S. 2414 (106th): Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000

106th Congress, 1999–2000. Text as of Apr 12, 2000 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

S 2414 IS

106th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. 2414

To combat trafficking of persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and slavery-like conditions, in the United States and countries around the world through prevention, through prosecution and enforcement against traffickers, and through protection and assistance to victims of trafficking.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

April 12, 2000

Mr. WELLSTONE introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations


A BILL

To combat trafficking of persons, especially into the sex trade, slavery, and slavery-like conditions, in the United States and countries around the world through prevention, through prosecution and enforcement against traffickers, and through protection and assistance to victims of trafficking.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) SHORT TITLE- This Act may be cited as the ‘Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000’.

    (b) TABLE OF CONTENTS- The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

      Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

      Sec. 2. Purposes and findings.

      Sec. 3. Definitions.

      Sec. 4. Annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices; interim reports.

      Sec. 5. Interagency task force to monitor and combat trafficking.

      Sec. 6. Prevention of trafficking.

      Sec. 7. Protection and assistance for victims of trafficking.

      Sec. 8. Minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking.

      Sec. 9. Assistance to foreign countries to meet minimum standards.

      Sec. 10. Actions against governments failing to meet minimum standards.

      Sec. 11. Actions against traffickers in persons.

      Sec. 12. Strengthening prosecution and punishment of traffickers.

      Sec. 13. Authorization of appropriations.

SEC. 2. PURPOSES AND FINDINGS.

    (a) PURPOSES- The purposes of this Act are to combat trafficking in persons, a contemporary manifestation of slavery whose victims are predominantly women and children, to ensure just and effective punishment of traffickers, and to protect their victims.

    (b) FINDINGS- Congress finds that:

      (1) Millions of people every year, primarily women and children, are trafficked within or across international borders. Approximately 50,000 women and children are trafficked into the United States each year.

      (2) Many of these persons are trafficked into the international sex trade, often by means of force, fraud, or coercion. The sex industry has rapidly expanded over the past several decades. It involves sexual exploitation of persons, predominantly women and girls, within activities related to prostitution, pornography, sex tourism, and other commercial sexual services. The rapid expansion of the sex industry and the low status of women in many parts of the world have contributed to a burgeoning of the trafficking industry.

      (3) Trafficking in persons is not limited to the sex industry. Such trafficking also involves forced labor and other violations of internationally recognized human rights. The worldwide trafficking of persons is a growing transnational crime, migration, economics, labor, public health, and human rights problem that is significant on nearly every continent.

      (4) Traffickers primarily target women and girls, who are disproportionately affected by poverty, lack of access to education, chronic unemployment, discrimination, and lack of viable economic opportunities in countries of origin. Traffickers lure women and girls into their networks through false promises of decent working conditions at relatively good pay as nannies, maids, dancers, factory workers, restaurant workers, sales clerks, or models. Traffickers also buy children from poor families and sell them into prostitution or into various types of forced or bonded labor.

      (5) Traffickers often facilitate victims’ movement from their home communities to unfamiliar destinations, away from family and friends, religious institutions, and other sources of protection and support, making the victims more vulnerable.

      (6) Victims are often forced to engage in sex acts or to perform labor or other services through physical violence, including rape and other forms of sexual abuse, torture, starvation, and imprisonment, through threats of violence, and through other forms of psychological abuse and coercion.

      (7) Traffickers often make representations to their victims that physical harm may occur to them or to others should the victim escape or attempt to escape. Such representations can have the same coercive effects on victims as specific threats to inflict such harm.

      (8) Trafficking in persons is perpetrated increasingly by organized and sophisticated criminal enterprises. Such trafficking is the fastest growing source of profits for organized criminal enterprises worldwide. Profits from the trafficking industry contribute to the expansion of organized criminal activity in the United States and around the world. Trafficking often is aided by official corruption in countries of origin, transit, and destination, thereby threatening the rule of law.

      (9) Trafficking, when it involves the involuntary participation of another person in sex acts by means of fraud, force, or coercion, includes all the elements of the crime of forcible rape.

      (10) Trafficking also involves violations of other laws, including labor and immigration codes and laws against kidnapping, slavery, false imprisonment, assault, battery, pandering, fraud, and extortion.

      (11) Trafficking exposes victims to serious health risk. Women and children trafficked into the sex industry are exposed to deadly diseases, including HIV and AIDS. Trafficking victims are sometimes worked or physically brutalized to death.

      (12) Trafficking in persons involving slavery-like practices substantially affects interstate and foreign commerce. The United States must take action to eradicate the substantial burdens on commerce that result from trafficking in persons and to prevent the channels of commerce from being used for immoral and injurious purposes.

      (13) Trafficking of persons in all its forms is an evil requiring concerted and vigorous action by countries of origin, transit or destination, and by international organizations.

      (14) Existing legislation and law enforcement in the United States and in other countries have proved inadequate to deter trafficking and to bring traffickers to justice, principally because such legislation and enforcement do not reflect the gravity of the offenses involved. No comprehensive law exists in the United States that penalizes the range of offenses involved in the trafficking scheme. Instead, even the most brutal instances of trafficking into the sex industry are often punished under laws that also apply to lesser offenses such as consensual sexual activity and illegal immigration, so that traffickers typically escape severe punishment.

      (15) In the United States, the seriousness of the crime of trafficking in persons is not reflected in current sentencing guidelines for component crimes of the trafficking scheme, which results in weak penalties for convicted traffickers. Additionally adequate services and facilities do not exist to meet the health care, housing, education, and legal assistance needs for the safe reintegration of domestic trafficking victims.

      (16) In some countries, enforcement against traffickers is also hindered by official indifference, by corruption, and sometimes even by active official participation in trafficking.

      (17) Because existing laws and law enforcement procedures often fail to make clear distinctions between victims of trafficking and persons who have knowingly and willfully violated laws, and because such victims often do not have legal immigration status in the countries into which they are trafficked, the victims are often punished more harshly than the traffickers themselves.

      (18) Because victims of trafficking are frequently unfamiliar with the laws, cultures, and languages of the countries into which they have been trafficked, and because they are often subjected to coercion and intimidation including physical detention, debt bondage, fear of retribution, and fear of forcible removal to countries in which they will face retribution or other hardship, these victims often find it difficult or impossible to report the crimes committed against them or to assist in the investigation and prosecution of such crimes.

      (19) The United States and the international community are in agreement that trafficking in persons involves grave violations of human rights and is a matter of pressing international concern. The international community has repeatedly condemned slavery and involuntary servitude, violence against women, and other elements of trafficking, through declarations, treaties, United Nations resolutions and reports, including the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; the 1956 Supplementary Convention on the Abolition of Slavery, the Slave Trade, and Institutions and Practices Similar to Slavery; the 1957 Abolition of Forced Labor Convention; the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women; the Convention Against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment; United Nations General Assembly Resolutions 50/167, 51/66, and 52/98; the Final Report of the World Congress against Sexual Exploitation of Children (Stockholm, 1996); the Fourth World Conference on Women (Beijing, 1995); and the 1991 Moscow Document of the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.

      (20) Trafficking in persons is a transnational crime with national implications. In order to deter international trafficking and to bring its perpetrators to justice, nations including the United States must recognize that trafficking is a serious offense by prescribing appropriate punishment, by giving priority to investigation and prosecution of trafficking offenses, and by protecting rather than punishing the victims of such offenses. The United States must work bilaterally and multilaterally to abolish the trafficking industry by taking steps to promote and facilitate cooperation among countries linked together by international trafficking routes. The United States must also urge the international community to take strong action in multilateral fora to engage recalcitrant countries in serious and sustained efforts to eliminate trafficking and protect trafficking victims.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:

      (1) ACT OF A SEVERE FORM OF TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS- The term ‘act of a severe form of trafficking in persons’ means any act at any point in the process of a severe form of trafficking in persons, including--

        (A) any act of recruitment, harboring, transport, provision, employment, securing, transfer, purchase, sale or receipt of a victim of such trafficking; or

        (B) any act of--

          (i) operation, management, or ownership of an enterprise in which a victim of such trafficking engages in a commercial sex act, is subjected to slavery or a slavery-like practice, or is expected or induced to engage in such acts or be subjected to such condition or practice; or

          (ii) sharing in the profits of a severe form of trafficking in persons or any part thereof.

      (2) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- The term ‘appropriate congressional committees’ means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives.

      (3) COERCION- The term ‘coercion’ means the use of force, violence, physical restraint, deception, or acts or circumstances not necessarily including physical force but calculated to have the same effect, such as the credible threat of force or of the infliction of serious harm.

      (4) COMMERCIAL SEX ACT- The term ‘commercial sex act’ means any sex act whereby anything of value is given to or received by any person.

      (5) MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR THE ELIMINATION OF TRAFFICKING- The term ‘minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking’ means the standards set forth in section 8.

      (6) SEVERE FORMS OF TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS- The term ‘severe forms of trafficking in persons’ means--

        (A) sex trafficking in which either a commercial sex act or any act or event contributing to such act is effected or induced by fraud, force, coercion, or deception, or in which the person induced to perform such act has not attained 18 years of age; or

        (B) the recruitment, harboring, provision, transportation, employment, transfer, receipt, purchase, sale, or securing, by any means, of a person, through the use of force, coercion, fraud, or deception, for the purpose of subjection to involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery or slavery-like practices.

      (7) SEX TRAFFICKING- The term ‘sex trafficking’ means the purchase, sale, recruitment, harboring, transportation, transfer, or receipt of a person for the purpose of a commercial sex act.

      (8) SLAVERY-LIKE PRACTICES- The term ‘slavery-like practices’ means the inducement of a person to perform labor or other services, or an act by force, fraud, coercion, or any scheme, plan, or pattern to cause the person to believe that failure to perform the work will result in--

        (A) the infliction of serious harm;

        (B) debt bondage in which labor or services are pledged for debt on terms calculated never to allow full payment of the debt or otherwise amounting to indentured servitude for life or for an indefinite period; or

        (C) subjection of the person to conditions so harsh or degrading as to provide a clear indication that the person has been subjected to them by force, fraud, or coercion.

      (9) VICTIM OF TRAFFICKING- The term ‘victim of trafficking’ means a person subjected to an act or practice described in paragraph (6) or (7).

      (10) VICTIM OF A SEVERE FORM OF TRAFFICKING- The term ‘victim of a severe form of trafficking’ means a person subject to an act or practice described in paragraph (6).

SEC. 4. ANNUAL COUNTRY REPORTS ON HUMAN RIGHTS PRACTICES; INTERIM REPORTS.

    (a) ANNUAL COUNTRY REPORTS- The Secretary of State, with the assistance of the Assistant Secretary of Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, shall, as part of the annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, include information on the status of trafficking in persons, including the following information:

      (1) A list of foreign countries that are countries of origin, transit, or destination for a significant number of victims of severe forms of trafficking and which do not meet the minimum standards set forth in section 8.

      (2) A description of the nature and extent of severe forms of trafficking in persons in each country.

      (3) An assessment of the efforts by the governments described in paragraph (1) to combat severe forms of trafficking. Such an assessment shall address--

        (A) whether any governmental authorities tolerate or are involved in such trafficking;

        (B) which governmental authorities are involved in activities to combat such trafficking;

        (C) what steps the government has taken against its officials who participate in, facilitate, or condone such trafficking;

        (D) what steps the government has taken to investigate and prosecute officials who participate in or facilitate such trafficking;

        (E) what steps the government has taken to prohibit other individuals from participating in such trafficking, including the investigation, prosecution, and conviction of individuals involved in severe forms of trafficking in persons, the criminal and civil penalties for such trafficking, and the efficacy of those penalties in eliminating or reducing such trafficking;

        (F) what steps the government has taken to assist victims of such trafficking, including efforts to prevent victims from being further victimized by traffickers, government officials, or others, grants of stays of deportation, and provision of humanitarian relief, including provision of mental and physical health care and shelter;

        (G) whether the government--

          (i) is cooperating with governments of other countries to extradite traffickers when requested;

          (ii) is assisting in international investigations of transnational trafficking networks and in other cooperative efforts to combat trafficking;

          (iii) refrains from prosecuting victims of severe forms of trafficking and from other discriminatory treatment of such victims due to such victims having been trafficked, or due to their having left or entered the country illegally; and

          (iv) recognizes the rights of victims and ensures their access to justice.

      (4) Information described in paragraph (2) and, where appropriate, in paragraph (3) shall be included in the annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices on a country-by-country basis.

      (5) In addition to the information described in this section, the Annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices may contain such other information relating to trafficking in persons as the Secretary determines to be appropriate.

    (b) INTERIM REPORTS- In addition to the list provided under subsection (a)(1), the Secretary of State, in the capacity as chair of the Interagency Task Force, may submit to the appropriate congressional committees 1 or more interim reports with respect to the status of severe forms of trafficking in persons, including information about countries whose governments have come into or out of compliance with the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking since the transmission of the last annual report.

SEC. 5. INTERAGENCY TASK FORCE TO MONITOR AND COMBAT TRAFFICKING.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- The President shall establish an Interagency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking (in this Act referred to as the ‘Task Force’).

    (b) APPOINTMENT- The President shall appoint the members of the Task Force, which shall include the Secretary of State, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Director of Central Intelligence, and such other officials as may be designated by the President.

    (c) CHAIRMAN- The Task Force shall be chaired by the Secretary of State.

    (d) SUPPORT FOR THE TASK FORCE- The Secretary of State is authorized to establish within the Department of State an Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking, which shall provide assistance to the Task Force. Any such Office shall be headed by a Director. The Director shall have the primary responsibility for assisting the Secretary of State in carrying out the purposes of this Act and may have additional responsibilities as determined by the Secretary. The Director shall consult with domestic, international nongovernmental organizations, and multilateral organizations, including the Organization of American States, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, and the United Nations, and with trafficking victims or other affected persons. The Director shall have the authority to take evidence in public hearings or by other means. The Office is authorized to retain staff members from agencies represented on the Task Force.

    (e) ACTIVITIES OF THE TASK FORCE- In consultation with nongovernmental organizations, the Task Force shall carry out the following activities:

      (1) Coordinate the implementation of this Act.

      (2) Measure and evaluate progress of the United States and other countries in the areas of trafficking prevention, protection and assistance to victims of trafficking, and prosecution and enforcement against traffickers, including the role of public corruption in facilitating trafficking.

      (3) Expand interagency procedures to collect and organize data, including significant research and resource information on domestic and international trafficking. Any data collection procedures established under this subsection shall respect the confidentiality of victims of trafficking.

      (4) Engage in efforts to facilitate cooperation among countries of origin, transit, and destination. Such efforts shall aim to strengthen local and regional capacities to prevent trafficking, prosecute traffickers and assist trafficking victims, and shall include initiatives to enhance cooperative efforts between destination countries and countries of origin and assist in the appropriate reintegration of stateless victims of trafficking.

      (5) Examine the role of the international ‘sex tourism’ industry in the trafficking of persons and in the sexual exploitation of women and children around the world.

SEC. 6. PREVENTION OF TRAFFICKING.

    (a) ECONOMIC ALTERNATIVES TO PREVENT AND DETER TRAFFICKING- The President, acting through the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development and the heads of other appropriate agencies, shall establish and carry out initiatives to enhance economic opportunity for potential victims of trafficking as a method to deter trafficking. Such initiatives may include--

      (1) microcredit lending programs, training in business development, skills training, and job counseling;

      (2) programs to promote women’s participation in economic decisionmaking;

      (3) programs to keep children, especially girls, in elementary and secondary schools, and to educate children, women, and men who have been victims of trafficking;

      (4) development of educational curricula regarding the dangers of trafficking; and

      (5) grants to nongovernmental organizations to accelerate and advance the political, economic, social, and educational roles and capacities of women in their countries.

    (b) PUBLIC AWARENESS AND INFORMATION- The President, acting through the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Attorney General, and the Secretary of State, shall establish and carry out programs to increase public awareness, particularly

among potential victims of trafficking, of the dangers of trafficking and the protections that are available for victims of trafficking.

    (c) CONSULTATION REQUIREMENT- The President shall consult with appropriate nongovernmental organizations with respect to the establishment and conduct of initiatives described in subsections (a) and (b).

SEC. 7. PROTECTION AND ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING.

    (a) Assistance for Victims in Other Countries-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, in consultation with appropriate nongovernmental organizations, shall establish and carry out programs and initiatives in foreign countries to assist in the safe integration, reintegration, or resettlement, as appropriate, of victims of trafficking and their children and, if appropriate, their spouses and parents. Such programs and initiatives shall be designed to meet the mental and physical health, housing, legal, and other assistance needs of such persons and their children, as identified by the Inter-Agency Task Force to Monitor and Combat Trafficking established under section 5.

      (2) ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT- In establishing and conducting programs and initiatives described in paragraph (1), the Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development shall take all appropriate steps to enhance cooperative efforts among foreign countries, including countries of origin of victims of trafficking, to assist in the integration, reintegration, or resettlement, as appropriate, of victims of trafficking including stateless victims.

    (b) Victims in the United States-

      (1) ASSISTANCE- Subject to the availability of appropriations and notwithstanding title IV of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Labor, and the Board of Directors of the Legal Services Corporation shall expand existing services to provide assistance to victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons within the United States, without regard to the immigration status of such victims.

      (2) BENEFITS- Subject to the availability of appropriations and notwithstanding any other provision of law, victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons in the United States shall be eligible, without regard to their immigration status, for any benefits that are otherwise available under the Crime Victims Fund, established under the Victims of Crime Act of 1984, including victims’ services, compensation, and assistance.

      (3) Grants-

        (A) Subject to the availability of appropriations, the Attorney General may make grants to States, territories, and possessions of the United States (including the Commonwealths of Puerto Rico and the Northern Mariana Islands), Indian tribes, units of local government, and nonprofit, nongovernmental victims’ service organizations to develop, expand, or strengthen victim service programs for victims of trafficking.

        (B) To receive a grant under this paragraph, an eligible unit of government or organization shall certify that its laws, policies, and practices, as appropriate, do not punish or deny services to victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons on account of the nature of their work or services performed in connection with such trafficking.

        (C) Of amounts made available for grants under this paragraph, there shall be set aside 3 percent for research, evaluation and statistics; 2 percent for training and technical assistance; and 1 percent for management and administration.

        (D) The Federal share of a grant made under this paragraph may not exceed 75 percent of the total costs of the projects described in the application submitted.

      (4) CIVIL ACTION- An individual who is a victim of a violation of section 1589 or section 1589A of title 18, United States Code, regarding trafficking, may bring a civil action in United States district court. The court may award actual damages, punitive damages, reasonable attorneys’ fees, and other litigation costs reasonably incurred.

    (c) TRAFFICKING VICTIM REGULATIONS- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Attorney General and the Secretary of State shall promulgate regulations for law enforcement personnel, immigration officials, and Department of State officials to implement the following:

      (1) Victims of severe forms of trafficking, while in the custody of the Federal Government and to the extent practicable, shall--

        (A) be housed in appropriate housing as quickly as possible;

        (B) receive prompt medical care, food, and other assistance; and

        (C) be provided protection if a victim’s safety is at risk or if there is danger of additional harm by recapture of the victim by a trafficker, including--

          (i) taking measures to protect trafficked persons and their family members from intimidation and threats of reprisals and reprisals from traffickers and their associates; and

          (ii) ensuring that the names and identifying information of trafficked persons and their family members are not disclosed to the public.

      (2) Victims of severe forms of trafficking shall not be jailed, fined, or otherwise penalized for unlawful acts due to having been trafficked, including

for having used false documents, entering the country without documentation, or working without documentation.

      (3) Victims of severe forms of trafficking shall have access to legal assistance, information about their rights, and translation services.

      (4) Federal law enforcement officials shall act to ensure an alien individual’s continued presence in the United States, if after an assessment, it is determined that such individual is a victim of trafficking or a material witness, in order to effectuate prosecution of those responsible and to further the humanitarian interests of the United States, and such officials in investigating and prosecuting traffickers shall protect the safety and integrity of trafficking victims, including taking measures to protect trafficked persons and their family members from intimidation, threats of reprisals and reprisals from traffickers and their associates.

      (5) Appropriate personnel of the Department of State and the Department of Justice are trained in identifying victims of severe forms of trafficking and providing for the protection of such victims. Training under this paragraph should include methods for achieving antitrafficking objectives through the nondiscriminatory application of immigration and other related laws.

    (d) CONSTRUCTION- Nothing in subsection (c) shall be construed as creating any private cause of action against the United States or its offices or employees.

    (e) FUNDING- Funds from asset forfeiture under section 1592 of title 18, United States Code (as added by section 12 of this Act) should be first disbursed to satisfy any judgments awarded victims of trafficking under subsection (b)(4) and section 1591 of title 18, United States Code (as added by such section 12). The remaining funds from asset forfeiture are authorized to be available in equal amounts for the purposes of subsections (a) and (b) and shall remain available for obligation until expended.

    (f) PROTECTION FROM REMOVAL FOR CERTAIN VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING-

      (1) NONIMMIGRANT CLASSIFICATION FOR CERTAIN VICTIMS OF TRAFFICKING- Section 101(a)(15) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)) is amended--

        (A) by striking ‘or’ at the end of subparagraph (R);

        (B) by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (S) and inserting ‘; or’; and

        (C) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

        ‘(T) an alien who the Attorney General determines--

          ‘(i) is physically present in the United States or at a port of entry thereto;

          ‘(ii) is or has been a victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons as defined in section 3 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000;

          ‘(iii)(I) has not unreasonably refused to assist in the investigation or prosecution of acts of trafficking; or

          ‘(II) has not attained the age of 14 years; and

          ‘(iv) would face a significant possibility of retribution or other hardship if removed from the United States,

        and, if the Attorney General considers it to be appropriate, the spouse, married and unmarried sons and daughters, and parents of an alien described in this subparagraph if accompanying, or following to join, the alien, except that no person shall be eligible for admission to the United States under this subparagraph if there is substantial reason to believe that the person has committed an act of a severe form of trafficking in persons as defined in section 3 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.’.

      (2) DUTIES OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL WITH RESPECT TO ‘T’ VISA NONIMMIGRANTS- Section 101 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(i) With respect to nonimmigrant aliens described in subsection (a)(15)(T)--

      ‘(1) the Attorney General and other government officials, where appropriate, shall provide those aliens with referrals to nongovernmental organizations that would educate the aliens regarding their options while in the United States and the resources available to them; and

      ‘(2) the Attorney General shall, during the period those aliens are in lawful temporary resident status under that subsection, grant the aliens authorization to engage in employment in the United States and provide the aliens with an ‘employment authorized’ endorsement or other appropriate work permit.’.

      (3) WAIVER OF GROUNDS FOR INELIGIBILITY FOR ADMISSION- Section 212(d) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(d)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

    ‘(13) The Attorney General shall determine whether a ground for inadmissibility exists with respect to a nonimmigrant described in section 101(a)(15)(T). The Attorney General, in the Attorney General’s discretion, may waive the application of subsection (a) (other than paragraph (3)(E)) in the case of a nonimmigrant described in section 101(a)(15)(T), if the Attorney General considers it to be in the national interest to do so. Nothing in this section shall be regarded as prohibiting the Attorney General from instituting removal proceedings against an alien admitted as a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15)(T) for material nontrafficking related conduct committed after the alien’s admission into the United States, or for material nontrafficking related conduct or a condition that was not disclosed to the Attorney General prior to the alien’s admission as a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15)(T).’.

      (4) ADJUSTMENT TO PERMANENT RESIDENT STATUS- Section 245 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1255) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(l)(1) If, in the opinion of the Attorney General, a nonimmigrant admitted into the United States under section 101(a)(15)(T)--

      ‘(A) has been physically present in the United States for a continuous period of at least 3 years since the date of admission as a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15)(T);

      ‘(B) has, throughout such period, been a person of good moral character;

      ‘(C) has not, during such period, unreasonably refused to provide assistance in the investigation or prosecution of acts of trafficking; and

      ‘(D) would face a significant possibility of retribution or other hardship if removed from the United States, the Attorney General may adjust the status of the alien (and the spouse, married and unmarried sons and daughters, and parents of the alien if admitted under that section) to that of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence if the alien is not described in section 212(a)(3)(E).

    ‘(2) An alien shall be considered to have failed to maintain continuous physical presence in the United States under paragraph (1)(A) if the alien has departed from the United States for any period in excess of 90 days or for any periods in the aggregate exceeding 180 days.’.

SEC. 8. MINIMUM STANDARDS FOR THE ELIMINATION OF TRAFFICKING.

    (a) MINIMUM STANDARDS- For purposes of this Act, the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking for a country that is a country of origin, transit, or destination for a significant number of victims are the following standards:

      (1) The country should prohibit severe forms of trafficking in persons and punish acts of such trafficking.

      (2) For the knowing commission of any act of sex trafficking involving fraud, force, coercion, or deception, or in which the victim of sex trafficking is a child incapable of giving meaningful consent, or of trafficking which includes rape or kidnapping or which causes a death, the country should prescribe punishment commensurate with that for the most serious crimes, such as forcible sexual assault.

      (3) For the knowing commission of any act of a severe form of trafficking in persons, the country should prescribe punishment which is sufficiently stringent to deter and which adequately reflects the heinous nature of the offense.

      (4) The country should make serious and sustained efforts to eliminate severe forms of trafficking in persons.

    (b) CRITERIA- In determinations under subsection (a)(4) the following factors should be considered:

      (1) Whether the country vigorously investigates and prosecutes acts of severe forms of trafficking in persons that take place wholly or partly within the territory of the country.

      (2) Whether the country cooperates with other countries in the investigation and prosecution of severe forms of trafficking in persons.

      (3) Whether the country extradites persons charged with acts of severe forms of trafficking in persons on the same terms and to the same extent as persons charged with other serious crimes.

      (4) Whether the country monitors immigration and emigration patterns for evidence of severe forms of trafficking in persons and whether law enforcement agencies of the country respond to any such evidence in a manner which is consistent with the vigorous investigation and prosecution of acts of such trafficking, as well as with the protection of human rights of victims and the internationally recognized human right to leave and return to one’s own country.

      (5) Whether the country protects victims of severe forms of trafficking in persons and encourages their assistance in the investigation and prosecution of such trafficking, including provision for legal alternatives to their removal to countries in which they would face retribution or other hardship.

      (6) Whether the country vigorously investigates and prosecutes public officials who participate in or facilitate severe forms of trafficking in persons, and takes all appropriate measures against officials who condone such trafficking.

SEC. 9. ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES TO MEET MINIMUM STANDARDS.

    The Secretary of State and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development are authorized to provide assistance to foreign countries directly, or through nongovernmental, intergovernmental and multilateral organizations, for programs and activities designed to meet the minimum international standards for the elimination of trafficking, including drafting of legislation to prohibit and punish acts of trafficking, investigation and prosecution of traffickers, creation and maintenance of facilities, programs, and activities for the protection of victims, and the expansion of exchange programs and international visitor programs for governmental and nongovernmental personnel to combat trafficking.

SEC. 10. ACTIONS AGAINST GOVERNMENTS FAILING TO MEET MINIMUM STANDARDS.

    (a) AUTHORITY TO IMPOSE SANCTIONS- The President may impose any of the measures described in subsection (b) against any foreign country to which the minimum standards for the elimination of trafficking under section 8 are applicable and which do not meet such standards.

    (b) SANCTIONS THAT MAY BE IMPOSED- The measures described in this subsection are the following:

      (1) FOREIGN ASSISTANCE-

        (A) IN GENERAL- Subject to subparagraph (B), the President may deny to the country assistance of any kind which is provided by grant, sale, loan, lease, credit, guaranty, or insurance, or by any other means, by any agency or instrumentality of the United States Government.

        (B) EXCEPTION- Subparagraph (A) shall not apply to assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.), or any successor provision of law, or the Arms

Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) that is intended to benefit the people of that country directly and that is not channeled through governmental agencies or entities of that country.

      (2) MULTILATERAL DEVELOPMENT BANK ASSISTANCE-

        (A) IN GENERAL- The President may instruct the United States Executive Director to each international financial institution described in subparagraph (B) to use the voice and vote of the United States to oppose any loan or financial or technical assistance to the country by such international financial institution.

        (B) INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS DESCRIBED- The international financial institutions described in this subparagraph are the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the International Development Association, the International Finance Corporation, the Inter-American Development Bank, the African Development Bank, the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and the International Monetary Fund.

      (3) PROHIBITION OF ARMS SALES- The President may prohibit the transfer of defense articles, defense services, or design and construction services under the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.), including defense articles and defense services licensed or approved for export under section 38 of that Act (22 U.S.C. 2778), to the country or any national of the country.

      (4) EXPORT RESTRICTIONS- The President may prohibit or otherwise substantially restrict exports to the country of goods, technology, and services (excluding agricultural commodities and products otherwise subject to control) and may suspend existing licenses for the transfer to that person of items the export of which is controlled under the Export Administration Act of 1979 or the Export Administration Regulations.

    (c) REPORT TO CONGRESS- Upon exercising the authority of subsection (a), the President shall submit a report to Congress on the measures applied under this section and the reasons for the application of the measures.

SEC. 11. ACTIONS AGAINST TRAFFICKERS IN PERSONS.

    (a) Authority To Sanction Traffickers in Persons-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The President may exercise IEEPA authorities (other than authorities relating to importation) without regard to section 202 of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701) in the case of any foreign person who is on the list described in subsection (b).

      (2) PENALTIES- The penalties set forth in section 206 of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1705) apply to violations of any license, order, or regulation issued under paragraph (1).

      (3) IEEPA AUTHORITIES- For purposes of clause (i), the term ‘IEEPA authorities’ means the authorities set forth in section 203(a) of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1702(a)).

    (b) List of Traffickers of Persons-

      (1) COMPILING LIST OF TRAFFICKERS IN PERSONS- The Secretary of State is authorized to compile a list of the following persons:

        (A) Any foreign person that plays a significant role in a severe form of trafficking in persons, directly or indirectly in the United States or any of its territories or possessions.

        (B) Foreign persons who materially assist in, or provide financial or technological support for or to, or providing goods or services in support of, activities of a significant foreign trafficker in persons identified pursuant to subparagraph (A).

        (C) Foreign persons that are owned, controlled, or directed by, or acting for or on behalf of, a significant foreign trafficker so identified pursuant to subparagraph (A).

      (2) REVISIONS TO LIST- The Secretary of State shall make additions or deletions to any list compiled under paragraph (1) on an ongoing basis based on the latest information available.

      (3) CONSULTATION- The Secretary of State shall consult with the following officers in carrying out paragraphs (1) and (2).

        (A) The Attorney General.

        (B) The Director of Central Intelligence.

        (C) The Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

        (D) The Secretary of Labor.

        (E) The Secretary of Health and Human Services.

      (4) PUBLICATION OF LIST- Upon compiling the list referred to in paragraph (1) and within 30 days of any revisions to such list, the Secretary of State shall submit the list or revisions to such list to the Committees on the International Relations and Judiciary and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives; and to the Committees on Foreign Relations, the Judiciary, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate; and publish the list or revisions to such list in the Federal Register after such persons on the list have admitted, been convicted, or been formally found to have participated in the acts described in paragraph (1) (A), (B), and (C).

    (c) REPORT TO CONGRESS ON IDENTIFICATION AND SANCTIONING OF TRAFFICKERS IN PERSONS- Upon exercising the authority of subsection (a), the President shall submit a report to the Committees on the International Relations and the Judiciary, and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives and to the Committees on Foreign Relations and the Judiciary, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate--

      (1) identifying publicly the foreign persons from the list published under subsection (b)(4) that the

President determines are appropriate for sanctions pursuant to this section; and

      (2) detailing publicly the sanctions imposed pursuant to this section.

    (d) Exclusion of Certain Information-

      (1) INTELLIGENCE- Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the list and report described in subsections (b) and (c) shall not disclose the identity of any person, if the Director of Central Intelligence determines that such disclosure could compromise an intelligence operation, activity, source, or method of the United States.

      (2) LAW ENFORCEMENT- Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, the list and report described in subsections (b) and (c) shall not disclose the name of any person if the Attorney General, in coordination as appropriate with the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration, and the Secretary of the Treasury, determines that such disclosure could reasonably be expected to--

        (A) compromise the identity of a confidential source, including a State, local, or foreign agency or authority or any private institution that furnished information on a confidential basis;

        (B) jeopardize the integrity or success of an ongoing criminal investigation or prosecution;

        (C) endanger the life or physical safety of any person; or

        (D) cause substantial harm to physical property.

      (3) NOTIFICATION REQUIRED- (A) Whenever either the Director of Central Intelligence or the Attorney General makes a determination under this subsection, the Director of Central Intelligence or the Attorney General shall notify the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate, and explain the reasons for such determination.

      (B) The notification required under this paragraph shall be submitted to the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate not later than July 1, 2001, and on an annual basis thereafter.

    (e) LAW ENFORCEMENT AND INTELLIGENCE ACTIVITIES NOT AFFECTED- Nothing in this section prohibits or otherwise limits the authorized law enforcement or intelligence activities of the United States or the law enforcement activities of any State or subdivision thereof.

    (f) EXCLUSION OF PERSONS WHO HAVE BENEFITED FROM ILLICIT ACTIVITIES OF TRAFFICKERS IN PERSONS- Section 212(a)(2) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

        ‘(H) TRAFFICKERS IN PERSONS- Any alien who--

          ‘(i) is on the most recent list of traffickers provided in section 11 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, or who the consular officer or the Attorney General knows or has reason to believe is or has been a knowing aider, abettor, assister, conspirator, or colluder with such a trafficker in severe forms of trafficking in persons, as defined in the section 3 of such Act; or

          ‘(ii) who the consular officer or the Attorney General knows or has reason to believe is the spouse, son, or daughter of an alien inadmissible under clause (i), has, within the previous 5 years, obtained any financial or other benefit from the illicit activity of that alien, and knew or reasonably should have known that the financial or other benefit was the product of such illicit activity, is inadmissible.’.

    (g) IMPLEMENTATION- The Secretary of State, the Attorney General, and the Secretary of the Treasury are authorized to take such actions as may be necessary to carry out this section, including promulgating rules and regulations permitted under this Act.

    (h) DEFINITION OF FOREIGN PERSONS- As used in this section, the term ‘foreign person’ means any citizen or national of a foreign state or any entity not organized under the laws of the United States, including a foreign government official, but does not include a foreign state.

SEC. 12. STRENGTHENING PROSECUTION AND PUNISHMENT OF TRAFFICKERS.

    (a) TITLE 18 AMENDMENTS- Chapter 77 of title 18, United States Code, is amended--

      (1) in each of sections 1581(a), 1583, and 1584--

        (A) by striking ‘10 years’ and inserting ‘20 years’;

        (B) by adding at the end the following: ‘If, in addition to the foregoing elements, death results from a violation of this section, or if such violation includes kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or the attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, the defendant shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years or life, or both.’;

      (2) by inserting at the end the following:

‘Sec. 1589. Trafficking into involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery-like conditions

    ‘(a) Whoever recruits, harbors, provides, transports, employs, transfers, receives, purchases, sells, or secures, by any means, any person, knowing or having reason to know that the person is or will be subjected to involuntary servitude or peonage or to slavery-like conditions as described in subsection (b) of this section, or in any way, financially or otherwise, knowingly benefits from, or makes use of, the labor or services of a person subjected to a condition of involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery-like conditions, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than 20 years, or both; and if, in addition to the foregoing elements, death results from an act committed in violation of this section, or if such act includes

kidnapping or an attempt to kidnap, aggravated sexual abuse or the attempt to commit aggravated sexual abuse, or an attempt to kill, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for any term of years or life, or both.

    ‘(b) In this section--

      ‘(1) the term ‘slavery-like conditions’ means that the labor or services of a person are obtained or maintained through any scheme or artifice to defraud, by debt bondage, by subjection of the person to conditions so harsh or degrading as to provide a clear indication that the person has been subjected to them by force, fraud, or coercion, or by means of any plan or pattern, including false and fraudulent pretense and misrepresentations, such that the person reasonably believes that if he did not perform the act, labor, or services, serious harm would be inflicted on himself or on another person, or the person reasonably believes that the person has no option but to perform the act, labor, or services; and

      ‘(2) the term ‘debt bondage’ means a relationship in which labor or services are pledged for debt on terms calculated never to allow full payment of the debt or otherwise amounting to indentured servitude for life or for an indefinite period.

    ‘(c) This section does not apply to labor performed as a punishment for a crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.

‘Sec. 1589A. Sex trafficking of children or by force, fraud, or coercion

    ‘(a) IN GENERAL- Whoever--

      ‘(1) recruits, entices, harbors, provides, transports, employs, transfers, receives, purchases, sells, or secures, by any means, any person, or

      ‘(2) owns, manages, or operates the premises, or shares in the proceeds of an enterprise in which a person has been recruited, enticed, harbored, purchased, sold, transported, or transferred,

    knowing or having reason to know that the person will be caused by force, fraud, or coercion to engage in a commercial sex act, or that the person has not attained the age of 18 years and will be caused or expected to engage in a commercial sexual act, shall be punished as provided in subsection (b).

    ‘(b) PUNISHMENT- The punishment for an offense under subsection (a) is--

      ‘(1) if the offense was effected by fraud, force, or coercion, or if the person transported had not attained the age of 14 years at the time of such offense, by a fine under this title or imprisonment for any term of years or for life, or both; or

      ‘(2) if the offense was not effected by fraud, force, or coercion, and the person transported had attained the age of 14 years but had not attained the age of 18 years at the time of such offense, by a fine under this title or imprisonment for not more than 20 years, or both.

    ‘(c) DEFINITION OF COMMERCIAL SEX ACT- In this section, the term ‘commercial sex act’ means any sex act, whereby anything of value is given to or received by any person, and--

      ‘(1) which takes place in the United States;

      ‘(2) which affects United States foreign commerce; or

      ‘(3) in which either the person caused or expected to participate in the act or the person committing the violation is a United States citizen or an alien admitted for permanent residence in the United States.

‘Sec. 1590. Unlawful possession of documents in furtherance of trafficking, involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery-like conditions

    ‘(a) Except as provided in subsection (b), whoever destroys, conceals, removes, confiscates, or possesses any identification, passport, or other immigration documents, or any other documentation of another person--

      ‘(1) in the course of, or under circumstances which facilitate a violation of section 1581, 1583, 1584, 1589, or 1589A or a conspiracy or attempt to commit such a violation; or

      ‘(2) to conceal or impair the investigation or prosecution of a violation of any section described in paragraph (1);

      ‘(3) to prevent or restrict, without lawful authority, the person’s liberty to move or travel in interstate or foreign commerce,

    shall be fined under this title or imprisoned for not more than 5 years, or both.

    ‘(b) The provisions of subsection (a) shall not apply to persons who have been trafficked as defined in section 7(c)(2) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.

‘Sec. 1591. Mandatory restitution

    ‘(a) Notwithstanding section 3663 or 3663A, and in addition to any other civil or criminal penalties authorized by law, the court shall order restitution for any offense under this chapter.

    ‘(b)(1) The order of restitution under this section shall direct the defendant to pay the victim (through the appropriate court mechanism) the full amount of the victim’s losses, as determined by the court under paragraph (3) of this subsection.

    ‘(2) An order of restitution under this section shall be issued and enforced in accordance with section 3664 in the same manner as an order under section 3663A.

    ‘(3) As used in this subsection, the term ‘full amount of the victim’s losses’ has the same meaning as provided in section 2259(b)(3) and shall in addition include the greater of the gross income or value to the defendant of the victim’s services or labor or the value of the victim’s labor as guaranteed under the minimum wage and overtime guarantees of the Fair Labor Standards Act (29 U.S.C. 201, et seq.).

    ‘(c) As used in this section, the term ‘victim’ means the individual harmed as a result of a crime under this chapter, including, in the case of a victim who is under 18 years of age, incompetent, incapacitated, or deceased, the legal guardian of the victim or a representative of the victim’s estate, or another family member, or any other person appointed as suitable by the court, but in no event shall the defendant be named such representative or guardian.

‘Sec. 1592. General provisions

    ‘(a) In a prosecution under section 1581, 1583, 1584, or 1589, a condition of involuntary servitude or peonage may be established by proof that the defendant obtained or maintained the labor or service of any person--

      ‘(1) by the use, or threatened use, of force, violence, physical restraint, or physical injury, or by extortion or the abuse of threatened abuse of law or the legal process;

      ‘(2) through representations made to any person that physical harm may occur to that person, or to another, in an effort to wrongfully obtain or maintain the labor or services of that person; or

      ‘(3) by the use of fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation toward any person in an effort to wrongfully obtain or maintain the labor or services of that person.

    ‘(b) An attempt or conspiracy to violate section 1581, 1583, 1584, 1589, or 1589A shall be punishable in the same manner as a completed violation of each of these sections, respectively.

    ‘(c)(1) The court, in imposing sentence on any person convicted of a violation of this chapter, shall order, in addition to any other sentence imposed and irrespective of any provision of State law, that such person shall forfeit to the United States--

      ‘(A) such person’s interest in any property, real or personal, that was used or intended to be

used to commit or to facilitate the commission of such violation; and

      ‘(B) any property, real or personal, constituting or derived from, any proceeds that such person obtained, directly or indirectly, as a result of such violation.

    ‘(2) The criminal forfeiture of property under this subsection, any seizure and disposition thereof, and any administrative or judicial proceeding in relation thereto, shall follow the guidelines of section 7(e) of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.

    ‘(d)(1) The following shall be subject to forfeiture to the United States and no property right shall exist in them--

      ‘(A) any property, real or personal, used or intended to be used to commit or to facilitate the commission of any violation of this chapter; and

      ‘(B) any property, real or personal, which constitutes or is derived from proceeds traceable to any violation of this chapter.

    ‘(2) The provisions of chapter 46 of this title relating to civil forfeitures shall extend to any seizure or civil forfeiture under this subsection.

    ‘(f) WITNESS PROTECTION- Any violation of this chapter shall be considered an organized criminal activity or other serious offense for the purposes of application of chapter 224 (relating to witness protection).’; and

      (3) by amending the table of sections at the beginning of chapter 77 by adding at the end the following new items:

      ‘1589. Trafficking into involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery-like conditions.

      ‘1589A. Sex trafficking of children or by force, fraud, or coercion.

      ‘1590. Unlawful possession of documents in furtherance of trafficking, involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery-like conditions.

      ‘1591. Mandatory restitution.

      ‘1592. General provisions.’.

    (b) AMENDMENT TO THE SENTENCING GUIDELINES-

      (1) Pursuant to its authority under section 994 of title 28, United States Code, and in accordance with this section, the United States Sentencing Commission shall review and, if appropriate, amend the sentencing guidelines and policy statements applicable to persons convicted of offenses involving the trafficking of persons including component or related crimes of peonage, involuntary servitude, slave trade offenses, and possession, transfer or sale of false immigration documents in furtherance of trafficking, and the Fair Labor Standards Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act.

      (2) In carrying out this subsection, the Sentencing Commission shall--

        (A) take all appropriate measures to ensure that these sentencing guidelines and policy statements applicable to the offenses described in paragraph (1) of this subsection are sufficiently stringent to deter and adequately reflect the heinous nature of such offenses;

        (B) consider conforming the sentencing guidelines applicable to offenses involving trafficking in persons to the guidelines applicable to peonage, involuntary servitude, and slave trade offenses; and

        (C) consider providing sentencing enhancements for those convicted of the offenses described in paragraph (1) of this subsection that--

          (i) involve a large number of victims;

          (ii) involve a pattern of continued and flagrant violations;

          (iii) involve the use or threatened use of a dangerous weapon; or

          (iv) result in the death or bodily injury of any person.

      (3) The Commission may promulgate the guidelines or amendments under this subsection in accordance with the procedures set forth in section 21(a) of the Sentencing Act of 1987, as though the authority under that Act had not expired.

    (c) RACKETEERING- Section 1961(1) of title 18, United States Code, is amended by inserting ‘section 1589 (relating to trafficking into involuntary servitude, peonage, or slavery-like conditions), section 1589A (relating to sex trafficking of children or by force, fraud, or coercion),’ after ‘murder-for-hire),’.

SEC. 13. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE INTERAGENCY TASK FORCE- To carry out the purposes of section 5, there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State $1,500,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $3,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.

    (b) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS TO THE SECRETARY OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES- To carry out the purposes of section 7(b), there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Health and Human Services $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.

    (c) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS TO THE SECRETARY OF STATE-

      (1) ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS IN OTHER COUNTRIES- To carry out the purposes of section 7(a), there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.

      (2) VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO OSCE- To carry out the purposes of section 9, there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State $100,000 for voluntary contributions to the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) for fiscal year 2001.

      (3) PREPARATION OF ANNUAL COUNTRY REPORTS ON HUMAN RIGHTS- To carry out the purposes of section 4, there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State such sums as may be necessary to include the additional information required by that section in the annual Country Reports on Human Rights Practices, including the preparation and publication of the list described in subsection (a)(1) of that section.

    (d) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS TO ATTORNEY GENERAL- To carry out the purposes of section 7(b), there are authorized to be appropriated to the Attorney General $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.

    (e) Authorization of Appropriations to President-

      (1) FOREIGN VICTIM ASSISTANCE- To carry out the purposes of section 6, there are authorized to be appropriated to the President $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.

      (2) ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES TO MEET MINIMUM STANDARDS- To carry out the purposes of section 9, there are authorized to be appropriated to the President $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.

    (f) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS TO THE SECRETARY OF LABOR- To carry out the purposes of section 7(b), there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of Labor $5,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2002.