S.Con.Res. 65 (104th): A concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the Congress that Members should understand and use the Internet ...

...to improve the democratic process and to communicate with the Internet community.

104th Congress, 1995–1996. Text as of Jun 13, 1996 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

SCON 65 IS

104th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. CON. RES. 65

Expressing the sense of the Congress that Members should understand and use the Internet to improve the democratic process and to communicate with the Internet community.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

June 13, 1996

Mr. PRESSLER (for himself and Mr. LEAHY) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the Congress that Members should understand and use the Internet to improve the democratic process and to communicate with the Internet community.

Whereas approximately 18,000,000 people use the Internet and nearly 100,000,000 expect to use it by 1998;

Whereas the Internet is changing the way the world communicates, conducts business, and educates;

Whereas the Internet can lead to a more open democratic process if fully utilized by elected representatives;

Whereas many Members of the House of Representatives and Senate do not use electronic mail or World Wide Web sites;

Whereas an increase in the usage and knowledge by Members of the Internet will lead to better policy decisions regarding the Internet and better communications with the Internet community: Now, therefore, be it

    Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), That it is the sense of Congress that--

      (1) Congress should educate itself about the Internet and use the technology in personal, committee, and leadership offices;

      (2) Congress should work in a bipartisan and bicameral fashion to facilitate the growth and advancement of the Internet;

      (3) Congress should maximize the openness of and participation in government by the people via the Internet so that our constituents can have more information from and more access to their elected representatives;

      (4) Congress should promote commerce and free flow of information on the Internet;

      (5) Congress should advance the United States’ world leadership in the digital world by avoiding the passage of laws that stifle innovation and increase regulation of the Internet; and

      (6) Congress should work with the Internet community to receive its input on the issues affecting the Internet that come before Congress.