< Back to H.Con.Res. 428 (107th Congress, 2001–2002)

Text of Expressing the sense of the Congress that recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in schools is consitutional under the First ...

...under the First Amendment to the Constitution, and urging the Supreme Court to uphold the constitutionality of such practi

This resolution was introduced on June 26, 2002, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Jun 26, 2002 (Introduced).

Download PDF

Source: GPO

HCON 428 IH

107th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. CON. RES. 428

Expressing the sense of the Congress that recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in schools is constitutional under the First Amendment to the Constitution, and urging the Supreme Court to uphold the constitutionality of such practices.

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

JUNE 26, 2002

Mr. HILLEARY submitted the following concurrent resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary


CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the Congress that recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in schools is constitutional under the First Amendment to the Constitution, and urging the Supreme Court to uphold the constitutionality of such practices.

Whereas lessons and practices in schools provide a significant and long-lasting impact in character and values development among young people;

Whereas the values of faith, patriotism and dedication to a cause larger than self have consistently carried this country through difficult times;

Whereas countless Americans from Washington to Jefferson to Lincoln to Roosevelt to everyday citizens have all acknowledged the role of Providence in the history of our country;

Whereas the Congress itself has found value in beginning each session with an invocation and a recital of the Pledge of Allegiance, including the words ‘one nation under God’;

Whereas in the ruling of 26 June 2001, the Court of the Ninth Circuit of the United States ruled that the Pledge of Allegiance is an unconstitutional endorsement of religion and cannot be recited in schools, more than 48 years after the present Pledge was instituted and in direct contravention of 215 years of Constitutional law; and

Whereas statements of belief in a Supreme Power and the virtue of seeking strength and protection from that Power are prevalent throughout our national history, currency, and rituals; Now, therefore, be it

    Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That it is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance in schools, including the phrase ‘One Nation Under God’ is constitutional under the First Amendment to the Constitution; and

      (2) the Supreme Court, accordingly, should uphold the constitutionality of such practices.