< Back to H.R. 2415 (106th Congress, 1999–2000)

Text of the Admiral James W. Nance Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001

This bill was pocket vetoed on December 19, 2000. The text of the bill below is as of Jul 27, 1999 (Placed on Calendar in the Senate).

This is not the latest text of this bill.

Source: GPO

HR 2415 PCS

Calendar No. 229

106th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 2415

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

July 27, 1999

Received; read twice and placed on the calendar


AN ACT

To enhance security of United States missions and personnel overseas, to authorize appropriations for the Department of State for fiscal year 2000, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ‘American Embassy Security Act of 1999’.

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    The table of contents is as follows:

      Sec. 1. Short title.

      Sec. 2. Table of contents.

      Sec. 3. Definitions.

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED PROVISIONS

TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

Chapter 1--Department of State

      Sec. 101. Administration of foreign affairs.

      Sec. 102. International organizations.

      Sec. 103. International commissions.

      Sec. 104. Migration and refugee assistance.

      Sec. 105. Public diplomacy programs.

      Sec. 106. Voluntary contributions to international organizations.

      Sec. 107. Grants to the Asia Foundation.

Chapter 2--Broadcasting Board of Governors

      Sec. 121. International broadcasting.

TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

Chapter 1--Authorities and Activities

      Sec. 201. Authority to lease aircraft to respond to a terrorist attack abroad.

      Sec. 202. Report on Cuban drug trafficking.

      Sec. 203. Report on compliance with the Hague Convention on International Child Abduction.

      Sec. 204. Elimination of obsolete reports.

      Sec. 205. Continuation of reporting requirements.

      Sec. 206. International arms sales code of conduct.

      Sec. 207. Human rights and democracy fellowships.

      Sec. 208. Joint funds under agreements for cooperation in environmental, scientific, cultural, and related areas.

      Sec. 209. Report on international extradition.

      Sec. 210. Effective regulation of satellite export activities.

      Sec. 211. Report concerning attack in Cambodia.

      Sec. 212. Gender Related Persecution Task Force.

      Sec. 213. Report concerning the diplomatic initiatives of the United States and other interested parties in the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.

      Sec. 214. Report concerning proliferation of small arms.

Chapter 2--Consular And Related Activities

      Sec. 251. Deaths and estates of United States citizens abroad.

      Sec. 252. Duties of consular officers.

      Sec. 253. Machine readable visas.

      Sec. 254. Processing of visa applications.

      Sec. 255. Repeal of outdated provision on passport fees.

      Sec. 256. Fees relating to affidavits of support.

      Sec. 257. Report on terrorist activity in which United States citizens were killed and related matters.

      Sec. 258. Denial of passports to noncustodial parents subject to State arrest warrants in cases of nonpayment of child support.

      Sec. 259. Issuance of passports for the first time to children under age 14.

Chapter 3--Refugees

      Sec. 271. United States policy regarding the involuntary return of refugees.

      Sec. 272. Human rights reports.

      Sec. 273. Guidelines for refugee processing posts.

      Sec. 274. Vietnamese refugees.

TITLE III--ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE; PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND FOREIGN SERVICE

Chapter 1--Organization of the Department of State

      Sec. 301. Establishment of Bureau for International Information Programs and Bureau for Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.

      Sec. 302. Correction of designation of Inspector General of the Department of State.

      Sec. 303. Science and Technology Adviser to Secretary of State.

Chapter 2--Personnel of the Department of State

      Sec. 321. Establishment of Foreign Service Star.

      Sec. 322. United States citizens hired abroad.

      Sec. 323. Border equalization adjustment.

      Sec. 324. Treatment of grievance records.

      Sec. 325. Report concerning financial disadvantages for administrative and technical personnel.

      Sec. 326. Extension of overseas hiring authority.

      Sec. 327. Medical emergency assistance.

      Sec. 328. Families of deceased foreign service personnel.

      Sec. 329. Parental choice in education.

      Sec. 330. Workforce planning for foreign service personnel by federal agencies.

      Sec. 331. Compensation for survivors of terrorist attacks overseas.

      Sec. 332. Preservation of diversity in reorganization.

TITLE IV--UNITED STATES INFORMATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS

      Sec. 401. Educational and cultural exchanges and scholarships for Tibetans and Burmese.

      Sec. 402. Conduct of certain educational and cultural exchange programs.

      Sec. 403. Notification to Congress of grants.

      Sec. 404. National security measures.

      Sec. 405. Designation of North/South Center as the Dante B. Fascell North-South Center.

      Sec. 406. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.

      Sec. 407. International expositions.

      Sec. 408. Royal Ulster Constabulary.

TITLE V--INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING

      Sec. 501. Permanent authorization for Radio Free Asia.

      Sec. 502. Preservation of RFE/RL (Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty).

      Sec. 503. Immunity from civil liability for Broadcasting Board of Governors.

TITLE VI--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND COMMISSIONS

      Sec. 601. Interparliamentary groups.

      Sec. 602. Authority to assist State and local governments.

      Sec. 603. International Boundary and Water Commission.

      Sec. 604. Concerning United Nations General Assembly Resolution ES-10/6.

TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONS

      Sec. 701. Sense of the Congress concerning support for democracy and human rights activists in Cuba.

      Sec. 702. Relating to Cyprus.

      Sec. 703. Recognition of the Magen David Adom Society in Israel as a full member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

      Sec. 704. Annual reporting on war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide.

      Sec. 705. Sense of the Congress supporting humanitarian assistance to the people of Burma.

      Sec. 706. Restrictions on nuclear cooperation with North Korea.

      Sec. 707. Self-determination in East Timor.

      Sec. 708. Sense of the Congress relating to Linda Shenwick.

      Sec. 709. Sense of the Congress regarding sewage treatment along the border between the United States and Mexico.

      Sec. 710. Sense of the Congress regarding Colombia.

      Sec. 711. Sense of the House of representatives concerning Haitian elections.

      Sec. 712. Sense of the Congress commending the people of Israel for reaffirming the democratic ideals of Israel in its elections.

      Sec. 713. Sense of the Congress regarding the sovereignty of territories in the Aegean Sea.

      Sec. 714. Sense of the Congress that the President should seek a public renunciation by the People’s Republic of China of any use of force, or threat to use force, against taiwan, and that the United States should help Taiwan in case of threats or a military attack by the People’s Republic of China.

      Sec. 715. Sense of the Congress regarding support for the Iraqi democratic opposition.

      Sec. 716. Kosovar Albanian prisoners held in Serbia.

TITLE VIII--LIMITATION ON PROCUREMENT OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES

      Sec. 801. Limitation on procurement outside the United States.

TITLE IX--GULF WAR VETERANS’ IRAQI CLAIMS PROTECTION

      Sec. 901. Short title.

      Sec. 902. Adjudication of claims.

      Sec. 903. Claims funds.

      Sec. 904. Authority to vest Iraqi assets.

      Sec. 905. Reimbursement for administrative expenses.

      Sec. 906. Payments.

      Sec. 907. Authority to transfer records.

      Sec. 908. Statute of limitations; disposition of unused funds.

      Sec. 909. Definitions.

DIVISION B--SECURITY ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS

      Sec. 1001. Short title.

TITLE XI--TRANSFERS OF EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES

      Sec. 1101. Excess defense articles for central european countries.

      Sec. 1102. Excess defense articles for certain independent States of the former Soviet Union.

TITLE XII--FOREIGN MILITARY SALES AUTHORITIES

      Sec. 1201. Termination of foreign military financed training.

      Sec. 1202. Sales of excess Coast Guard property.

      Sec. 1203. Competitive pricing for sales of defense articles.

      Sec. 1204. Reporting of offset agreements.

      Sec. 1205. Notification of upgrades to direct commercial sales.

      Sec. 1206. Expanded prohibition on incentive payments.

      Sec. 1207. Administrative fees for leasing of defense articles.

TITLE XIII--STOCKPILING OF DEFENSE ARTICLES FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES

      Sec. 1301. Additions to United States war reserve stockpiles for allies.

      Sec. 1302. Transfer of certain obsolete or surplus defense articles in the war reserves stockpile for allies.

TITLE XIV--INTERNATIONAL ARMS SALES CODE OF CONDUCT ACT OF 1999

      Sec. 1401. Short title.

      Sec. 1402. Findings.

      Sec. 1403. International arms sales code of conduct.

TITLE XV--AUTHORITY TO EXEMPT INDIA AND PAKISTAN FROM CERTAIN SANCTIONS

      Sec. 1501. Waiver authority.

      Sec. 1502. Consultation.

      Sec. 1503. Reporting requirement.

      Sec. 1504. Appropriate congressional committees defined.

TITLE XVI--TRANSFER OF NAVAL VESSELS TO CERTAIN FOREIGN COUNTRIES

      Sec. 1601. Authority to transfer naval vessels.

      Sec. 1602. Inapplicability of aggregate annual limitation on value of transferred excess defense articles.

      Sec. 1603. Costs of transfers.

      Sec. 1604. Expiration of authority.

      Sec. 1605. Repair and refurbishment of vessels in United States shipyards.

      Sec. 1606. Sense of the Congress relating to transfer of naval vessels and aircraft to the Government of the Philippines.

TITLE XVII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

      Sec. 1701. Annual military assistance reports.

      Sec. 1702. Publication of arms sales certifications.

      Sec. 1703. Notification requirements for commercial export of significant military equipment on United States munitions list.

      Sec. 1704. Enforcement of Arms Export Control Act.

      Sec. 1705. Violations relating to material support to terrorists.

      Sec. 1706. Authority to consent to third party transfer of ex-U.S.S. Bowman County to USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc.

      Sec. 1707. Exceptions relating to prohibitions on assistance to countries involved in transfer or use of nuclear explosive devices.

      Sec. 1708. Continuation of the export control regulations under IEEPA.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:

      (1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- The term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means the Committee on International Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate.

      (2) SECRETARY- The term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of State.

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED PROVISIONS

TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

CHAPTER 1--DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 101. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State under ‘Administration of Foreign Affairs’ to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes authorized by law, including the diplomatic security program:

      (1) DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS-

        (A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- For ‘Diplomatic and Consular Programs’ of the Department of State, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

        (B) LIMITATIONS-

          (i) WORLDWIDE SECURITY UPGRADES- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), $254,000,000 for fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for worldwide security upgrades.

          (ii) BUREAU OF DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND LABOR- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for salaries and expenses of the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.

          (iii) RECRUITMENT OF MINORITY GROUPS- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), $2,000,000 for fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for the recruitment of members of minority groups for careers in the Foreign Service and international affairs.

      (2) CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND- For ‘Capital Investment Fund’ of the Department of State, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (3) SECURITY AND MAINTENANCE OF UNITED STATES MISSIONS-

        (A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- For ‘Security and Maintenance of United States Missions’, $1,580,066,000 for the fiscal year 2000.

        (B) SECURITY UPGRADES FOR UNITED STATES MISSIONS- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), $1,146,000,000 for fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for security upgrades to United States missions abroad, including construction and relocation costs.

      (4) REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES- For ‘Representation Allowances’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (5) EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE- For ‘Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (6) OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL- For ‘Office of the Inspector General’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (7) PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN- For ‘Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (8) PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS-

        (A) For ‘Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

        (B) Each amount appropriated pursuant to this paragraph is authorized to remain available through September 30 of the fiscal year following the fiscal year for which the amount appropriated was made.

      (9) REPATRIATION LOANS- For ‘Repatriation Loans’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000, for administrative expenses.

SEC. 102. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Contributions to International Organizations’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international organizations and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

    (b) ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international peacekeeping activities and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

    (c) CIVIL BUDGET OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION- For the fiscal year 2000, there are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary to pay the full amount for the United States assessment for the civil budget of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

SEC. 103. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated under ‘International Commissions’ for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes authorized by law:

      (1) INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO- For ‘International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico’--

        (A) for ‘Salaries and Expenses’ such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000; and

        (B) for ‘Construction’ such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (2) INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA- For ‘International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (3) INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION- For ‘International Joint Commission’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (4) INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS- For ‘International Fisheries Commissions’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

SEC. 104. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

    (a) MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE-

      (1) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Migration and Refugee Assistance’ for authorized activities, $750,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000.

      (2) LIMITATIONS-

        (A) TIBETAN REFUGEES IN INDIA AND NEPAL- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated in paragraph (1), not more than $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available only for humanitarian assistance, including food, medicine, clothing, and medical and vocational training, to Tibetan refugees in India and Nepal who have fled Chinese-occupied Tibet.

        (B) REFUGEES RESETTLING IN ISRAEL- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated in paragraph (1), $60,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available only for assistance for refugees resettling in Israel from other countries.

        (C) HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE FOR DISPLACED BURMESE- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated in paragraph (1), $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 for humanitarian assistance are authorized to be available only for assistance (including food, medicine, clothing, and medical and vocational training) to persons displaced as a result of civil conflict in Burma, including persons still within Burma.

        (D) ASSISTANCE FOR DISPLACED SIERRA LEONEANS- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated in paragraph (1), $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 for humanitarian assistance are authorized to be available only for assistance (including food, medicine, clothing, and medical and vocational training) and resettlement of persons who have been severely mutilated as a result of civil conflict in Sierra Leone, including persons still within Sierra Leone.

        (E) ASSISTANCE FOR KOSOVAR REFUGEES-

          (i) Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated in paragraph (1), $50,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 are authorized to be appropriated only for the Front Line States Initiative defined in clause (ii).

          (ii) For the purposes of this subparagraph, the term ‘Front Line States Initiative’ means assistance for the relief of refugees fleeing from the conflict in Kosovo provided through nongovernmental organizations in the form of food, housing, clothing, transportation, and other material, with priority assistance for the relief of refugees in the front line states of Albania and Macedonia and for returned or returning refugees, displaced persons, and other victims of the humanitarian crisis within Kosovo.

      (F) INTERNATIONAL RAPE COUNSELING PROGRAM- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated in paragraph (1), $2,500,000 for the fiscal year 2000 are authorized to be appropriated only for a United States based rape counseling program for assistance to women who have been victimized by the systematic use of rape as a weapon in times of conflict and war.

(b) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Funds appropriated pursuant to this section are authorized to remain available until expended.

SEC. 105. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY PROGRAMS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State to carry out international information activities and educational and cultural exchange programs under the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, Reorganization Plan Number 2 of 1977, the Dante B. Fascell North-South Center Act of 1991, and the National Endowment for Democracy Act, and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes:

      (1) INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION PROGRAMS- For ‘International Information Programs’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (2) EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS-

        (A) FULBRIGHT ACADEMIC EXCHANGE PROGRAMS- There are authorized to be appropriated for the ‘Fulbright Academic Exchange Programs’ (other than programs described in subparagraph (B)), such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

        (B) OTHER EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS-

          (i) IN GENERAL- There are authorized to be appropriated for other educational and cultural exchange programs authorized by law, including the Claude and Mildred Pepper Scholarship Program of the Washington Workshops Foundation and the Mike Mansfield Fellowship Program, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

          (ii) SOUTH PACIFIC EXCHANGES- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under clause (i), $750,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available for ‘South Pacific Exchanges’.

          (iii) EAST TIMORESE SCHOLARSHIPS- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under clause (i), $500,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available for ‘East Timorese Scholarships’.

          (iv) TIBETAN EXCHANGES- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under clause (i), $500,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available for ‘Ngawang Choephel Exchange Programs’ (formerly known as educational and cultural exchanges with Tibet) under section 103(a) of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319).

          (v) AFRICAN EXCHANGES- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under clause (i), $500,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available only for ‘Educational and Cultural Exchanges with Sub-Saharan Africa’.

      (3) CENTER FOR CULTURAL AND TECHNICAL INTERCHANGE BETWEEN EAST AND WEST- For the ‘Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange between East and West’, $17,500,000 for the fiscal year 2000.

      (4) NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY- For the ‘National Endowment for Democracy’, $32,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000.

      (5) REAGAN-FASCELL DEMOCRACY FELLOWS- For a fellowship program, to be known as the ‘Reagan-Fascell Democracy Fellows’, for democracy activists and scholars from around the world at the International Forum for Democratic Studies in Washington, D.C., to study, write, and exchange views with other activists and scholars and with Americans, $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000.

      (6) DANTE B. FASCELL NORTH-SOUTH CENTER- For ‘Dante B. Fascell North-South Center’ such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (7) ISRAEL-ARAB PEACE PARTNERS PROGRAM- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under clause (i), $1,500,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be available only for people-to-people activities (with a focus on young people) to support the Middle East peace process involving participants from Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Arab countries, and the United States, to be known as the ‘Israel-Arab Peace Partners Program’. Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a plan to the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives for implementation of such program. The Secretary shall not implement the plan until 45 days after its submission to the Committee.

SEC. 106. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated for ‘Voluntary Contributions to International Organizations’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

    (b) LIMITATIONS ON AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS-

      (1) WORLD FOOD PROGRAM- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $5,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for a United States contribution to the World Food Program.

      (2) UNITED NATIONS VOLUNTARY FUND FOR VICTIMS OF TORTURE- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $5,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for a United States contribution to the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture.

      (3) INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM ON THE ELIMINATION OF CHILD LABOR- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $5,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for a United States contribution to the International Labor Organization for the activities of the International Program on the Elimination of Child Labor.

      (4) ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $240,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for a United States contribution to the Organization of American States for the Office of the Special Rapporteur for Freedom of Expression in the Western Hemisphere to conduct investigations, including field visits, to establish a network of nongovernmental organizations, and to hold hemispheric conferences, of which $6,000 for each fiscal year is authorized to be appropriated only for the investigation and dissemination of information on violations of freedom of expression by the Government of Cuba.

      (5) UNICEF- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $110,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for a United States contribution to UNICEF.

    (c) RESTRICTIONS ON UNITED STATES VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM-

      (1) LIMITATION- Of the amounts made available under subsection (a) for the fiscal year 2000 for United States voluntary contributions to the United Nations Development Program an amount equal to the amount the United Nations Development Program will spend in Burma during each fiscal year shall be withheld unless during such fiscal year the Secretary of State submits to the appropriate congressional committees the certification described in paragraph (2).

      (2) CERTIFICATION- The certification referred to in paragraph (1) is a certification by the Secretary of State that all programs and activities of the United Nations Development Program (including United Nations Development Program--Administered Funds) in Burma--

        (A) are focused on eliminating human suffering and addressing the needs of the poor;

        (B) are undertaken only through international or private voluntary organizations that have been deemed independent of the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) (formerly known as the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC), after consultation with the leadership of the National League for Democracy and the leadership of the National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma;

        (C) provide no financial, political, or military benefit to the SPDC; and

        (D) are carried out only after consultation with the leadership of the National League for Democracy and the leadership of the National Coalition Government of the Union of Burma.

    (d) CONTRIBUTIONS TO UNITED NATIONS POPULATION FUND-

      (1) LIMITATIONS ON AMOUNT OF CONTRIBUTION- Of the amounts made available under subsection (a), not more than $25,000,000 for fiscal year 2000 shall be available for the United Nations Population Fund (hereinafter in this subsection referred to as the ‘UNFPA’).

      (2) PROHIBITION ON USE OF FUNDS IN CHINA- None of the funds made available under subsection (a) may be made available for the UNFPA for a country program in the People’s Republic of China.

      (3) CONDITIONS ON AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Amounts made available under subsection (a) for fiscal year 2000 for the UNFPA may not be made available to UNFPA unless--

        (A) the UNFPA maintains amounts made available to the UNFPA under this section in an account separate from other accounts of the UNFPA;

        (B) the UNFPA does not commingle amounts made available to the UNFPA under this section with other sums; and

        (C) the UNFPA does not fund abortions.

      (4) REPORT TO CONGRESS AND WITHHOLDING OF FUNDS-

        (A) Not later than February 15, 2000, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees indicating the amount of funds that the United Nations Population Fund is budgeting for the year in which the report is submitted for a country program in the People’s Republic of China.

        (B) If a report under subparagraph (A) indicates that the United Nations Population Fund plans to spend funds for a country program in the People’s Republic of China in the year covered by the report, then the amount of such funds that the UNFPA plans to spend in the People’s Republic of China shall be deducted from the funds made available to the UNFPA after March 1 for obligation for the remainder of the fiscal year in which the report is submitted.

    (e) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a) are authorized to remain available until expended.

SEC. 107. GRANTS TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION.

    Section 404 of The Asia Foundation Act (title IV of Public Law 98-164) is amended to read as follows:

    ‘SEC. 404. There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State $15,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000 for grants to The Asia Foundation pursuant to this title.’.

CHAPTER 2--BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS

SEC. 121. INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Broadcasting Board of Governors to carry out certain international broadcasting activities under the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and for other purposes authorized by law:

      (1) INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS-

        (A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- For ‘International Broadcasting Operations’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

        (B) ALLOCATION- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), the Broadcasting Board of Governors shall seek to ensure that the amounts made available for broadcasting to nations whose people do not fully enjoy freedom of expression do not decline in proportion to the amounts made available for broadcasting to other nations.

      (2) BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS- For ‘Broadcasting Capital Improvements’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

      (3) RADIO FREE ASIA- For ‘Radio Free Asia’, $30,000,000 for the fiscal year 2000.

      (4) BROADCASTING TO CUBA-

        (A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- For ‘Broadcasting to Cuba’, such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2000.

        (B) LIMITATION- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under subparagraph (A), $712,000 for the fiscal year 2000 is authorized to be appropriated only for the Office of Cuba Broadcasting to develop and implement new technology and enhance current methods to strengthen and improve the transmission capabilities of Radio Marti and TV Marti.

TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

CHAPTER 1--AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 201. AUTHORITY TO LEASE AIRCRAFT TO RESPOND TO A TERRORIST ATTACK ABROAD.

    Subject to the availability of appropriations, in the event of an emergency which involves a terrorist attack abroad, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice is authorized to lease commercial aircraft to transport equipment and personnel in response to such attack if there have been reasonable efforts to obtain appropriate Department of Defense aircraft and such aircraft are unavailable. The leasing authority under this section shall include authority to provide indemnification insurance or guarantees, if necessary and appropriate.

SEC. 202. REPORT ON CUBAN DRUG TRAFFICKING.

    Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act and every 180 days thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees an unclassified report (with a classified annex) on the extent of international drug trafficking from, through, or over Cuba. Each report shall include the following:

      (1) Information concerning the extent to which the Cuban Government or any official, employee, or entity of the Government of Cuba has engaged in, facilitated, or condoned such trafficking.

      (2) The extent to which the appropriate agencies of the United States Government have investigated and prosecuted such activities of the Cuban Government or any official, employee, or entity of the Government of Cuba.

      (3) A determination of whether the Government of Cuba should be included in the list of nations considered to be major drug trafficking countries.

SEC. 203. REPORT ON COMPLIANCE WITH THE HAGUE CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL CHILD ABDUCTION.

    Section 2803(a) of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted by division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘1999,’ and inserting ‘2000,’;

      (2) in paragraph (2) by striking ‘abducted.’ and inserting ‘abducted, are being wrongfully retained in violation of United States court orders, or which have failed to comply with any of their obligations under such convention with respect to applications for the return of children, access to children, or both, submitted by United States citizens or lawful residents.’;

      (3) in paragraph (3)--

        (A) by striking ‘children’ and inserting ‘children, access to children, or both,’; and

        (B) by inserting ‘or lawful residents’ after ‘citizens’; and

      (4) by inserting after paragraph (5) the following new paragraph:

      ‘(6) A list of the countries which are Parties to the Convention, but in which due to the absence of a prompt and effective method for enforcement of civil court orders, the absence of a doctrine of comity, or other factors, there is a substantial possibility that an order of return or access under a Hague Convention proceeding, or a United States custody, access, or visitation order, will not be promptly enforced.’.

SEC. 204. ELIMINATION OF OBSOLETE REPORTS.

    (a) POST LANGUAGE COMPETENCE- Section 304(c) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3944(c)) is repealed.

    (b) SUSTAINABLE ECONOMIC GROWTH- Section 574 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1996 (Public Law 104-107) is repealed.

    (c) REDUNDANT REPORTS ON CERTAIN WEAPONS-

      (1) Section 308 of the Chemical and Biological Weapons and Warfare Elimination Act of 1991 (Public Law 102-182) is repealed.

      (2) Section 585 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-208), is repealed.

    (d) SITUATION IN IRAQ- Section 3 of Public Law 102-1 is amended by striking ‘60 days’ and inserting ‘6 months’.

SEC. 205. CONTINUATION OF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.

    (a) REPORTS ON CLAIMS BY UNITED STATES FIRMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT OF SAUDI ARABIA- Section 2801(b) of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted by division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘the earlier of--’;

      (2) by striking paragraph (1); and

      (3) by striking the designation for paragraph (2) and adjusting the tabulation.

    (b) REPORTS ON DETERMINATIONS UNDER TITLE IV OF THE LIBERTAD ACT- Section 2802(a) of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted by division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended by striking ‘during the period ending September 30, 1999,’ and inserting a comma.

    (c) RELATIONS WITH VIETNAM- Section 2805 of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted by division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended by striking ‘during the period ending September 30, 1999,’.

    (d) REPORTS ON BALLISTIC MISSILE COOPERATION WITH RUSSIA- Section 2705(d) of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted by division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended by striking ‘and January 1, 2000,’ and inserting ‘January 1, 2000, January 1, 2001, and January 1, 2002,’.

SEC. 206. INTERNATIONAL ARMS SALES CODE OF CONDUCT.

    (a) NEGOTIATIONS- The Secretary of State shall attempt to achieve the foreign policy goal of an international arms sales code of conduct with all Wassenaar Arrangement countries. The Secretary of State shall take the necessary steps to begin negotiations with all Wassenaar Arrangement countries within 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. The purpose of such negotiations shall be to conclude an agreement on restricting or prohibiting arms transfers to countries that do not meet the criteria under subsection (b).

    (b) CRITERIA- The criteria referred to in subsection (a) are as follows:

      (1) PROMOTING DEMOCRACY- Such government--

        (A) was chosen by and permits free and fair elections;

        (B) promotes civilian control of the military and security forces and has civilian institutions controlling the policy, operation, and spending of all law enforcement and security institutions, as well as the armed forces;

        (C) promotes the rule of law, equality before the law, and respect for individual and minority rights, including freedom to speak, publish, associate, and organize; and

        (D) promotes the strengthening of political, legislative, and civil institutions of democracy, as well as autonomous institutions to monitor the conduct of public officials and to combat corruption.

      (2) RESPECTS HUMAN RIGHTS- Such government--

        (A) does not engage in gross violations of internationally recognized human rights, including--

          (i) extrajudicial or arbitrary executions;

          (ii) disappearances;

          (iii) torture or severe mistreatment;

          (iv) prolonged arbitrary imprisonment;

          (v) systematic official discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, national origin, or political affiliation; and

          (vi) grave breaches of international laws of war or equivalent violations of the laws of war in internal conflicts;

        (B) vigorously investigates, disciplines, and prosecutes those responsible for gross violations of internationally recognized human rights;

        (C) permits access on a regular basis to political prisoners by international humanitarian organizations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross;

        (D) promotes the independence of the judiciary and other official bodies that oversee the protection of human rights;

        (E) does not impede the free functioning of domestic and international human rights organizations; and

        (F) provides access on a regular basis to humanitarian organizations in situations of conflict or famine.

      (3) NOT ENGAGED IN CERTAIN ACTS OF ARMED AGGRESSION- Such government is not currently engaged in acts of armed aggression in violation of international law.

      (4) FULL PARTICIPATION IN UNITED NATIONS REGISTER OF CONVENTIONAL ARMS- Such government is fully participating in the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms.

    (c) REPORTS-

      (1) REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE- Not later than 6 months after the commencement of negotiations under subsection (a), and not later than the end of every 6-month period thereafter until an agreement described in subsection (a) is concluded, the Secretary of State shall report to the appropriate congressional committees on the progress of such negotiations.

      (2) HUMAN RIGHTS REPORT- In the report required by sections 116(d) and 502B of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Secretary of State shall describe the extent to which the practices of each country evaluated meet the criteria of subsection (b).

    (d) DEFINITION- For purposes of this section, the term ‘Wassenaar Arrangement countries’ means those participating in the Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual Use Goods and Technologies, done at Vienna on July 11-12, 1996.

SEC. 207. HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY FELLOWSHIPS.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- There is established in the Department of State a program which shall be known as the ‘Human Rights and Democracy Fellowship Program’. The program shall be administered by the Secretary with the assistance of the Assistant Secretary for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. The program shall provide for the employment of not less than 6 and not more than 12 fellows in the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor. Fellowships shall be for an initial 1 year period which may be extended for a total of not more than 3 years. Fellowships shall be available to individuals who have expertise in human rights policy, human rights law, or related subjects and who are not permanent employees of the United States Government.

    (b) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATION- There are authorized to be appropriated for the Human Rights and Democracy Fellowship Program under subsection (a) $1,000,000 for fiscal year 2000.

SEC. 208. JOINT FUNDS UNDER AGREEMENTS FOR COOPERATION IN ENVIRONMENTAL, SCIENTIFIC, CULTURAL AND RELATED AREAS.

    Amounts made available to the Department of State for participation in joint funds under agreements for cooperation in environmental, scientific, cultural and related areas prior to fiscal year 1996 which, pursuant to express terms of such international agreements, were deposited in interest-bearing accounts prior to disbursement may earn interest, and interest accrued to such accounts may be used and retained without return to the Treasury of the United States and without further appropriation by Congress. The Department of State shall take action to ensure the complete and timely disbursement of appropriations and associated interest within joint funds covered by this section and final disposition of such agreements.

SEC. 209. REPORT ON INTERNATIONAL EXTRADITION.

    Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit to the Congress a report concerning international extradition. The report shall review all extradition treaties and agreements to which the United States is signatory; identify those countries that have become ‘safe havens’ for individuals fleeing the American justice system; identify the factors which contribute to the international extradition problem, particularly laws in foreign countries which prohibit the extradition to another country of certain classes of persons; and propose appropriate legislative and diplomatic solutions to such problem, including, where appropriate, the renegotiation of extradition treaties.

SEC. 210. EFFECTIVE REGULATION OF SATELLITE EXPORT ACTIVITIES.

    (a) LICENSING REGIME-

      (1) ESTABLISHMENT- The Secretary of State shall establish a regulatory regime for the licensing for export of commercial satellites, satellite technologies, their components, and systems which shall include expedited approval, as appropriate, of the licensing for export by United States companies of commercial satellites, satellite technologies, their components, and systems, to NATO allies, major non-NATO allies, and other friendly countries, but not to the Peoples Republic of China.

      (2) REQUIREMENTS- For proposed exports to those nations which meet the requirements of paragraph (1) above, the regime should include expedited processing of requests for export authorizations that--

        (A) are time-critical, including a transfer or exchange of information relating to a satellite failure or anomaly in-flight or on-orbit;

        (B) are required to submit bids to procurements offered by foreign persons;

        (C) relate to the re-export of unimproved materials, products, or data; or

        (D) are required to obtain launch and on-orbit insurance.

    (b) FINANCIAL AND PERSONNEL RESOURCES- Of the funds authorized to be appropriated in section 101(1)(A), $11,000,000 is authorized to be appropriated for the Office of Defense Trade Controls for fiscal year 2000, to enable that office to carry out its responsibilities.

    (c) IMPROVEMENT AND ASSESSMENT- The Secretary shall, not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, submit to the Congress a plan for--

      (1) continuously gathering industry and public suggestions for potential improvements in the State Department’s export control regime for commercial satellites; and

      (2) arranging for the conduct and submission to Congress, not later than 15 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, an independent review of the export control regime for commercial satellites as to its effectiveness at promoting national security and economic competitiveness.

SEC. 211. REPORT CONCERNING ATTACK IN CAMBODIA.

    Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and every 6 months thereafter until the investigation referred to in this section is completed, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Attorney General, shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees, in classified and unclassified form, containing the most current information on the investigation into the March 30, 1997, grenade attack in Cambodia, including a discussion of communication between the United States Embassy in Phnom Penh and Washington.

SEC. 212. GENDER RELATED PERSECUTION TASK FORCE.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT OF TASK FORCE- The Secretary of State, in consultation with other Federal agencies, shall establish a task force with the goal of determining eligibility guidelines for women seeking refugee status overseas due to gender-related persecution (including but not limited to domestic and workplace violence and female genital mutilation).

    (b) REPORT- Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit to the Congress a report outlining the guidelines determined by the task force under subsection (a).

SEC. 213. REPORT CONCERNING THE DIPLOMATIC INITIATIVES OF THE UNITED STATES AND OTHER INTERESTED PARTIES IN THE FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF YUGOSLAVIA.

    Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees assessing the diplomatic initiatives of the United States and other interested parties in the period leading up to and during the war in Kosovo. The report shall be written by an independent panel of experts (from the National Academy of Sciences). The report shall give particular consideration to the Rambouilliet negotiations, diplomatic initiatives undertaken by representatives of Russia, Cyprus, Finland, United States congressional members, other United States citizens, and other parties. The report analysis will evaluate the role of diplomacy in ending the war and compare the final agreement with various proposed agreements dating from before the commencement of the bombing campaign.

SEC. 214. REPORT CONCERNING PROLIFERATION OF SMALL ARMS.

    Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report containing--

      (1) an assessment of whether the global trade in small arms poses any proliferation problems including--

        (A) estimates of the numbers and sources of licit and illicit small arms and light arms in circulation and their origins;

        (B) the challenges associated with monitoring small arms; and

        (C) the political, economic, and security dimensions of this issue, and the threats posed, if any, by these weapons to United States interests, including national security interests;

      (2) an assessment of whether the export of small arms of the type sold commercially in the United States should be considered a foreign policy or proliferation issue;

      (3) a description and analysis of the adequacy of current Department of State activities to monitor and, to the extent possible ensure adequate control of, both the licit and illicit manufacture, transfer, and proliferation of small arms and light weapons, including efforts to survey and assess this matter with respect to Africa and to survey and assess the scope and scale of the issue, including stockpile security and destruction of excess inventory, in NATO and Partnership for Peace countries;

      (4) a description of the impact of the reorganization of the Department of State made by the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 on the transfer of functions relating to monitoring, licensing, analysis, and policy on small arms and light weapons, including--

        (A) the integration of and the functions relating to small arms and light weapons of the United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency with those of the Department of State;

        (B) the functions of the Bureau of Arms Control, the Bureau of Nonproliferation, the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, regional bureaus, and any other relevant bureau or office of the Department of State, including the allocation of personnel and funds, as they pertain to small arms and light weapons;

        (C) the functions of the regional bureaus of the Department of State in providing information and policy coordination in bilateral and multilateral settings on small arms and light weapons;

        (D) the functions of the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control and International Security pertaining to small arms and light weapons; and

        (E) the functions of the scientific and policy advisory board on arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament pertaining to small arms and light weapons; and

      (5) an assessment of whether foreign governments are enforcing their own laws concerning small arms and light weapons import and sale, including commitments under the Inter-American Convention Against the Illicit Manufacturing of and Trafficking in Firearms, Ammunition, Explosives, and Other Related Materials or other relevant international agreements.

CHAPTER 2--CONSULAR AND RELATED ACTIVITIES

SEC. 251. DEATHS AND ESTATES OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS ABROAD.

    (a) REPEAL- Section 1709 of the Revised Statutes (22 U.S.C. 4195) is repealed.

    (b) AMENDMENT TO STATE DEPARTMENT BASIC AUTHORITIES ACT OF 1956- The State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 is amended by inserting after section 43 the following new sections:

‘SEC. 43A. NOTIFICATION OF NEXT OF KIN; REPORTS OF DEATH.

    ‘Pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe--

      ‘(1) When a United States citizen or national dies abroad, a consular officer shall endeavor to notify, or assist the Secretary of State in notifying, the next of kin or legal guardian as soon as possible; provided, that in the case of death of Peace Corps Volunteers, members of the Armed Forces, their dependents, or Department of Defense civilian employees, the consular officer shall assist the Peace Corps or the appropriate military authorities in making such notifications.

      ‘(2) The consular officer may, for any United States citizen who dies abroad, (A) in the case of a finding by appropriate local authorities, issue a report of death or of presumptive death, or (B) in the absence of a finding by appropriate local authorities, issue a report of presumptive death.

‘SEC. 43B. CONSERVATION AND DISPOSITION OF ESTATES.

    ‘(a) CONSERVATION OF ESTATES ABROAD-

      ‘(1) AUTHORITY TO ACT AS CONSERVATOR- Pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe, when a United States citizen or national dies abroad, a consular officer shall act as the provisional conservator of the decedent’s estate and, subject to paragraphs (3) and (4), shall--

        ‘(A) take possession of the personal effects within his jurisdiction;

        ‘(B) inventory and appraise the personal effects, sign the inventory, and annex thereto a certificate as to the accuracy of the inventory and appraised value of each article;

        ‘(C) when appropriate, collect the debts due to the decedent in the officer’s jurisdiction and pay from the estate the obligations owed there by the decedent;

        ‘(D) sell or dispose of, as appropriate, all perishable items of property;

        ‘(E) sell, after reasonable public notice and notice to such next of kin as can be ascertained with reasonable diligence, such additional items of property as necessary to provide funds sufficient to pay the decedent’s debts and property taxes in the country of death, funeral expenses, and other expenses incident to the disposition of the estate;

        ‘(F) at the end of 1 year from the date of death (or after such additional period as may be required for final settlement of the estate), if no claimant shall have appeared, sell or dispose of the residue of the personal estate, except as provided in subparagraph (G) below, in the same manner as United States Government-owned foreign excess property;

        ‘(G) transmit to the United States, to the Secretary of State, the proceeds of any sales along with any financial instruments (including bonds, shares of stock, and notes of indebtedness), jewelry, heirlooms, and other articles of obvious sentimental value, to be held in trust for the legal claimant; and

        ‘(H) in the event that the decedent’s estate includes an interest in real property located within the jurisdiction of the officer and such interest does not devolve by the applicable laws of intestate succession or otherwise, provide for title to the property to be conveyed to the Government of the United States unless the Secretary declines to accept such conveyance.

      ‘(2) AUTHORITY TO ACT AS ADMINISTRATOR- The Secretary of State may expressly authorize the officer to act as administrator of the estate in exceptional circumstances, pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe. The officer shall not otherwise act in such capacity.

      ‘(3) EXCEPTIONS-

        ‘(A) The function provided for in this section shall not be performed to the extent that the decedent has left or there is otherwise appointed, in the country where the death occurred or where the decedent was domiciled, a legal representative, partner in trade, or trustee appointed to take care of his personal estate. If the decedent’s legal representative shall appear at any time prior to transmission of the estate to the Secretary and demand the proceeds and effects being held by the officer, the officer shall deliver them to the representative after having collected any prescribed fee for the services rendered pursuant to this section.

        ‘(B) Nothing in this section shall affect the authority of military commanders under title 10 of the United States Code with respect to persons or property under military command or jurisdiction or the authority of the Peace Corps with respect to Peace Corps Volunteers or their property.

      ‘(4) CONDITIONS- The functions provided for in this section shall be performed only when authorized by treaty provisions or permitted by the laws or authorities of the country wherein the death occurs, or the decedent is domiciled, or if such functions are permitted by established usage.

    ‘(b) DISPOSITION OF ESTATES BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE-

      ‘(1) PERSONAL ESTATES-

        ‘(A) After receipt of personal estates pursuant to subsection (a), the Secretary, pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe for the conservation of such estates, may seek payment of all outstanding debts to the estate as they become due, may receive any balances due on such estates, may endorse all checks, bills of exchange, promissory notes, and other instruments of indebtedness payable to the estate for the benefit thereof, and may take such other action as is reasonably necessary for the conservation of the estate.

        ‘(B) If by the end of the fifth full fiscal year after receipt of the personal estate pursuant to subsection (a), no legal claimant for such estate has appeared, title to the estate shall pass to the Secretary who shall dispose of the estate in the same manner as surplus United States Government-owned property or by such means as may be appropriate in light of the nature and value of the property involved. The expenses of sales shall be paid from the estate, and any lawful claim received thereafter shall be payable to the extent of the value of the net proceeds of the estate as a refund from the appropriate Treasury account.

        ‘(C) The net cash estate after disposition as provided in subparagraph (B) shall be remitted to the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.

      ‘(2) REAL PROPERTY- Pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe--

        ‘(A) in the event that real property is conveyed to the Government of the United States pursuant to subsection (a)(1)(H) and is not needed by the Department of State, such property shall be considered foreign excess property under title IV of the Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949 (40 U.S.C. 511 et seq.); and

        ‘(B) in the event that the Department needs such property, the Secretary shall treat such property as if it were an unconditional gift accepted on behalf of the Department of State pursuant to section 25 of this Act and section 9(a)(3) of the Foreign Service Buildings Act of 1926, as amended.

    ‘(c) LOSSES IN CONNECTION WITH THE CONSERVATION OF ESTATES-

      ‘(1) AUTHORITY- Pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe, the Secretary is authorized to compensate the estate of any United States citizen, who has died overseas, for property, the conservation of which has been undertaken under either section 43 or subsection (a) of this section, and that has been lost, stolen, or destroyed while in the custody of officers or employees of the Department of State. Any such compensation shall be in lieu of personal liability of officers or employees of the Department of State. Officers and employees of the Department of State may be liable in appropriate cases to the Department of State to the extent of any compensation provided pursuant to this subsection.

      ‘(2) LIABILITY- The liability of officers or employees of the Department of State to the Department for payments made pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section shall be determined pursuant to the Department’s procedures for determining accountability for United States Government property.’.

    (c) EFFECTIVE DATE- The amendments made by this section shall take effect 6 months after enactment of this Act or upon the effective date of any regulations promulgated hereunder, whichever is sooner.

SEC. 252. DUTIES OF CONSULAR OFFICERS.

    Section 43 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2715) is amended--

      (1) by inserting ‘(a) AUTHORITY- ’ before ‘In’;

      (2) by striking ‘disposition of personal effects.’ in the last sentence and inserting ‘disposition of personal estates pursuant to section 43B of this Act.’; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(b) DEFINITIONS- For purposes of this section and sections 43A and 43B of this Act, the term ‘consular officer’ includes any United States citizen employee of the Department of State who is designated by the Secretary of State to perform consular services pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe.’.

SEC. 253. MACHINE READABLE VISAS.

    Section 140(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (8 U.S.C. 1351 note) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (3) by amending the first sentence to read as follows: ‘For each of the fiscal years 2000, 2001, and 2002, any amount collected under paragraph (1) that exceeds $316,715,000 for fiscal year 2000, $338,885,000 for fiscal year 2001, and $362,607,000 for fiscal year 2002 may be made available only if a notification is submitted to Congress in accordance with the procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications under section 34 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956.’; and

      (2) by striking paragraphs (4) and (5).

SEC. 254. PROCESSING OF VISA APPLICATIONS.

    (a) POLICY- It shall be the policy of the Department of State to process immigrant visa applications of immediate relatives of United States citizens and nonimmigrant k-1 visa applications of fiances of United States citizens within 30 days of the receipt of all necessary documents from the applicant and the Immigration and Naturalization Service. In the case of a visa application where the sponsor of such applicant is a relative other than an immediate relative, it should be the policy of the Department of State to process such an application within 60 days of the receipt of all necessary documents from the applicant and the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

    (b) REPORTS- For each of the fiscal years 2000 and 2001, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees an annual report on the extent to which the Department of State is meeting the policy standards under subsection (a). Each report shall be based on a survey of the 22 consular posts which account for approximately 72 percent of immigrant visas issued and, in addition, the consular posts in Guatemala City, Nicosia, Caracas, Naples, and Jakarta. Each report should include data on the average time for processing each category of visa application under subsection (a), a list of the embassies and consular posts which do not meet the policy standards under subsection (a), the amount of funds collected for processing of visa applications, the costs of processing such visa applications, and the steps being taken by the Department of State to achieve such policy standards.

    (c) TASK FORCE- The Secretary of State, in consultation with other Federal agencies, shall establish a joint task force with the goal of reducing the overall processing time for visa applications.

SEC. 255. REPEAL OF OUTDATED PROVISION ON PASSPORT FEES.

    Section 4 of the Passport Act of June 4, 1920 (22 U.S.C. 216, 41 Stat. 751) is repealed.

SEC. 256. FEES RELATING TO AFFIDAVITS OF SUPPORT.

    (a) AUTHORITY FOR FEE FOR PREPARATION ASSISTANCE- Subject to subsection (b), the Secretary of State is authorized to charge a fee for services provided by the Department of State to an individual for assistance in the preparation and filing of an affidavit of support pursuant to section 213A of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1183A) to ensure that the affidavit is properly completed before consideration of the affidavit and an immigrant visa application by a consular officer.

    (b) LIMITATION- An individual may be charged a fee under this section only once, regardless of the number of separate affidavits of support and visa applications for which services are provided.

    (c) TREATMENT OF FEES- Fees collected under the authority of subsection (a) shall be deposited as an offsetting collection to any Department of State appropriation, to recover the costs of providing affidavit preparation services under subsection (a). Such fees shall remain available for obligation until expended. Fees collected shall be available only to such extent and in such amounts as are provided in advance in an appropriation Act.

SEC. 257. REPORT ON TERRORIST ACTIVITY IN WHICH UNITED STATES CITIZENS WERE KILLED AND RELATED MATTERS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and every 6 months thereafter, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report, with a classified annex as necessary, to the appropriate congressional committees regarding terrorist attacks in Israel, in territory administered by Israel, and in territory administered by the Palestinian Authority.

    (b) CONTENTS- Each report under subsection (a) shall contain the following information:

      (1) A list of formal commitments the Palestinian Authority has made to combat terrorism.

      (2) A list of terrorist attacks, occurring between September 13, 1993 and the date of the report, against United States citizens in Israel, in territory administered by Israel, or in territory administered by the Palestinian Authority, including--

        (A) a list of all citizens of the United States killed or injured in such attacks;

        (B) the date of each attack and the total number of people killed or injured in each attack;

        (C) the person or group claiming responsibility for the attack and where such person or group has found refuge or support;

        (D) a list of suspects implicated in each attack and the nationality of each suspect, including information on--

          (i) which suspects are in the custody of the Palestinian Authority and which suspects are in the custody of Israel;

          (ii) which suspects are still at large in areas controlled by the Palestinian Authority or Israel; and

          (iii) the whereabouts (or suspected whereabouts) of suspects implicated in each attack.

      (3) Of the suspects implicated in the attacks described in paragraph (2) and detained by Palestinian or Israeli authorities, information on--

        (A) the date each suspect was incarcerated;

        (B) whether any suspects have been released, the date of such release, and whether any released suspect was implicated in subsequent acts of terrorism; and

        (C) the status of each case pending against a suspect, including information on whether the suspect has been indicted, prosecuted, or convicted by the Palestinian Authority or Israel.

      (4) The policy of the Department of State with respect to offering rewards for information on terrorist suspects, including any information on whether a reward has been posted for suspects involved in terrorist attacks listed in the report.

      (5) A list of each request by the United States for assistance in investigating terrorist attacks listed in the report, a list of each request by the United States for the transfer of terrorist suspects from the Palestinian Authority and Israel since September 13, 1993, and the response to each request from the Palestinian Authority and Israel.

      (6) A description of efforts made by United States officials since September 13, 1993, to bring to justice perpetrators of terrorist acts against United States citizens as listed in the report.

      (7) A list of any terrorist suspects in each such case who are members of Palestinian police or security forces, the Palestine Liberation Organization, or any Palestinian governing body.

    (c) CONSULTATION WITH OTHER DEPARTMENTS- In preparing each report required by this section, the Secretary of State shall consult and coordinate with all other Government officials who have information necessary to complete the report. Nothing contained in this section shall require the disclosure, on a classified or unclassified basis, of information that would jeopardize sensitive sources and methods or other vital national security interests or jeopardize ongoing criminal investigations or proceedings.

    (d) INITIAL REPORT- The initial report filed under this section shall cover the period between September 13, 1993, and the date of the report.

    (e) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- For purposes of this section, the term ‘appropriate congressional committee’ means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 258. DENIAL OF PASSPORTS TO NONCUSTODIAL PARENTS SUBJECT TO STATE ARREST WARRANTS IN CASES OF NONPAYMENT OF CHILD SUPPORT.

    The Secretary of State is authorized to refuse a passport or revoke, restrict, or limit a passport in any case in which the Secretary of State determines, or is informed by competent authority, that the applicant or passport holder is a noncustodial parent who is the subject of an outstanding State warrant of arrest for nonpayment of child support, where the amount in controversy is not less than $2,500.

SEC. 259. ISSUANCE OF PASSPORTS FOR THE FIRST TIME TO CHILDREN UNDER AGE 14.

    (a) IN GENERAL-

      (1) REGULATIONS- Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall issue regulations providing that before a child under the age of 14 years is issued a passport for the first time, the requirements under paragraph (2) shall apply under penalty of perjury.

      (2) REQUIREMENTS-

        (A) Both parents, or the child’s legal guardian, must execute the application and provide documentary evidence demonstrating that they are the parents or guardian; or

        (B) the person executing the application must provide documentary evidence that such person--

          (i) has sole custody of the child;

          (ii) has the consent of the other parent to the issuance of the passport; or

          (iii) is in loco parentis and has the consent of both parents, of a parent with sole custody over the child, or of the child’s legal guardian, to the issuance of the passport.

    (b) EXCEPTIONS- The regulations required by subsection (a) may provide for exceptions in exigent circumstances, such as, those involving the health or welfare of the child.

CHAPTER 3--REFUGEES

SEC. 271. UNITED STATES POLICY REGARDING THE INVOLUNTARY RETURN OF REFUGEES.

    (a) IN GENERAL- None of the funds made available by this Act or by section 2(c) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (22 U.S.C. 2601(c)) shall be available to effect the involuntary return by the United States of any person to a country in which the person has a well-founded fear of persecution on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion, except on grounds recognized as precluding protection as a refugee under the United Nations Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees of July 28, 1951, and the Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees of January 31, 1967, subject to the reservations contained in the United States Senate Resolution of Ratification.

    (b) MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE- None of the funds made available by this Act or by section 2(c) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (22 U.S.C. 2601(c)) shall be available to effect the involuntary return of any person to any country unless the Secretary of State first notifies the appropriate congressional committees, except that in the case of an emergency involving a threat to human life the Secretary of State shall notify the appropriate congressional committees as soon as practicable.

    (c) INVOLUNTARY RETURN DEFINED- As used in this section, the term ‘to effect the involuntary return’ means to require, by means of physical force or circumstances amounting to a threat thereof, a person to return to a country against the person’s will, regardless of whether the person is physically present in the United States and regardless of whether the United States acts directly or through an agent.

SEC. 272. HUMAN RIGHTS REPORTS.

    Section 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2304(b)) is amended by inserting after the fourth sentence the following: ‘Each report under this section shall describe the extent to which each country has extended protection to refugees, including the provision of first asylum and resettlement.’.

SEC. 273. GUIDELINES FOR REFUGEE PROCESSING POSTS.

    (a) GUIDELINES FOR ADDRESSING HOSTILE BIASES- Section 602(c) of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-292; 112 Stat. 2812) is amended by inserting ‘and of the Department of State’ after ‘Service’.

    (b) GUIDELINES FOR OVERSEAS REFUGEE PROCESSING- Section 602(c) of such Act is further amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      ‘(3) Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2000, the Secretary of State (after consultation with the Attorney General) shall issue guidelines to ensure that persons with potential biases against any refugee applicant, including persons employed by, or otherwise subject to influence by, governments known to be involved in persecution on account of religion, race, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion, shall not in any way be used in processing determinations of refugee status, including interpretation of conversations or examination of documents presented by such applicants.’.

SEC. 274. VIETNAMESE REFUGEES.

    No funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be made available to support a larger number of personnel assigned to United States diplomatic or consular posts in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam than the number assigned to such posts on March 22, 1999, unless not less than 60 days prior to any obligation or expenditure of such funds the Secretary of State submits a certification to the appropriate congressional committees that--

      (1) all United States refugee programs in Vietnam, as well as programs to provide visas for Amerasians and for immediate relatives of refugees and asylees, are supervised by a Refugee Counselor or Refugee Coordinator who has a proven record of sensitivity to the problems of refugees and other victims of human rights violations and who reports directly to the Ambassador or the Consul General at the United States Consulate in Saigon and receives policy guidance from the Assistant Secretary of State for the bureau with principal responsibility for refugees;

      (2) a program has been established in which all former United States Government employees who were adjudicated through a Vietnamese government interpreter and whose applications for refugee status were denied will be re-interviewed by Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) Asylum Officers reporting directly to INS headquarters in Washington, D.C., and receiving specialized training and written guidance from the INS Asylum Division and Office of General Counsel;

      (3) members of the Montagnard ethnic minority groups who fought alongside United States forces prior to 1975, and who later served 3 years or more in prisons or re-education camps, will not be disqualified from eligibility for resettlement in the United States as refugees on the sole ground that they continued to fight the Communists after 1975 and therefore did not begin their prison or re-education sentences until several years later;

      (4) allied combat veterans whose 3-year re-education or prison sentences began before April 30, 1975, because they were serving in parts of the country that fell to the Communists before Saigon, and who are otherwise eligible for resettlement as refugees in the United States, are not disqualified on the sole ground of the date their re-education or prison sentences began;

      (5) persons who were eligible for the Orderly Departure Program (ODP), but who missed the application deadline announced and imposed in 1994 because they were still in detention, in internal exile in a remote and inaccessible location, unable to afford bribes demanded by corrupt local officials for documentation and permission to attend refugee interviews, or for other reasons beyond their control, will be considered for interviews on a case-by-case basis, and that such case-by-case consideration is subject to clear written guidance and administrative review to ensure that persons who missed the deadline for reasons beyond their control will not be denied consideration on the merits;

      (6) widows of allied combat veterans who died in re-education camps, including those who did not apply before the 1994 deadline solely because they lacked documentary evidence from the Communist authorities to prove the death and/or marriage, and who are otherwise eligible for ODP will have their cases considered on the merits;

      (7) unmarried sons and daughters of persons eligible for United States programs, including persons described in section 2244 of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (enacted as Division G of the Omnibus Consolidated Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 1999, Public Law 105-277) will not be disqualified from accompanying or following to join their parents on the sole ground that they have not been continuously listed on the household registration issued to their parents by the government of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam;

      (8) returnees from refugee camps outside Vietnam who met the criteria for the Resettlement Opportunities for Vietnamese Returnees (ROVR) program, in that they either signed up for repatriation or were actually repatriated between October 1, 1995, and June 30, 1996, but did not fill out a ROVR application before their repatriation, will be given the opportunity to fill out an application in Vietnam and will have their cases considered on the merits;

      (9) returnees whose special circumstances denied them any meaningful opportunity to apply for ROVR in the camps, such as those who were not offered applications because they were in hospitals or were being held in detention centers within certain camps, or who were erroneously told by camp administrators or Vietnamese government officials that they were ineligible for the program, will be given an opportunity to apply in Vietnam and will have their cases considered on the merits, even if their repatriation took place after June 30, 1996;

      (10) a program has been established to identify, interview, and resettle persons who have experienced recent persecution or credible threats of persecution because of political, religious, or human rights activities in Vietnam, subject to clear written standards to ensure that such persons will have access to the program whether or not they are included in a ROVR or ODP interview category and whether or not their cases are referred by an international organization;

      (11) written guidance with respect to applications for reconsideration has been issued by the Immigration and Naturalization Service Office of General Counsel to ensure that applicants whose cases were denied on grounds described in paragraphs (2) through (10), because they were unwilling or unable to describe mistreatment by the Vietnamese government in the presence of a Vietnamese government interpreter, or for other reasons contrary to the interest of justice, will be re-interviewed; and

      (12) all applicants described in paragraphs (2) through (11) will have the assistance of a Joint Voluntary Agency (JVA) in preparing their cases.

TITLE III--ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE; PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE; FOREIGN SERVICE

CHAPTER 1--ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 301. ESTABLISHMENT OF BUREAU FOR INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION PROGRAMS AND BUREAU FOR EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    Section 1 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(i) ESTABLISHMENT OF CERTAIN BUREAUS, OFFICES, AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONAL ENTITIES WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE-

      ‘(1) BUREAU FOR INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION PROGRAMS- There is established within the Department of State the Bureau for International Information Programs which shall assist the Secretary of State in carrying out international information activities formerly carried out by the United States Information Agency.

      ‘(2) BUREAU FOR EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS- There is established within the Department of State a Bureau for Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs which shall assist the Secretary of State in carrying out educational and cultural exchange programs.’.

SEC. 302. CORRECTION OF DESIGNATION OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    (a) AMENDMENTS TO FOREIGN SERVICE ACT OF 1980- The Foreign Service Act of 1980 is amended--

      (1) in section 105(b)(2)(B) by striking ‘State and the Foreign Service)’ and inserting ‘State)’;

      (2) in section 209(a)(1) by striking ‘State and the Foreign Service,’ and inserting ‘State,’;

      (3) in section 603(a) by striking ‘State and the Foreign Service,’ and inserting ‘State,’; and

      (4) in section 1002(12)(E) by striking ‘and the Foreign Service’.

    (b) AMENDMENTS TO THE FOREIGN AFFAIRS REFORM AND RESTRUCTURING ACT OF 1998- The Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted in division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended--

      (1) in section 2208(c) by striking ‘and the Foreign Service’; and

      (2) in section 1314(e) by striking ‘and the Foreign Service’.

    (c) AMENDMENTS TO PUBLIC LAW 103-236- Effective October 2, 1999, subsections (i) and (j) of section 308 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6207 (i) and (j)) are amended by striking ‘Inspector General of the Department of State and the Foreign Service’ each place it appears and inserting ‘Inspector General of the Department of State’.

    (d) AMENDMENTS TO UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACT OF 1994- Section 304(a)(3)(A) of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6203(a)(3)(A)) is amended by striking ‘and the Foreign Service’.

SEC. 303. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ADVISER TO SECRETARY OF STATE.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT OF POSITION- Section 1 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(g) SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ADVISER-

      ‘(1) IN GENERAL- There shall be within the Department of State a Science and Technology Adviser (in this paragraph referred to as the ‘Adviser’). The Adviser shall have substantial experience in the area of science and technology. The Adviser shall report to the Secretary of State through the Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs.

      ‘(2) DUTIES- The Adviser shall--

        ‘(A) advise the Secretary of State, through the Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs, on international science and technology matters affecting the foreign policy of the United States; and

        ‘(B) perform such duties, exercise such powers, and have such rank and status as the Secretary of State shall prescribe.’.

    (b) REPORT- Not later than 6 months after receipt by the Secretary of State of the report by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences with respect to the contributions that science, technology, and health matters can make to the foreign policy of the United States, the Secretary of State, acting through the Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs, shall submit a report to Congress setting forth the Secretary of State’s plans for implementation, as appropriate, of the recommendations of the report.

CHAPTER 2--PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 321. ESTABLISHMENT OF FOREIGN SERVICE STAR.

    The State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 is amended by inserting after section 36 the following new section:

‘SEC. 36A. THE FOREIGN SERVICE STAR.

    ‘(a) AUTHORITY- The President may award a decoration called the ‘Foreign Service Star’ to an individual--

      ‘(1) who is killed or injured after August 1, 1998;

      ‘(2) whose death or injury occurs while the individual is a member of the Foreign Service or a civilian employee of the Government of the United States--

      ‘(3) whose death or injury occurs while the individual--

        ‘(A) is employed at, or assigned permanently or temporarily to, an official mission overseas; or

        ‘(B) was traveling abroad on official business; and

      ‘(4) whose death or injury occurs while performing official duties, while on the premises of a United States mission abroad, or due to such individual’s status as an employee of the United States Government, and results from any form of assault including terrorist or military action, civil unrest, or criminal activities directed at facilities of the Government of the United States.

    ‘(b) SELECTION- The Secretary shall submit recommendations for the Foreign Service Star to the President. The Secretary shall establish criteria and procedures for nominations for the Foreign Service Star pursuant to such regulations as the Secretary may prescribe for awards under this section.

    ‘(c) FUNDING- Any expenses incident to an award under this section may be paid out of the applicable current account of the agency with which the individual was or is employed.

    ‘(d) POSTHUMOUS AWARD- A Foreign Service Star award to an individual who is deceased shall be presented to the individual’s next of kin or representative, as designated by the President.’.

SEC. 322. UNITED STATES CITIZENS HIRED ABROAD.

    Section 408(a)(1) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3968(a)(1)) is amended in the last sentence by striking ‘(A)’ and all that follows through ‘(B)’.

SEC. 323. BORDER EQUALIZATION ADJUSTMENT.

    Chapter 4 of title I of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 et seq.) is amended by adding the following new section at the end:

‘SEC. 414. BORDER EQUALIZATION ADJUSTMENT.

    ‘(a) IN GENERAL- An employee who regularly commutes from his or her place of residence in the continental United States to an official duty station in Canada or Mexico shall receive a border equalization adjustment equal to the amount of comparability payments under section 5304 of title 5, United States Code, that he or she would receive if assigned to an official duty station within the United States locality pay area closest to the employee’s official duty station.

    ‘(b) DEFINITION OF EMPLOYEE- For purposes of this section, the term ‘employee’ shall mean a person who--

      ‘(1) is an ‘employee’ as defined under section 2105 of title 5, United States Code; and

      ‘(2) is employed by the United States Department of State, the United States Agency for International Development, or the International Joint Commission, except that the term shall not include members of the Foreign Service as defined by section 103 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-465), section 3903 of title 22 of the United States Code.

    ‘(c) TREATMENT AS BASIC PAY- An equalization adjustment payable under this section shall be considered basic pay for the same purposes as are comparability payments under section 5304 of title 5, United States Code, and its implementing regulations.

    ‘(d) REGULATIONS- The agencies referenced in subsection (b)(2) are authorized to promulgate regulations to carry out the purposes of this section.’.

SEC. 324. TREATMENT OF GRIEVANCE RECORDS.

    Section 1103(d)(1) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4133(d)(1)) is amended by adding the following new sentence at the end: ‘Nothing in this subsection shall prevent a grievant from placing a rebuttal to accompany a record of disciplinary action in such grievant’s personnel records nor prevent the Department from including a response to such rebuttal, including documenting those cases in which the Board has reviewed and upheld the discipline.’.

SEC. 325. REPORT CONCERNING FINANCIAL DISADVANTAGES FOR ADMINISTRATIVE AND TECHNICAL PERSONNEL.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds that administrative and technical personnel posted to United States missions abroad who do not have diplomatic status suffer financial disadvantages from their lack of such status.

    (b) REPORT- Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees concerning the extent to which administrative and technical personnel posted to United States missions abroad who do not have diplomatic status suffer financial disadvantages from their lack of such status, including proposals to alleviate such disadvantages.

SEC. 326. EXTENSION OF OVERSEAS HIRING AUTHORITY.

    Section 202(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3922(a)) is amended by inserting at the end the following new paragraph:

    ‘(4) When and to the extent the Secretary of State deems it in the best interests of the United States Government, the Secretary of State may authorize the head of any agency or other Government establishment (including any establishment in the legislative or judicial branch), to appoint pursuant to section 303 individuals hired abroad as members of the Service and to utilize the Foreign Service personnel system under such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe, provided that appointments of United States citizens under this subsection shall be limited to appointments authorized by section 311(a).’.

SEC. 327. MEDICAL EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE.

    Section 5927 of title 5, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

‘Sec. 5927. Advances of pay

    ‘(a) Up to three months’ pay may be paid in advance--

      ‘(1) to an employee upon the assignment of the employee to a post in a foreign area;

      ‘(2) to an employee, other than an employee appointed under section 303 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (and employed under section 311 of such Act), who--

        ‘(A) is a citizen of the United States;

        ‘(B) is officially stationed or located outside the United States pursuant to Government authorization; and

        ‘(C) requires (or has a family member who requires) medical treatment outside the United States, in circumstances specified by the President in regulations; and

      ‘(3) to a foreign national employee appointed under section 303 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980, or a nonfamily member United States citizen appointed under such section 303 (and employed under section 311 of such Act) for service at such nonfamily member’s post of residence, who--

        ‘(A) is located outside the country of employment of such foreign national employee or nonfamily member (as the case may be) pursuant to Government authorization; and

        ‘(B) requires medical treatment outside the country of employment of such foreign national employee or nonfamily member (as the case may be), in circumstances specified by the President in regulations.

    ‘(b) For the purpose of this section, the term ‘country of employment’, as used with respect to an individual under subsection (a)(3), means the country (or other area) outside the United States where such individual is appointed (as described in subsection (a)(3)) by the Government.’.

SEC. 328. FAMILIES OF DECEASED FOREIGN SERVICE PERSONNEL.

    Section 5922 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

    ‘(f)(1) If an employee dies at post in a foreign area, a transfer allowance under section 5924(2)(B) may be granted to the spouse or dependents of such employee (or both) for the purpose of providing for their return to the United States.

    ‘(2) A transfer allowance under this subsection may not be granted with respect to the spouse or a dependent of the employee unless, at the time of death, such spouse or dependent was residing--

      ‘(A) at the employee’s post of assignment; or

      ‘(B) at a place, outside the United States, for which a separate maintenance allowance was being furnished under section 5924(3).

    ‘(3) The President may prescribe any regulations necessary to carry out this subsection.’.

SEC. 329. PARENTAL CHOICE IN EDUCATION.

    Section 5924(4) of title 5, United States Code, is amended--

      (1) in subparagraph (A) by striking ‘between that post and the nearest locality where adequate schools are available,’ and inserting ‘between that post and the school chosen by the employee, not to exceed the total cost to the Government of the dependent attending an adequate school in the nearest locality where an adequate school is available,’; and

      (2) by adding after subparagraph (B) the following new subparagraph:

        ‘(C) In those cases in which an adequate school is available at the post of the employee, if the employee chooses to educate the dependent at a school away from post, the education allowance which includes board and room, and periodic travel between the post and the school chosen, shall not exceed the total cost to the Government of the dependent attending an adequate school at the post of the employee.’.

SEC. 330. WORKFORCE PLANNING FOR FOREIGN SERVICE PERSONNEL BY FEDERAL AGENCIES.

    Section 601(c) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4001(c)) is amended by striking paragraph (4) and inserting the following:

    ‘(4) Not later than March 1, 2001, and every 4 years thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate which shall include the following:

      ‘(A) A description of the steps taken and planned in furtherance of--

        ‘(i) maximum compatibility among agencies utilizing the Foreign Service personnel system, as provided for in section 203; and

        ‘(ii) the development of uniform policies and procedures and consolidated personnel functions, as provided for in section 204.

      ‘(B) A workforce plan for the subsequent 5 years, including projected personnel needs, by grade and by skill. Each such plan shall include for each category the needs for foreign language proficiency, geographic and functional expertise, and specialist technical skills. Each workforce plan shall specifically account for the training needs of Foreign Service personnel and shall delineate an intake program of generalist and specialist Foreign Service personnel to meet projected future requirements.

    ‘(5) If there are substantial modifications to any workforce plan under paragraph (4)(B) during any year in which a report under paragraph (4) is not required, a supplemental annual notification shall be submitted in the same manner as is required under paragraph (4).’.

SEC. 331. COMPENSATION FOR SURVIVORS OF TERRORIST ATTACKS OVERSEAS.

    The Secretary of State shall examine the current benefit structure for survivors of United States Government employees who are killed while serving at United States diplomatic facilities abroad as a result of terrorist acts. Such a review shall include an examination of whether such benefits are adequate, whether they are fair and equitably distributed without regard to category of employment, and how they compare to benefits available to survivors of other United States Government employees serving overseas, including noncivilian employees.

SEC. 332. PRESERVATION OF DIVERSITY IN REORGANIZATION.

    Section 1613(c) of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (as enacted by division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1999; Public Law 105-277) is amended in the first sentence by striking ‘changed.’ and inserting ‘changed, nor shall the relative positions of women and minorities in the administrative structures of the agencies subject to this section be adversely affected as a result of such transfers.’.

TITLE IV--UNITED STATES INFORMATIONAL, EDUCATIONAL, AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS

SEC. 401. EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGES AND SCHOLARSHIPS FOR TIBETANS AND BURMESE.

    (a) DESIGNATION OF NGAWANG CHOEPHEL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS- Section 103(a) of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319) is amended by inserting after the first sentence the following: ‘Exchange programs under this subsection shall be known as the ‘Ngawang Choephel Exchange Programs’.’.

    (b) SCHOLARSHIPS FOR TIBETANS AND BURMESE- Section 103(b)(1) of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note) is amended by striking ‘for the fiscal year 1999’ and inserting ‘for the fiscal year 2000’.

    (c) SCHOLARSHIPS FOR PRESERVATION OF TIBET’S CULTURE, LANGUAGE, AND RELIGION- Section 103(b)(1) of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note) is further amended by striking ‘Tibet,’ and inserting ‘Tibet (whenever practical giving consideration to individuals who are active in the preservation of Tibet’s culture, language, and religion),’.

SEC. 402. CONDUCT OF CERTAIN EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    Section 102 of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (22 U.S.C. 2452 note) is amended by striking ‘Director’ and all that follows through the period and inserting the following: ‘Secretary of State, with the assistance of the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy, shall--

      ‘(1) include, as a significant proportion of the participants in such programs, nationals of such countries who the Secretary has reason to believe are committed to freedom and democracy;

      ‘(2) consult with human rights and democracy advocates from such countries on the inclusion of participants and grantee organizations for such programs;

      ‘(3) take all appropriate steps to ensure that inclusion in such programs does not compromise the personal safety of participants; and

      ‘(4) select grantee organizations for such programs through an open, competitive process in which proposals are solicited from multiple applicants and in which important factors inthe selection of a grantee include the relative likelihood that each of the competing applicants would be willing and able--

        ‘(A) to recruit as participants in the program persons described in paragraph (1); and

        ‘(B) in selecting participants who are associated with governments or other institutions wielding power in countries described in this section, to recruit those most likely to be open to an understanding of the principles of freedom and democracy, and to avoid--

          ‘(i) giving such governments inappropriate influence in the selection process; and

          ‘(ii) selecting those who are so firmly committed to the suppression of freedom and democracy that their inclusion could create an appearance that the United States condones such suppression.’.

SEC. 403. NOTIFICATION TO CONGRESS OF GRANTS.

    Section 705 of the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1477c(b)) is amended--

      (1) by inserting ‘(a)’ after ‘705.’; and

      (2) by inserting at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(b) For fiscal year 2000 and each subsequent fiscal year, the Secretary of State may not award any grant to carry out the purposes of this Act until 45 days after written notice has been provided to the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate of the intent to award such grant. In determining whether to award a grant the Secretary shall consider any objections or modifications raised in the course of consultations with such committees.’.

SEC. 404. NATIONAL SECURITY MEASURES.

    The United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 is amended by adding after section 1011 the following new sections:

‘NATIONAL SECURITY MEASURES

    ‘SEC. 1012. In coordination with other appropriate executive branch officials, the Secretary of State shall take all appropriate steps to prevent foreign espionage agents from participating in educational and cultural exchange programs under this Act.

‘PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION

    ‘SEC. 1013. The Secretary of State shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that no individual, who is employed by or attached to an office or department involved with the research, development, or production of missiles or weapons of mass destruction, from a country identified by the Central Intelligence Agency, the Department of Defense, the National Security Agency, or the Department of Energy, as a country involved in the proliferation of missiles or weapons of mass destruction is a participant in any program of educational or cultural exchange under this Act. Appropriate steps under this section shall include prior consultation with the Federal agencies designated in the first sentence with respect to all prospective participants in such programs with respect to whom there is a reasonable basis to believe that such prospective participant may be employed by or attached to an office or department identified under the first sentence.’.

SEC. 405. DESIGNATION OF NORTH/SOUTH CENTER AS THE DANTE B. FASCELL NORTH-SOUTH CENTER.

    (a) DESIGNATION- Section 208 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (22 U.S.C. 2075) is amended--

      (1) by striking subsection (a) and inserting the following:

    ‘(a) SHORT TITLE- This section may be cited as the ‘Dante B. Fascell North-South Center Act of 1991’.’;

      (2) in subsection (c)--

        (A) by amending the section heading to read as follows: ‘DANTE B. FASCELL NORTH-SOUTH CENTER- ’; and

        (B) by striking ‘known as the North/South Center,’ and inserting ‘which shall be known and designated as the Dante B. Fascell North-South Center,’; and

      (3) in subsection (d) by striking ‘North/South Center’ and inserting ‘Dante B. Fascell North-South Center’.

    (b) REFERENCES-

      (1) CENTER- Any reference in any other provision of law to the educational institution in Florida known as the North/South Center shall be deemed to be a reference to the ‘Dante B. Fascell North-South Center’.

      (2) SHORT TITLE- Any reference in any other provision of law to the North/South Center Act of 1991 shall be deemed to be a reference to the ‘Dante B. Fascell North/South Center Act of 1991’.

SEC. 406. ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY.

    Section 1334 of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998 (enacted as Division G of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 1999; Public Law 105-277) is repealed.

SEC. 407. INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITIONS.

    (a) LIMITATION- Except as provided in subsection (b), notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Department of State may not obligate or expend any funds for a United States Government funded pavilion or other major exhibit at any international exposition or world’s fair registered by the Bureau of International Expositions in excess of amounts expressly authorized and appropriated for such purpose.

    (b) EXCEPTIONS-

      (1) The Department of State is authorized to utilize its personnel and resources to carry out its responsibilities--

        (A) under section 102(a)(3) of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2452(a)(3), to provide for United States participation in international fairs and expositions abroad;

        (B) under section 105(f) of such Act with respect to encouraging foreign governments, international organizations, and private individuals, firms, associations, agencies and other groups to participate in international fairs and expositions and to make contributions to be utilized for United States participation in international fairs and expositions; and

        (C) to encourage private support to the United States Commissioner General for participation in international fairs and expositions.

      (2) Nothing in this subsection shall be construed as authorizing the use of funds appropriated to the Department of State to make payments for--

        (A) contracts, grants, or other agreements with any other party to carry out the activities described in this subsection; or

        (B) any legal judgment or the costs of litigation brought against the Department of State arising from activities described in this subsection.

    (c) REPEAL- Section 230 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 2452 note) is repealed.

SEC. 408. ROYAL ULSTER CONSTABULARY.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Except as provided in subsection (b), the Secretary of State shall take all appropriate steps to ensure the following:

      (1) Members of the Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) are not participants in any program of educational or cultural exchange or training through the National Academy Program at Quantico, Virginia, under the auspices of the Department of State or the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the Department of Justice.

      (2) Items designated as crime control and detection instruments and equipment for purposes of section 6(n) of the Export Administration Act (50 U.S.C. App. 2405(n)) are not approved for export for use by the RUC.

    (b) EXCEPTION- Subsection (a) shall not apply if the President certifies that complete, independent, credible and transparent investigations of the murders of defense attorneys Rosemary Nelson and Patrick Finucane have been initiated by the Government of the United Kingdom and that the Government has taken appropriate steps to protect defense attorneys against RUC harassment in Northern Ireland.

TITLE V--INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING

SEC. 501. PERMANENT AUTHORIZATION FOR RADIO FREE ASIA.

    (a) REPEAL OF SUNSET PROVISION- Section 309 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6208) is amended--

      (1) by striking subsection (g); and

      (2) in subsection (d)(2) by striking ‘Government,’ and all that follows through the period and inserting ‘Government.’.

    (b) REPEAL OF FUNDING LIMITATIONS- Section 309 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 is further amended --

      (1) in subsection (d) by striking paragraphs (4) and (5) and by redesignating paragraph (6) as paragraph (4); and

      (2) in subsection (c)--

        (A) in paragraph (1)(A) by striking ‘the funding’ and all that follows through the semicolon and inserting ‘any funding limitations under subsection (d);’; and

        (B) in paragraph (3) by striking ‘the funding’ and all that follows through the period and inserting ‘any funding limitations under subsection (d).’.

SEC. 502. PRESERVATION OF RFE/RL (RADIO FREE EUROPE/RADIO LIBERTY).

    (a) REPEAL OF PRIVATIZATION POLICY STATEMENT- Section 312 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6211) is repealed.

    (b) INCREASE IN LIMITATION ON GRANT AMOUNTS- Section 308(c) of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6207(c)) is amended by striking ‘$75,000,000’ and inserting ‘$80,000,000’.

SEC. 503. IMMUNITY FROM CIVIL LIABILITY FOR BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS.

    Section 304 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6203) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(g) IMMUNITY FROM CIVIL LIABILITY- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 shall apply to the members of the Broadcasting Board of Governors when acting in their capacities as members of the boards of directors of RFE/RL, Incorporated and Radio Free Asia.’.

TITLE VI--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND COMMISSIONS

SEC. 601. INTERPARLIAMENTARY GROUPS.

    (a) AMERICAN DELEGATIONS TO CONFERENCES- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, whenever either the House of Representatives or the Senate does not appoint its allotment of members as part of the American delegation or group to a conference or assembly of the British-American Interparliamentary Group, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), the Mexico-United States Interparliamentary Group, the North Atlantic Assembly, or any similar interparliamentary group of which the United States is a member or participates and so notifies the other body of Congress, the other body may make appointments to complete the membership of the American delegation. Any appointment pursuant to this section shall be for the period of such conference or assembly and the body of Congress making such an appointment shall be responsible for the expenses of any member so appointed. Any such appointment shall be made in same manner in which other appointments to the delegation by such body of Congress are made.

    (b) TRANSATLANTIC LEGISLATIVE DIALOGUE- Section 109(c) of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985 (22 U.S.C. 276 note) is amended by striking ‘United States-European Community Interparliamentary Group’ and inserting ‘Transatlantic Legislative Dialogue (United States-European Union Interparliamentary Group)’.

SEC. 602. AUTHORITY TO ASSIST STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS.

    (a) AUTHORITY- The Commissioner of the U.S. Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission may provide technical tests, evaluations, information, surveys, or others similar services to State or local governments upon the request of such State or local government on a reimbursable basis.

    (b) REIMBURSEMENTS- Reimbursements shall be paid in advance of the goods or services ordered and shall be for the estimated or actual cost as determined by the U.S. Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission. Proper adjustment of amounts paid in advance shall be made as agreed to by the U.S. Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission on the basis of the actual cost of goods or services provided. Reimbursements received by the U.S. Section of the International Boundary and Water Commission for providing services under this section shall be credited to the appropriation from which the cost of providing the services will be charged.

SEC. 603. INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION.

    Section 2(b) of the American-Mexican Chamizal Convention Act of 1964 (Public Law 88-300; 22 U.S.C. 277d-18(b)) is amended by inserting ‘operations, maintenance, and’ after ‘cost of’.

SEC. 604. CONCERNING UNITED NATIONS GENERAL ASSEMBLY RESOLUTION ES-10/6.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) In an Emergency Special Session, the United Nations General Assembly voted on February 9, 1999, to pass Resolution ES-10/6, Illegal Israeli Actions In Occupied East Jerusalem And The Rest Of The Occupied Palestinian Territory, to convene for the first time in 50 years the parties of the Fourth Geneva Convention for the Protection of Civilians in Time of War.

      (2) Such resolution unfairly places full blame for the deterioration of the Middle East Peace Process on Israel and dangerously politicizes the Geneva Convention, which was established to deal with critical humanitarian crises.

      (3) Such vote is intended to prejudge direct negotiations, put added and undue pressure on Israel to influence the results of those negotiations, and single out Israel for unprecedented enforcement proceedings which have never been invoked against governments with records of massive violations of the Geneva Convention.

    (b) CONGRESSIONAL STATEMENT OF POLICY- The Congress--

      (1) commends the Department of State for the vote of the United States against United Nations General Assembly Resolution ES-10/6 affirming that the text of such resolution politicizes the Fourth Geneva Convention which was primarily humanitarian in nature; and

      (2) urges the Department of State to continue its efforts against convening the conference.

TITLE VII--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 701. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS CONCERNING SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS ACTIVISTS IN CUBA.

    It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the United States should increase its support to democracy and human rights activists in Cuba, providing assistance with the same intensity and decisiveness with which it supported the pro-democracy movements in Eastern Europe during the Cold War; and

      (2) the United States should substantially increase funding for programs and activities under section 109 of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity Act of 1996 (22 U.S.C. 6021 et seq.) designed to support democracy and human rights activists and others in Cuba who are committed to peaceful and democratic change on the island.

SEC. 702. RELATING TO CYPRUS.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) At the urging of the United States Government, the Republic of Cyprus refrained from exercising that country’s sovereign right to self-defense, a right fully recognized by the United States Government and by Article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations, and canceled the deployment on Cyprus of defensive antiaircraft missiles.

      (2) In close cooperation with the United States Government and the Government of Greece, Cyprus rerouted the missiles to the Greek island of Crete.

      (3) This extraordinarily conciliatory and courageous action was taken in the interest of peace.

      (4) With this action, the Republic of Cyprus displayed its full compliance with the recently adopted United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1217 and 1218 which address the Cyprus issue, demonstrated its support for President Bill Clinton’s December 22, 1998, commitment to ‘take all necessary steps to support a sustained effort to implement United Nations Security Council Resolution 1218’, and continued its efforts of the last 25 years to take substantive steps to reduce tensions and move toward a Cyprus settlement.

      (5) The Republic of Cyprus has no navy, air force, or army and faces one of the world’s largest and most sophisticated military forces, just minutes away, in Turkey, as well as an area described by the United Nations Secretary General as, ‘one of the most densely militarized areas in the world’ in the Turkish-occupied area of northern Cyprus.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) in light of this and other similar extraordinary actions taken by the Republic of Cyprus, as well as the importance of a Cyprus settlement to American security and other interests, the United States should do all that is possible to bring about commensurate actions by Turkey;

      (2) the time has come for the United States to expect from Turkey actions on the Cyprus issue in the interest of peace, including steps in conformity with United States proposals concerning Cyprus and in compliance with provisions contained in United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1217 and 1218; and

      (3) such an effort would also be in the best interest of the people of Turkey, as well as in the interest of all others involved.

SEC. 703. RECOGNITION OF THE MAGEN DAVID ADOM SOCIETY IN ISRAEL AS A FULL MEMBER OF THE INTERNATIONAL RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT MOVEMENT.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds the following:

      (1) It is the mission of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement to prevent and alleviate human suffering, wherever it may be found, without discrimination.

      (2) The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is a worldwide institution in which all National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies have equal status and share equal responsibilities.

      (3) The state of Israel has ratified the Geneva Conventions which govern the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

      (4) The Magen David Adom Society is the national humanitarian society in the state of Israel.

      (5) The Magen David Adom Society follows all the principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

      (6) Since the founding of the Magen David Adom Society in 1930, the American Red Cross has regarded it as a sister national society and close working ties have been established between the two societies.

      (7) The Magen David Adom Society is excluded from full membership in the International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement solely because the Society is not an official protective symbol recognized by either the Geneva Conventions governing the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement or the Statutes of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

      (8) During the past 25 years the American Red Cross has consistently advocated recognition and membership of the Magen David Adom Society in the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

      (9) The state of Israel has unsuccessfully tried in the past to amend the Geneva Conventions to allow for the emblematic recognition of the Magen David Adom Society.

      (10) Recognition of the Magen David Adom Society in Israel as a member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement would help fortify the spirit of goodwill in the Middle East peace process.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the President should, at the earliest possible date, enlist the cooperation of all nations that are signatory to the Geneva Conventions to ensure that the recognition of the Magen David Adom Society in Israel as a full member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement is resolved at the forthcoming 27th International Conference of the Red Cross and Red Crescent; and

      (2) the President should support a resolution by that Conference requesting the International Committee of the Red Cross to waive on an exceptional basis the 5th condition of recognition in article 4 of its Statutes of the Movement, thus enabling the full participation of the Magen David Adom Society as a member of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

SEC. 704. ANNUAL REPORTING ON WAR CRIMES, CRIMES AGAINST HUMANITY, AND GENOCIDE.

    (a) SECTION 116 OF FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961- Section 116(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d)) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (6), by striking ‘and’ at the end;

      (2) in paragraph (7), by striking the period at the end and inserting ‘and’; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following:

      ‘(8) wherever applicable, consolidated information regarding the commission of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and evidence of acts that may constitute genocide.’.

    (b) SECTION 502B OF THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961- Section 502B(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2304(b)) is amended by inserting after the first sentence the following: ‘Wherever applicable, such report shall include consolidated information regarding the commission of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and evidence of acts that may constitute genocide.’.

SEC. 705. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS SUPPORTING HUMANITARIAN ASSISTANCE TO THE PEOPLE OF BURMA.

    It is the sense of the Congress that the United States Government should support humanitarian assistance that is targeted to the people of Burma and does not support the State Peace and Development Council (SPDC) and is only implemented and monitored by international or private voluntary organizations that are independent of the SPDC.

SEC. 706. RESTRICTIONS ON NUCLEAR COOPERATION WITH NORTH KOREA.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Notwithstanding any other provision of law or any international agreement, no agreement for cooperation (as defined in sec. 11 b. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2014 b.)) between the United States and North Korea may become effective, no license may be issued for export directly or indirectly to North Korea of any nuclear material, facilities, components, or other goods, services, or technology that would be subject to such agreement, and no approval may be given for the transfer or retransfer directly or indirectly to North Korea of any nuclear material, facilities, components, or other goods, services, or technology that would be subject to such agreement, until--

      (1) the President determines and reports to the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate that--

        (A) North Korea has come into full compliance with its safeguards agreement with the IAEA (INFCIRC/403), and has taken all steps that have been deemed necessary by the IAEA in this regard;

        (B) North Korea has permitted the IAEA full access to all additional sites and all information (including historical records) deemed necessary by the IAEA to verify the accuracy and completeness of North Korea’s initial report of May 4, 1992, to the IAEA on all nuclear sites and material in North Korea;

        (C) North Korea is in full compliance with its obligations under the Agreed Framework;

        (D) North Korea is in full compliance with its obligations under the Joint Declaration on Denuclearization;

        (E) North Korea does not have the capability to enrich uranium, and is not seeking to acquire or develop such capability, or any additional capability to reprocess spent nuclear fuel;

        (F) North Korea has terminated its nuclear weapons program, including all efforts to acquire, develop, test, produce, or deploy such weapons; and

        (G) the transfer to North Korea of key nuclear components, under the proposed agreement for cooperation with North Korea and in accordance with the Agreed Framework, is in the national interest of the United States; and

      (2) there is enacted a joint resolution stating in substance that the Congress concurs in the determination and report of the President submitted pursuant to paragraph (1).

    (b) CONSTRUCTION- The restrictions contained in subsection (a) shall apply in addition to all other applicable procedures, requirements, and restrictions contained in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and other laws.

    (c) DEFINITIONS- In this section:

      (1) AGREED FRAMEWORK- The term ‘Agreed Framework’ means the ‘Agreed Framework Between the United States of America and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’, signed in Geneva on October 21, 1994, and the Confidential Minute to that Agreement.

      (2) IAEA- The term ‘IAEA’ means the International Atomic Energy Agency.

      (3) NORTH KOREA- The term ‘North Korea’ means the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

      (4) JOINT DECLARATION ON DENUCLEARIZATION- The term ‘Joint Declaration on Denuclearization’ means the Joint Declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, signed by the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea on January 1, 1992.

SEC. 707. SELF-DETERMINATION IN EAST TIMOR.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds the following:

      (1) On May 5, 1999, the Government of Indonesia and the Government of Portugal signed an agreement that provides for a vote on the political status of East Timor to be held on August 8, 1999, under the auspices of the United Nations.

      (2) On June 22, 1999, the vote was rescheduled for August 21 or 22, 1999, because of concerns that the conditions necessary for a free and fair vote could not be established prior to August 8, 1999.

      (3) On January 27, 1999, Indonesian President Habibie expressed a willingness to consider independence for East Timor if a majority of the East Timorese reject autonomy in the August 1999 vote.

      (4) Under the agreement between the Governments of Indonesia and Portugal, the Government of Indonesia is responsible for ensuring that the August 1999 vote is carried out in a fair and peaceful way and in an atmosphere free of intimidation, violence, or interference.

      (5) The inclusion of anti-independence militia members in Indonesian forces that are responsible for establishing security in East Timor violates this agreement because the agreement states that the absolute neutrality of the military and police is essential for holding a free and fair vote.

      (6) The arming of anti-independence militias by members of the Indonesian military for the purpose of sabotaging the August 1999 ballot has resulted in hundreds of civilians killed, injured, or missing in separate attacks by these militias and these militias continue to act without restraint.

      (7) The United Nations Secretary General has received credible reports of political violence, including intimidation and killing, by armed anti-independence militias against unarmed pro-independence civilians in East Timor.

      (8) There have been killings of opponents of independence for East Timor, including civilians and militia members.

      (9) The killings in East Timor should be fully investigated and the individuals responsible brought to justice.

      (10) Access to East Timor by international human rights monitors and humanitarian organizations is limited and members of the press have been threatened.

      (11) The presence of members of the United Nations Assistance Mission in East Timor has already resulted in an improved security environment in the East Timorese capital of Dili.

      (12) A robust international observer mission and police force throughout East Timor is critical to creating a stable and secure environment necessary for a free and fair vote.

      (13) The Administration should be commended for its support for the United Nations Assistance Mission in East Timor which will provide monitoring and support for the ballot and include international civilian police, military liaison officers, and election monitors.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It it the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the President and the Secretary of State should immediately intensify their efforts to prevail upon the Indonesian Government and military--

        (A) to disarm and disband anti-independence militias in East Timor;

        (B) to grant full access to East Timor by international human rights monitors, humanitarian organizations, and the press; and

        (C) to allow Timorese who have been living in exile to return to East Timor to participate in the vote on the political status of East Timor to be held on August 1999 under the auspices of the United Nations; and

      (2) not later than 21 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the President should prepare and transmit to the Congress a report that contains a description of the efforts of the Administration, and an assessment of the steps taken by the Indonesian Government and military, to ensure a stable and secure environment in East Timor for the vote on the political status of East Timor, including an assessment of the steps taken in accordance with subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C) of paragraph (1).

SEC. 708. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS RELATING TO LINDA SHENWICK.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Linda Shenwick, an employee of the Department of State, in the performance of her duties, informed the Congress of waste, fraud, and mismanagement at the United Nations.

      (2) Ms. Shenwick is being persecuted by Secretary of State Madeleine Albright and other State Department officials who have removed her from her current position at the United Nations and withheld her salary.

      (3) Ms. Shenwick was even blocked from entering her office at the United States Mission to the United Nations to retrieve her personal effects unless accompanied by an armed guard.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that employees of the Department of State who, in the performance of their duties, inform the Congress of pertinent facts concerning their responsibilities, should not as a result be demoted or removed from their current position or from Federal employment.

SEC. 709. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING SEWAGE TREATMENT ALONG THE BORDER BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND MEXICO.

    (a) FINDINGS-

      (1) The Congress finds that it must take action to address the comprehensive treatment of sewage emanating from the Tijuana River, so as to eliminate river and ocean pollution in the San Diego border region.

      (2) Congress bases this finding on the following factors:

        (A) The San Diego border region is adversely impacted from cross border raw sewage flows that effect the health and safety of citizens in the United States and Mexico and the environment.

        (B) The United States and Mexico have agreed pursuant to the Treaty for the Utilization of Waters of the Colorado and Tijuana Rivers and of the Rio Grande, dated February 3, 1944, ‘to give preferential attention to the solution of all border sanitation problems’.

        (C) The United States and Mexico recognize the need for utilization of reclaimed water to supply the growing needs of the City of Tijuana, Republic of Mexico, and the entire border region.

        (D) Current legislative authority limits the scope of proposed treatment options in a way that prevents a comprehensive plan to address the volume of cross border raw sewage flows and the effective utilization of reclamation opportunities.

        (E) This section encourages action to address the comprehensive treatment of sewage emanating from the Tijuana River, so as to eliminate river and ocean pollution in the San Diego border region, and to exploit effective reclamation opportunities.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- The Congress--

      (1) encourages the Secretary of State to give the highest priority to the negotiation and execution of a new treaty minute with Mexico, which would augment Minute 283 so as to allow for the siting of sewage treatment facilities in Mexico, to provide for additional treatment capacity, up to 50,000,000 gallons per day, for the treatment of additional sewage emanating from the Tijuana area, and to provide direction and authority so that a comprehensive solution to this trans-border sanitation problem may be implemented as soon as practicable;

      (2) encourages the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and the United States section of the International Boundary and Water Commission to enter into an agreement to provide for secondary treatment in Mexico of effluent from the International Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP);

      (3) encourages the United States section of the International Boundary and Water Commission to provide for the development of a privately-funded Mexican Facility, through the execution of a fee-for-services contract with the owner of such facility, in order to provide for--

        (A) secondary treatment of effluent from the IWTP, if found to be necessary, in compliance with applicable water quality laws of the United States, Mexico, and California; and

        (B) additional capacity for primary and secondary treatment of up to 50,000,000 gallons per day, for the purpose of providing additional sewage treatment capacity in order to fully address the trans-border sanitation problem;

        (C) provision for any and all approvals from Mexican authorities necessary to facilitate water quality verification and enforcement at the Mexican Facility to be carried out by the International Boundary and Water Commission or other appropriate authority;

        (D) any terms and conditions deemed necessary to allow for use in the United States of treated effluent from the Mexican Facility if there is reclaimed water surplus to the needs of users in Mexico; and

        (E) return transportation of whatever portion of the treated effluent which cannoted by reused to the South Bay Ocean Outfall; and

      (4) in addition to other terms and conditions considered appropriate by the International Boundary and Water Commission, in any fee-for-services contract, encourages the International Boundary and Water Commission to include the following terms and conditions--

        (A) a term of 30 years;

        (B) appropriate arrangements for the monitoring and verification of compliance with applicable United States, California, and Mexican water quality standards;

        (C) arrangements for the appropriate disposition of sludge, produced from the IWTP and the Mexican Facility, at a location or locations in Mexico; and

        (D) payment of appropriate fees from the International Boundary and Water Commission to the owner of the Mexican Facility for sewage treatment services, with the annual amount payable to be reflective of all costs associated with the development, construction, operation, and financing of the Mexican Facility.

SEC. 710. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING COLOMBIA.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Colombia is a democratic country fighting multiple wars--

        (A) a war against the Colombian Revolutionary Armed Forces (FARC);

        (B) a war against the National Liberation Army (ELN);

        (C) a war against the United Self-Defense Forces of Colombia (AUC) and other paramilitary organizations; and

        (D) a war against drug lords who traffic in deadly cocaine and heroin.

      (2) In 1998 alone, 308,000 Colombians were internally displaced in Colombia. Over the last decade, 35,000 Colombians have been killed.

      (3) The operations of the FARC, ELN, AUC, and other extragovernmental forces have profited from, and become increasingly dependent upon, cooperation with the illicit narcotics trade.

      (4) The FARC and ELN have waged the longest-running anti-government insurgencies in Latin America and control roughly 60 percent of the country, including a demilitarized zone ruled by the FARC.

      (5) Representatives of the Government of Colombia and the FARC are scheduled to begin peace talks on July 20, 1999.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the United States should recognize the crisis in Colombia and play a more pro-active role in its resolution, including offering U.S. political support to help Colombia with the peace process;

      (2) all extragovernmental combatant groups, including the FARC, ELN, and AUC, should demonstrate their commitment to peace by ceasing to engage in violence, kidnapping, and cooperation with the drug trade; and

      (3) the United States should mobilize the international community to pro-actively engage in resolving the Colombian wars.

SEC. 711. SENSE OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES CONCERNING HAITIAN ELECTIONS.

    The House of Representatives supports the critically important Haitian parliamentary and local elections scheduled for November 1999 and urges the Department of State to review embassy operations to ensure that the embassy has sufficient personnel and resources necessary to carry out its important responsibilities during the run-up to the fall elections.

SEC. 712. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS COMMENDING THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL FOR REAFFIRMING THE DEMOCRATIC IDEALS OF ISRAEL IN ITS ELECTIONS.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Since its creation in 1948, Israel has fulfilled the dreams of its founders who envisioned a vigorous, open, and stable democracy.

      (2) The centerpiece of Israeli democracy is its system of competitive and free elections.

      (3) On May 17, 1999, the Israeli people--Israeli Jews and Israeli Arabs-- went to the polls in large numbers in a remarkably peaceful election.

      (4) This election is only the latest example of Israel’s commitment to the democratic ideals of freedom and pluralism, values that it shares with the United States.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- The Congress--

      (1) commends the people of Israel for reaffirming, in the May 17, 1999, election, its dedication to democratic ideals;

      (2) congratulates Ehud Barak on his election as Prime Minister of Israel; and

      (3) pledges to work with the President of the United States and the new Government of Israel to strengthen the bonds between the United States and Israel and to advance the cause of peace in the Middle East.

SEC. 713. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING THE SOVEREIGNTY OF TERRITORIES IN THE AEGEAN SEA.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The maritime borders between Greece and Turkey in the Aegean have been delimited in international law and are regarded as having been agreed, established, and settled.

      (2) A fundamental principle of international law is that, once agreed, a boundary shall remain stable and predictable.

      (3) Turkey is claiming sovereignty to numerous islands and islets and unspecified ‘gray areas’ in the Aegean Sea.

      (4) In Article 15 of the Treaty of Peace with Turkey, and Other Instruments, signed at Lausanne on July 24, 1923, Turkey renounced in favor of Italy all right, title, and interest of Turkey in the 12 enumerated island in the Dodecanese region that were occupied at the time of the treaty by Italy, including the Island of Calimnos, and the islets dependent on such islands.

      (5) The Convention Between Italy and Turkey for the Delimitation of the Territorial Waters Between the Coasts of Anatolia and the Island of Castellorizo, signed at Ankara on January 4, 1932, established the rights of Italy and Turkey in coastal islands, waters, and rocks in the Aegean Sea and delimited a maritime frontier between the two countries.

      (6) A protocol dated December 28, 1932, annexed to that Convention memorialized an agreement on a water boundary between Italy and Turkey which placed the Imia Islets under the sovereignty of Italy.

      (7) In Article 14 of the 1947 Paris Treaty of Peace with Italy, Italy ceded to Greece the Dodecanese Islands under Italy’s control, including the Island of Calimnos and the adjacent Islets of Imia.

      (8) By resolution dated February 15, 1996, the European Parliament resolved that the water boundaries established in the Treaty of Lausanne of 1923 and the 1932 Convention Between Italy and Turkey, including the protocol annexed to such Convention, are the borders between Greece and Turkey.

      (9) Greece, as the successor state to Italy under the above-enumerated treaties, conventions, and protocols, acceded to sovereignty under the same treaties, conventions, and protocols.

      (10) Turkish Government claims to territories in the Aegean delimited as Greek sovereign territory under the above-enumerated treaties, conventions, and protocols contravene these same treaties, conventions, and treaties.

      (11) Both Greece and Turkey are members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and allies of the United States.

      (12) It is in the interest of the United States and other nations to have disputes resolved peacefully.

      (13) The Eastern Mediterranean region, in which the Aegean Sea is located, is a region of vital strategic importance to the United States.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the water boundaries established in the Treaty of Lausanne of 1923 and the 1932 Convention Between Italy and Turkey, including the Protocol annexed to such Convention, are the borders between Greece and Turkey in the Aegean Sea; and

      (2) any party, including Turkey, objecting to these established boundaries should seek redress in the International Court of Justice at The Hague.

SEC. 714. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS THAT THE PRESIDENT SHOULD SEEK A PUBLIC RENUNCIATION BY THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA OF ANY USE OF FORCE, OR THREAT TO USE FORCE, AGAINST TAIWAN, AND THAT THE UNITED STATES SHOULD HELP TAIWAN IN CASE OF THREATS OR A MILITARY ATTACK BY THE PEOPLE’S REPUBLIC OF CHINA.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) In March of 1996, the political leadership of the People’s Republic of China used provocative military maneuvers, including missile launch exercises in the Taiwan Strait, in an attempt to intimidate the people of Taiwan during their historic, free, and democratic presidential elections.

      (2) The People’s Republic of China refuses to renounce the use of force against Taiwan.

      (3) The House of Representatives passed a resolution by a vote of 411-0 in June 1998 urging the President to seek, during his July 1998 summit meeting in Beijing, a public renunciation by the People’s Republic of China of any use of force, or threat of use of force, against democratic Taiwan.

      (4) Senior United States executive branch officials have called upon the People’s Republic of China to renounce the use of force against Taiwan.

      (5) The use of force, and the threat to use force, by the People’s Republic of China against Taiwan threatens peace and stability in the region.

      (6) The Taiwan Relations Act, enacted in 1979, states that ‘[i]t is the policy of the United States . . . to consider any effort to determine the future of Taiwan by other than peaceful means, including by boycotts or embargoes, a threat to the peace and security of the Western Pacific area and of grave concern to the United States’.

      (7) The Taiwan Relations Act states that it is the policy of the United States to provide Taiwan with arms of a defensive character.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS-

      (1) The Congress commends the people of Taiwan for having established a democracy in Taiwan over the past decades and repeatedly reaffirming their dedication to democratic ideals.

      (2) It is the sense of the Congress that--

        (A) the President of the United States should seek a public renunciation by the People’s Republic of China of any use of force, or threat to use force, against Taiwan, especially in Taiwan’s March 2000 free Presidential elections; and

        (B) the United States should help Taiwan defend itself in case of threats or a military attack by the People’s Republic of China against Taiwan.

SEC. 715. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS REGARDING SUPPORT FOR THE IRAQI DEMOCRATIC OPPOSITION.

    It is the sense of the Congress that the United States Government should support the holding of a plenary session of the Iraqi National Assembly in the near future.

SEC. 716. KOSOVAR ALBANIAN PRISONERS HELD IN SERBIA.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) At the conclusion of the NATO campaign to halt the Serbian and Yugoslav ethnic cleansing in Kosova, a large, but undetermined number of Kosovar Albanians held in Serbian prisons in Kosova were taken from Kosova before and during the withdrawal of Serbian and Yugoslav police and military forces from Kosova.

      (2) Serbian Justice Minister Dragoljub Jankovic has admitted that 1,860 prisoners were brought to Serbia from Kosova on June 10, 1999, the day Serbian and Yugoslav police and military forces began their withdrawal from Kosova.

      (3) International humanitarian organizations, including the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and Human Rights Watch, have expressed serious concern with the detention of Kosovar Albanians in prisons in Serbia.

      (4) On June 25, 1999, Serbia released 166 of the detained Kosovar Albanian prisoners to the ICRC.

      (5) On July 10, 1999, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, comprised of parliamentarians from across Europe, the United States and Canada, adopted a resolution calling upon Serbia and Yugoslavia, in accordance with international humanitarian law, to grant full, immediate and ongoing ICRC access to all prisoners held in relation to the Kosova crisis, to ensure the humane treatment of such prisoners, and to arrange for the release of all such prisoners.

    (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the Serbian and Yugoslav Governments should immediately account for all Kosovar Albanians held in their prisons and treat them in accordance with all applicable international standards;

      (2) the ICRC should be given full, immediate, and ongoing access to all Kosovar Albanians held in Serbian and Yugoslav prisons; and

      (3) all Kosovar Albanians held in Serbian and Yugoslav prisons should be released and returned to Kosova.

TITLE VIII--LIMITATION ON PROCUREMENT OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES

SEC. 801. LIMITATION ON PROCUREMENT OUTSIDE THE UNITED STATES.

    Funds made available for assistance for fiscal year 2000 under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Arms Export Control Act, or any other provision of law described in this Act for which amounts are authorized to be appropriated for such fiscal years, may be used for procurement outside the United States or less developed countries only if--

      (1) such funds are used for the procurement of commodities or services, or defense articles or defense services, produced in the country in which the assistance is to be provided, except that this paragraph only applies if procurement in that country would cost less than procurement in the United States or less developed countries;

      (2) the provision of such assistance requires commodities or services, or defense articles or defense services, of a type that are not produced in, and available for purchase from, the United States, less developed countries, or the country in which the assistance is to be provided;

      (3) the Congress has specifically authorized procurement outside the United States or less developed countries; or

      (4) the President determines on a case-by-case basis that procurement outside the United States or less developed countries would result in the more efficient use of United States foreign assistance resources.

TITLE IX--GULF WAR VETERANS’ IRAQI CLAIMS PROTECTION

SEC. 901. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ‘Gulf War Veterans’ Iraqi Claims Protection Act of 1999’.

SEC. 902. ADJUDICATION OF CLAIMS.

    (a) CLAIMS AGAINST IRAQ- The United States Commission is authorized to receive and determine the validity and amounts of any claims by nationals of the United States against the Government of Iraq. Such claims must be submitted to the United States Commission within the period specified by such Commission by notice published in the Federal Register. The United States Commission shall certify to each claimant the amount determined by the Commission to be payable on the claim under this title.

    (b) DECISION RULES- In deciding claims under subsection (a), the United States Commission shall apply, in the following order--

      (1) applicable substantive law, including international law; and

      (2) applicable principles of justice and equity.

    (c) PRIORITY CLAIMS- Before deciding any other claim against the Government of Iraq, the United States Commission shall, to the extent practical, decide all pending non-commercial claims of active, retired, or reserve members of the United States Armed Forces, retired former members of the United States Armed Forces, and other individuals arising out of Iraq’s invasion and occupation of Kuwait or out of the 1987 attack on the USS Stark.

    (d) APPLICABILITY OF INTERNATIONAL CLAIMS SETTLEMENT ACT- To the extent they are not inconsistent with the provisions of this title, the provisions of title I (other than section 902(c)) and title VII of the International Claims Settlement Act of 1949 (22 U.S.C. 1621-1627 and 1645-1645o) shall apply with respect to claims under this title.

SEC. 903. CLAIMS FUNDS.

    (a) IRAQ CLAIMS FUND- The Secretary of the Treasury is authorized to establish in the Treasury of the United States a fund (hereafter in this title referred to as the ‘Iraq Claims Fund’) for payment of claims certified under section 902(a). The Secretary of the Treasury shall cover into the Iraq Claims Fund such amounts as are allocated to such fund pursuant to subsection (b).

    (b) ALLOCATION OF PROCEEDS FROM IRAQI ASSET LIQUIDATION-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The President shall allocate funds resulting from the liquidation of assets pursuant to section 904 in the manner the President determines appropriate between the Iraq Claims Fund and such other accounts as are appropriate for the payment of claims of the United States Government against Iraq, subject to the limitation in paragraph (2).

      (2) LIMITATION- The amount allocated pursuant to this subsection for payment of claims of the United States Government against Iraq may not exceed the amount which bears the same relation to the amount allocated to the Iraq Claims Fund pursuant to this subsection as the sum of all certified claims of the United States Government against Iraq bears to the sum of all claims certified under section 902(a). As used in this paragraph, the term ‘certified claims of the United States Government against Iraq’ means those claims of the United States Government against Iraq which are determined by the Secretary of State to be outside the jurisdiction of the United Nations Commission and which are determined to be valid, and whose amount has been certified, under such procedures as the President may establish.

SEC. 904. AUTHORITY TO VEST IRAQI ASSETS.

    The President is authorized to vest and liquidate as much of the assets of the Government of Iraq in the United States that have been blocked pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) as may be necessary to satisfy claims under section 902(a), claims of the United States Government against Iraq which are determined by the Secretary of State to be outside the jurisdiction of the United Nations Commission, and administrative expenses under section 905.

SEC. 905. REIMBURSEMENT FOR ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

    (a) DEDUCTION- In order to reimburse the United States Government for its expenses in administering this title, the Secretary of the Treasury shall deduct 1.5 percent of any amount covered into the Iraq Claims Fund to satisfy claims under this title.

    (b) DEDUCTIONS TREATED AS MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS- Amounts deducted pursuant to subsection (a) shall be deposited in the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts.

SEC. 906. PAYMENTS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The United States Commission shall certify to the Secretary of the Treasury each award made pursuant to section 902. The Secretary of the Treasury shall make payment, out of the Iraq Claims Fund, in the following order of priority to the extent funds are available in such fund:

      (1) Payment of $10,000 or the principal amount of the award, whichever is less.

      (2) For each claim that has priority under section 902(c), payment of an additional $90,000 toward the unpaid balance of the principal amount of the award.

      (3) Payments from time to time in ratable proportions on account of the unpaid balance of the principal amounts of all awards according to the proportions which the unpaid balance of such awards bear to the total amount in the Iraq Claims Fund that is available for distribution at the time such payments are made.

      (4) After payment has been made of the principal amounts of all such awards, pro rata payments on account of accrued interest on such awards as bear interest.

    (b) UNSATISFIED CLAIMS- Payment of any award made pursuant to this title shall not extinguish any unsatisfied claim, or be construed to have divested any claimant, or the United States on his or her behalf, of any rights against the Government of Iraq with respect to any unsatisfied claim.

SEC. 907. AUTHORITY TO TRANSFER RECORDS.

    The head of any Executive agency may transfer or otherwise make available to the United States Commission such records and documents relating to claims authorized to be determined under this title as may be required by the United States Commission in carrying out its functions under this title.

SEC. 908. STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS; DISPOSITION OF UNUSED FUNDS.

    (a) STATUTE OF LIMITATIONS- Any demand or claim for payment on account of an award that is certified under this title shall be barred on and after the date that is 1 year after the date of publication of the notice required by subsection (b).

    (b) PUBLICATION OF NOTICE-

      (1) IN GENERAL- At the end of the 9-year period specified in paragraph (2), the Secretary of the Treasury shall publish a notice in the Federal Register detailing the statute of limitations provided for in subsection (a) and identifying the claim numbers of, and the names of the claimants holding, unpaid certified claims.

      (2) PUBLICATION DATE- The notice required by paragraph (1) shall be published 9 years after the last date on which the Secretary of the Treasury covers into the Iraq Claims Fund amounts allocated to that fund pursuant to section 903(b).

    (c) DISPOSITION OF UNUSED FUNDS-

      (1) DISPOSITION- At the end of the 2-year period beginning on the publication date of the notice required by subsection (b), the Secretary of the Treasury shall dispose of all unused funds described in paragraph (2) by depositing in the Treasury of the United States as miscellaneous receipts any such funds that are not used for payments of certified claims under this title.

      (2) UNUSED FUNDS- The unused funds referred to in paragraph (1) are any remaining balance in the Iraq Claims Fund.

SEC. 909. DEFINITIONS.

    As used in this title:

      (1) EXECUTIVE AGENCY- The term ‘Executive agency’ has the meaning given that term by section 105 of title 5, United States Code.

      (2) GOVERNMENT OF IRAQ- The term ‘Government of Iraq’ includes agencies, instrumentalities, and entities controlled by that government (including public sector enterprises).

      (3) UNITED NATIONS COMMISSION- The term ‘United Nations Commission’ means the United Nations Compensation Commission established pursuant to United Nations Security Council Resolution 687 (1991).

      (4) UNITED STATES COMMISSION- The term ‘United States Commission’ means the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the United States.

DIVISION B--SECURITY ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS

SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

    This division may be cited as the ‘Security Assistance Act of 1999’.

TITLE XI--TRANSFERS OF EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES

SEC. 1101. EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES FOR CENTRAL EUROPEAN COUNTRIES.

    Section 105 of Public Law 104-164 (110 Stat. 1427) is amended by striking ‘1996 and 1997’ and inserting ‘2000 and 2001’.

SEC. 1102. EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES FOR CERTAIN INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.

    (a) USES FOR WHICH FUNDS ARE AVAILABLE- Notwithstanding section 516(e) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j(e)), during each of the fiscal years 2000 and 2001, funds available to the Department of Defense may be expended for crating, packing, handling, and transportation of excess defense articles transferred under the authority of section 516 of that Act to Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan.

    (b) CONTENT OF CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION- Each notification required to be submitted under section 516(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j(f)) with respect to a proposed transfer of a defense article described in subsection (a) shall include an estimate of the amount of funds to be expended under subsection (a) with respect to that transfer.

TITLE XII--FOREIGN MILITARY SALES AUTHORITIES

SEC. 1201. TERMINATION OF FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCED TRAINING.

    Section 617 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2367) is amended--

      (1) by inserting in the second sentence ‘and the Arms Export Control Act’ after ‘under this Act’ the first place it appears;

      (2) by striking ‘under this Act’ the second place it appears; and

      (3) by inserting in the third sentence ‘and under the Arms Export Control Act’ after ‘this Act’.

SEC. 1202. SALES OF EXCESS COAST GUARD PROPERTY.

    Section 21(a)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761(a)(1)) is amended in the text above subparagraph (A) by inserting ‘and the Coast Guard’ after ‘Department of Defense’.

SEC. 1203. COMPETITIVE PRICING FOR SALES OF DEFENSE ARTICLES.

    Section 22(d) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2762(d)) is amended--

      (1) by striking ‘Procurement contracts’ and inserting ‘(1) Procurement contracts’; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following:

    ‘(2) Direct costs associated with meeting additional or unique requirements of the purchaser shall be allowable under contracts described in paragraph (1). Loadings applicable to such direct costs shall be permitted at the same rates applicable to procurement of like items purchased by the Department of Defense for its own use.’.

SEC. 1204. REPORTING OF OFFSET AGREEMENTS.

    (a) GOVERNMENT-TO-GOVERNMENT SALES- Section 36(b)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(b)(1)) is amended in the fourth sentence by striking ‘(if known on the date of transmittal of such certification)’ and inserting ‘and, if known on the date of transmittal of such certification, a description of the offset agreement. Such description may be included in the classified portion of such numbered certification’.

    (b) COMMERCIAL SALES- Section 36(c)(1) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(c)(1)) is amended in the second sentence by striking ‘(if known on the date of transmittal of such certification)’ and inserting ‘and, if known on the date of transmittal of such certification, a description of the offset agreement. Such description may be included in the classified portion of such numbered certification’.

SEC. 1205. NOTIFICATION OF UPGRADES TO DIRECT COMMERCIAL SALES.

    Section 36(c) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(c)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

    ‘(4) The provisions of subsection (b)(5) shall apply to any equipment, article, or service for which a numbered certification has been transmitted to Congress pursuant to paragraph (1) in the same manner and to the same extent as that subsection applies to any equipment, article, or service for which a numbered certification has been transmitted to Congress pursuant to subsection (b)(1). For purposes of such application, any reference in subsection (b)(5) to ‘a letter of offer’ or ‘an offer’ shall be deemed to be a reference to ‘a contract’.’.

SEC. 1206. EXPANDED PROHIBITION ON INCENTIVE PAYMENTS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 39A(a) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2779a(a)) is amended--

      (1) by inserting ‘or licensed’ after ‘sold’; and

      (2) by inserting ‘or export’ after ‘sale’.

    (b) DEFINITION OF UNITED STATES PERSON- Section 39A(d)(3)(B)(ii) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2779a(d)(3)(B)(ii)) is amended by inserting ‘or by an entity described in clause (i)’ after ‘subparagraph (A)’.

SEC. 1207. ADMINISTRATIVE FEES FOR LEASING OF DEFENSE ARTICLES.

    Section 61(a) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2796(a)) is amended in paragraph (4) of the first sentence by inserting after ‘including reimbursement for depreciation of such articles while leased,’ the following: ‘a fee for the administrative services associated with processing such leasing,’.

TITLE XIII--STOCKPILING OF DEFENSE ARTICLES FOR FOREIGN COUNTRIES

SEC. 1301. ADDITIONS TO UNITED STATES WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES FOR ALLIES.

    Paragraph (2) of section 514(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h(b)(2)) is amended to read as follows:

      ‘(2)(A) The value of such additions to stockpiles of defense articles in foreign countries shall not exceed $340,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 and $60,000,000 for fiscal year 2000.

      ‘(B)(i) Of the amount specified in subparagraph (A) for fiscal year 1999, not more than $320,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles in the Republic of Korea and not more than $20,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles in Thailand.

      ‘(ii) Of the amount specified in subparagraph (A) for fiscal year 2000, not more than $40,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles in the Republic of Korea and not more than $20,000,000 may be made available for stockpiles in Thailand.’.

SEC. 1302. TRANSFER OF CERTAIN OBSOLETE OR SURPLUS DEFENSE ARTICLES IN THE WAR RESERVES STOCKPILE FOR ALLIES.

    (a) ITEMS IN THE KOREAN STOCKPILE-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Notwithstanding section 514 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h), the President is authorized to transfer to the Republic of Korea, in return for concessions to be negotiated by the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, any or all of the items described in paragraph (2).

      (2) COVERED ITEMS- The items referred to in paragraph (1) are munitions, equipment, and material such as tanks, trucks, artillery, mortars, general purpose bombs, repair parts, ammunition, barrier material, and ancillary equipment, if such items are--

        (A) obsolete or surplus items;

        (B) in the inventory of the Department of Defense;

        (C) intended for use as reserve stocks for the Republic of Korea; and

        (D) as of the date of the enactment of this Act, located in a stockpile in the Republic of Korea.

    (b) ITEMS IN THE THAILAND STOCKPILE-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Notwithstanding section 514 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h), the President is authorized to transfer to Thailand, in return for concessions to be negotiated by the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the Secretary of State, any or all of the items in the WRS-T stockpile described in paragraph (2).

      (2) COVERED ITEMS- The items referred to in paragraph (1) are munitions, equipment, and material such as tanks, trucks, artillery, mortars, general purpose bombs, repair parts, ammunition, barrier material, and ancillary equipment, if such items are--

        (A) obsolete or surplus items;

        (B) in the inventory of the Department of Defense;

        (C) intended for use as reserve stocks for Thailand; and

        (D) as of the date of the enactment of this Act, located in a stockpile in Thailand.

    (c) VALUATION OF CONCESSIONS- The value of concessions negotiated pursuant to subsections (a) and (b) shall be at least equal to the fair market value of the items transferred. The concessions may include cash compensation, services, waiver of charges otherwise payable by the United States, and other items of value.

    (d) PRIOR NOTIFICATIONS OF PROPOSED TRANSFERS- Not less 30 days before making a transfer under the authority of this section, the President shall transmit to the chairmen of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives a detailed notification of the proposed transfer, which shall include an identification of the items to be transferred and the concessions to be received.

    (e) TERMINATION OF AUTHORITY- No transfer may be made under the authority of this section more than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

TITLE XIV--INTERNATIONAL ARMS SALES CODE OF CONDUCT ACT OF 1999

SEC. 1401. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the ‘International Arms Sales Code of Conduct Act of 1999’.

SEC. 1402. FINDINGS.

    The Congress finds the following:

      (1) The proliferation of conventional arms and conflicts around the globe are multilateral problems. The only way to effectively prevent rogue nations from acquiring conventional weapons is through a multinational ‘arms sales code of conduct’.

      (2) Approximately 40,000,000 people, over 75 percent of whom were civilians, died as a result of civil and international wars fought with conventional weapons during the 45 years of the cold war, demonstrating that conventional weapons can in fact be weapons of mass destruction.

      (3) Conflict has actually increased in the post cold war era.

      (4) It is in the national security and economic interests of the United States to reduce dramatically the $840,000,000,000 that all countries spend on armed forces every year, $191,000,000,000 of which is spent by developing countries, an amount equivalent to 4 times the total bilateral and multilateral foreign assistance such countries receive every year.

      (5) The Congress has the constitutional responsibility to participate with the executive branch in decisions to provide military assistance and arms transfers to a foreign government, and in the formulation of a policy designed to reduce dramatically the level of international militarization.

      (6) A decision to provide military assistance and arms transfers to a government that is undemocratic, does not adequately protect human rights, or is currently engaged in acts of armed aggression should require a higher level of scrutiny than does a decision to provide such assistance and arms transfers to a government to which these conditions do not apply.

SEC. 1403. INTERNATIONAL ARMS SALES CODE OF CONDUCT.

    (a) NEGOTIATIONS- The President shall attempt to achieve the foreign policy goal of an international arms sales code of conduct with all Wassenaar Arrangement countries. The President shall take the necessary steps to begin negotiations with all Wassenaar Arrangement countries within 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. The purpose of these negotiations shall be to conclude an agreement on restricting or prohibiting arms transfers to countries that do not meet the following criteria:

      (1) PROMOTES DEMOCRACY- The government of the country--

        (A) was chosen by and permits free and fair elections;

        (B) promotes civilian control of the military and security forces and has civilian institutions controlling the policy, operation, and spending of all law enforcement and security institutions, as well as the armed forces;

        (C) promotes the rule of law, equality before the law, and respect for individual and minority rights, including freedom to speak, publish, associate, and organize; and

        (D) promotes the strengthening of political, legislative, and civil institutions of democracy, as well as autonomous institutions to monitor the conduct of public officials and to combat corruption.

      (2) RESPECTS HUMAN RIGHTS- The government of the country--

        (A) does not engage in gross violations of internationally recognized human rights, including--

          (i) extra judicial or arbitrary executions;

          (ii) disappearances;

          (iii) torture or severe mistreatment;

          (iv) prolonged arbitrary imprisonment;

          (v) systematic official discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, national origin, or political affiliation; and

          (vi) grave breaches of international laws of war or equivalent violations of the laws of war in internal conflicts;

        (B) vigorously investigates, disciplines, and prosecutes those responsible for gross violations of internationally recognized human rights;

        (C) permits access on a regular basis to political prisoners by international humanitarian organizations such as the International Committee of the Red Cross;

        (D) promotes the independence of the judiciary and other official bodies that oversee the protection of human rights;

        (E) does not impede the free functioning of domestic and international human rights organizations; and

        (F) provides access on a regular basis to humanitarian organizations in situations of conflict or famine.

      (3) NOT ENGAGED IN CERTAIN ACTS OF ARMED AGGRESSION- The government of the country is not currently engaged in acts of armed aggression in violation of international law.

      (4) FULL PARTICIPATION IN UNITED NATIONS REGISTER OF CONVENTIONAL ARMS- The government of the country is fully participating in the United Nations Register of Conventional Arms.

    (b) REPORTS TO CONGRESS- (1) In the report required in sections 116(d) and 502B of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the Secretary of State shall describe the extent to which the practices of each country evaluated meet the criteria in paragraphs (1) through (4) of subsection (a).

    (2) Not later than 6 months after the commencement of the negotiations under subsection (a), and not later than the end of every 6-month period thereafter until an agreement described in subsection (a) is concluded, the President shall report to the appropriate committees of the Congress on the progress made during these negotiations.

    (c) DEFINITION- The term ‘Wassenaar Arrangement countries’ means Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Republic of Korea, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, and the United Kingdom.

TITLE XV--AUTHORITY TO EXEMPT INDIA AND PAKISTAN FROM CERTAIN SANCTIONS

SEC. 1501. WAIVER AUTHORITY.

    (a) AUTHORITY-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Except as provided in subsection (b), the President may waive, with respect to India or Pakistan, the application of any sanction or prohibition (or portion thereof) contained in section 101 or 102 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2799aa or 2799aa-1), section 620E(e) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2375(e)), or section 2(b)(4) of the Export Import Bank Act of 1945 (12 U.S.C. 635(b)(4)).

      (2) EFFECTIVE DATE- A waiver of the application of a sanction or prohibition (or portion thereof) under paragraph (1) shall be effective only for a period ending on or before September 30, 2000.

    (b) EXCEPTION- The authority to waive the application of a sanction or prohibition (or portion thereof) under subsection (a) shall not apply with respect to a sanction or prohibition contained in subparagraph (B), (C), or (G) of section 102(b)(2) of the Arms Export Control Act.

    (c) NOTIFICATION- A waiver of the application of a sanction or prohibition (or portion thereof) contained in section 541 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 shall not become effective until 15 days after notice of such waiver has been reported to the congressional committees specified in section 634A(a) of such Act in accordance with the procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications under that section.

SEC. 1502. CONSULTATION.

    Prior to each exercise of the authority provided in section 1501, the President shall consult with the appropriate congressional committees.

SEC. 1503. REPORTING REQUIREMENT.

    Not later than August 31, 2000, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on economic and national security developments in India and Pakistan.

SEC. 1504. APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES DEFINED.

    In this title, the term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means--

      (1) the Committee on International Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of Representatives; and

      (2) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate.

TITLE XVI--TRANSFER OF NAVAL VESSELS TO CERTAIN FOREIGN COUNTRIES

SEC. 1601. AUTHORITY TO TRANSFER NAVAL VESSELS.

    (a) DOMINICAN REPUBLIC- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of the Dominican Republic the medium auxiliary floating dry dock AFDM 2. Such transfer shall be on a grant basis under section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j).

    (b) ECUADOR- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Ecuador the ‘OAK RIDGE’ class medium auxiliary repair dry dock ALAMOGORDO (ARDM 2). Such transfer shall be on a sales basis under section 21 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761).

    (c) EGYPT- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Egypt the ‘NEWPORT’ class tank landing ships BARBOUR COUNTY (LST 1195) and PEORIA (LST 1183). Such transfers shall be on a sales basis under section 21 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761).

    (d) GREECE- (1) The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Greece the ‘KNOX’ class frigate CONNOLE (FF 1056). Such transfer shall be on a grant basis under section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j).

    (2) The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Greece the medium auxiliary floating dry dock COMPETENT (AFDM 6). Such transfer shall be on a sales basis under section 21 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761).

    (e) MEXICO- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Mexico the ‘NEWPORT’ class tank landing ship NEWPORT (LST 1179) and the ‘KNOX’ class frigate WHIPPLE (FF 1062). Such transfers shall be on a sales basis under section 21 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761).

    (f) POLAND- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Poland the ‘OLIVER HAZARD PERRY’ class guided missile frigate CLARK (FFG 11). Such transfer shall be on a grant basis under section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j).

    (g) TAIWAN- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office in the United States (which is the Taiwan instrumentality designated pursuant to section 10(a) of the Taiwan Relations Act) the ‘NEWPORT’ class tank landing ship SCHENECTADY (LST 1185). Such transfer shall be on a sales basis under section 21 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761).

    (h) THAILAND- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Thailand the ‘KNOX’ class frigate TRUETT (FF 1095). Such transfer shall be on a grant basis under section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j).

    (i) TURKEY- The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to transfer to the Government of Turkey the ‘OLIVER HAZARD PERRY’ class guided missile frigates FLATLEY (FFG 21) and JOHN A. MOORE (FFG 19). Such transfers shall be on a sales basis under section 21 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761).

SEC. 1602. INAPPLICABILITY OF AGGREGATE ANNUAL LIMITATION ON VALUE OF TRANSFERRED EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES.

    The value of a vessel transferred to another country on a grant basis under section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j) pursuant to authority provided by section 1601 shall not be counted for the purposes of section 516(g) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 in the aggregate value of excess defense articles transferred to countries under that section in any fiscal year.

SEC. 1603. COSTS OF TRANSFERS.

    Any expense incurred by the United States in connection with a transfer of a vessel authorized by section 1601 shall be charged to the recipient.

SEC. 1604. EXPIRATION OF AUTHORITY.

    The authority to transfer vessels under section 1601 shall expire at the end of the 2-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 1605. REPAIR AND REFURBISHMENT OF VESSELS IN UNITED STATES SHIPYARDS.

    The Secretary of the Navy shall require, to the maximum extent possible, as a condition of a transfer of a vessel under section 1601, that the country to which the vessel is transferred have such repair or refurbishment of the vessel as is needed, before the vessel joins the naval forces of that country, performed at a shipyard located in the United States, including a United States Navy shipyard.

SEC. 1606. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS RELATING TO TRANSFER OF NAVAL VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT TO THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PHILIPPINES.

    (a) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the President should transfer to the Government of the Philippines, on a grant basis under section 516 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321j), the excess defense articles described in subsection (b); and

      (2) the United States should not oppose the transfer of F-5 aircraft by a third country to the Government of the Philippines.

    (b) EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES- The excess defense articles described in this subsection are the following:

      (1) UH-1 helicopters, A-4 aircraft, and the ‘POINT’ class Coast Guard cutter POINT EVANS.

      (2) Amphibious landing craft, naval patrol vessels (including patrol vessels of the Coast Guard), and other naval vessels (such as frigates), if such vessels are available.

TITLE XVII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

SEC. 1701. ANNUAL MILITARY ASSISTANCE REPORTS.

    Section 655(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2415(b)) is amended to read as follows:

    ‘(b) INFORMATION RELATING TO MILITARY ASSISTANCE AND MILITARY EXPORTS- Each such report shall show the aggregate dollar value and quantity of defense articles (including excess defense articles), defense services, and international military education and training activities authorized by the United States and of such articles, services, and activities provided by the United States, excluding any activity that is reportable under title V of the National Security Act of 1947, to each foreign country and international organization. The report shall specify, by category, whether such defense articles--

      ‘(1) were furnished by grant under chapter 2 or chapter 5 of part II of this Act or under any other authority of law or by sale under chapter 2 of the Arms Export Control Act;

      ‘(2) were furnished with the financial assistance of the United States Government, including through loans and guarantees; or

      ‘(3) were licensed for export under section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act.’.

SEC. 1702. PUBLICATION OF ARMS SALES CERTIFICATIONS.

    Section 36 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776) is amended in the second subsection (e) (as added by section 155 of Public Law 104-164)--

      (1) by inserting ‘in a timely manner’ after ‘to be published’; and

      (2) by striking ‘the full unclassified text of’ and all that follows and inserting the following: ‘the full unclassified text of--

      ‘(1) each numbered certification submitted pursuant to subsection (b);

      ‘(2) each notification of a proposed commercial sale submitted under subsection (c); and

      ‘(3) each notification of a proposed commercial technical assistance or manufacturing licensing agreement submitted under subsection (d).’.

SEC. 1703. NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR COMMERCIAL EXPORT OF SIGNIFICANT MILITARY EQUIPMENT ON UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST.

    (a) NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENT- Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778) is amended by adding at the end the following:

    ‘(i) As prescribed in regulations issued under this section, a United States person to whom a license has been granted to export an item identified as significant military equipment on the United States Munitions List shall, not later than 15 days after the item is exported, submit to the Department of State a report containing all shipment information, including a description of the item and the quantity, value, port of exit, and destination of the item.’.

    (b) QUARTERLY REPORTS TO CONGRESS- Section 36(a) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(a)) is amended--

        (A) in paragraph (11), by striking ‘and’ at the end;

        (B) in paragraph (12), by striking ‘third-party transfers.’ and inserting ‘third-party transfers; and’; and

        (C) by adding after paragraph (12) (but before the last sentence of the subsection), the following:

      ‘(13) a report on all exports of significant military equipment for which information has been provided pursuant to section 38(i).’.

SEC. 1704. ENFORCEMENT OF ARMS EXPORT CONTROL ACT.

    The Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) is amended in sections 38(e), 39A(c), and 40(k) by inserting after ‘except that’ each place it appears the following: ‘section 11(c)(2)(B) of such Act shall not apply, and instead, as prescribed in regulations issued under this section, the Secretary of State may assess civil penalties for violations of this Act and regulations prescribed thereunder and further may commence a civil action to recover such civil penalties, and except further that’.

SEC. 1705. VIOLATIONS RELATING TO MATERIAL SUPPORT TO TERRORISTS.

    Section 38(g)(1)(A)(iii) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(1)(A)(iii)) is amended by adding at the end before the comma the following: ‘or section 2339A of such title (relating to providing material support to terrorists)’.

SEC. 1706. AUTHORITY TO CONSENT TO THIRD PARTY TRANSFER OF EX-U.S.S. BOWMAN COUNTY TO USS LST SHIP MEMORIAL, INC.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) It is the long-standing policy of the United States Government to deny requests for the retransfer of significant military equipment that originated in the United States to private entities.

      (2) In very exceptional circumstances, when the United States public interest would be served by the proposed retransfer and end-use, such requests may be favorably considered.

      (3) Such retransfers to private entities have been authorized in very exceptional circumstances following appropriate demilitarization and receipt of assurances from the private entity that the item to be transferred would be used solely in furtherance of Federal Government contracts or for static museum display.

      (4) Nothing in this section should be construed as a revision of long-standing policy referred to in paragraph (1).

      (5) The Government of Greece has requested the consent of the United States Government to the retransfer of HS Rodos (ex-U.S.S. Bowman County (LST 391)) to the USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc.

    (b) AUTHORITY TO CONSENT TO RETRANSFER-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Subject to paragraph (2), the President may consent to the retransfer by the Government of Greece of HS Rodos (ex-U.S.S. Bowman County (LST 391)) to the USS LST Ship Memorial, Inc.

      (2) CONDITIONS FOR CONSENT- The President should not exercise the authority under paragraph (1) unless USS LST Memorial, Inc-

        (A) utilizes the vessel for public, nonprofit, museum-related purposes;

        (B) submits a certification with the import application that no firearms frames or receivers, ammunition, or other firearms as defined in section 5845 of the National Firearms Act (26 U.S.C. 5845) will be imported with the vessel; and

        (C) complies with regulatory policy requirements related to the facilitation of monitoring by the Federal Government of, and the mitigation of potential environmental hazards associated with, aging vessels, and has a demonstrated financial capability to so comply.

SEC. 1707. EXCEPTIONS RELATING TO PROHIBITIONS ON ASSISTANCE TO COUNTRIES INVOLVED IN TRANSFER OR USE OF NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE DEVICES.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 2 of the Agriculture Export Relief Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-194; 112 Stat. 627) is amended--

      (1) by striking subsection (d); and

      (2) by striking the second sentence of subsection (e).

    (b) EFFECTIVE DATE- The amendments made by subsection (a) shall take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act or September 30, 1999, whichever occurs earlier.

SEC. 1708. CONTINUATION OF THE EXPORT CONTROL REGULATIONS UNDER IEEPA.

    To the extent that the President exercises the authorities of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act to carry out the provisions of the Export Administration Act of 1979 in order to continue in full force and effect the export control system maintained by the Export Administration regulations issued under that Act, including regulations issued under section 8 of that Act, the following shall apply:

      (1) The penalties for violations of the regulations continued pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act shall be the same as the penalties for violations under section 11 of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as if that section were amended--

        (A) by amending subsection (a) to read as follows:

    ‘(a) IN GENERAL- Except as provided in subsection (b), whoever knowingly violates or conspires to or attempts to violate any provision of this Act or any license, order, or regulation issued under this Act--

      ‘(1) except in the case of an individual, shall be fined not more than $500,000 or 5 times the value of any exports involved, whichever is greater; and

      ‘(2) in the case of an individual, shall be fined not more than $250,000 or 5 times the value of any exports involved, whichever is greater, or imprisoned not more than 5 years, or both.’;

        (B) in subsection (b)--

          (i) in paragraphs (1)(A) and (2)(A) by striking ‘five times’ and inserting ‘10 times’;

          (ii) in paragraph (1)(B) by striking ‘$250,000’ and inserting ‘$500,000’; and

          (iii) in paragraph (2)(B) by striking ‘$250,000, or imprisoned not more than 5 years’ and inserting ‘$500,000, or imprisoned not more than 10 years’;

        (C) in subsection (c)(1)--

          (i) by striking ‘$10,000’ and inserting ‘$250,000’; and

          (ii) by striking ‘except that the civil penalty’ and all that follows through the end of the paragraph and inserting ‘except that the civil penalty for a violation of the regulations issued pursuant to section 8 may not exceed $50,000.’; and

        (D) in subsection (h)(1), by inserting after ‘Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778)’ the following: ‘section 16 of the Trading with the enemy Act (50 U.S.C. 16), or, to the extent the violation involves the export of goods or technology controlled under this or any other Act or defense articles or defense services controlled under the Arms Export Control Act, section 371 or 1001 of title 18, United States Code,’.

      (2) The authorities set forth in section 12(a) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 may be exercised in carrying out the regulations continued pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

      (3) The provisions of sections 12(c) and 13 of the Export Administration Act of 1979 shall apply in carrying out the regulations continued pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

      (4) The continuation of the provisions of the Export Administration Regulations pursuant to the International Emergency Economic Powers Act shall not be construed as not having satisfied the requirements of that Act.

Passed the House of Representatives July 21, 1999.

Attest:

JEFF TRANDAHL,

Clerk.