H.R. 3130 (107th): Undergraduate Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education Improvement Act

Introduced:
Oct 16, 2001 (107th Congress, 2001–2002)
Status:
Died (Passed House)
Sponsor
Sherwood “Sherry” Boehlert
Representative for New York's 23rd congressional district
Party
Republican
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Jul 11, 2002
Length
36 pages
Related Bills
S. 1549 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Oct 15, 2001

H.R. 4664 (Related)
National Science Foundation Authorization Act of 2002

Signed by the President
Dec 19, 2002

 
Status

This bill was introduced in a previous session of Congress and was passed by the House on July 9, 2002 but was never passed by the Senate.

Progress
Introduced Oct 16, 2001
Referred to Committee Oct 16, 2001
Reported by Committee May 22, 2002
Passed House Jul 09, 2002
 
Full Title

To provide for increasing the technically trained workforce in the United States.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
43 cosponsors (28D, 15R) (show)
Committees

House Education and the Workforce

Higher Education and Workforce Training

House Science, Space, and Technology

Research

Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


7/9/2002--Passed House amended.
Undergraduate Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education Improvement Act - Technology Talent Act of 2002 - Requires the Director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) to award competitive, merit-based grants to increase the number of students studying and receiving associate's or bachelor's degrees in established or emerging fields within science, mathematics, engineering, and technology.
Provides that an institution receiving such a grant shall be known as a National Science Foundation Science and Engineering Talent Expansion Center.
Section 5 -
Establishes a program of grants to expand previously implemented reforms of undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, or technology education demonstrated to have been successful in increasing the number and quality of students studying and receiving associate or baccalaureate degrees in such fields.
Section 6 -
Establishes a program of grants for professional development of undergraduate faculty in support of improved undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, and technology education.
Section 7 -
Establishes a program of grants to support acquisition of research-grade instrumentation and training related to its use.
Section 8 -
Establishes a program of grants to establish sites that provide research experiences for undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, or technology students.
Section 9 -
Requires the Director to ensure Internet dissemination of certain information by all NSF-sponsored undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, or technology education projects.
Section 10 -
Requires the Director to: (1) evaluate the effectiveness of all NSF-supported undergraduate science, mathematics, engineering, or technology education activities in increasing the number and quality of students, including those from groups underrepresented in such fields, studying and receiving associate or baccalaureate degrees in such fields; and (2) establish a common set of assessment benchmarks and tools for every NSF-sponsored project to use.
Section 11 -
Requires the Director to: (1) arrange for the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences to study factors that influence undergraduate students to enter and persist to degree completion in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology programs or to leave such programs; and (2) report the study results to Congress.
Section 12 -
Establishes a program of grants to Hispanic-Serving Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native-Serving Institutions, Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions, and tribally controlled colleges and universities to: (1) enhance the quality of undergraduate science, mathematics, and engineering education at such institutions; and (2) increase the retention and graduation rates of students pursuing baccalaureate degrees in such fields.
Section 13 -
Amends the Scientific and Advanced-Technology Act of 1992 (SATA) to include improving the quality of their core education courses in science and mathematics among the uses of national advanced scientific and technical education program grants to associate-degree-granting colleges.
Requires, as a condition for receiving certain grants for aiding transition of students from associate- to bachelor-degree-granting-institutions, that articulation partnerships provide students with research experiences and faculty mentors at bachelor-degree-granting institutions in the partnership.Requires the Director to:
(1) establish an advisory committee on the advanced technological education program; and
(2) report to Congress on specified NSF and other efforts with regard to the program and other SATA requirements.Extends the authorization of appropriations for acquisition of instrumentation under SATA. Authorizes appropriations for the following programs added to SATA by this Act:
(1) activities to improve core science and mathematics education; and
(2) support for research experiences for undergraduate students.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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