworks established in law for the participation of the American nongovernmental sector in UNESCO policy and activities; and

          (iii) to reconstitute the United States National Commission for UNESCO;

        (C) consult with other governments on prospects for further reform of the organization’s policy bodies and governance, particularly with an eye to strengthening in all member states the role of independent, nongovernmental, intellectual sectors in agency programs and governance; and

        (D) report to the Congress before September 30, 1995, on the nature and extent of the consultations and the progress being made on the strategy.