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S. 861 (106th): America’s Red Rock Wilderness Act of 1999

The text of the bill below is as of Apr 22, 1999 (Introduced).


S 861 IS

106th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 861

To designate certain Federal land in the State of Utah as wilderness, and for other purposes.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

April 22, 1999

Mr. DURBIN (for himself, Mr. FEINGOLD, Mr. LAUTENBERG, Mrs. MURRAY, Mr. KENNEDY, Mr. TORRICELLI, Mr. KERRY, Mr. REED, Mrs. BOXER, Mr. HARKIN, Mr. SCHUMER, and Mr. WELLSTONE) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources


A BILL

To designate certain Federal land in the State of Utah as wilderness, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) SHORT TITLE- This Act may be cited as the ‘America’s Red Rock Wilderness Act of 1999’.

    (b) TABLE OF CONTENTS- The table of contents of this Act is as follows:

      Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

      Sec. 2. Definitions.

Title I--Designation of Wilderness Areas

      Sec. 101. Great Basin Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 102. Zion and Mojave Desert Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 103. Grand Staircase-Escalante Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 104. Moab-LaSal Canyons Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 105. Henry Mountains Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 106. Glen Canyon Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 107. San Juan-Anasazi Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 108. Canyonlands Basin Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 109. San Rafael Swell Wilderness Areas.

      Sec. 110. Book Cliffs and Uinta Basin Wilderness Areas.

Title II--Administrative Provisions.

      Sec. 201. General provisions.

      Sec. 202. Administration.

      Sec. 203. State school trust land within wilderness areas.

      Sec. 204. Water.

      Sec. 205. Roads.

      Sec. 206. Livestock.

      Sec. 207. Fish and wildlife.

      Sec. 208. Management of newly acquired land.

      Sec. 209. Authorization of appropriations.

SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:

      (1) SECRETARY- The term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of the Interior, acting through the Bureau of Land Management.

      (2) STATE- The term ‘State’ means the State of Utah.

TITLE I--DESIGNATION OF WILDERNESS AREAS

SEC. 101. GREAT BASIN WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the Great Basin region of western Utah is comprised of starkly beautiful mountain ranges that rise as islands from the desert floor;

      (2) the Wah Wah Mountains in the Great Basin region are arid and austere, with massive cliff faces and leathery slopes speckled with pin.AE6on and juniper;

      (3) the Pilot Range and Stansbury Mountains in the Great Basin region are high enough to draw moisture from passing clouds and support ecosystems found nowhere else on earth;

      (4) from bristlecone pine, the world’s oldest living organism, to newly-flowered mountain meadows, mountains of the Great Basin region are islands of nature that--

        (A) support remarkable biological diversity; and

        (B) provide opportunities to experience the colossal silence of the Great Basin; and

      (5) the Great Basin region of western Utah should be protected and managed to ensure the preservation of the natural conditions of the region.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Barn Hills (approximately 21,000 acres).

      (2) Black Hills (approximately 9,000 acres).

      (3) Bullgrass Knoll (approximately 16,000 acres).

      (4) Burbank Hills/Tunnel Spring (approximately 94,000 acres).

      (5) Cedar Mountains (approximately 108,000 acres).

      (6) Conger Mountains (approximately 22,000 acres).

      (7) Cougar Canyon/Docs Pass (approximately 43,000 acres).

      (8) Crater Bench (approximately 35,000 acres).

      (9) Crater and Silver Island Mountains (approximately 124,000 acres).

      (10) Cricket Mountains Cluster (approximately 63,000 acres).

      (11) Deep Creek Mountains (approximately 114,000 acres).

      (12) Drum Mountains (approximately 40,000 acres).

      (13) Dugway Mountains (approximately 24,000 acres).

      (14) Fish Springs Range (approximately 53,000 acres).

      (15) Granite Peak (approximately 17,000 acres).

      (16) Grassy Mountains (approximately 24,000 acres).

      (17) Grouse Creek Mountains (approximately 15,000 acres).

      (18) House Range (approximately 174,000 acres).

      (19) Keg Mountains (approximately 38,000 acres).

      (20) King Top (approximately 101,000 acres).

      (21) Ledger Canyon (approximately 9,000 acres).

      (22) Little Goose Creek (approximately 1,300 acres).

      (23) Middle/Granite Mountains (approximately 82,000 acres).

      (24) Mount Escalante (approximately 17,000 acres).

      (25) Mountain Home Range (approximately 90,000 acres).

      (26) Newfoundland Mountains (approximately 23,000).

      (27) Ochre Mountain (approximately 13,000 acres).

      (28) Painted Rock Mountain (approximately 26,000 acres).

      (29) Paradise/Steamboat Mountains (approximately 124,000 acres).

      (30) Pilot Range (approximately 46,000 acres).

      (31) Red Top (approximately 27,000 acres).

      (32) Rockwell-Little Sahara (approximately 12,000 acres).

      (33) San Francisco Mountains (approximately 40,000 acres).

      (34) Sand Ridge (approximately 73,000 acres).

      (35) Simpson Mountains (approximately 43,000 acres).

      (36) Snake Valley (approximately 101,000 acres).

      (37) Stansbury Mountains (approximately 25,000 acres).

      (38) Thomas Range (approximately 36,000 acres).

      (39) Tule Valley (approximately 156,000 acres).

      (40) Wah Wah Mountains (approximately 150,000 acres).

      (41) Wasatch/Sevier Plateaus (approximately 30,000 acres).

      (42) White Rock Range (approximately 5,500 acres).

SEC. 102. ZION AND MOJAVE DESERT WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the renowned landscape of Zion National Park, including soaring cliff walls, forested plateaus, and deep narrow gorges, extends beyond the boundaries of the Park onto surrounding public lands managed by the Secretary;

      (2) from the pink sand dunes of Moquith Mountain to the golden pools of Beaver Dam Wash, the Zion and Mojave Desert areas encompass 3 major provinces of the Southwest that include--

        (A) the sculpted canyon country of the Colorado Plateau;

        (B) the Mojave Desert; and

        (C) portions of the Great Basin;

      (3) the Zion and Mojave Desert areas display a rich mosaic of biological, archaeological, and scenic diversity;

      (4) 1 of the last remaining populations of threatened desert tortoise is found within this region; and

      (5) the Zion and Mojave Desert areas in Utah should be protected and managed as wilderness areas.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Beaver Dam Mountains-North (approximately 19,000 acres).

      (2) Beaver Dam Mountains-South (approximately 12,000 acres).

      (3) Beaver Dam Wash (approximately 23,000 acres).

      (4) Beaver Dam Wilderness Expansion (approximately 7,600 acres).

      (5) Canaan Mountain (approximately 56,000 acres).

      (6) Cottonwood Canyon (approximately 12,000 acres).

      (7) Glass Eye Canyon (approximately 18,000 acres).

      (8) Joshua Tree (approximately 13,000 acres).

      (9) Parunuweap Canyon (approximately 44,000 acres).

      (10) Red Butte (approximately 4,200 acres).

      (11) Red Mountain (approximately 19,000 acres).

      (12) Scarecrow Peak (approximately 17,000 acres).

      (13) Zion Adjacent (approximately 56,000 acres).

SEC. 103. GRAND STAIRCASE-ESCALANTE WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) GRAND STAIRCASE AREA-

      (1) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

        (A) the area known as the Grand Staircase rises more than 6,000 feet in a series of great cliffs and plateaus from the depths of the Grand Canyon to the forested rim of Bryce Canyon;

        (B) the Grand Staircase--

          (i) spans 6 major life zones, from the lower Sonoran Desert to the alpine forest; and

          (ii) encompasses geologic formations that display 3,000,000,000 years of Earth’s history;

        (C) land managed by the Secretary lines the intricate canyon system of the Paria River and forms a vital natural corridor connection to the deserts and forests of these national parks;

        (D) land described in paragraph (2) (other than Upper Kanab Creek, Moquith Mountain, and Vermillion Cliffs) is located within the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; and

        (E) the Grand Staircase in Utah should be protected and managed as a wilderness area.

      (2) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

        (A) Bunting Point- (approximately 11,000 acres).

        (B) East of Bryce- (approximately 800 acres).

        (C) Ladder Canyon- (approximately 14,000 acres).

        (D) Moquith Mountain (approximately 15,000 acres).

        (E) Nephi Point (approximately 13,000 acres).

        (F) Paria-Hackberry (approximately 186,000 acres).

        (G) land adjacent to the Paria Wilderness (approximately 2,900 acres).

        (H) Pine Hollow (approximately 10,000 acres).

        (I) Timber Mountain (approximately 46,000 acres).

        (J) Upper Kanab Creek (approximately 48,000 acres).

        (K) Vermillion Cliffs (approximately 27,000 acres).

        (L) Willis Creek (approximately 21,000 acres).

        (M) Willis Creek North (approximately 690 acres).

    (b) KAIPAROWITS PLATEAU-

      (1) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

        (A) the Kaiparowits Plateau east of the Paria River is 1 of the most rugged and isolated wilderness regions in the United States;

        (B) the Kaiparowits Plateau, a windswept land of harsh beauty, contains distant vistas and a remarkable variety of plant and animal species;

        (C) ancient forests, an abundance of big game animals, and 22 species of raptors thrive undisturbed on the grassland mesa tops of the Kaiparowits Plateau;

        (D) each of the areas described in paragraph (2) is located within the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; and

        (E) the Kaiparowits Plateau should be protected and managed as a wilderness area.

      (2) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

        (A) Andalex Not (approximately 15,000 acres).

        (B) Box Canyon (approximately 2,900 acres).

        (C) Burning Hills (approximately 80,000 acres).

        (D) Carcass Canyon (approximately 84,000 acres).

        (E) Fiftymile Bench (approximately 13,000 acres).

        (F) Fiftymile Mountain (approximately 201,000 acres).

        (G) Heaps Canyon (approximately 4,100 acres).

        (H) Horse Spring Canyon (approximately 32,000 acres).

        (I) Little Valley Canyon (approximately 4,100 acres).

        (J) Mud Spring Canyon (approximately 65,000 acres).

        (K) Nipple Bench (approximately 29,000 acres).

        (L) Paradise Canyon-Wahweap (approximately 264,000 acres).

        (M) Rock Cove (approximately 17,000 acres).

        (N) The Blues (approximately 22,000 acres).

        (O) The Cockscomb (approximately 12,000 acres).

        (P) Warm Creek (approximately 23,000 acres).

        (Q) Wide Hollow (approximately 7,100 acres).

    (c) ESCALANTE CANYONS-

      (1) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

        (A) glens and coves carved in massive sandstone cliffs, spring-watered hanging gardens, and the silence of ancient Anasazi ruins are examples of the unique features that entice hikers, campers, and sightseers from around the world to Escalante Canyon;

        (B) Escalante Canyon links the spruce fir forests of the 11,000-foot Aquarius Plateau with winding slickrock canyons that flow into Lake Powell;

        (C) Escalante Canyon, 1 of Utah’s most popular natural areas, contains critical habitat for deer, elk, and wild bighorn sheep that also enhances the scenic integrity of the area;

        (D) each of the areas described in paragraph (2) is located within the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument; and

        (E) Escalante Canyon should be protected and managed as a wilderness area.

      (2) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

        (A) Brinkerhof Flats (approximately 3,100 acres).

        (B) Colt Mesa (approximately 28,000 acres).

        (C) Death Hollow (approximately 49,000 acres).

        (D) Forty Mile Gulch (approximately 5,500 acres).

        (E) Hurricane Wash (approximately 10,000 acres).

        (F) Lampstand (approximately 8,000 acres).

        (G) North Escalante Canyons (approximately 177,000 acres).

        (H) Pioneer Mesa (approximately 11,000 acres).

        (I) Scorpion (approximately 44,000 acres).

        (J) Sooner Bench (approximately 530 acres).

        (K) Steep Creek (approximately 35,000 acres).

        (L) Studhorse Peaks (approximately 24,000 acres).

SEC. 104. MOAB-LASAL CANYONS WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the canyons surrounding the La Sal Mountains and the town of Moab offer a variety of extraordinary landscapes;

      (2) outstanding examples of natural formations and landscapes in the Moab-LaSal area include the huge sandstone fins of Behind the Rocks, the mysterious Fisher Towers, and the whitewater rapids of Westwater Canyon; and

      (3) the Moab-LaSal area should be protected and managed as a wilderness area.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Beaver Creek (approximately 40,000 acres).

      (2) Behind the Rocks and Hunters Canyon (approximately 23,000 acres).

      (3) Big Triangle (approximately 21,000 acres).

      (4) Black Ridge Canyon (approximately 410 acres).

      (5) Dome Plateau-Professor Valley (approximately 35,000 acres).

      (6) Fisher Towers (approximately 18,000 acres).

      (7) Goldbar Canyon (approximately 6,900 acres).

      (8) Granite Creek (approximately 5,000 acres).

      (9) Mary Jane Canyon (approximately 24,000 acres).

      (10) Mill Creek (approximately 15,000 acres).

      (11) Porcupine Rim and Morning Glory (approximately 19,000 acres).

      (12) Westwater Canyon (approximately 37,000 acres).

      (13) Yellow Bird (approximately 400 acres).

SEC. 105. HENRY MOUNTAINS WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the Henry Mountain Range, the last mountain range to be discovered and named by early explorers in the contiguous United States, still retains a wild and undiscovered quality;

      (2) fluted badlands that surround the flanks of 11,000-foot Mounts Ellen and Pennell contain areas of critical habitat for mule deer and for the largest herd of free-roaming buffalo in the United States;

      (3) despite their relative accessibility, the Henry Mountain Range remains 1 of the wildest, least-known ranges in the United States; and

      (4) the Henry Mountain range should be protected and managed to ensure the preservation of the range as a wilderness area.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System.

      (1) Bull Mountain (approximately 17,000 acres).

      (2) Bullfrog Creek (approximately 35,000 acres).

      (3) Dogwater Creek (approximately 4,500 acres).

      (4) Fremont Gorge (approximately 21,000 acres).

      (5) Long Canyon (approximately 17,000 acres).

      (6) Mount Ellen-Blue Hills (approximately 132,000 acres).

      (7) Mount Hillers (approximately 19,000 acres).

      (8) Mount Pennell- (approximately 147,000 acres).

      (9) Notom Bench (approximately 6,500 acres).

      (10) Ragged Mountain (approximately 28,000 acres).

SEC. 106. GLEN CANYON WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the side canyons of Glen Canyon, including the Dirty Devil River and the Red, White and Blue Canyons, contain some of the most remote and outstanding landscapes in southern Utah;

      (2) the Dirty Devil River, once the fortress hideout of outlaw Butch Cassidy’s Wild Bunch, has sculpted a maze of slickrock canyons through an imposing landscape of monoliths and inaccessible mesas;

      (3) the Red and Blue Canyons contain colorful Chinle/Moenkopi badlands found nowhere else in the region; and

      (4) the canyons of Glen Canyon in the State should be protected and managed as wilderness areas.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Cane Spring Desert (approximately 18,000 acres).

      (2) Dark Canyon (approximately 137,000 acres).

      (3) Dirty Devil (approximately 243,000 acres).

      (4) Fiddler Butte (approximately 93,000 acres).

      (5) Flat Tops (approximately 30,000 acres).

      (6) Little Rockies (approximately 63,000 acres).

      (7) Red Rock Plateau (approximately 210,000 acres).

      (8) White Canyon (approximately 96,000 acres).

SEC. 107. SAN JUAN-ANASAZI WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) more than 1,000 years ago, the Anasazi Indian culture flourished in the slickrock canyons and on the pin.AE6on-covered mesas of southeastern Utah;

      (2) evidence of the ancient presence of the Anasazi pervades the Cedar Mesa area of the San Juan-Anasazi area where cliff dwellings, rock art, and ceremonial kivas embellish sandstone overhangs and isolated benchlands;

      (3) the Cedar Mesa area is in need of protection from the vandalism and theft of its unique cultural resources;

      (4) the Cedar Mesa wilderness areas should be created to protect both the archaeological heritage and the extraordinary wilderness, scenic, and ecological values of the United States; and

      (5) the San Juan-Anasazi area should be protected and managed as a wilderness area to ensure the preservation of the unique and valuable resources of that area.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Allen Canyon (approximately 9,000 acres).

      (2) Arch Canyon (approximately 31,000 acres).

      (3) Comb Ridge (approximately 16,000 acres).

      (4) East Montezuma (approximately 48,000 acres).

      (5) Fish and Owl Creek Canyons (approximately 72,000 acres).

      (6) Grand Gulch (approximately 158,000 acres).

      (7) Hammond Canyon (approximately 4,600 acres).

      (8) Nokai Dome (approximately 94,000 acres).

      (9) Road Canyon (approximately 63,000 acres).

      (10) San Juan River (Sugarloaf) (approximately 15,000 acres).

      (11) The Tabernacle (approximately 7,700 acres).

SEC. 108. CANYONLANDS BASIN WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) Canyonlands National Park safeguards only a small portion of the extraordinary red-hued, cliff-walled canyonland region of the Colorado Plateau;

      (2) areas near Arches National Park and Canyonlands National Park contain canyons with rushing perennial streams, natural arches, bridges, and towers;

      (3) the gorges of the Green and Colorado Rivers, lie on adjacent land managed by the Secretary;

      (4) popular overlooks in Canyonlands Nations Park and Dead Horse Point State Park have views directly into adjacent areas, including Lockhart Basin and Indian Creek; and

      (5) designation of these areas as wilderness would ensure the protection of this erosional masterpiece of nature and of the rich pockets of wildlife found within its expanded boundaries.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Bridger Jack Mesa (approximately 33,000 acres).

      (2) Butler Wash (approximately 29,000 acres).

      (3) Dead Horse Cliffs (approximately 3,000 acres).

      (4) Demon’s Playground (approximately 3,700 acres).

      (5) Duma Point (approximately 10,000 acres).

      (6) Gooseneck (approximately 9,000 acres).

      (7) Hatch Point Canyons/Lockhart Basin (approximately 149,000 acres).

      (8) Horsethief Point (approximately 14,000 acres).

      (9) Indian Creek- (approximately 28,000 acres).

      (10) Labyrinth Canyon (approximately 152,000 acres).

      (11) San Rafael River (approximately 102,000 acres).

      (12) Shay Mountain (approximately 15,000 acres).

      (13) Sweetwater Reef (approximately 69,000 acres).

      (14) Upper Horseshoe Canyon (approximately 60,000 acres).

SEC. 109. SAN RAFAEL SWELL WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the San Rafael Swell towers above the desert like a castle, ringed by 1,000-foot ramparts of Navajo Sandstone;

      (2) the highlands of the San Rafael Swell have been fractured by uplift and rendered hollow by erosion over countless millennia, leaving a tremendous basin punctuated by mesas, buttes, and canyons and traversed by sediment-laden desert streams;

      (3) among other places, the San Rafael wilderness offers exceptional back country opportunities in the colorful Wild Horse Badlands, the monoliths of North Caineville Mesa, the rock towers of Cliff Wash, and colorful cliffs of Humbug Canyon;

      (4) the mountains within these areas are among Utah’s most valuable habitat for desert bighorn sheep; and

      (5) the San Rafael Swell area should be protected and managed to ensure its preservation as a wilderness area.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System:

      (1) Cedar Mountain (approximately 15,000 acres).

      (2) Devils Canyon (approximately 23,000 acres).

      (3) Hondu Country- (approximately 20,000 acres).

      (4) Jones Bench (approximately 2,800 acres).

      (5) Limestone Cliffs (approximately 24,000 acres).

      (6) Lost Spring Wash (approximately 36,000 acres).

      (7) Mexican Mountain (approximately 99,000 acres).

      (8) Molen Reef (approximately 33,000 acres).

      (9) Muddy Creek (approximately 235,000 acres).

      (10) Mussentuchit Badlands (approximately 25,000 acres).

      (11) Price River-Humbug (approximately 99,000 acres).

      (12) Red Desert (approximately 40,000 acres).

      (13) Rock Canyon (approximately 17,000 acres).

      (14) San Rafael Reef (approximately 105,000 acres).

      (15) Sids Mountain (approximately 146,000 acres).

      (16) Upper Muddy Creek (approximately 19,000 acres).

      (17) Wild Horse Mesa (approximately 91,000 acres).

SEC. 110. BOOK CLIFFS AND UINTA BASIN WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress finds that--

      (1) the Book Cliffs and Uinta Basin wilderness areas offer--

        (A) unique big game hunting opportunities in verdant high-plateau forests;

        (B) the opportunity for float trips of several days duration down the Green River in Desolation Canyon; and

        (C) the opportunity for calm water canoe weekends on the White River;

      (2) the long rampart of the Book Cliffs bounds the area on the south, while seldom-visited uplands, dissected by the rivers and streams, slope away to the north into the Uinta Basin;

      (3) bighorn sheep, elk, mule deer, bears, and cougars flourish in the back country of the Book Cliffs; and

      (4) the Book Cliffs and Uinta Basin areas should be protected and managed to ensure the protection of the areas as wilderness.

    (b) DESIGNATION- In accordance with the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.), the following areas in the State are designated as wilderness areas and as components of the National Wilderness Preservation System.

      (1) Bourdette Draw (approximately 16,000 acres).

      (2) Bull Canyon (approximately 3,000 acres).

      (3) Chipeta Cluster (approximately 98,000 acres).

      (4) Desbrough Canyon (approximately 13,000 acres).

      (5) Desolation Canyon (approximately 552,000 acres).

      (6) Diamond Canyon (approximately 167,000 acres).

      (7) Diamond Breaks (approximately 8,000 acres).

      (8) Diamond Mountain (also known as ‘Wild Mountain’) (approximately 27,000 acres).

      (9) Goslin Mountain (approximately 5,100 acres).

      (10) Hideout Canyon (approximately 13,000 acres).

      (11) Lower Bitter Creek (approximately 14,000 acres).

      (12) Lower Flaming Gorge (approximately 20,000 acres).

      (13) Mexico Point- (approximately 15,000 acres).

      (14) Moonshine Draw (also known as ‘Daniels Canyon’) (approximately 10,000 acres).

      (15) O-Wi-Yu-Kuts- (approximately 11,000 acres).

      (16) Red Creek Badlands (approximately 3,800 acres).

      (17) Sunday School Canyon- (approximately 18,000 acres).

      (18) Survey Point (approximately 9,000 acres).

      (19) Tabyago Canyon (approximately 21,000 acres).

      (20) Turtle Canyon (approximately 37,000 acres).

      (21) White River (approximately 19,000 acres).

      (22) Winter Ridge- (approximately 38,000 acres).

TITLE II--ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

SEC. 201. GENERAL PROVISIONS.

    (a) NAMES OF WILDERNESS AREAS- Each wilderness area named in title I shall--

      (1) consist of the quantity of land referenced with respect to that named area, as generally depicted on the map entitled ‘Utah BLM Wilderness Proposed by S. XXX, 106th Congress’; and

      (2) be known by the name given to it in title I.

    (b) MAP AND DESCRIPTION-

      (1) IN GENERAL- As soon as practicable after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall file a map and a legal description of each wilderness area designated by this Act with--

        (A) the Committee on Resources of the House of Representatives; and

        (B) the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate.

      (2) FORCE OF LAW- A map and legal description filed under paragraph (1) shall have the same force and effect as if included in this Act, except that the Secretary may correct clerical and typographical errors in the map and legal description.

      (3) PUBLIC AVAILABILITY- Each map and legal description filed under paragraph (1) shall be filed and made available for public inspection in the Office of the Director of the Bureau of Land Management.

SEC. 202. ADMINISTRATION.

    Subject to valid rights in existence on the date of enactment of this Act, each wilderness area designated under this Act shall be administered by the Secretary in accordance with--

      (1) the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.); and

      (2) the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.).

SEC. 203. STATE SCHOOL TRUST LANDS WITHIN WILDERNESS AREAS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Subject to subsection (b), if State-owned land is included in an area designated by this Act as a wilderness area, the Secretary shall offer to exchange land owned by the United States in the State of approximately equal value in accordance with section 603(c) of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1782(c)) and section 5(a) of the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1134(a)).

    (b) MINERAL INTERESTS- The Secretary shall not transfer any mineral interests under subsection (a) unless the State transfers to the Secretary any mineral interests in land designated by this Act as a wilderness area.

SEC. 204. WATER.

    (a) RESERVATION-

      (1) WATER FOR WILDERNESS AREAS-

        (A) IN GENERAL- With respect to each wilderness area designated by this Act, Congress reserves a quantity of water determined by the Secretary to be sufficient for the wilderness area.

        (B) PRIORITY DATE- The priority date of a right reserved under subparagraph (A) shall be the date of enactment of this Act.

      (2) PROTECTION OF RIGHTS- The Secretary and other officers and employees of the United States shall take any steps necessary to protect the rights reserved by paragraph (1)(A), including the filing of a claim for the quantification of the rights in any present or future appropriate stream adjudication in the courts of the State--

        (A) in which the United States is or may be joined; and

        (B) that is conducted in accordance with section 208 of the Department of Justice Appropriation Act, 1953 (66 Stat. 560, chapter 651).

    (b) PRIOR RIGHTS NOT AFFECTED- Nothing in this Act relinquishes or reduces any water rights reserved or appropriated by the United States in the State on or before the date of enactment of this Act.

    (c) ADMINISTRATION-

      (1) SPECIFICATION OF RIGHTS- The Federal water rights reserved by this Act are specific to the wilderness areas designated by this Act.

      (2) NO PRECEDENT ESTABLISHED- Nothing in this Act related to reserved Federal water rights--

        (A) shall establish a precedent with regard to any future designation of water rights; or

        (B) shall affect the interpretation of any other Act or any designation made under any other Act.

SEC. 205. ROADS.

    (a) SETBACKS-

      (1) MEASUREMENT IN GENERAL- A setback under this section shall be measured from the center line of the road.

      (2) WILDERNESS ON 1 SIDE OF ROADS- Except as provided in subsection (b), a setback for a road with wilderness on only 1 side shall be set at--

        (A) 300 feet from a paved Federal or State highway;

        (B) 100 feet from any other paved road or high standard dirt or gravel road; and

        (C) 30 feet from any other road.

      (3) WILDERNESS ON BOTH SIDES OF ROADS- Except as provided in subsection (b), a setback for a road with wilderness on both sides (including cherry-stems or roads separating 2 wilderness units) shall be set at--

        (A) 200 feet from a paved Federal or State highway;

        (B) 40 feet from any other paved road or high standard dirt or gravel road; and

        (C) 10 feet from any other roads.

    (b) SETBACK EXCEPTIONS-

      (1) WELL-DEFINED TOPOGRAPHICAL BARRIERS- If, between the road and the boundary of a setback area described in paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection (a), there is a well-defined cliff edge, stream bank, or other topographical barrier, the Secretary shall use the barrier as the wilderness boundary.

      (2) FENCES- If, between the road and the boundary of a setback area specified in paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection (a), there is a fence running parallel to a road, the Secretary shall use the fence as the wilderness boundary if, in the opinion of the Secretary, doing so would result in a more manageable boundary.

      (3) DEVIATIONS FROM SETBACK AREAS-

        (A) EXCLUSION OF DISTURBANCES FROM WILDERNESS BOUNDARIES- In cases where there is an existing livestock development, dispersed camping area, borrow pit, or similar disturbance within 100 feet of a road that forms part of a wilderness boundary, the Secretary may delineate the boundary so as to exclude the disturbance from the wilderness area.

        (B) LIMITATION ON EXCLUSION OF DISTURBANCES- The Secretary shall make a boundary adjustment under subparagraph (A) only if the Secretary determines that doing so is consistent with wilderness management goals.

        (C) DEVIATIONS RESTRICTED TO MINIMUM NECESSARY- Any deviation under this paragraph from the setbacks required under in paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection (a) shall be the minimum necessary to exclude the disturbance.

    (c) DELINEATION WITHIN SETBACK AREA- The Secretary may delineate a wilderness boundary at a location within a setback under paragraph (2) or (3) of subsection (a) if, as determined by the Secretary, the delineation would enhance wilderness management goals.

SEC. 206. LIVESTOCK

    Within the wilderness areas designated under title I, the grazing of livestock authorized on the date of enactment of this Act shall be permitted to continue subject to such reasonable regulations and procedures as the Secretary considers necessary, as long as the regulations and procedures are consistent with--

      (1) the Wilderness Act (16 U.S.C. 1131 et seq.); and

      (2) section 101(f) the Arizona Desert Wilderness Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-628; 104 Stat. 4469).

SEC. 207. FISH AND WILDLIFE.

    Nothing in this Act affects the jurisdiction of the State with respect to wildlife and fish on the public land located in the State.

SEC. 208. MANAGEMENT OF NEWLY ACQUIRED LANDS.

    Any land within the boundaries of a wilderness area designated under this Act that is acquired by the Federal Government shall--

      (1) become part of the wilderness area in which the land is located; and

      (2) be managed in accordance with this Act and other laws applicable to wilderness areas.

SEC. 209. WITHDRAWAL.

    Subject to valid rights existing on the date of enactment of this Act, the Federal land referred to in title I is withdrawn from all forms of--

      (1) entry, appropriation, or disposal under public law;

      (2) location, entry, and patent under mining law; and

      (3) disposition under all laws pertaining to mineral and geothermal leasing or mineral materials.

SEC. 210. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There is authorized to be appropriated such sums as are necessary to carry out this Act.