S. 771 (104th): A bill to provide that certain Federal property shall be made available to States for State use before being made available to other entities, and for other purposes.

Introduced:
May 09, 1995 (104th Congress, 1995–1996)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
David Pryor
Senator from Arkansas
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
May 09, 1995
Length
6 pages
 
Status

This bill was introduced on May 9, 1995, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced May 09, 1995
Referred to Committee May 09, 1995
 
Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
8 cosponsors (5D, 3R) (show)
Committees

Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

Widget

Get a bill status widget for your website »

Citation

Click a format for a citation suggestion:

Notes

S. stands for Senate bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


5/9/1995--Introduced.
Revises various specified Federal laws concerning the transfer, disposal, and distribution of certain surplus Federal property by the Department of Defense (DOD) and other specified Federal agencies.
Gives State and local governments priority over foreign countries in receiving nonlethal excess DOD supplies before they are made available for humanitarian relief purposes.
Amends the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 1990 and 1991 to exclude motor vehicles from the personal property DOD may transfer to Federal and State agencies for counter-drug activities.
Repeals the mandate for DOD participation in infrastructure improvement demonstration programs conducted by Regional Equipment Centers in Newport Township and Cambria County, Pennsylvania. Amends the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, with respect to the transfer of property for environmental protection in foreign countries, to prohibit such transfers unless the Administrator of General Services (GSA Administrator) determines that there is no Federal or State use requirements for the property under any other provision of law.
Amends the Small Business Act to subject to the supervision of the GSA Administrator, in consultation with State agencies responsible for surplus property distribution, the transfer of U.S.-owned technology or surplus property to participants in the small business and capital ownership development program.
Repeals the authority of the Secretary of Energy to transfer surplus equipment to an educational institution with which it has a partnership agreement.
Amends the Stevenson-Wydler Technology Innovation Act of 1980 to repeal the authority of a Federal agency head or the director of a Federal laboratory to give excess research equipment to an educational institution or nonprofit organization.
Amends the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 to authorize the Administrator of General Services to delegate such transfer authority to the director of a Federal laboratory.
Requires the Administrator of General Services to review all such laws for a report to the Congress on the effectiveness of surplus personal property disposal programs along with recommendations for consolidating them under a single Federal authority.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

The House Democratic Caucus does not provide summaries of bills.

So, yes, we display the House Republican Conference’s summaries when available even if we do not have a Democratic summary available. That’s because we feel it is better to give you as much information as possible, even if we cannot provide every viewpoint.

We’ll be looking for a source of summaries from the other side in the meanwhile.

Use the comment space below for discussion of the merits of S. 771 (104th) with other GovTrack users.
Your comments are not read by Congressional staff.

comments powered by Disqus