H.Res. 676 (108th): Recognizing and honoring the 40th anniversary of congressional passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

108th Congress, 2003–2004. Text as of Jun 15, 2004 (Introduced).

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IV

108th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. RES. 676

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

June 15, 2004

(for herself, Mr. Sensenbrenner, Mr. Conyers, Mr. Cummings, Mr. Lewis of Georgia, Ms. Majette, Mr. Meek of Florida, Mr. Meeks of New York, Ms. Millender-McDonald, Mr. Owens, Mr. Payne, Mr. Rangel, Mr. Rush, Mr. Scott of Georgia, Mr. Scott of Virginia, Mr. Thompson of Mississippi, Mr. Towns, Ms. Waters, Ms. Watson, Mr. Watt, Mr. Wynn, Mr. Bishop of Georgia, Ms. Corrine Brown of Florida, Ms. Carson of Indiana, Mrs. Christensen, Mr. Clay, Mr. Clyburn, Mr. Davis of Alabama, Mr. Davis of Illinois, Mr. Fattah, Mr. Ford, Mr. Hastings of Florida, Mr. Jackson of Illinois, Ms. Jackson-Lee of Texas, Mr. Jefferson, Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas, Mrs. Jones of Ohio, Ms. Kilpatrick, and Ms. Lee) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and in addition to the Committee on Education and the Workforce, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned

RESOLUTION

Recognizing and honoring the 40th anniversary of congressional passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Whereas 2004 marks the 40th anniversary of congressional passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Public Law 88–352);

Whereas the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was the result of decades of struggle and sacrifice of many Americans who fought for equality and justice;

Whereas generations of Americans of every background supported Federal legislation to eliminate discrimination against African Americans;

Whereas a civil rights movement developed to achieve the goal of equal rights for all Americans;

Whereas President John F. Kennedy on June 11, 1963, in a nationally televised address proposed that Congress pass a civil rights act to address the problem of invidious discrimination;

Whereas a broad coalition of civil rights, labor, and religious organizations, culminating in the 1963 march on Washington, created national support for civil rights legislation;

Whereas during consideration of the bill a historic prohibition against discrimination based on sex was added;

Whereas the Congress of the United States passed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and President Lyndon Johnson signed the bill into law on July 2, 1964;

Whereas the Civil Rights Act of 1964, among other things, prohibited the use of Federal funds in a discriminatory fashion, barred unequal application of voter registration requirements, encouraged the desegregation of public schools and authorized the United States Attorney General to file suits to force desegregation, banned discrimination in hotels, motels, restaurants, theaters, and all other places of public accommodations engaged in interstate commerce, and established the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission;

Whereas title VII of the Act not only prohibited discrimination by employers on the basis of race, color, national origin, and religion but sex as well, thereby recognizing the national problem of sex discrimination in the workplace;

Whereas the Congress of the United States has amended the Civil Rights Act of 1964 from time to time, with major changes that strengthened the Act;

Whereas the 1972 amendments, among other things, gave the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission litigation authority, thereby giving the EEOC the right to sue nongovernment respondents, made State and local governments subject to title VII of the Act, made educational institutions subject to title VII of the Act, and made the Federal Government subject to title VII, thereby prohibiting Federal executive agencies from discriminating on the basis of race, color, sex, religion, and national origin;

Whereas the 1991 amendments to the Civil Rights Act overruled several Supreme Court decisions rendered in the late 1980s and allowed for the recovery of fees and costs in lawsuits where plaintiff prevailed, for jury trials, and for the recovery of compensatory and punitive damages in intentional employment discrimination cases, and also expanded title VII protections to include congressional and high level political appointees;

Whereas the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is the most comprehensive civil rights legislation in our Nation’s history; and

Whereas we applaud all those whose support and efforts lead to passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Now, therefore, be it

That the House of Representatives—

(1)

recognizes and honors the 40th anniversary of congressional passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964; and

(2)

encourages all Americans to recognize and celebrate the important historical milestone of the congressional passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.