S.Con.Res. 126 (105th): A concurrent resolution expressing the sense of Congress that the President should reassert the traditional opposition of ...

...the United States to the unilateral declaration of a Palestinian State.

105th Congress, 1997–1998. Text as of Oct 08, 1998 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

SCON 126 IS

105th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. CON. RES. 126

Expressing the sense of Congress that the President should reassert the traditional opposition of the United States to the unilateral declaration of a Palestinian State.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

October 8 (legislative day, OCTOBER 2), 1998

Mr. D’AMATO (for himself and Mr. WYDEN) submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of Congress that the President should reassert the traditional opposition of the United States to the unilateral declaration of a Palestinian State.

Whereas the United States has never endorsed the creation of an independent Palestinian state;

Whereas the United States has traditionally opposed the unilateral declaration of a Palestinian state because of concerns that such a state could pose a threat to Israel and would likely have a destabilizing effect on the entire Middle East;

Whereas the United States stated its position, after Israel and the Palestinians signed the Oslo Accords, that all questions of Palestinian sovereignty and statehood are matters which must be mutually agreed upon by the parties;

Whereas, the Administration’s recent statements on a unilateral declaration of a Palestinian state have been contradictory and confusing;

Whereas a unilateral declaration of Palestinian statehood would be a grievous violation of the Oslo Accords;

Whereas despite the Oslo Accords, Chairman Arafat, his cabinet, and the Palestinian National Council, have threatened to unilaterally proclaim the establishment of a Palestinian state in May, 1999;

Whereas the Palestinian cabinet, on September 24, 1998 stated that ‘at the end of the interim period, it (the Palestinian Government) shall declare the establishment of a Palestinian state on all Palestinian land occupied since 1967, with Jerusalem as the eternal capital of the Palestinian state’;

Whereas Chairman Arafat in speaking to the United Nations on September 28, 1998, called on world leaders to support an independent Palestinian state;

Whereas Chairman Arafat stated on July 15, 1998, that ‘[t]here is a transition period of 5 years and after 5 years we have the right to declare an independent Palestinian state.’; and

Whereas Palestinian National Council Speaker Salim al-Za’nun stated on June 15, 1998, that: ‘If following our declaration of a state, Israel renews its occupation of East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and the Gaza Strip, the Palestinian people will struggle and resist the occupier with all means possible, including armed struggle’: Now, therefore, be it

    Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) Israel, and Israel alone, can determine its security needs;

      (2) The final political status of the Palestinian entity can only be determined through bilateral negotiations and agreement between Israel and the Palestinian Authority;

      (3) Any such unilateral declaration of a Palestinian state would be a grievous violation of the Oslo Accords, would seriously impede any possibility of advancing the peace process, and would have severe negative consequences for Palestinian relations with the United States; and

      (4) The President should now publicly and unequivocally state that the United States will actively oppose such a unilateral declaration and will not extend recognition to any unilaterally declared Palestinian state.