H.R. 3153 (107th): State Bioterrorism Preparedness Act

Introduced:
Oct 17, 2001 (107th Congress, 2001–2002)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
Rod Blagojevich
Representative for Illinois's 5th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Oct 17, 2001
Length
14 pages
Related Bills
S. 1520 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Oct 09, 2001

 
Status

This bill was introduced on October 17, 2001, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Oct 17, 2001
Referred to Committee Oct 17, 2001
 
Full Title

To assist States in preparing for, and responding to, biological or chemical terrorist attacks.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
none
Committees

House Energy and Commerce

Health

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

Widget

Get a bill status widget for your website »

Citation

Click a format for a citation suggestion:

Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


10/17/2001--Introduced.
State Bioterrorism Preparedness Act - Requires the Secretary of Health and Human Services to award grants to States to enable them to prepare for and respond to bioterrorism.Sets forth requirements regarding:
(1) State plans which shall include a description of the State process to detect and respond to bioterrorism and of State efforts to stockpile medications, vaccines, antibiotics, and medical supplies;
(2) annual submissions to the Secretary of an updated State plan;
(3) permissible uses of grant funds; and
(4) fund allocations.Requires specified Federal agencies to provide to States information, including:
(1) a description of the probable agents of a biological or chemical attack; and
(2) model or proposed bioterrorism plans with respect to such an attack.Establishes within the Office of Homeland Security an Assistant Director for State Coordination.Directs the Secretary, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to:
(1) carry out activities to implement a national communications system;
(2) develop a national emergency communication plan; and
(3) establish an Internet web-site that contains training, and bioterrorism-related emergency, information.Requires:
(1) the Secretary to award grants to each State to carry out table-top and computer-based biological or chemical attack simulations;
(2) the CDC Director to provide each State with simulation exercises;
(3) each State that receives a grant to complete at least one of the required simulations; and
(4) the Secretary to provide for the conduct of a biological or chemical attack simulation in three geographically diverse States that receive a grant.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

The House Democratic Caucus does not provide summaries of bills.

So, yes, we display the House Republican Conference’s summaries when available even if we do not have a Democratic summary available. That’s because we feel it is better to give you as much information as possible, even if we cannot provide every viewpoint.

We’ll be looking for a source of summaries from the other side in the meanwhile.

Use the comment space below for discussion of the merits of H.R. 3153 (107th) with other GovTrack users.
Your comments are not read by Congressional staff.

comments powered by Disqus