< Back to S. 2743 (108th Congress, 2003–2004)

Text of the Veterans Eye Treatment Safety (VETS) Act of 2004

This bill was introduced on July 22, 2004, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Jul 22, 2004 (Introduced).

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S 2743 IS

108th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. 2743

To amend title 38, United States Code, to provide that only licensed medical doctors, licensed doctors of osteopathy, and certain licensed dentists may perform eye surgery at Department of Veterans Affairs facilities or under contract with the Department.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

July 22, 2004

Mr. FITZGERALD (for himself, Ms. CANTWELL, Mr. HOLLINGS, Mrs. FEINSTEIN, and Mr. SESSIONS) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs


A BILL

To amend title 38, United States Code, to provide that only licensed medical doctors, licensed doctors of osteopathy, and certain licensed dentists may perform eye surgery at Department of Veterans Affairs facilities or under contract with the Department.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ‘Veterans Eye Treatment Safety (VETS) Act of 2004’.

SEC. 2. LIMITATION AS TO PERSONS WHO MAY PERFORM EYE SURGERY FOR DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.

    Section 1707 of title 38, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    ‘(c)(1) Eye surgery at a Department facility or under contract with the Department may be performed only by an individual who is a licensed medical doctor, a licensed doctor of osteopathy, or a licensed dentist whose practice is limited to the specialty of oral or maxillofacial surgery.

    ‘(2) For purposes of this subsection, the term ‘eye surgery’ means any procedure involving the eye or the adnexa in which human tissue is cut, burned, frozen, vaporized, ablated, probed, or otherwise altered or penetrated by incision, injection, laser, ultrasound, ionizing radiation, or by other means, in order to treat eye disease, alter or correct refractive error, or alter or enhance cosmetic appearance. Such term does not include the following noninvasive, nonsurgical procedures: removal of superficial ocular foreign bodies from the conjunctival surface, from the eyelid epidermis, or from the corneal epithelium; corneal debridement and scraping; forceps epilation of misaligned eyelashes; the prescription and fitting of contact lenses; insertion of punctal plugs, diagnostic dilation or irrigation of the lacrimal system; the use of diagnostic ultrasound; orthokeratology; or the treatment of emergency cases of anaphylactic shock (with subcutaneous epinephrine, such as that included in a bee sting kit).’.