H.R. 3242 (107th): Biological and Chemical Weapons Preparedness Act of 2001

Introduced:
Nov 07, 2001 (107th Congress, 2001–2002)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
Rod Blagojevich
Representative for Illinois's 5th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Nov 07, 2001
Length
40 pages
Related Bills
S. 1486 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Oct 03, 2001

 
Status

This bill was introduced on November 7, 2001, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Nov 07, 2001
Referred to Committee Nov 07, 2001
 
Full Title

To ensure that the United States is prepared for an attack using biological or chemical weapons.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
none
Committees

House Agriculture

Department Operations, Oversight, and Nutrition

House Energy and Commerce

Health

House Science, Space, and Technology

Energy

Technology

House Judiciary

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


11/7/2001--Introduced.
Biological and Chemical Weapons Preparedness Act of 2001 - Amends the Public Health Service Act to direct the Secretary of Health and Human Services to develop a coordinated plan to achieve the following biological or chemical preparedness goals by 2010:
(1) first responders (law enforcement, fire, and medical services) will have adequate response capacity, training, and technology;
(2) sophisticated electronic disease surveillance and information exchange; and
(3) development of the health care and public health workforce in key biopreparedness priority areas.Requires such plan to include specific benchmarks and outcome measures.
Funds activities through block grants to States. Includes Indian tribes in this program at their request.Requires each participating States' public health agency to develop (with the recommendations of a State Bioterrorism Preparedness Advisory Committee) a certifiable plan.
Sets forth uniform data collection and reporting requirements.
Requires fiscal controls on the use of such funds, including audits, repayments, and withholding (after investigation).Requires compliance with specified nondiscrimination acts.
Establishes criminal penalties for fraudulently collecting payments.Directs the Secretary to award competitive grants with an emphasis on building emergency surge capacity, biocontainment, and decontamination capabilities.Authorizes additional appropriations for programs concerning;
(1) vaccine, antibiotic, and therapeutic research and development;
(2) protecting the food supply (including interdiction); and
(3) research by specified federal agencies and departments.Requires the Secretary to review Federal counterterrorism efforts in light of unique rural community requirements.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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