< Back to S. 600 (109th Congress, 2005–2006)

Text of the Foreign Affairs Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007

This bill was introduced on March 3, 2005, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Mar 10, 2005 (Placed on Calendar in the Senate).

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S 600 PCS1S

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Calendar No. 48

109th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 600

[Report No. 109-35]

To authorize appropriations for the Department of State and international broadcasting activities for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, for the Peace Corps for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, for foreign assistance programs for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, and for other purposes.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

March 10, 2005

Mr. LUGAR, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, reported the following original bill; which was read twice and placed on the calendar


A BILL

To authorize appropriations for the Department of State and international broadcasting activities for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, for the Peace Corps for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, for foreign assistance programs for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, and for other purposes.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the `Foreign Affairs Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007'.

SEC. 2. ORGANIZATION OF ACT INTO DIVISIONS; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) DIVISIONS- This Act is organized into two divisions as follows:

      (1) DIVISION A- Foreign Relations Authorizations.

      (2) DIVISION B- Foreign Assistance Authorizations.

    (b) TABLE OF CONTENTS- The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

      Sec. 1. Short title.

      Sec. 2. Organization of Act into divisions; table of contents.

      Sec. 3. Definitions.

DIVISION A--FOREIGN RELATIONS AUTHORIZATIONS

      Sec. 100. Short title.

TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

Subtitle A--Department of State

      Sec. 101. Administration of foreign affairs.

      Sec. 102. International organizations and conferences.

      Sec. 103. International commissions.

      Sec. 104. Migration and refugee assistance.

      Sec. 105. Centers and foundations.

      Sec. 106. Vietnam Fulbright Academic Exchange Program.

Subtitle B--United States International Broadcasting Activities

      Sec. 111. Authorization of appropriations.

TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

      Sec. 201. Interference with protective functions.

      Sec. 202. Authority to issue administrative subpoenas.

      Sec. 203. Enhanced Department of State authority for uniformed security officers.

      Sec. 204. Grant authorities.

      Sec. 205. International Litigation Fund.

      Sec. 206. Retention of medical reimbursements.

      Sec. 207. Transfer authority for buying power maintenance account.

      Sec. 208. Accountability review boards.

      Sec. 209. Designation of Colin L. Powell Residential Plaza.

      Sec. 210. Removal of contracting prohibition.

      Sec. 211. American Institute in Taiwan facilities enhancement.

      Sec. 212. Extension of the Advisory Committee on Cultural Diplomacy.

      Sec. 213. Victims of crime in foreign countries.

      Sec. 214. United States Diplomacy Center.

      Sec. 215. Strengthening United States educational programs in the Islamic world.

TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

      Sec. 301. Education allowances.

      Sec. 302. Official residence expenses.

      Sec. 303. Increased limits applicable to post differentials and danger pay allowances.

      Sec. 304. Home leave.

      Sec. 305. Fellowship of Hope Program.

      Sec. 306. Security Officers Exchange Program.

      Sec. 307. Reemployment of annuitants.

      Sec. 308. Suspension of Foreign Service members without pay.

      Sec. 309. Separation of lowest-ranked Foreign Service members.

      Sec. 310. Clarification of Foreign Service Grievance Board procedures.

      Sec. 311. Repeal of requirement for recertification process for members of the Senior Foreign Service.

      Sec. 312. Deadline for issuance of regulations regarding retirement credit for government service performed abroad.

      Sec. 313. Worldwide availability.

      Sec. 314. Technical amendments to title 5 provisions on recruitment, relocation, and retention bonuses.

      Sec. 315. Limited appointments in the Foreign Service.

      Sec. 316. Personal service contractors.

      Sec. 317. Disclosure requirements applicable to proposed recipients of the personal rank of ambassador or minister.

      Sec. 318. Provision of living quarters and allowances to the United States representatives to the United Nations.

TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

      Sec. 401. Limitation on the United States share of assessments for United Nations peacekeeping operations.

      Sec. 402. REDI center.

      Sec. 403. Report to Congress on implementation of the Brahimi Report.

      Sec. 404. Sense of Congress on the United Nations budgetary discipline and management reform.

TITLE V--BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS

      Sec. 501. Short title.

      Sec. 502. Middle East Broadcasting Networks.

      Sec. 503. Improving signal delivery to Cuba.

      Sec. 504. Extension of authority for Radio Free Asia.

      Sec. 505. Personal services contracting program.

      Sec. 506. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands education benefits.

      Sec. 507. Exemption from numerical limitations for temporary workers.

TITLE VI--CONSULAR AUTHORITIES

      Sec. 601. Technical amendments to Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004.

      Sec. 602. International student exchange programs.

TITLE VII--RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION

      Sec. 701. Short title.

      Sec. 702. Finding; purpose.

      Sec. 703. Definitions.

      Sec. 704. Sense of Congress.

      Sec. 705. Authority to provide assistance for reconstruction and stabilization crises.

      Sec. 706. Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization.

      Sec. 707. Response Readiness Corps.

      Sec. 708. Stabilization and reconstruction training and education.

      Sec. 709. Service related to stabilization and reconstruction.

      Sec. 710. Authorities related to personnel.

      Sec. 711. Authorization of appropriations.

TITLE VIII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

      Sec. 801. Reports on acquisition and major security upgrades.

      Sec. 802. Fellowships for multidisciplinary training on nonproliferation issues.

      Sec. 803. Reporting requirements related to United States international agreements.

      Sec. 804. Requirement to submit to Congress findings under the Diplomatic Security Act.

      Sec. 805. Requirement for additional report concerning efforts to promote Israel's diplomatic relations with other countries.

      Sec. 806. Sense of Congress relating to Magen David Adom Society.

      Sec. 807. Limitation on use of funds relating to United States policy with respect to Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

      Sec. 808. Authorization of appropriations for the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom.

      Sec. 809. Sense of Congress on terrorist attack on United States Consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

      Sec. 810. Sense of Congress on participation of women in elections in Saudi Arabia.

      Sec. 811. Strategy on combatting terrorism in West Africa.

DIVISION B--FOREIGN ASSISTANCE AUTHORIZATIONS

      Sec. 2001. Short title.

TITLE XXI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

Subtitle A--Development Assistance and Related Programs Authorizations

      Sec. 2101. Development assistance.

      Sec. 2102. Child Survival and Health Programs Fund.

      Sec. 2103. Development credit authority.

      Sec. 2104. Program to provide technical assistance to foreign governments and foreign central banks of developing or transitional countries.

      Sec. 2105. International organizations and programs.

      Sec. 2106. Continued availability of certain funds withheld from international organizations.

      Sec. 2107. International disaster and famine assistance.

      Sec. 2108. Transition initiatives.

      Sec. 2109. Assistance for the independent states of the former Soviet Union.

      Sec. 2110. Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic states.

      Sec. 2111. Operating expenses of the United States Agency for International Development.

      Sec. 2112. Capital investment funds for the United States Agency for International Development.

      Sec. 2113. Millennium Challenge assistance.

      Sec. 2114. Debt relief.

      Sec. 2115. Peace Corps.

      Sec. 2116. Middle East Partnership Initiative.

      Sec. 2117. Assistance to combat the avian flu.

Subtitle B--Counternarcotics, Security Assistance, and Related Programs Authorizations

      Sec. 2121. International narcotics control and law enforcement.

      Sec. 2122. Economic Support Fund.

      Sec. 2123. International military education and training.

      Sec. 2124. Peacekeeping operations.

      Sec. 2125. Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs.

      Sec. 2126. Foreign military financing program.

Subtitle C--Independent Agencies Authorizations

      Sec. 2131. Inter-American Foundation.

      Sec. 2132. African Development Foundation.

TITLE XXII--AMENDMENTS TO GENERAL FOREIGN ASSISTANCE AUTHORITIES

Subtitle A--Foreign Assistance Act Amendments and Related Provisions

      Sec. 2201. Development policy.

      Sec. 2202. Assistance for nongovernmental organizations.

      Sec. 2203. Authority for use of funds for unanticipated contingencies.

      Sec. 2204. Authority to accept lethal excess property.

      Sec. 2205. Reconstruction and famine assistance under international disaster assistance authority.

      Sec. 2206. Funding authorities for assistance for the independent states of the former Soviet Union.

      Sec. 2207. Waiver of net proceeds resulting from disposal of United States defense articles provided to a foreign country on a grant basis.

      Sec. 2208. Additions to war reserve stockpiles for allies for fiscal years 2006 and 2007.

      Sec. 2209. Restrictions on economic support funds for Lebanon.

      Sec. 2210. Administration of justice.

      Sec. 2211. Demining programs.

      Sec. 2212. Special waiver authority.

      Sec. 2213. Prohibition of assistance for countries in default.

      Sec. 2214. Military coups.

      Sec. 2215. Designation of position for which appointee is nominated.

      Sec. 2216. Exceptions to requirement for congressional notification of program changes.

      Sec. 2217. Commitments for expenditures of funds.

      Sec. 2218. Alternative dispute resolution.

      Sec. 2219. Administrative authorities.

      Sec. 2220. Assistance for law enforcement forces.

      Sec. 2221. Special debt relief for the poorest countries.

      Sec. 2222. Congo Basin Forest Partnership.

      Sec. 2223. Landmine clearance programs.

      Sec. 2224. Middle East Foundation.

      Sec. 2225. Database of United States military assistance.

      Sec. 2226. Millennium Challenge assistance for certain countries.

Subtitle B--Arms Export Control Act Amendments and Related Provisions

      Sec. 2231. Thresholds for advance notice to Congress of sales or upgrades of defense articles, design and construction services, and major defense equipment.

      Sec. 2232. Clarification of requirement for advance notice to Congress of comprehensive export authorizations.

      Sec. 2233. Authority to provide cataloging data and services to non-NATO countries.

      Sec. 2234. FREEDOM Support Act permanent waiver authority.

      Sec. 2235. Extension of Pakistan waivers.

      Sec. 2236. Consolidation of reports on nonproliferation in South Asia.

      Sec. 2237. Haitian Coast Guard.

      Sec. 2238. Requirement for the provision of certain assistance to Indonesia.

TITLE XXIII--RADIOLOGICAL TERRORISM SECURITY

      Sec. 2301. Short title.

      Sec. 2302. Definitions.

      Sec. 2303. Embassy threat assessment reports.

      Sec. 2304. Foreign first responders.

      Sec. 2305. Availability of funds.

TITLE XXIV--GLOBAL PATHOGEN SURVEILLANCE

      Sec. 2401. Short title.

      Sec. 2402. Findings; purpose.

      Sec. 2403. Definitions.

      Sec. 2404. Priority for certain countries.

      Sec. 2405. Restriction.

      Sec. 2406. Fellowship program.

      Sec. 2407. In-country training in laboratory techniques and syndrome surveillance.

      Sec. 2408. Assistance for the purchase and maintenance of public health laboratory equipment.

      Sec. 2409. Assistance for improved communication of public health information.

      Sec. 2410. Assignment of public health personnel to United States missions and international organizations.

      Sec. 2411. Expansion of certain United States government laboratories abroad.

      Sec. 2412. Assistance for regional health networks and expansion of foreign epidemiology training programs.

      Sec. 2413. Authorization of appropriations.

TITLE XXV--REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND OTHER MATTERS

Subtitle A--Elimination and Modification of Certain Reporting Requirements

      Sec. 2501. Annual report on territorial integrity.

      Sec. 2502. Annual reports on activities in Colombia.

      Sec. 2503. Annual report on foreign military training.

      Sec. 2504. Report on human rights in Haiti.

Subtitle B--New Reports and Other Matters

      Sec. 2511. Amendments to the Arms Control and Disarmament Act.

      Sec. 2512. Support for independent media in Ethiopia.

      Sec. 2513. Support for justice sector in Central African States and the African Union.

      Sec. 2514. Support for Haiti.

      Sec. 2515. Global Peace Operations Initiative.

      Sec. 2516. Assistance to combat HIV/AIDS in certain countries of the Caribbean region.

      Sec. 2517. Repeal of obsolete assistance authority.

      Sec. 2518. Consolidation of certain submissions under the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002.

      Sec. 2519. Technical corrections.

      Sec. 2520. Requirement for report on United States policy toward Haiti.

      Sec. 2521. United States policy on tsunami relief and reconstruction in Aceh, Indonesia.

      Sec. 2522. Drug price transparency in the emergency plan for AIDS relief.

TITLE XXVI--SAFE WATER

      Sec. 2601. Short title.

      Sec. 2602. Findings.

      Sec. 2603. Water for health and development.

      Sec. 2604. Pilot program for water sustainability infrastructure development and capacity building.

      Sec. 2605. Safe water strategy.

      Sec. 2606. Authorization of appropriations.

TITLE XXVII--PROTECTION OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS DURING HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCIES

      Sec. 2701. Short title.

      Sec. 2702. Definitions.

      Sec. 2703. Findings.

Subtitle A--Program and Policy Coordination

      Sec. 2711. Requirement to develop comprehensive strategy.

      Sec. 2712. Designation of coordinator.

Subtitle B--Prevention and Preparedness

      Sec. 2721. Reporting and monitoring systems.

      Sec. 2722. Protection training and expertise.

Subtitle C--Protection of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons

      Sec. 2731. Codes of conduct.

      Sec. 2732. Health services for refugees and displaced persons.

      Sec. 2733. Economic self-sufficiency of vulnerable populations affected by a humanitarian emergency.

      Sec. 2734. International military education and training.

      Sec. 2735. Sense of Congress regarding actions of United Nations peacekeepers.

Subtitle D--Protection of Vulnerable Populations Affected by a Humanitarian Emergency

      Sec. 2741. Actions to support protection.

      Sec. 2742. Protection assistance.

TITLE XXVIII--CONVENTIONAL ARMS DISARMAMENT

      Sec. 2801. Short title.

      Sec. 2802. Findings; sense of Congress.

      Sec. 2803. Statement of policy.

      Sec. 2804. Global program for the safeguarding and elimination of conventional arms.

      Sec. 2805. Redesignation of Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement as Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction.

      Sec. 2806. Report on conventional arms threat reduction.

      Sec. 2807. Authorization of appropriations.

      Sec. 2808. Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund defined.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:

      (1) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEE- The term `appropriate congressional committees' means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee or International Relations of the House of Representatives.

      (2) SECRETARY- Except as otherwise provided, the term `Secretary' means the Secretary of State.

DIVISION A--FOREIGN RELATIONS AUTHORIZATIONS

SEC. 100. SHORT TITLE.

    This division may be cited as the `Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007'.

TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

Subtitle A--Department of State

SEC. 101. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State under `Administration of Foreign Affairs' to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of foreign affairs of the United States, and for other purposes authorized by law:

      (1) DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR PROGRAMS-

        (A) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- For `Diplomatic and Consular Programs', $4,472,641,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

        (B) WORLDWIDE SECURITY UPGRADES- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), $689,523,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 are authorized to be made available for worldwide security upgrades.

      (2) CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUND- For `Capital Investment Fund', $133,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (3) EMBASSY SECURITY, CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE- For `Embassy Security, Construction and Maintenance', $1,526,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (4) EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS- For `Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs', $430,400,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (5) REPRESENTATION ALLOWANCES- For `Representation Allowances', $8,281,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (6) PROTECTION OF FOREIGN MISSIONS AND OFFICIALS- For `Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials', $9,390,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (7) EMERGENCIES IN THE DIPLOMATIC AND CONSULAR SERVICE- For `Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service', $13,643,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (8) REPATRIATION LOANS- For `Repatriation Loans', $1,319,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (9) PAYMENT TO THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN- For `Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan', $19,751,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (10) OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL- For `Office of the Inspector General', $29,983,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

SEC. 102. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND CONFERENCES.

    (a) ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated for `Contributions to International Organizations', $1,296,500,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international organizations and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

    (b) CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES-

      (1) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATION- There are authorized to be appropriated for `Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities', $1,035,500,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities of the United States with respect to international peacekeeping activities and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.

      (2) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Funds appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) are authorized to be available until expended.

    (c) FOREIGN CURRENCY EXCHANGE RATES-

      (1) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATION- In addition to amounts authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a), there are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State such sums as may be necessary for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to offset adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.

      (2) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Amounts appropriated under this subsection shall be available for obligation and expenditure only to the extent that the Director of the Office of Management and Budget determines and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that such amounts are necessary due to such fluctuations.

SEC. 103. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated under `International Commissions' for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international commissions and for other purposes authorized by law:

      (1) INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND MEXICO- For `International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico'--

        (A) for `Salaries and Expenses', $28,700,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007; and

        (B) for `Construction', $6,600,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (2) INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY COMMISSION, UNITED STATES AND CANADA- For `International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada', $1,429,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (3) INTERNATIONAL JOINT COMMISSION- For `International Joint Commission', $6,320,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      (4) INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSIONS- For `International Fisheries Commissions', $25,123,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

SEC. 104. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

    (a) IN GENERAL- There are authorized to be appropriated for `Migration and Refugee Assistance' for authorized activities, $892,770,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

    (b) REFUGEES RESETTLING IN ISRAEL- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $40,000,000 is authorized to be made available for fiscal year 2006 for the resettlement of refugees in Israel.

    (c) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Funds appropriated pursuant to subsection (a) are authorized to be available until expended.

SEC. 105. CENTERS AND FOUNDATIONS.

    (a) ASIA FOUNDATION- There are authorized to be appropriated for `The Asia Foundation' for authorized activities, $10,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

    (b) NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR DEMOCRACY- There are authorized to be appropriated for the `National Endowment for Democracy' for authorized activities, $80,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

    (c) CENTER FOR CULTURAL AND TECHNICAL INTERCHANGE BETWEEN EAST AND WEST- There are authorized to be appropriated for `Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and West' for authorized activities, $13,024,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

SEC. 106. VIETNAM FULBRIGHT ACADEMIC EXCHANGE PROGRAM.

    Of the amount made available for `Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs' under section 101(4), $5,000,000 is authorized to be made available for each of fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to carry out the Vietnam scholarship program established by section 229 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138).

Subtitle B--United States International Broadcasting Activities

SEC. 111. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated to carry out United States Government international broadcasting activities under the United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act, the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994, and the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, and to carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes:

      (1) INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING OPERATIONS- For `International Broadcasting Operations,' $641,050,000 for the fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2007.

      (2) BROADCASTING CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS- For `Broadcasting Capital Improvements,' $10,893,000 for the fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2007.

TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

SEC. 201. INTERFERENCE WITH PROTECTIVE FUNCTIONS.

    (a) OFFENSE- Chapter 7 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

`Sec. 117. Interference with certain protective functions

    `Whoever knowingly and willfully obstructs, resists, or interferes with a Federal law enforcement agent engaged, within the United States or the special maritime territorial jurisdiction of the United States, in the performance of the protective functions authorized by section 37 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2709) or section 103 of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4802) shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.'.

    (b) CLERICAL AMENDMENT- The table of sections at the beginning of such chapter is amended by adding at the end the following new item:

      `117. Interference with certain protective functions.'.

SEC. 202. AUTHORITY TO ISSUE ADMINISTRATIVE SUBPOENAS.

    Section 37 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2709) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(d) ADMINISTRATIVE SUBPOENAS-

      `(1) IN GENERAL- If the Secretary of State determines that there is an imminent threat against a person, foreign mission, or international organization protected under the authority of subsection (a)(3), the Secretary may issue in writing, and cause to be served, a subpoena requiring--

        `(A) the production of any records or other items relevant to the threat; and

        `(B) testimony by the custodian of the items required to be produced concerning the production and authenticity of those items.

      `(2) REQUIREMENTS-

        `(A) RETURN DATE- A subpoena under this subsection shall describe the items required to be produced and shall specify a return date within a reasonable period of time within which the requested items may be assembled and made available. The return date specified may not be less than 24 hours after service of the subpoena.

        `(B) NOTIFICATION TO ATTORNEY GENERAL- As soon as practicable following the issuance of a subpoena under this subsection, the Secretary shall notify the Attorney General of its issuance.

        `(C) OTHER REQUIREMENTS- The following provisions of section 3486 of title 18, United States Code, shall apply to the exercise of the authority of paragraph (1):

          `(i) Paragraphs (4) through (8) of subsection (a).

          `(ii) Subsections (b), (c), and (d).

      `(3) DELEGATION OF AUTHORITY- The authority under this subsection may be delegated only to the Deputy Secretary of State.

      `(4) ANNUAL REPORT- Not later than February 1 of each year, the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives a report regarding the exercise of the authority under this subsection during the previous calendar year.'.

SEC. 203. ENHANCED DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITY FOR UNIFORMED SECURITY OFFICERS.

    The State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 is amended by inserting after section 37 (22 U.S.C. 2709) the following new section:

`SEC. 37A. PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS AND AREAS IN THE UNITED STATES BY DESIGNATED LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS.

    `(a) DESIGNATION OF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS- The Secretary of State may designate Department of State uniformed guards as law enforcement officers for duty in connection with the protection of buildings and areas within the United States for which the Department of State provides protective services, including duty in areas outside the property to the extent necessary to protect the property and persons on the property.

    `(b) POWERS OF OFFICERS- While engaged in the performance of official duties as a law enforcement officer designated under subsection (a), an officer may--

      `(1) enforce Federal laws and regulations for the protection of persons and property;

      `(2) carry firearms; and

      `(3) make arrests without warrant for any offense against the United States committed in the officer's presence, or for any felony cognizable under the laws of the United States if the officer has reasonable grounds to believe that the person to be arrested has committed or is committing such felony in connection with the buildings and areas, or persons, for which the Department of State is providing protective services.

    `(c) REGULATIONS- (1) The Secretary of State may prescribe regulations necessary for the administration of buildings and areas within the United States for which the Department of State provides protective services. The regulations may include reasonable penalties, within the limits prescribed in subsection (d), for violations of the regulations.

    `(2) The Secretary shall consult with the Secretary of Homeland Security in prescribing the regulations under paragraph (1).

    `(3) The regulations shall be posted and kept posted in a conspicuous place on the property.

    `(d) PENALTIES- A person violating a regulation prescribed under subsection (c) shall be fined under title 18, United States Code, or imprisoned for not more than 30 days, or both.

    `(e) TRAINING OFFICERS- The Secretary of State may also designate firearms and explosives training officers as law enforcement officers under subsection (a) for the limited purpose of safeguarding firearms, ammunition, and explosives that are located at firearms and explosives training facilities approved by the Secretary or are in transit between training facilities and Department of State weapons and munitions vaults.

    `(f) ATTORNEY GENERAL APPROVAL- The powers granted to officers designated under this section shall be exercised in accordance with guidelines approved by the Attorney General.

    `(g) RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER AUTHORITY- Nothing in this section shall be construed to affect the authority of the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Administrator of General Services, or any Federal law enforcement agency.

    `(h) LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER STATUS- The use of the term `law enforcement officer' in this section shall not be construed to qualify a person so designated under this section as a law enforcement officer, as that term is defined in section 8401(17) of title 5, United States Code, for purposes of chapter 84 of such title.'.

SEC. 204. GRANT AUTHORITIES.

    Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

`SEC. 61. GRANT AUTHORITIES.

    `The Secretary of State is authorized to support, by grants, cooperative agreements, or contract, the following activities:

      `(1) Outreach and public diplomacy activities regarding the benefits of agricultural biotechnology, science-based regulatory systems, and the application of such technology for trade and development.

      `(2) Training and technical assistance projects regarding protection of intellectual property rights.'.

SEC. 205. INTERNATIONAL LITIGATION FUND.

    Section 38(d)(3) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2710(d)(3)) is amended--

      (1) by inserting `as a result of a decision of an international tribunal,' after `by the Department of State'; and

      (2) by inserting a comma after `United States Government'.

SEC. 206. RETENTION OF MEDICAL REIMBURSEMENTS.

    Section 904 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-465) (22 U.S.C. 4084) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(g) Reimbursements paid to the Secretary of State for funding the costs of medical care abroad for employees and eligible family members shall be credited to the currently available applicable appropriation account. Such reimbursements shall be available for obligation and expenditure during the fiscal year in which they are received or for such longer period of time as may be provided in law.'.

SEC. 207. TRANSFER AUTHORITY FOR BUYING POWER MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT.

    Section 24(b)(7) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2696(b)(7)) is amended by striking subparagraph (D).

SEC. 208. ACCOUNTABILITY REVIEW BOARDS.

    Section 301(a) of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4831(a)) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (1), by striking `paragraph (2)' and inserting `paragraphs (2) and (3)'; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      `(3) FACILITIES IN AFGHANISTAN AND IRAQ-

        `(A) LIMITED EXEMPTION FROM REQUIREMENT TO CONVENE BOARD- The Secretary of State is not required to convene a Board in the case of an incident that--

          `(i) involves serious injury, loss of life, or significant destruction of property at, or related to, a United States Government mission in Afghanistan or Iraq; and

          `(ii) occurs during the period beginning on July 1, 2004, and ending on September 30, 2009.

        `(B) REPORTING REQUIREMENTS- In the case of an incident described in subparagraph (A), the Secretary shall--

          `(i) promptly notify the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate of the incident;

          `(ii) conduct an inquiry of the incident; and

          `(iii) upon completion of the inquiry required by clause (ii), submit to such committees a report on the findings and recommendations related to such inquiry and the actions taken with respect to such recommendations.'.

SEC. 209. DESIGNATION OF COLIN L. POWELL RESIDENTIAL PLAZA.

    (a) DESIGNATION- The Federal building in Kingston, Jamaica, formerly known as the Crowne Plaza and now a staff housing facility for the United States mission in Jamaica, shall be known and designated at the `Colin L. Powell Residential Plaza'.

    (b) REFERENCES- Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United States to the Federal building referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be a reference to the Colin L. Powell Residential Plaza.

SEC. 210. REMOVAL OF CONTRACTING PROHIBITION.

    Section 406(c) of the Omnibus Diplomatic Security and Antiterrorism Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-399) is repealed.

SEC. 211. AMERICAN INSTITUTE IN TAIWAN FACILITIES ENHANCEMENT.

    Section 3(a) of the American Institute in Taiwan Facilities Enhancement Act (Public Law 106-212) is amended by striking `the sum of $75,000,000' and inserting `such sums as may be necessary'.

SEC. 212. EXTENSION OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON CULTURAL DIPLOMACY.

    Section 224(j) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (22 U.S.C. 2451 note) is amended by striking `2005' and inserting `2007'.

SEC. 213. VICTIMS OF CRIME IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.

    (a) VICTIMS OF CRIME OFFICE-

      (1) ESTABLISHMENT- The Secretary shall establish the Victims of Crime Office within the Bureau of Consular Affairs of the Department.

      (2) DUTIES- The head of the Victims of Crime Office shall--

        (A) compile a database of information regarding incidents of violent crime committed against nationals of the United States in a foreign country;

        (B) provide information and training to consular officers to assist such officers in addressing the needs of nationals of the United States who are victims of a violent crime in a foreign country; and

        (C) administer the assistance program authorized under subsection (b).

      (3) TIME FOR ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE- The Secretary shall complete the action required under paragraph (1) not later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act.

    (b) ASSISTANCE FOR CRIME VICTIMS-

      (1) AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE- The Secretary is authorized to provide financial assistance from funds available under section 4 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2671), to crime victims to address the needs of such victims. Such assistance may include funds for--

        (A) advance payment of emergency services including medical and travel expenses;

        (B) travel to and from judicial proceedings;

        (C) the shipment of remains; and

        (D) repatriation of victims of domestic violence or child abuse.

      (2) NONDUPLICATION OF ASSISTANCE- A crime victim is not eligible for assistance under paragraph (1) to meet a need of such crime victim if the Secretary determines that such crime victim is eligible to receive assistance from any other source, including from a program of assistance of a State, to meet such need.

      (3) OFFICE TO ADMINISTER PROGRAM- The Secretary shall carry out this subsection through the head of the Victims of Crime Office.

      (4) REGULATIONS- The Secretary shall prescribe such regulations as the Secretary determines necessary to administer the program of assistance to crime victims under paragraph (1).

      (5) AVAILABILITY OF EMERGENCY FUNDS-

        (A) IN GENERAL- Section 4(b)(2) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2671(b)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

      `(K) assistance to crime victims under section 213 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007.'.

        (B) TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS- Such section is further amended--

          (i) in subparagraph (I), by striking `and' at the end; and

          (ii) in subparagraph (J), by striking the period at the end and inserting `; and'.

    (c) REPORT- Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall report to the appropriate congressional committees on the activities of the Victims of Crime Office. The report shall include information on--

      (1) the operation of such Office;

      (2) the expenditure of any funds under subparagraph (K) of section 4(b)(2) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956, as added by subsection (b); and

      (3) the recommendations of the Secretary, if any, for legislation that is necessary to improve the operation of such Office.

    (d) DEFINITIONS- In this section:

      (1) CRIME VICTIM- The term `crime victim' means a national of the United States who is a victim of violent crime in a foreign country.

      (2) NATIONAL OF THE UNITED STATES- The term `national of the United States' has the meaning given that term in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(22)).

      (3) STATE- The term `State' means each of the several States of the United States, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and American Samoa.

      (4) VIOLENT CRIME- The term `violent crime' means the crimes of murder, non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, child abuse, domestic abuse, kidnaping, and aggravated assault, as defined by the Secretary.

SEC. 214. UNITED STATES DIPLOMACY CENTER.

    Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651, et seq.), as amended by section 204, is amended by adding after section 61 the following new section:

`SEC. 62. THE UNITED STATES DIPLOMACY CENTER.

    `(a) ACTIVITIES-

      `(1) SUPPORT AUTHORIZED- The Secretary of State is authorized to provide by contract, grant, or otherwise, for the performance of appropriate museum visitor and educational outreach services, including organizing conference activities, museum shop services, and food services, in the public exhibit and related space utilized by the United States Diplomacy Center (in this section referred to as the `Center').

      `(2) PAYMENT OF EXPENSES- The Secretary may pay all reasonable expenses of conference activities conducted by the Center, including refreshments and reimbursement of travel expenses incurred by participants.

      `(3) RECOVERY OF COSTS- Any revenues generated under the authority of paragraph (1) for visitor services may be retained, as a recovery of the costs of operating the Center, and credited to any Department of State appropriation.

    `(b) DISPOSITION OF UNITED STATES DIPLOMACY CENTER ARTIFACTS AND MATERIALS-

      `(1) PROPERTY OF SECRETARY- All historic documents, artifacts, or other articles permanently acquired by the Department of State and determined by the Secretary to be suitable for display in the Center shall be considered to be the property of the Secretary in the Secretary's official capacity and shall be subject to disposition solely in accordance with this subsection.

      `(2) SALE OR TRADE- Whenever the Secretary makes the determination under paragraph (3) with respect to an item, the Secretary may sell at fair market value, trade, or transfer the item, without regard to the requirements of subtitle I of title 40, United States Code. The proceeds of any such sale may be used solely for the advancement of the Center's mission and may not be used for any purpose other than the acquisition and direct care of collections.

      `(3) DETERMINATIONS PRIOR TO SALE OR TRADE- The determination referred to in paragraph (2), with respect to an item, is a determination that--

        `(A) the item no longer serves to further the purposes of the Center established in the collections management policy of the Center; or

        `(B) in order to maintain the standards of the collections of the Center, the sale or exchange of the item would be a better use of the item.

      `(4) LOANS- The Secretary may also lend items covered by paragraph (1), when not needed for use or display in the Center, to the Smithsonian Institution or a similar institution for repair, study, or exhibition.'.

SEC. 215. STRENGTHENING UNITED STATES EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD.

    (a) DEFINITIONS- In this section:

      (1) ELIGIBLE COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY- The term `eligible college or university' means a college or university that--

        (A) is primarily located in an eligible country;

        (B) is organized under laws of the United States, a State, or the District of Columbia;

        (C) is recognized as a not-for-profit organization under the provisions of section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986;

        (D) is accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the Secretary of Education; and

        (E) is not controlled by the government of an eligible country.

      (2) ELIGIBLE COUNTRY- The term `eligible country' means a country or entity in Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, or Southeast Asia that--

        (A) has a significant Muslim population; and

        (B) is designated by the Secretary as an eligible country.

      (3) SECONDARY SCHOOL- The term `secondary school' means a school that serves students in any of the grades 9 through 12 or equivalent grades in a foreign education system, as determined by the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Education.

    (b) SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM-

      (1) PURPOSE- The purpose of this subsection is to improve the national security of the United States by providing scholarships for students in the Islamic world to study at United States institutions of higher education that are chartered and accredited in the United States and that are primarily located in the Islamic world in order to--

        (A) nurture United States values and ideals in the Islamic world;

        (B) foster mutual respect for United States and Islamic values and culture; and

        (C) improve mutual understanding between the people of the United States and people in the Islamic world.

      (2) SPECIFIC PROGRAM- To carry out the purpose of this subsection, the Secretary shall establish a program to offer scholarships to permit an individual to attend an eligible college or university if such individual--

        (A) has graduated from secondary school; and

        (B) is a citizen or resident of an eligible country.

      (3) IMPLEMENTATION-

        (A) RELATIONSHIP TO THE MUTUAL EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE ACT OF 1961- The Secretary shall utilize the authorities of the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2451 et seq.) to carry out the program authorized by this subsection by grant, contract, or otherwise with eligible colleges or universities.

        (B) EMPHASIS ON DEGREE PROGRAMS- The program established by the Secretary under this subsection shall emphasize scholarships in support of complete programs of study leading to the award of an academic degree.

        (C) ENGLISH LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY- The Secretary or the eligible college or university shall establish the English language proficiency of eligible secondary school graduates. For secondary school graduates found in need of additional English language training, the Secretary shall provide for not to exceed twelve months of such training prior to the commencement of the student's course of regular academic study at an eligible college or university.

    (c) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for educational and cultural exchange programs in each of the fiscal years 2005 through 2009, there is authorized to be made available to the Secretary such sums as may be necessary to carry out programs under this section.

      (2) AVAILABLE UNTIL EXPENDED- Amounts made available pursuant to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until expended.

TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 301. EDUCATION ALLOWANCES.

    Section 5924(4) of title 5, United States Code, is amended--

      (1) in the first sentence of subparagraph (A)--

        (A) by inserting after `Act)' the following: `and, in those cases in which educational trips are required for successful completion of a grade or course, the cost of such trips'; and

        (B) by striking `nearest locality' and inserting `nearest United States locality';

      (2) by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the following:

        `(B) The travel expenses of dependents of an employee to and from a school to obtain a secondary, post-secondary, or post-baccalaureate education, not to exceed 1 annual trip each way for each dependent, except that an allowance payment under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph may not be made for a dependent during the 12 months following the arrival of the dependent at the selected educational institution under authority contained in this subparagraph.'; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

        `(D) Allowances provided pursuant to subparagraphs (A) and (B) may include, at the election of the employee, payment or reimbursement of the costs incurred to store baggage for the employee's dependent at or in the vicinity of the dependent's school during one trip per year by the dependent between the school and the employee's duty station, except that such payment or reimbursement may not exceed the cost that the Government would incur to transport the baggage with the dependent in connection with the trip, and such payment or reimbursement shall be in lieu of transportation of the baggage.'.

SEC. 302. OFFICIAL RESIDENCE EXPENSES.

    Section 5913 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(c) Funds made available under subsection (b) may be provided in advance to persons eligible to receive reimbursements.'.

SEC. 303. INCREASED LIMITS APPLICABLE TO POST DIFFERENTIALS AND DANGER PAY ALLOWANCES.

    (a) REPEAL OF LIMITED-SCOPE EFFECTIVE DATE FOR PREVIOUS INCREASE- Subsection (c) of section 591 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2004 (division D of Public Law 108-199) is repealed.

    (b) POST DIFFERENTIALS- Section 5925(a) of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking `25 percent of the rate of basic pay or, in the case of an employee of the United States Agency for International Development,'.

    (c) DANGER PAY ALLOWANCES- Section 5928 of title 5, United States Code, is amended by striking `25 percent of the basic pay of the employee or 35 percent of the basic pay of the employee in the case of an employee of the United States Agency for International Development' both places that it appears and inserting `35 percent of the basic pay of the employee'.

SEC. 304. HOME LEAVE.

    (a) ELIGIBILITY FOR TRAVEL AND RELATED EXPENSES- Section 901(6) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4081(6)) is amended by striking `unbroken by home leave' each place that phrase occurs.

    (b) LENGTH OF CONTINUOUS SERVICE ABROAD BEFORE REQUIRED LEAVE- Section 903(a) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4083(a)) is amended by striking `18 months' and inserting `12 months'.

SEC. 305. FELLOWSHIP OF HOPE PROGRAM.

    (a) FELLOWSHIP AUTHORIZED- Chapter 5 of title I of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3981 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

    `SEC. 506. FELLOWSHIP OF HOPE- (a) The Secretary is authorized to establish the Fellowship of Hope Program. Under the program, the Secretary may assign a member of the Service, for not more than one year, to a position with any designated country or designated entity that permits an employee to be assigned to a position with the Department.

    `(b) The salary and benefits of a member of the Service shall be paid as described in subsection (b) of section 503 during a period in which such member is participating in the Fellowship of Hope Program. The salary and benefits of an employee of a designated country or designated entity participating in such program shall be paid by such country or entity during the period in which such employee is participating in the program.

    `(c) In this section:

      `(1) The term `designated country' means a member country of--

        `(A) the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; or

        `(B) the European Union.

      `(2) The term `designated entity' means--

        `(A) the North Atlantic Treaty Organization; or

        `(B) the European Union.'.

    (b) TECHNICAL AND CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- Such Act is further amended--

      (1) in section 503 (22 U.S.C. 3983)--

        (A) in the section heading, by striking `AND' and inserting `FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS, OR'; and

        (B) in subsection (a)(1), by inserting after `body' the following: `, or with a foreign government under section 506'; and

      (2) in section 2, in the table of contents--

        (A) by striking the item relating to section 503 and inserting the following:

      `Sec. 503. Assignments to agencies, international organizations, foreign governments, or other bodies.';

        and

        (B) by inserting after the item relating to section 505 the following:

      `Sec. 506. Fellowship of Hope Program.'.

SEC. 306. SECURITY OFFICERS EXCHANGE PROGRAM.

    (a) AUTHORITY- Chapter 5 of title I of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3981 et seq.), as amended by section 307, is further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

    `SEC. 507. SECURITY OFFICERS EXCHANGE- (a) The Secretary is authorized to establish the Security Officers Exchange Program. Under the program, the Secretary may assign a member of the service, for not more than a total of 3 years, to a position with the Government of Australia or the United Kingdom if such Government permits an employee of such Government to be assigned to a position with the Department.

    `(b) The salary and benefits of the members of the service shall be paid as described in section 503(b) during a period in which such officer is participating in the Security Officers Exchange Program. The salary and benefits of an employee of the Government of Australia or the United Kingdom participating in such program shall be paid by such country during the period in which such employee is participating in the program.'.

    (b) TECHNICAL AND CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- Such Act, as amended by section 307, is further amended--

      (1) in section 503(a)(1) (22 U.S.C. 3983(a)(1)), by inserting `or 507' after `section 506'; and

      (2) in section 2, in the table of contents, by inserting after the item relating to section 506 the following:

`Sec. 507. Security Officers Exchange Program.'.

SEC. 307. REEMPLOYMENT OF ANNUITANTS.

    (a) ADDITIONAL WAIVER OF ANNUITY LIMITATIONS FOR FOREIGN SERVICE ANNUITANTS- Section 824(g) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4064(g)) is amended to read as follows:

    `(g)(1) The Secretary of State may waive the application of subsections (a) through (d) on a case-by-case basis for an annuitant reemployed on a temporary basis--

      `(A) if, and for so long as, such waiver is necessary due to an emergency involving a direct threat to life or property or other unusual circumstances; or

      `(B) if the annuitant is employed in a position for which there is exceptional difficulty in recruiting or retaining a qualified employee.

    `(2) The authority of the Secretary of State under paragraph (1)(B) to waive the application of subsections (a) through (d) shall expire on September 30, 2007.'.

    (b) REGULATIONS- The Secretary should prescribe regulations for the exercise of waiver authority under section 824(g) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4064(b)), as amended by subsection (a), including criteria for the exercise or delegation of such authority.

    (c) REPORT TO CONGRESS- Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the exercise of the waiver authorities provided under section 824(g) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4064(g)), as amended by subsection (a). The report shall include the number and type of positions that have been filled under such waiver authority, and the retirement date, former job title, and new job title of each annuitant reemployed under such authority.

SEC. 308. SUSPENSION OF FOREIGN SERVICE MEMBERS WITHOUT PAY.

    (a) SUSPENSION- Section 610 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4010) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(c)(1) The Secretary may suspend a member of the Service without pay when there is reasonable cause to believe that the member has committed a crime for which a sentence of imprisonment may be imposed and there is a connection between the conduct and the efficiency of the Service.

    `(2) Any member of the Service for which a suspension is proposed shall be entitled to--

        `(A) written notice stating the specific reasons for the proposed suspension;

        `(B) a reasonable time to respond orally and in writing to the proposed suspension;

        `(C) representation by an attorney or other representative; and

        `(D) a final written decision, including the specific reasons for such decision, as soon as practicable.

      `(3) Any member suspended under this section may file a grievance in accordance with the procedures applicable to grievances under chapter 11 of this title.

      `(4) In the case of a grievance filed under paragraph (3)--

        `(A) the review by the Foreign Service Grievance Board shall be limited to a determination of whether the reasonable cause requirement has been fulfilled and whether there is a connection between the conduct and the efficiency of the Service; and

        `(B) the Foreign Service Grievance Board may not exercise the authority provided under section 1106(8).

      `(5) In this subsection:

        `(A) The term `reasonable time' means--

          `(i) with respect to a member of the Service assigned to duty in the United States, at least 15 days after receiving notice of the proposed suspension; and

          `(ii) with respect to a member of the Service assigned to duty outside the United States, at least 30 days after receiving notice of the proposed suspension.

        `(B) The term `suspend' or `suspension' means the placing of a member of the Service in a temporary status without duties and pay.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AND CLERICAL AMENDMENTS-

      (1) AMENDMENT OF SECTION HEADING- Such section, as amended by subsection (a), is further amended in the section heading by inserting `; SUSPENSION' before the period at the end.

      (2) CLERICAL AMENDMENT- The item relating to such section in the table of contents in section 2 of such Act is amended to read as follows:

`Sec. 610. Separation for cause; suspension.'.

SEC. 309. SEPARATION OF LOWEST-RANKED FOREIGN SERVICE MEMBERS.

    Section 2311(b)(1) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999 (22 U.S.C. 4010 note) is amended--

      (1) by striking `Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the' and inserting `The';

      (2) by striking `5 percent' and inserting `2 percent'; and

      (3) by striking `for 2 or more of the 5 years preceding the date of enactment of this Act' and inserting `at least twice in any 5-year period'.

SEC. 310. CLARIFICATION OF FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD PROCEDURES.

    Section 1106(8) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4136(8)) is amended in the first sentence--

      (1) by inserting `the involuntary separation of the grievant (other than an involuntary separation for cause under section 610(a)),' after `considering'; and

      (2) by striking `the grievant or' and inserting `the grievant, or'.

SEC. 311. REPEAL OF REQUIREMENT FOR RECERTIFICATION PROCESS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR FOREIGN SERVICE.

    Section 305(d) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3945(d)) is repealed.

SEC. 312. DEADLINE FOR ISSUANCE OF REGULATIONS REGARDING RETIREMENT CREDIT FOR GOVERNMENT SERVICE PERFORMED ABROAD.

    Section 321(f) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (5 U.S.C. 8411 note) is amended by inserting `, not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007,' after `regulations'.

SEC. 313. WORLDWIDE AVAILABILITY.

    Section 301(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3941(b)) is amended by inserting at the end `At the time of entry into the Service, each member of the Service must be worldwide available, as determined by the Secretary of State through appropriate medical examinations, unless the Secretary determines that a waiver of the worldwide availability requirement is required to fulfill a compelling Service need.'.

SEC. 314. TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 5 PROVISIONS ON RECRUITMENT, RELOCATION, AND RETENTION BONUSES.

    (a) RECRUITMENT AND RELOCATION BONUSES- Section 5753(a)(2)(A) of title 5, United States Code, is amended by inserting after `a position' the following, `, other than as a member of the Foreign Service,'.

    (b) RETENTION ALLOWANCES- Section 5754(a)(2)(A) of title 5, United States Code, is amended by inserting after `a position' the following `, other than as a member of the Foreign Service,'.

SEC. 315. LIMITED APPOINTMENTS IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

    Section 309 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3949) is amended--

      (1) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(c)(1) Non-career specialist employees who have served five consecutive years under a limited appointment may be reappointed to a subsequent limited appointment, provided that there is a one-year break in service between each appointment.

    `(2) The requirement for a one-year break in service may be waived by the Secretary of State in cases of special need.';

      (2) in subsection (a), by striking `subsection (b)' and inserting `subsections (b) and (c)'; and

      (3) in subsection (b)--

        (A) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:

    `(3) as a career candidate if--

      `(A) continued service is determined appropriate to remedy a matter that would be cognizable as a grievance under chapter 11; or

      `(B) the career candidate is called to military active duty under chapter 43 of title 38, United States Code, and the limited appointment expires in the course of such military active duty;';

        (B) in paragraph (4), by striking `and' after the semicolon;

        (C) in paragraph (5), by striking the period at the end and inserting `; and'; and

        (D) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      `(6) in exceptional circumstances when the Secretary determines the needs of the Service require the extension of a limited appointment--

        `(A) for a period of time not to exceed 12 months provided such period of time does not permit additional review by the boards under section 306; or

        `(B) in order to settle a grievance, claim, or complaint not otherwise provided for in this section.'.

SEC. 316. PERSONAL SERVICE CONTRACTORS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Subject to the conditions in subsection (b), the Inspector General of the Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors (in this section referred to as the `Inspector General') may establish a demonstration program (in this section referred to as the `program') for the purpose of hiring as personal services contractors nationals of the United States (as defined in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(22)) or aliens authorized to be employed in the United States, without regard to civil service and classification laws, to provide services to the Office of the Inspector General to respond to new or emerging needs or to augment current services.

    (b) CONDITIONS- The authority under subsection (a) is subject to the following conditions:

      (1) The Inspector General determines that existing personnel resources are insufficient.

      (2) The contract length for a personal service contractor, including options, may not exceed 2 years, unless the Inspector General makes a finding that exceptional circumstances justify an extension of up to one additional year.

      (3) Not more than a total of 20 individuals may be employed at any one time as personal services contractors under the program.

    (c) TERMINATION OF AUTHORITY- The authority to award personal services contracts under this section shall terminate on December 31, 2007. A contract entered into prior to the termination date under this subsection may remain in effect until not later than June 30, 2008.

    (d) OTHER AUTHORITIES NOT AFFECTED- The authority provided in this section is in addition to any other authority of the Inspector General to hire personal service contractors.

SEC. 317. DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO PROPOSED RECIPIENTS OF THE PERSONAL RANK OF AMBASSADOR OR MINISTER.

    Section 302(a)(2)(B)(ii)(IV) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3942(a)(2)(B)(ii)(IV)) is amended by inserting before the period at the end the following: `, including information that is required to be disclosed on the Standard Form 278, or any successor financial disclosure report'.

SEC. 318. PROVISION OF LIVING QUARTERS AND ALLOWANCES TO THE UNITED STATES REPRESENTATIVES TO THE UNITED NATIONS.

    Section 9 of the United Nations Participation Act of 1945 (22 U.S.C. 287e-1) is amended to read as follows:

    `SEC. 9. (a) The Secretary of State may, under such regulations as the Secretary shall prescribe, and notwithstanding subsections (a) and (b) of section 3324 of title 31, United States Code, and section 5536 of title 5, United States Code--

      `(1) make available to the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations and the Deputy Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations--

        `(A) living quarters leased or rented by the United States for a period that does not exceed 10 years; and

        `(B) allowances for unusual expenses incident to the operation and maintenance of such living quarters that are similar to expenses authorized to be funded by section 5913 of title 5, United States Code;

      `(2) make available living quarters in New York leased or rented by the United States for a period of not more than 10 years to--

        `(A) not more than 40 members of the Foreign Service assigned to the United States Mission to the United Nations or other United States representatives to the United Nations; and

        `(B) not more than 2 employees who serve at the pleasure of the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations; and

      `(3) provide an allowance, as the Secretary considers appropriate, to each Delegate and Alternate Delegate of the United States to any session of the General Assembly of the United Nations who is not a permanent member of the staff of the United States Mission to the United Nations, in order to compensate each such Delegate or Alternate Delegate for necessary housing and subsistence expenses with respect to attending any such session.

    `(b) The Secretary of State may not make available living quarters or allowances under subsection (a) to an employee who is occupying living quarters that are owned by such employee.

    `(c) Living quarters and allowances provided under subsection (a) shall be considered for all purposes as authorized--

      `(1) by chapter 9 of title I of the Foreign Service Act of 1980; and

      `(2) by section 5913 of title 5, United States Code.

    `(d) The Inspector General of the Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors shall periodically review the administration of this section with a view to achieving cost savings and developing appropriate recommendations to make to the Secretary of State regarding the administration of this section.'.

TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

SEC. 401. LIMITATION ON THE UNITED STATES SHARE OF ASSESSMENTS FOR UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    Section 404(b)(2)(B) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 287e note) is amended by adding at the end the following new clause:

          `(v) For assessments made after calendar year 2004, 27.1 percent.'.

SEC. 402. REDI CENTER.

    The Secretary is authorized to provide for the participation by the United States in the Regional Emerging Disease Intervention (`REDI') Center in Singapore.

SEC. 403. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON IMPLEMENTATION OF THE BRAHIMI REPORT.

    (a) REQUIREMENT- Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report assessing the progress made to implement the recommendations set out in the Report of the Panel on United Nations Peace Operations, transmitted from the Secretary General of the United Nations to the President of the General Assembly and the President of the Security Council on August 21, 2000 (referred to in this section as the `Report').

    (b) CONTENT- The report required by subsection (a) shall include--

      (1) an assessment of the progress made by the United Nations toward implementing the recommendations set out in the Report;

      (2) a description of the progress made toward strengthening the capability of the United Nations to deploy a civilian police force and rule of law teams on an emergency basis at the request of the United Nations Security Council; and

      (3) a description of the policies, programs, and strategies of the United States Government that support the implementation of the recommendations set out in the Report, especially in the areas of civilian police and rule of law.

SEC. 404. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE UNITED NATIONS BUDGETARY DISCIPLINE AND MANAGEMENT REFORM.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) It is the responsibility of Congress to ensure that international organizations that receive contributions from the United States, including the United Nations, utilize United States taxpayer money in a manner that is effective and cost-efficient, and that promotes the policy goals of the United States.

      (2) The United States contributes 22 percent of the United Nations regular budget and approximately 27 percent of costs associated with United Nations peacekeeping operations.

      (3) The member states of the United Nations have increased the regular budget by more than $1,000,000,000 since the 1994-1995 biennium to deal with evolving global issues.

      (4) The member states of the United Nations have made commitments which have increased the costs of United Nations peacekeeping operations to more than $5,000,000,000 during the 2005-2006 biennium.

      (5) The February 3, 2005, report of the Independent Inquiry Committee into the United Nations Oil-for-Food Programme found significant weaknesses in United Nations management and internal oversight of the Oil-for-Food Programme, including a determination that the actions of the Executive Director of the United Nations Office of the Iraq Programme, which administered the Oil-for-Food Programme in Iraq, created `grave and continuing conflict of interest, were ethically improper, and seriously undermined the integrity of the United Nations'.

      (6) The United States Government Accountability Office found that the audit and summary reports of the United Nations Office of Internal Oversight Services (OIOS) revealed numerous deficiencies in the management and internal controls of the Oil-for-Food Programme, and that United Nations management and the Office of the Iraq Programme prevented OIOS from reporting its results directly to the United Nations Security Council.

    (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that--

      (1) the United Nations should comply fully with its commitments to budgetary discipline and management reform; and

      (2) the Secretary should instruct any United States representative to the United Nations to use the voice and vote of the United States to seek to enact significant and necessary changes to improve the accountability and increase the transparency of the United Nations processes, including in its peacekeeping missions around the world, as part of the follow-up to the 2005 United Nations report on reform initiatives entitled `The Report of the Secretary-General's High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change'.

TITLE V--BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS

SEC. 501. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `International Broadcasting Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007'.

SEC. 502. MIDDLE EAST BROADCASTING NETWORKS.

    (a) AUTHORITY- The United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6201 et seq.), is amended by inserting after section 309 the following new section:

`SEC. 310. MIDDLE EAST BROADCASTING NETWORKS.

    `(a) AUTHORITY- Grants authorized under section 305 shall be available to make annual grants to Middle East Broadcasting Networks for the purpose of carrying out radio and television broadcasting to the Middle East region.

    `(b) FUNCTION- Middle East Broadcasting Networks shall provide radio and television programming to the Middle East region consistent with the broadcasting standards and broadcasting principles set forth in section 303.

    `(c) GRANT AGREEMENT- Any grant agreement or grants under this section shall be subject to the following limitations and restrictions:

      `(1) The Broadcasting Board of Governors may not make any grant to the nonprofit corporation, Middle East Broadcasting Networks, unless its certificate of incorporation provides that--

        `(A) the Board of Directors of Middle East Broadcasting Networks shall consist of the members of the Broadcasting Board of Governors established under section 304 and of no other members; and

        `(B) such Board of Directors shall make all major policy determinations governing the operation of Middle East Broadcasting Networks, and shall appoint and fix the compensation of such managerial officers and employees of Middle East Broadcasting Networks as it considers necessary to carry out the purposes of the grant provided under this title.

      `(2) Any grant agreement under this section shall require that any contract entered into by Middle East Broadcasting Networks shall specify that obligations are assumed by Middle East Broadcasting Networks and not the United States Government.

      `(3) Any grant agreement shall require that any lease agreement entered into by Middle East Broadcasting Networks shall be, to the maximum extent possible, assignable to the United States Government.

      `(4) Grants awarded under this section shall be made pursuant to a grant agreement that--

        `(A) requires that grant funds be used only for activities consistent with this section; and

        `(B) provides that failure to comply with such requirements shall permit the grant to be terminated without fiscal obligation to the United States.

      `(5) Duplication of language services and technical operations among Middle East Broadcasting Networks (including Radio Sawa), RFE/RL, Incorporated, and the International Broadcasting Bureau will be reduced to the extent appropriate, as determined by the Board.

    `(d) NOT A FEDERAL AGENCY OR INSTRUMENTALITY- Nothing in this title may be construed to make Middle East Broadcasting Networks a Federal agency or instrumentality, nor shall the officers or employees of Middle East Broadcasting Networks be deemed to be officers or employees of the United States Government.

    `(e) AUDIT AND INSPECTION-

      `(1) COMPTROLLER GENERAL OF THE UNITED STATES- The Comptroller General of the United States may exercise, with respect to financial auditing of Middle East Broadcasting Networks corporation, the authorities provided by chapter 7 of title 31, United States Code, to the extent such authorities may apply with respect to corporations that are not Federal agencies or instrumentalities.

      `(2) INSPECTOR GENERAL- The Inspector General of the Department of State and the Broadcasting Board of Governors may exercise with respect to Middle East Broadcasting Networks corporation the authorities granted by section 209 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3929) and the Inspector General Act of 1978 (5 U.S.C. App.) to the extent such authorities may apply with respect to corporations that are not Federal agencies or instrumentalities.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS-

      (1) AUTHORITIES OF BOARD- Section 305 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6204), is amended--

        (A) in paragraph (5) of subsection (a), by striking `and 309' and inserting `, 309, and 310';

        (B) in paragraph (6) of such subsection, by striking `and 309' and inserting `, 309, and 310'; and

        (C) in subsection (c), by striking `and 309' and inserting `, 309, and 310'.

      (2) INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING BUREAU- Section 307 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6206), is amended--

        (A) in subsection (a), by striking `and 309' and inserting `, 309, and 310'; and

        (B) in subsection (c), by inserting `, Middle East Broadcasting Networks,' after `Asia'.

      (3) IMMUNITY FROM LIABILITY- Section 304(g) of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6203(g)), is amended--

        (A) by striking `and' after `Incorporated', and inserting a comma; and

        (B) by adding `, and Middle East Broadcasting Networks' after `Asia'.

      (4) CREDITABLE SERVICE- Section 8332(b)(11) of title 5, United States Code, is amended by inserting `the Middle East Broadcasting Network;' after `the Asia Foundation;'.

SEC. 503. IMPROVING SIGNAL DELIVERY TO CUBA.

    Section 3 of the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465a) is amended--

      (1) by striking subsection (b);

      (2) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (b);

      (3) by amending subsection (b), as redesignated by paragraph (2), to read as follows:

    `(b) In order to effect radio broadcasting to Cuba, the Broadcasting Board of Governors is authorized to utilize the United States international broadcasting facilities located in Marathon, Florida and the 1180 AM frequency used at those facilities. In addition to the above facilities, the Broadcasting Board of Governors may simultaneously utilize other governmental and nongovernmental broadcasting transmission facilities, and other frequencies, including the Amplitude Modulation (AM) band, the Frequency Modulation (FM) band, and the Shortwave (SW) band. The Broadcasting Board of Governors may lease time on commercial or noncommercial educational AM band, FM band, and SW band radio broadcasting stations to carry part of the service programs or to rebroadcast service programs.';

      (4) by striking subsections (d) and (f);

      (5) by redesignating subsection (e) as subsection (c); and

      (6) by amending subsection (c), as redesignated by paragraph (5), to read as follows:

    `(c) Any service program of United States Government radio broadcasts to Cuba authorized by this section shall be designated `Radio Marti program'.'.

SEC. 504. EXTENSION OF AUTHORITY FOR RADIO FREE ASIA.

    Section 309 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6208) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (c)(2), by striking `2009' and inserting `2015'; and

      (2) in subsection (f), by striking `2009' and inserting `2015'.

SEC. 505. PERSONAL SERVICES CONTRACTING PROGRAM.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 504 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228; 22 U.S.C. 6206 note), is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a)--

        (A) by striking `pilot'; and

        (B) by striking `broadcasters, producers, and writers' and inserting `broadcasters and other broadcasting specialists';

      (2) in subsection (b)(4), by striking `60' and inserting `100'; and

      (3) by striking subsection (c).

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- The Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228; 116 Stat. 1350) is amended--

      (1) in section 504, by striking `pilot' in the section heading; and

      (2) in the table of contents in section 2(b), by amending the item related to section 504 to read as follows:

`Sec. 504. Personal services contracting program.'.

SEC. 506. COMMONWEALTH OF THE NORTHERN MARIANA ISLANDS EDUCATION BENEFITS.

    Section 305(a) of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6204(a)) is amended--

      (1) by redesignating paragraphs (17) and (18) as (18) and (19), respectively; and

      (2) by inserting after paragraph (16), the following new paragraph:

      `(17) To, in its discretion--

        `(A) pay the expenses of primary and secondary schooling for dependents of personnel stationed in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands at a cost not in excess of those authorized by the Department of Defense for the same area, when it is determined by the Broadcasting Board of Governors that schools available in the locality are unable to provide adequately for the education of such dependents; and

        `(B) provide transportation of those dependents between their place of residence and schools serving the area, which those dependents would normally attend within the local area, when the Broadcasting Board of Governors determines that such schools are not accessible by public means of transportation.'.

SEC. 507. EXEMPTION FROM NUMERICAL LIMITATIONS FOR TEMPORARY WORKERS.

    Section 214(g)(5)(B) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1184(g)(5)(B)) is amended to read as follows:

      `(B) is employed (or has received an offer of employment) by or at the Broadcasting Board of Governors or one of its grantees, a nonprofit research organization, or a governmental research organization; or'.

TITLE VI--CONSULAR AUTHORITIES

SEC. 601. TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS TO INTELLIGENCE REFORM AND TERRORISM PREVENTION ACT OF 2004.

    (a) TRANSIT WITHOUT VISA PROGRAM- Section 7209(d) of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 (Public Law 108-458) is amended to read as follows:

    `(d) TRANSIT WITHOUT VISA PROGRAM- The Secretary of Homeland Security and the Secretary of State shall not use any authorities granted under section 212(d)(4)(C) of such Act until the Secretary of Homeland Security completely implements a security plan to fully ensure secure transit passage areas to prevent aliens proceeding in immediate and continuous transit through the United States from illegally entering the United States.'.

    (b) FRONTLINE COUNTERTERRORIST TRAVEL TECHNOLOGY AND TRAINING- Section 7201(c)(1) of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 is amended in the second sentence by inserting after `Department of Homeland Security' the following: `and the Department of State'.

    (c) REPORT ON IMPLEMENTATION OF AMENDED INADMISSABILITIES- Section 5506 of the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004 is amended by inserting after `consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security' the following: `and the Secretary of State'.

SEC. 602. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    (a) Sense of Congress on Reciprocity Agreements- It is the sense of Congress that the United States should negotiate reciprocity agreements with foreign countries with the goal of mutual agreement on extending the validity of student and scholar visas to 4 years and permitting multiple entry into the United States by an individual using a student or scholar visa.

    (b) CONSULAR OFFICER GUIDANCE-

      (1) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

        (A) The United States has a strategic interest in encouraging international students, scholars, scientists, and exchange visitors to visit the United States to study, collaborate in research, and to develop personal relationships.

        (B) Openness to international students, scholars, scientists, and exchange visitors serves vital and longstanding national foreign policy, educational, and economic interests and the erosion of such openness undermines the national security interests of the United States.

        (C) Educating successive generations of future world leaders has long been a foundation of the United States international influence and leadership.

        (D) Open scientific exchange enables the United States to benefit from the knowledge of the world's top students and scientists and has been a critical factor in maintaining the United States leadership in science and technology.

        (E) Improvements to the visa processing procedures of the United States would enhance the national security of the United States by permitting--

          (i) closer scrutiny of visa applicants who might pose threats to national security; and

          (ii) timely adjudication of visa applications submitted by individuals whose presence in the United States serves an important national interest.

      (2) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that--

        (A) improvements to the visa processing procedures of the United States that should be considered for implementation include--

          (i) an operational visa policy that articulates the national interest of the United States in denying entry to visitors who seek to harm the United States and in opening entry to legitimate visitors, to guide consular officers in achieving the appropriate balance;

          (ii) focusing the efforts of the visa system on visitors who require special screening, while minimizing delays for legitimate visitors; and

          (iii) a timely, transparent, and predictable visa process, through appropriate guidelines for inter-agency review of visa applications; and

        (B) the Secretary should continue to issue updated appropriate guidance to consular officers to improve the procedures for processing visa applications in order to facilitate United States openness to international student, scholar, scientist, and international visitors.

    (c) REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Education, Secretary of Commerce, Secretary of Homeland Security, and Secretary of Energy, shall submit to Congress a report that includes a description, for calendar years 2004 and 2005, of--

      (1) the measures carried out to enhance access to the United States by foreign students, scholars, scientists, and exchange visitors and to improve inter-agency coordination with regard to foreign students, scholars, scientists, and exchange visitors;

      (2) the measures carried out to utilize the educational advising centers of the Department of State that are located in foreign countries to promote study in the United States and to prescreen visa applicants;

      (3) the measures carried out to negotiate reciprocal agreements referred to in subsection (a);

      (4) the number of foreign students, scholars, scientists, and exchange visitors who applied for visas to enter the United States, disaggregated by applicants' fields of study or expertise, the number of such visa applications that are approved, the number of such visa applications that are denied, and the reasons for such denials;

      (5) the average processing time for an application for a visa submitted by a foreign student, scholar, scientist, or exchange visitor;

      (6) the number of applications for a visa submitted by foreign students, scholars, scientists, or exchange visitors that require inter-agency review;

      (7) the number of applications for a visa submitted by foreign students, scholars, scientists, or exchange visitors that were approved after receipt of such applications in a period of time that was--

        (A) less than 15 days;

        (B) between 15 and 30 days;

        (C) between 31 and 45 days;

        (D) between 46 and 60 days;

        (E) between 61 and 90 days; or

        (F) more than 90 days; and

      (8) the measures carried out to reduce the time required for universities and programs approved under the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) required by the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act of 1996 (Division C of Public Law 104-208; 110 Stat. 3009-546) to perform the clerical tasks associated with SEVIS.

TITLE VII--RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION

SEC. 701. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `Reconstruction and Stabilization Civilian Management Act of 2005'.

SEC. 702. FINDING; PURPOSE.

    (a) FINDING- Congress finds that the resources of the United States Armed Forces have been burdened by having to undertake stabilization and reconstruction tasks in the Balkans, Afghanistan, Iraq, and other countries of the world that could have been performed by civilians, which has resulted in lengthy deployments for Armed Forces personnel.

    (b) PURPOSE- The purpose of this title is to provide for the development, as a core mission of the Department of State and the United States Agency for International Development, of an effective expert civilian response capability to carry out reconstruction and stabilization activities in a country or region that is in, or is in transition from, conflict or civil strife.

SEC. 703. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:

      (1) ADMINISTRATOR- The term `Administrator' means the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development.

      (2) DEPARTMENT- Except as otherwise provided in this Act, the term `Department' means the Department of State.

      (3) EXECUTIVE AGENCY- The term `Executive agency' has the meaning given that term in section 105 of title 5, United States Code.

SEC. 704. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

    It is the sense of Congress that--

      (1) the civilian element of United States joint civilian-military operations should be strengthened in order to enhance the execution of current and future reconstruction and stabilization activities in foreign countries or regions that are in, or are in transition from, conflict or civil strife;

      (2) the capability of civilian agencies of the United States Government to carry out reconstruction and stabilization activities in such countries or regions should also be enhanced through a new rapid response corps of civilian experts supported by the establishment of a new system of planning, organization, personnel policies, and education and training, and the provision of adequate resources;

      (3) the international community, including nongovernmental organizations, and the United Nations and its specialized agencies, should be further encouraged to participate in planning and organizing reconstruction and stabilization activities in such countries or regions;

      (4) the President should establish a new directorate of stabilization and reconstruction activities within the National Security Council to oversee the development of interagency contingency plans and procedures, including plans and procedures for joint civilian-military operations, to address stabilization and reconstruction requirements in such countries or regions;

      (5) the President should establish a standing committee to exercise responsibility for overseeing the formulation and execution of stabilization and reconstruction policy in order to ensure appropriate interagency coordination in the planning and execution of stabilization and reconstruction activities, including joint civilian-military operations, of the United States Government, and should provide for the committee--

        (A) to be chaired by the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs; and

        (B) to include the heads of--

          (i) the Department;

          (ii) the United States Agency for International Development;

          (iii) the Department of Labor;

          (iv) the Department of Commerce;

          (v) the Department of Justice;

          (vi) the Department of the Treasury;

          (vii) the Department of Agriculture;

          (viii) the Department of Defense; and

          (ix) other Executive agencies as appropriate;

      (6) the Secretary and the Administrator should work with the Secretary of Defense to establish a personnel exchange program among the Department, the United States Agency for International Development, and the Department of Defense, including the regional commands and the Joint Staff, to enhance the stabilization and reconstruction skills of military and civilian personnel and their ability to undertake joint operations; and

      (7) the heads of other Executive agencies should establish personnel exchange programs that are designed to enhance the stabilization and reconstruction skills of military and civilian personnel.

SEC. 705. AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE ASSISTANCE FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION CRISES.

    Chapter 1 of part III of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2351 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 617 the following new section:

`SEC. 618. ASSISTANCE FOR A RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION CRISIS.

    `(a) AUTHORITY- If the President determines that it is important to the national interests of the United States for United States civilian agencies or non-Federal employees to assist in stabilizing and reconstructing a country or region that is in, or is in transition from, conflict or civil strife, the President may, in accordance with the provisions set forth in section 614(a)(3), notwithstanding any other provision of law, and on such terms and conditions as the President may determine, furnish assistance to respond to the crisis.

    `(b) SPECIAL AUTHORITIES- To provide assistance authorized in subsection (a), the President may exercise the authorities contained in sections 552(c)(2), 610, and 614 of this Act without regard to the percentage and aggregate dollar limitations contained in such sections.

    `(c) AUTHORIZATION OF FUNDING-

      `(1) INITIAL AUTHORIZATION- There is authorized to be appropriated, without fiscal year limitation, $100,000,000 in funds that may be used to provide assistance authorized in subsection (a).

      `(2) REPLENISHMENT- There is authorized to be appropriated each fiscal year such sums as may be necessary to replenish funds expended as provided under paragraph (1). Funds authorized to be appropriated under this paragraph shall be available without fiscal year limitation for the same purpose and under the same conditions as are provided under paragraph (1).'.

SEC. 706. OFFICE OF THE COORDINATOR FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION.

    Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651 et seq.), as amended by section 214, is further amended by adding at the end the following new section:

`SEC. 63. RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION.

    `(a) OFFICE OF THE COORDINATOR FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION-

      `(1) ESTABLISHMENT- The Secretary shall establish within the Department of State an Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization.

      `(2) COORDINATOR FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND STABILIZATION- The head of the Office shall be the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization, who shall be appointed by the Secretary, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Coordinator shall report directly to the Secretary and shall have the rank and status of Ambassador-at-Large.

      `(3) FUNCTIONS- The functions of the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization include the following:

        `(A) Monitoring, in coordination with relevant bureaus within the Department of State, political and economic instability worldwide to anticipate the need for mobilizing United States and international assistance for the stabilization and reconstruction of countries or regions that are in, or are in transition from, conflict or civil strife.

        `(B) Assessing the various types of stabilization and reconstruction crises that could occur and cataloging and monitoring the non-military resources and capabilities of Executive agencies that are available to address such crises.

        `(C) Planning to address requirements, such as demobilization, policing, human rights monitoring, and public information, that commonly arise in stabilization and reconstruction crises.

        `(D) Coordinating with relevant Executive agencies (as that term is defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code) to develop interagency contingency plans to mobilize and deploy civilian personnel to address the various types of such crises.

        `(E) Entering into appropriate arrangements with other Executive agencies to carry out activities under this section and the Reconstruction and Stabilization Civilian Management Act of 2005.

        `(F) Identifying personnel in State and local governments and in the private sector who are available to participate in the Response Readiness Corps or the Response Readiness Reserve established under subsection (b) or to otherwise participate in or contribute to stabilization and reconstruction activities.

        `(G) Ensuring that training of civilian personnel to perform such stabilization and reconstruction activities is adequate and, as appropriate, includes security training that involves exercises and simulations with the Armed Forces, including the regional commands.

        `(H) Sharing information and coordinating plans for stabilization and reconstruction activities with the United Nations and its specialized agencies, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, nongovernmental organizations, and other foreign national and international organizations.

        `(I) Coordinating plans and procedures for joint civilian-military operations with respect to stabilization and reconstruction activities.

        `(J) Maintaining the capacity to field on short notice an evaluation team to undertake on-site needs assessment.

    `(b) RESPONSE TO STABILIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION CRISIS- If the President makes a determination regarding a stabilization and reconstruction crisis under section 618 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, the President may designate the Coordinator, or such other individual as the President may determine appropriate, as the coordinator of the United States response. The individual so designated, or, in the event the President does not make such a designation, the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization, shall--

      `(1) assess the immediate and long-term need for resources and civilian personnel;

      `(2) identify and mobilize non-military resources to respond to the crisis; and

      `(3) coordinate the activities of the other individuals or management team, if any, designated by

the President to manage the United States response.'.

SEC. 707. RESPONSE READINESS CORPS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 63 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (as added by section 706) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(c) RESPONSE READINESS CORPS-

      `(1) RESPONSE READINESS ACTIVE DUTY PERSONNEL-

        `(A) ESTABLISHMENT AND PURPOSE- The Secretary, in consultation with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, is authorized to establish a Response Readiness Corps (hereafter referred to in this section as the `Corps') to provide assistance in support of stabilization and reconstruction activities in foreign countries or regions that are in, or are in transition from, conflict or civil strife.

        `(B) COMPOSITION- The Secretary and Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development should coordinate in the recruitment, hiring, and training of--

          `(i) up to 250 personnel to serve in the active duty Corps; and

          `(ii) such other personnel as the Secretary, in consultation with the Administrator, may designate as members of the Corps from among employees of the Department of State and the United States Agency for International Development.

        `(C) TRAINING- The Secretary shall train the members of the Corps to perform services necessary to carry out the purpose of the Corps under subparagraph (A).

        `(D) COMPENSATION- Members of the Corps hired under subparagraph (B)(i) shall be compensated in accordance with the appropriate salary class for the Foreign Service, as set forth in sections 402 and 403 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3962 and 22 U.S.C. 3963), or in accordance with the relevant authority under sections 3101 and 3392 of title 5, United States Code.

      `(2) RESPONSE READINESS RESERVE DUTY PERSONNEL-

        `(A) ESTABLISHMENT AND PURPOSE- The Secretary, in consultation with the heads of other relevant Executive agencies, is authorized to establish and maintain a roster of personnel who are trained and available as needed to perform services necessary to carry out the purpose of the Corps under paragraph (1)(A). The personnel listed on the roster shall constitute a reserve component of the Response Readiness Corps.

        `(B) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES- The Response Readiness reserve component may include employees of the Department of State, including Foreign Service Nationals, employees of the United States Agency for International Development, employees of any other Executive agency (as that term is defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code), and employees from the legislative and judicial branches who--

          `(i) have the training and skills necessary to enable them to contribute to stabilization and reconstruction activities; and

          `(ii) have volunteered for deployment to carry out stabilization and reconstruction activities.

        `(C) NON-FEDERAL PERSONNEL- The Response Readiness reserve component should also include at least 500 personnel, which may include retired employees of the Federal Government, contractor personnel, nongovernmental organization personnel, and State and local government employees, who--

          `(i) have the training and skills necessary to enable them to contribute to stabilization and reconstruction activities; and

          `(ii) have volunteered to carry out stabilization and reconstruction activities.

      `(3) USE OF RESPONSE READINESS CORPS-

        `(A) RESPONSE READINESS ACTIVE DUTY COMPONENT- The members of the active duty Corps shall be available--

          `(i) if responding in support of stabilization and reconstruction activities pursuant to a determination by the President regarding a stabilization and reconstruction crisis under section 618 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, for deployment in support of such activities; and

          `(ii) if not responding as described in clause (i), for assignment in the United States, United States diplomatic missions, and United States Agency for International Development missions.

        `(B) RESPONSE READINESS RESERVE COMPONENT- The Secretary may deploy members of the reserve component under paragraph (2) in support of stabilization and reconstruction activities in a foreign country or region if the President makes a determination regarding a stabilization and reconstruction crisis under section 618 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.'.

    (b) EMPLOYMENT AUTHORITY- The full-time personnel authorized to be employed in the Response Readiness Corps under section 63(c)(1)(B)(i) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (as added by subsection (a)) are in addition to any other full-time personnel of the Department or the United States Agency for International Development authorized to be employed under any other provision of law.

    (c) REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the status of efforts to establish the Response Readiness Corps under this section. The report shall include recommendations--

      (1) for any legislation necessary to implement subsection (a); and

      (2) related to the regulation and structure of the Response Readiness Corps, including with respect to pay and employment security for, and benefit and retirement matters related to, such individuals.

SEC. 708. STABILIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION TRAINING AND EDUCATION.

    Section 701 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4021) is amended--

      (1) by redesignating subsection (g) as subsection (h); and

      (2) by inserting after subsection (f) the following new subsection:

    `(g) STABILIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION CURRICULUM-

      `(1) ESTABLISHMENT AND MISSION- The Secretary, in cooperation with the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Army, is authorized to establish a stabilization and reconstruction curriculum for use in programs of the Foreign Service Institute, the National Defense University, and the United States Army War College.

      `(2) CURRICULUM CONTENT- The curriculum shall include the following:

        `(A) An overview of the global security environment, including an assessment of transnational threats and an analysis of United States policy options to address such threats.

        `(B) A review of lessons learned from previous United States and international experiences in stabilization and reconstruction activities.

        `(C) An overview of the relevant responsibilities, capabilities, and limitations of various Executive agencies (as that term is defined in section 105 of title 5, United States Code) and the interactions among them.

        `(D) A discussion of the international resources available to address stabilization and reconstruction requirements, including resources of the United Nations and its specialized agencies, nongovernmental organizations, private and voluntary organizations, and foreign governments, together with an examination of the successes and failures experienced by the United States in working with such entities.

        `(E) A study of the United States interagency system.

        `(F) Foreign language training.

        `(G) Training and simulation exercises for joint civilian-military emergency response operations.'.

SEC. 709. SERVICE RELATED TO STABILIZATION AND RECONSTRUCTION.

    (a) PROMOTION PURPOSES- Service in stabilization and reconstruction operations overseas, membership in the Response Readiness Corps under section 63(c) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (as added by section 707), and education and training in the stabilization and reconstruction curriculum established under section 701(g) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (as added by section 708) should be considered among the favorable factors for the promotion of employees of Executive agencies.

    (b) PERSONNEL TRAINING AND PROMOTION- The Secretary and the Administrator should take steps to ensure that, not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, at least 10 percent of the employees of the Department and the United States Agency for International Development in the United States are members of the Response Readiness Corps or are trained in the activities of, or identified for potential deployment in support of, the Response Readiness Corps. The Secretary should provide such training to Ambassadors and Deputy Chiefs of Mission.

    (c) OTHER INCENTIVES AND BENEFITS- The Secretary and the Administrator may establish and administer a system of awards and other incentives and benefits to confer appropriate recognition on and reward any individual who is assigned, detailed, or deployed to carry out stabilization or reconstruction activities in accordance with this title.

SEC. 710. AUTHORITIES RELATED TO PERSONNEL.

    (a) CONTRACTING AUTHORITY-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The Secretary, or the Administrator with the concurrence of the Secretary, may enter into contracts to procure the services of nationals of the United States (as defined in section 101(a)(22) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(22)) or aliens authorized to be employed in the United States as personal services contractors for the purpose of carrying out this title, without regard to Civil Service or classification laws, for service in the Office of the Coordinator for Reconstruction and Stabilization or for service in foreign countries to assist, in stabilizing and reconstructing a country or region that is in, or is in transition from, conflict or civil strife.

      (2) LIMITATION- Not more than 100 individuals may be engaged to perform services under a contract described in paragraph (1) at any time.

      (3) NOT EMPLOYEES- Individuals performing services under contracts described in paragraph (1) shall not by virtue of performing such services be considered to be employees of the United States Government for purposes of any law administered by the Office of Personnel Management (except that the Secretary or Administrator may determine the applicability to such individuals of any law administered by the Secretary or Administrator concerning the performance of such services by such individuals).

    (b) EXPERTS AND CONSULTANTS- The Secretary and the Administrator may, to the extent necessary to obtain services without delay, employ experts and consultants under section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, to assist in stabilizing and reconstructing a country or region that is in, or is in transition from, conflict or civil strife, without requiring compliance with any otherwise applicable requirements for that employment as the Secretary or Administrator may determine, except that such employment shall be terminated after 60 days if by that time the applicable requirements are not complied with.

    (c) AUTHORITY TO ACCEPT AND ASSIGN DETAILS- The Secretary is authorized to accept details or assignments of employees of Executive agencies, members of the uniformed services, and employees of State or local governments on a reimbursable or nonreimbursable basis in order to assist in stabilizing and reconstructing a country or region that is in, or is in, transition from conflict or civil strife. The assignment of an employee of a State or local government under this subsection shall be consistent with subchapter VI of chapter 33 of title 5, United States Code.

    (d) DUAL COMPENSATION WAIVER- The Secretary may waive the application of subsections (a) through (d) of section 824 of the Foreign Service Act (22 U.S.C. 4064), for annuitants under the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability System or the Foreign Service Pension System who are reemployed on a temporary basis in order to be assigned, detailed, or deployed to assist in stabilization and reconstruction activities in accordance with this title.

    (e) EXTENSION OF CERTAIN FOREIGN SERVICE BENEFITS- The Secretary may extend to any individuals assigned, detailed, or deployed to carry out stabilization and reconstruction activities in accordance with this title the benefits or privileges set forth in sections 412, 413, 704, and 901 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 972, 22 U.S.C. 3973, 22 U.S.C. 4024, and 22 U.S.C. 4081) to the same extent and manner that such benefits and privileges are extended to members of the Foreign Service.

    (f) COMPENSATORY TIME- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary may, subject to the consent of an individual who is assigned, detailed, or deployed to carry out stabilization and reconstruction activities in accordance with this title, grant such individual compensatory time off for an equal amount of time spent in regularly or irregularly scheduled overtime work. Credit for compensatory time off earned shall not form the basis for any additional compensation. Any such compensatory time not used within 26 pay periods shall be forfeited.

    (g) ACCEPTANCE OF VOLUNTEER SERVICES-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The Secretary may accept volunteer services to assist in stabilization and reconstruction activities under this title and section 63 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (as added by section 706) without regard to section 1342 of title 31, United States Code.

      (2) TYPES OF VOLUNTEERS- Donors of voluntary services accepted for purposes of this section may include--

        (A) advisors;

        (B) experts;

        (C) consultants; and

        (D) persons performing services in any other capacity determined appropriate by the Secretary.

      (3) SUPERVISION- The Secretary shall--

        (A) ensure that each person performing voluntary services accepted under this section is notified of the scope of the voluntary services accepted;

        (B) supervise the volunteer to the same extent as employees receiving compensation for similar services; and

        (C) ensure that the volunteer has appropriate credentials or is otherwise qualified to perform in each capacity for which the volunteer's services are accepted.

      (4) APPLICABILITY OF LAW RELATING TO FEDERAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES- A person providing volunteer services accepted under this section shall not be considered an employee of the Federal Government in the performance of those services, except for the purposes of the following provisions of law:

        (A) Chapter 81 of title 5, United States Code, relating to compensation for work-related injuries.

        (B) Chapter 11 of title 18, United States Code, relating to conflicts of interest.

      (5) APPLICABILITY OF LAW RELATING TO VOLUNTEER LIABILITY PROTECTION-

        (A) IN GENERAL- A person providing volunteer services accepted under this section shall be deemed to be a volunteer of a nonprofit organization or governmental entity, with respect to the accepted services, for purposes of the Volunteer Protection Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 14501 et seq.).

        (B) INAPPLICABILITY OF EXCEPTIONS TO VOLUNTEER LIABILITY PROTECTION- Section 4(d) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 14503(d)) does not apply with respect to the liability of a person with respect to services of such person that are accepted under this section.

    (h) AUTHORITY FOR OUTSIDE ADVISORS-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The Secretary may establish temporary commissions composed of individuals with appropriate expertise to facilitate the carrying out of this title.

      (2) INAPPLICABILITY OF FACA- The requirements of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the activities of a commission established under this subsection.

SEC. 711. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    There are authorized to be appropriated $24,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 for personnel, education and training, equipment, and travel costs for purposes of carrying out this title and the amendments made by this title.

TITLE VIII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS

SEC. 801. REPORTS ON ACQUISITION AND MAJOR SECURITY UPGRADES.

    Section 605(c) of the Secure Embassy Construction and Counterterrorism Act of 1999 (title VI of the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 (as enacted into law by section 1000(a)(7) of Public Law 106-113 and contained in appendix G of that Act; 113 Stat. 1501A-454)) is amended--

      (1) by striking `SEMIANNUAL' and inserting `ANNUAL'; and

      (2) by striking `June 1 and'; and

      (3) in paragraph (1)(A), by striking `two fiscal quarters' and inserting `year'.

SEC. 802. FELLOWSHIPS FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY TRAINING ON NONPROLIFERATION ISSUES.

    (a) FELLOWSHIPS AUTHORIZED- In carrying out international exchange programs, the Secretary shall design and implement a program to encourage eligible students to study at an accredited United States institution of higher education in an appropriate graduate program.

    (b) ELIGIBLE STUDENT DEFINED- In this section, the term `eligible student' means a citizen of a foreign country who--

      (1) has completed undergraduate education; and

      (2) is qualified (as determined by the Secretary).

    (c) APPROPRIATE GRADUATE PROGRAM DEFINED- In this section, the term `appropriate graduate program'

means a graduate level program that provides for the multidisciplinary study of issues relating to weapons nonproliferation and includes training in--

      (1) diplomacy;

      (2) arms control;

      (3) multilateral export controls; or

      (4) threat reduction assistance.

    (d) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for educational and cultural exchange programs under section 101(4), $2,000,000 may be available to carry out this section.

SEC. 803. REPORTING REQUIREMENTS RELATED TO UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL AGREEMENTS.

    Section 112b of title 1, United States Code, is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a)--

        (A) by striking `Congress' in the first sentence and inserting `Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives'; and

        (B) in the second sentence--

          (i) by striking `However, any' and inserting `Any'; and

          (ii) by striking `shall not be so transmitted' and all that follows through `House of Representatives' and inserting `shall be transmitted'; and

      (2) in subsection (b)--

        (A) by striking `the President shall, under his own signature,' and inserting `the Secretary of State shall';

        (B) by striking `Speaker' and all that follows through `the chairman of the';

        (C) by inserting `and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives' after `of the Senate'; and

        (D) by striking `the Congress' and inserting `such Committees'.

SEC. 804. REQUIREMENT TO SUBMIT TO CONGRESS FINDINGS UNDER THE DIPLOMATIC SECURITY ACT.

    (a) REQUIREMENT- Section 304 of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4834) is amended in subsection (b), by striking `State,' and inserting `State and the appropriate congressional committees,'.

    (b) CONFORMING AND CLARIFYING AMENDMENTS-

      (1) PROGRAM RECOMMENDATIONS- Paragraph (1) of subsection (d) of such section is amended to read as follows:

      `(1) PROGRAM RECOMMENDATIONS- In any case in which a Board transmits recommendations under subsection (b) of this section, the Secretary of State shall, not later than 90 days after the receipt of such recommendations, submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on each such recommendation and the action taken with respect to that recommendation.'.

      (2) PERSONNEL RECOMMENDATIONS- Paragraph (2) of such subsection is amended by striking `Congress' and inserting `appropriate congressional committees'.

    (c) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES DEFINED- Such section is further amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(e) APPROPRIATE CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES DEFINED- In this section, the term `appropriate congressional committees' means the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives.'.

SEC. 805. REQUIREMENT FOR ADDITIONAL REPORT CONCERNING EFFORTS TO PROMOTE ISRAEL'S DIPLOMATIC RELATIONS WITH OTHER COUNTRIES.

    Section 215(b) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228; 116 Stat. 1366) is amended by inserting `and again not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007,' after `Act,' in the matter preceding paragraph (1).

SEC. 806. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO MAGEN DAVID ADOM SOCIETY.

    It is the sense of Congress that, in light of the findings of fact set out in section 690(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228; 116 Stat. 1414) and the fact that the Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has not granted full membership to the Magen David Adom Society, the United States should continue to press for full membership for the Magen David Adom Society in the International Red Cross Movement.

SEC. 807. LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS RELATING TO UNITED STATES POLICY WITH RESPECT TO JERUSALEM AS THE CAPITAL OF ISRAEL.

    (a) LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS FOR CONSULATE IN JERUSALEM- None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this division may be expended for the operation of any United States consulate or diplomatic facility in Jerusalem that is not under the supervision of the United States Ambassador to Israel.

    (b) LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS FOR PUBLICATIONS- None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this division may be available for the publication of any official document of the United States that lists countries including Israel and their capital cities unless the publication identifies Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

SEC. 808. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE UNITED STATES COMMISSION ON INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Subsection (a) of section 207 of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (22 U.S.C. 6435) is amended by striking `$3,000,000 for the fiscal year 2003' and inserting `$3,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007'.

    (b) TECHNICAL CORRECTION- Subsection (b) of such section is amended by striking `subparagraph (a)' and inserting `subsection (a)'.

SEC. 809. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON TERRORIST ATTACK ON UNITED STATES CONSULATE IN JEDDAH, SAUDI ARABIA.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) In Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on December 4, 2004, five armed terrorists entered the compound of the United States Consulate with the likely intention to murder Americans.

      (2) The combined efforts of the United States Embassy Marine Security Guard detachment and the perimeter security guards prevented the attackers from breaching the chancery building in spite of intense machine gun fire by the terrorists.

      (3) Based on their inability to enter the main building, the terrorists attempted to learn the location of any other Americans who might be in the compound.

      (4) In spite of imminent threats of death, United States Consulate employees refused to divulge the whereabouts of any United States staff, including those they had hidden nearby.

      (5) During the attack and in the ensuing battle with Saudi National Guard units, the following four Foreign Service Nationals were murdered:

        (A) Ali Yaslem BinTalib, from Yemen, who worked for the United States Government for more than 25 years, who leaves behind a wife.

        (B) Imad-E-Deen Musa All, from Sudan, who worked for the United States Government for more than 26 years, who leaves behind a wife and two daughters aged 16 and 13.

        (C) Mohammed Basheer Uddin, from India, who worked for the United States Government for 16 months, who leaves behind a wife and elder brother.

        (D) Romeo Dela Rosa, from the Philippines, who worked for the United States Government for more than 12 years, who leaves behind a wife and 12 year old son.

      (6) During the attack, Jaufar Sadik of Sri Lanka died returning fire against the attackers in his capacity as a local guard while protecting the Consulate.

      (7) During the attack, 10 other Foreign Service Nationals were seriously injured.

      (8) The Governments of the United States and Saudi Arabia remain committed to bringing those responsible for planning, assisting, and carrying out these attacks to justice.

      (9) The United States and Saudi Arabia are allied by a common interest in building a stable, peaceful, and prosperous world.

      (10) The acts of murder committed on December 6, 2004, demonstrate again that terrorism respects neither boundaries nor borders.

    (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS ON ATTACK ON CONSULATE- Congress--

      (1) notes the vital role that Foreign Service Nationals serve throughout the world and recognizes their integral efforts in providing for the operation of diplomacy overseas;

      (2) applauds the quick thinking on the part of the Marine Security Guards to secure the chancery when the attack on the United States Consulate in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, occurred;

      (3) expresses its condolences to the families of the individuals murdered in the terrorist attack;

      (4) expresses its sympathies to the individuals injured in the attack;

      (5) conveys its hope for the rapid and complete recovery of all such injured individuals; and

      (6) expresses its solidarity with all those countries that stand united against terrorism and work together to bring to justice the perpetrators of this and other terrorist attacks.

SEC. 810. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON PARTICIPATION OF WOMEN IN ELECTIONS IN SAUDI ARABIA.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) On February 10, 2005, for the first time in over forty years, Saudi Arabia held the first stage of nationwide municipal elections.

      (2) Women in Saudi Arabia were not permitted to run for office or vote during these municipal elections.

      (3) While the United States acknowledges the deep cultural and religious traditions and sentiments within Saudi society, without the right to vote, Saudi women are denied not only a basic human right but also the ability to contribute fully to the economic development, modernization and prosperity of their own country.

      (4) According to the State Department's 2004 Report on Human Rights Practices, in Saudi Arabia `women have few political or social rights and were not treated as equal members of society. There were no active women's rights groups.'.

      (5) In December 2003, a petition submitted by more than 300 Saudi Arabian women called for greater rights for women in Saudi Arabia and greater recognition of their contributions to society.

      (6) The Saudi Foreign Minister, Prince Saud Al Faisal stated after the election that he assumed women will be allowed to vote in future elections and that modernization of Saudi society was taking place because of the actions of Saudi women themselves.

    (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of the Congress that--

      (1) the municipal elections in Saudi Arabia are a positive initial step in broadening civic participation; and

      (2) it is in the interest of Saudi Arabia to permit women to run for office and vote in all future elections.

SEC. 811. STRATEGY ON COMBATTING TERRORISM IN WEST AFRICA.

    (a) REQUIREMENT FOR STRATEGY- Not later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives a strategy for combating terrorism in West Africa during the 3-year period beginning on such date.

    (b) CONTENT- The strategy shall include--

      (1) a comprehensive assessment of the activity of international terrorist organizations in West Africa;

      (2) an interagency plan for dealing with the threats posed by international terrorist organizations in West Africa;

      (3) a description of the resources required to implement the plan described in paragraph (2);

      (4) a description of the planned coordination with all other regional counter-terrorism efforts including the Pan-Sahel and East Africa Counter-Terrorism Initiatives, and any other similar programs in the region, including in North Africa; and

      (5) an analysis of the expected level of cooperation from countries in West Africa and other appropriate countries in implementing the plan described in paragraph (2).

DIVISION B--FOREIGN ASSISTANCE AUTHORIZATIONS

SEC. 2001. SHORT TITLE.

    This division may be cited as the `Foreign Assistance Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2006 and 2007'.

TITLE XXI--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

Subtitle A--Development Assistance and Related Programs Authorizations

SEC. 2101. DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for `Development Assistance', $1,103,233,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, to carry out sections 103, 105, 106, and 496 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151a, 2151c, 2151d, and 2293).

    (b) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated under this section for the purposes specified in subsection (a)--

      (1) are authorized to remain available until expended; and

      (2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes.

    (c) REPEAL OF OBSOLETE AUTHORIZATIONS-

      (1) AGRICULTURE, RURAL DEVELOPMENT, AND NUTRITION- Section 103(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151a(a)) is amended--

        (A) by striking `(a)(1)' and inserting `(a)';

        (B) by striking paragraphs (2) and (3); and

        (C) by redesignating subparagraphs (A), (B), and (C), as paragraphs (1), (2), and (3), respectively.

      (2) EDUCATION AND HUMAN RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT- Section 105(a) of such Act (22 U.S.C. 2151c(a)) is amended by striking the second sentence.

      (3) ENERGY, PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS, AND SELECTED DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES- Section 106 of such Act (22 U.S.C. 2151d) is amended by striking subsections (e) and (f).

    (d) TECHNICAL AMENDMENT OF DEVELOPMENT FUND FOR AFRICA- Section 497 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2294) is amended by striking `AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT FUND FOR AFRICA- ' and inserting `AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- '.

SEC. 2102. CHILD SURVIVAL AND HEALTH PROGRAMS FUND.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for `Child Survival and Health Programs Fund', $1,251,500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, to carry out sections 104 and 496 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151b and 2293). Amounts authorized to be appropriated under this section are in addition to amounts available under other provisions of law to combat the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), tuberculosis, or malaria.

    (b) FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAMS- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $346,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 may be used for assistance under sections 104(b) and 496(i)(3) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151b(b) and 2293(i)(3)).

    (c) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated under this section for the purposes specified in subsection (a)--

      (1) are authorized to remain available until expended; and

      (2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes.

    (d) REPEAL OF OBSOLETE AUTHORIZATIONS AND TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS- Section 104(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151b(c)) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (2)--

        (A) by striking subparagraphs (B) and (C); and

        (B) by striking `(2)(A)' and inserting `(2)'; and

      (2) in paragraph (3), by striking the last sentence.

SEC. 2103. DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY.

    Subtitle B of title VI chapter 2 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by inserting after section 256 the following:

`SEC. 256A. DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY.

    `(a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      `(1) Developing countries often have large reserves of privately held capital that are not being adequately mobilized and invested due to weak financial institutions and other market imperfections in such countries.

      `(2) Partial loan guarantees, particularly when used as an integral part of a development strategy, are useful to leverage local private capital for development while reforming and strengthening developing country financial markets.

      `(3) Requiring risk-sharing guarantees and limiting guarantee assistance to private lenders encourages such lenders to provide appropriate oversight and management of development projects funded with loans made by such lenders and, thereby, maximize the benefit which such projects will achieve.

    `(b) POLICY- It is the policy of the United States to make partial loan guarantees available to private lenders to fund development projects in developing countries that encourage such lenders to provide appropriate oversight and management of such development projects.

    `(c) AUTHORITY- To carry out the policy set forth in subsection (b), the President is authorized to provide assistance in the form of loans and partial loan guarantees to private lenders in developing countries to achieve the economic development purposes of the provisions of this part.

    `(d) POLICIES TO LIMIT FINANCIAL RISK TO THE UNITED STATES-

      `(1) PRIORITY FOR ASSISTANCE- The President, in providing assistance under this section, shall give priority to providing partial loan guarantees made pursuant to the authority in subsection (c) that are used in transactions in which the financial risk of loss to the United States Government under such guarantee does not exceed the financial risk of loss of the private lender that receives such guarantee.

      `(2) MAXIMUM EXPOSURE- The investment or risk of the United States in any one development project may not exceed 70 percent of the total outstanding investment or risk associated with such project.

    `(e) TERMS AND CONDITIONS-

      `(1) IN GENERAL- Assistance provided under this section shall be provided on such terms and conditions as the President determines appropriate.

      `(2) MAXIMUM TOTAL AMOUNT OF LOANS OR GUARANTIES PER BORROWER- The principal amount of loans made or guaranteed under this section in any fiscal year, with respect to any single country or borrower, may not exceed $100,000,000.

    `(f) OBLIGATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES- A partial loan guarantee made under subsection (c) shall constitute an obligation, in accordance with the terms of such guarantee, of the United States of America and the full faith and credit of the United States of America is pledged for the full payment and performance of such obligation.

    `(g) PROCUREMENT PROVISIONS- Assistance may be provided under this section notwithstanding section 604(a).

    `(h) DEVELOPMENT CREDIT AUTHORITY PROGRAM ACCOUNT- There is established on the books of the Treasury an account known as the Development Credit Authority Program Account. There shall be deposited into the account all amounts made available for providing assistance under this section, other than amounts made available for administrative expenses to carry out this section. Amounts in the Account shall be available to provide assistance under this section.

    `(i) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS-

      `(1) IN GENERAL- Of the amounts authorized to be available for the purposes of part I of this Act and for the Support for Eastern European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 (22 U.S.C. 5401 et seq.), not more than $21,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 may be made available to carry out this section.

      `(2) TRANSFER OF FUNDS- Amounts made available under paragraph (1) may be transferred to the Development Credit Authority Program Account established by subsection (h).

      `(3) SUBSIDY COST- Amounts made available under paragraph (1) shall be available for the subsidy cost, as defined in section 502(5) of the Federal Reform Credit Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 661a(5)), of activities under this section.

    `(j) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS-

      `(1) IN GENERAL- There is authorized to be appropriated for administrative expenses to carry out this section $8,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

      `(2) TRANSFER OF FUNDS- The amounts appropriated for administrative expenses under paragraph (1) may be transferred to and merged with amounts made available under section 667(a).

    `(k) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated or made available under this section are authorized to remain available until expended.'.

SEC. 2104. PROGRAM TO PROVIDE TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS AND FOREIGN CENTRAL BANKS OF DEVELOPING OR TRANSITIONAL COUNTRIES.

    Section 129(j)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151aa(j)(1)) is amended by striking `$5,000,000 for fiscal year 1999' and inserting `$20,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007'.

SEC. 2105. INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Section 302 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2222) is amended by striking subsections (a) through (j) and inserting the following:

    `(a) There are authorized to be appropriated to the President $281,908,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, for grants to carry out the purposes of this chapter. Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations in this section are in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENTS- Such section is further amended--

      (1) in the heading, by striking `AUTHORIZATION- ' and inserting `AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- '; and

      (2) by redesignating subsections (k), (l), and (m) as subsections (b), (c), and (d), respectively.

SEC. 2106. CONTINUED AVAILABILITY OF CERTAIN FUNDS WITHHELD FROM INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    Section 307 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2227) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a), by striking `Iraq,'; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(e) Funds available in any fiscal year to carry out the provisions of this chapter that are returned or not made available for organizations and programs because of the application of this section shall remain available for obligation until September 30 of the fiscal year after the fiscal year for which such funds are appropriated.'.

SEC. 2107. INTERNATIONAL DISASTER AND FAMINE ASSISTANCE.

    Section 492(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292a(a)) is amended by striking `$25,000,000 for fiscal year 1986 and $25,000,000 for fiscal year 1987' and inserting `$655,500,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007'.

SEC. 2108. TRANSITION INITIATIVES.

    Section 494 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292c) is amended to read as follows:

`SEC. 494. TRANSITION AND DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE.

    `(a) TRANSITION AND DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE- The President is authorized to furnish assistance to support the transition to democracy and to long-term development in accordance with the general authority contained in section 491, including assistance to--

      `(1) develop, strengthen, or preserve democratic institutions and processes;

      `(2) revitalize basic infrastructure; and

      `(3) foster the peaceful resolution of conflict.

    `(b) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President $325,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, to carry out this section.

    `(c) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated under this section for the purpose specified in subsection (b)--

      `(1) are authorized to remain available until expended; and

      `(2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available to carry out this section.'.

SEC. 2109. ASSISTANCE FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for `Assistance for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union', $482,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, to carry out chapters 11 and 12 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2295 et seq. and 2296 et seq.) and the FREEDOM Support Act (22 U.S.C. 5801 et seq.).

    (b) BIRTH DEFECTS SURVEILLANCE AND FOLIC ACID WHEAT FORTIFICATION PROJECTS- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), not less than $8,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 should be made available for birth defects surveillance and folic acid wheat fortification projects in Ukraine and the other independent states of the former Soviet Union.

    (c) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated under this section for the purposes specified in subsection (a)--

      (1) are authorized to remain available until expended; and

      (2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes.

SEC. 2110. ASSISTANCE FOR EASTERN EUROPE AND THE BALTIC STATES.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for `Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States' $382,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 to carry out the Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 (22 U.S.C. 5401 et seq.), and the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.).

    (b) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated under this section for the purposes specified in subsection (a)--

      (1) are authorized to remain available until expended;

      (2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes;

      (3) may be made available notwithstanding any other provision of law; and

      (4) shall be considered to be economic assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) for purposes of making applicable the administrative authorities contained in that Act for the use of economic assistance.

SEC. 2111. OPERATING EXPENSES OF THE UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Section 667 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2427) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a)--

        (A) by striking paragraph (1) and inserting the following:

      `(1) $680,735,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 for necessary operating expenses of the United States Agency for International Development; and'; and

        (B) in paragraph (2) of such subsection, by striking `agency' and inserting `Agency';

      (2) by redesignating subsection (b) as subsection (c); and

      (3) by inserting after subsection (a) the following new subsection (b):

    `(b) There are authorized to be appropriated to the President, in addition to funds available under subsection (a) or any other provision of law for such purposes--

      `(1) $36,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, for necessary operating expenses of the Office of Inspector General of the United States Agency for International Development; and

      `(2) such amounts as may be necessary for increases in pay, retirement, and other employee benefits authorized by law for the employees of such Office, and for other nondiscretionary costs of such Office.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- The heading of section 667 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2427) is amended by striking `EXPENSES- ' and inserting `EXPENSES OF THE UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT- '.

SEC. 2112. CAPITAL INVESTMENT FUNDS FOR THE UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

    There are authorized to be appropriated $77,700,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007 for overseas construction and related costs and for enhancement of information technology and related investments.

SEC. 2113. MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE ASSISTANCE.

    Section 619(a) of the Millennium Challenge Act of 2003 (22 U.S.C. 7718) is amended by striking the period at the end and inserting `, $3,000,000,000 for fiscal year 2006, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.'.

SEC. 2114. DEBT RELIEF.

    There is authorized to be appropriated for purposes of United States contributions for debt relief under the Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 1998 (part V of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2431 et seq.)), poorest country debt reduction, bilateral Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) debt reduction, and the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Trust Fund administered by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development for the period beginning October 1, 2005, and ending September 30, 2007, $99,750,000, of which not more than $20,000,000 may be made available to carry out the Tropical Forest Conservation Act of 1998.

SEC. 2115. PEACE CORPS.

    Section 3(b)(1) of the Peace Corps Act (22 U.S.C. 2502(b)(1)) is amended by striking `$270,000,000' and all that follows through `2003' and inserting `$345,000,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007'.

SEC. 2116. MIDDLE EAST PARTNERSHIP INITIATIVE.

    (a) DECLARATION OF POLICY- Congress makes the following declarations:

      (1) The United States and the international community have long-term interests in the stability, security and prosperity of the people of the Middle East and North Africa and their ability to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

      (2) The United States and the international community should, through a Middle East Partnership Initiative, support modernization and reform efforts that advance education, promote economic opportunity, foster private sector development, strengthen civil society, and enhance security in the Middle East and North Africa.

      (3) The United States recognizes that the countries included in this large region have many forms of government and are at varying stages of economic, political, and social development; and that any assistance and cooperative efforts in these nations should aim to improve the lives of individuals and take into account cultural, historical, and religious factors in each country.

      (4) The United States further recognizes that modernization and reform in countries included in this large region must be generated by the people of these nations themselves and that their efforts will require long-term, sustained, and multi-dimensional assistance and cooperative support from the United States and others in the international community.

      (5) The United States Government, in particular, should provide its expertise to enhance the efforts of governments in the Middle East and North Africa to address the gaps identified in the Arab Development Reports of 2002 and 2003, including diffusion of knowledge, freedom, and women's empowerment, as follows:

        (A) To address the knowledge deficit, the United States should support the efforts of governments in the Middle East and North Africa to revamp antiquated and under-resourced education systems, tapping human capital in the region and drawing from the rich cultural, linguistic, and intellectual heritage of these states. United States efforts should support a broader quality of education and wider availability of education within these societies.

        (B) To encourage greater human freedoms, the United States Government should support efforts that increase the ability of people to freely express ideas and opinions, to associate with one another, to influence governing systems, and to fully participate in political processes.

        (C) To support empowerment of women in this large region, the United States Government should support programs that are gender-inclusive, gender-sensitive, and that increase the role of women in society, the market place, and governance.

      (6) Fostering modernization, reform, development, and stability in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa will help eliminate environments that fuel terrorism by expanding opportunities for education, decreasing isolationism, improving the welfare of the people of the region, and promoting the active involvement of citizens in the direction and development of their society and systems of governance.

    (b) PURPOSES OF ASSISTANCE- The purposes of assistance authorized by this section are to support through the Middle East Partnership Initiative programs and activities--

      (1) to help achieve broad-based, multi-ethnic, gender-sensitive, and fully representative governments in the Middle East and North Africa that are freely chosen by the people of each country and that respect the human rights of all people, particularly women;

      (2) to help modernize the institutions and infrastructure of Middle East and North Africa countries with a particular emphasis on meeting the political, educational, health, and economic needs of women and children to better enable their full participation in society, enhancing civil society, independent media, the judiciary and the rule of law;

      (3) to support the continued efforts of the United States Government and the international community to address gaps identified by the Arab Development Reports of 2002 and 2003, especially regarding diffusion of knowledge, advancement of human freedom, and empowerment of women, in the countries of the Middle East and North Africa; and

      (4) to support the economic development of the Middle East and North Africa through programs that create jobs, educate and train women in the labor force, enhance the health care system, and create an environment that encourages investment in the countries of the region.

    (c) AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated for Economic Support Fund assistance under section 2122 for fiscal year 2006, $120,000,000 may be made available for programs and activities under the Middle East Partnership Initiative.

    (d) REPORT TO CONGRESS-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the activities of the United States Government to carry out the provisions of this section.

      (2) CONTENTS- The report required under this section shall include--

        (A) a description of the Middle East Partnership Initiative programs and activities undertaken, by country;

        (B) a description of the funds obligated and expended in each country, by program and fiscal year;

        (C) a description of the coordination of these efforts within the United States Government interagency process and with other nations.

    (e) MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA DEFINED- In this section, the term `Middle East and North Africa' includes the countries and governing entities that are covered by the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs of the Department of State.

SEC. 2117. ASSISTANCE TO COMBAT THE AVIAN FLU.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) On February 21, 2005, Dr. Julie Gerberding, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, stated that avian flu is `a very ominous situation for the globe' and that avian flu is `the most important threat we are facing right now'.

      (2) On February 23, 2005, Dr. Shigeru Omi, Regional Director for the Western Pacific Region of the World Health Organization (WHO), stated with respect to the avian flu, `[w]e at WHO believe that the world is now in the gravest possible danger of a pandemic'.

      (3) There is no vaccine available for the H5N1 strain of the avian flu, the strain of the avian flu which is infecting human beings through contact with infected live birds and which has a 72-percent mortality rate.

      (4) At an international conference in Vietnam on the avian flu held in February 2005, the WHO called for at least $100,000,000 in new funding to combat avian flu before the disease has a chance to mutate into a strain that can be passed between human beings.

    (b) INTERAGENCY COORDINATION TO COMBAT THE AVIAN FLU-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Not later than 45 days after the date of enactment of this Act, if not already accomplished, the President should establish an interagency task force composed of representatives of the Department of State, Department of Health and Human Services, Department of Agriculture, and other appropriate agencies.

      (2) PURPOSES- The purposes of the interagency task force shall include--

        (A) designing and implementing a comprehensive, international strategy to prevent, and if necessary responding to, an outbreak of the avian flu;

        (B) ensuring program and policy coordination among agencies of the United States Government, other countries, international organizations, private entities, and other nongovernmental organizations in carrying out the strategy described in subparagraph (A); and

        (C) maintaining proper management, implementation, and oversight by agencies responsible for executing programs undertaken pursuant to the strategy described in subparagraph (A).

      (3) REPRESENTATION- A representative of an agency or department who participates in the interagency task force should hold the position of an assistant secretary, or an equivalent position, or a higher ranking position at such agency or department.

      (4) CONSULTATION- In establishing the interagency task force, the President should consult with the majority and minority leaders of the Senate, the Speaker and minority leader of the House of Representatives, and the chairman and ranking members of the appropriate congressional committees.

      (5) REPORT- Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act, and every 120 days thereafter until the task force described in subsection (b) ceases operations, the President shall submit to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry, the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate and the Committee on Agriculture, the Committee on Education and the Workforce, and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives a report setting forth progress made on formulating and implementing the strategy described in paragraph (2)(A).

    (c) ASSISTANCE TO PREVENT AND RESPOND TO AN OUTBREAK OF THE AVIAN FLU-

      (1) IN GENERAL- In addition to amounts otherwise available for preventing and responding to an outbreak of the avian flu, out of funds authorized to be appropriated to carry out the provisions of section 491 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292), $25,000,000 may be made available for fiscal year 2006 to provide assistance for preventing and responding to an outbreak of the avian flu.

      (2) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) are authorized to remain available until expended.

      (3) USES OF ASSISTANCE- Amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) are authorized to be used to provide assistance for preventing and responding to an outbreak of the avian flu, may be transferred to other appropriate agencies of the United States Government, and may be made available for contributions to appropriate international organizations, including the World Health Organization.

Subtitle B--Counternarcotics, Security Assistance, and Related Programs Authorizations

SEC. 2121. INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS CONTROL AND LAW ENFORCEMENT.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Paragraph (1) of section 482(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291a(a)) is amended by striking `$147,783,000' and all that follows and inserting `$1,258,374,000 for fiscal year 2006, of which $734,500,000 is authorized to be appropriated for the Andean Counterdrug Initiative, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.'.

    (b) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS FOR COLOMBIA- That section is further amended by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:

    `(3) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, amounts authorized to be appropriated to carry out the purposes of section 481 for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, and amounts appropriated for fiscal years prior to fiscal year 2006 for purposes of such section that remain available for obligation, as well as assistance provided with amounts appropriated for fiscal years prior to fiscal year 2006, may be used to furnish assistance to the Government of Colombia--

      `(A) to support a unified campaign against narcotics trafficking and terrorist activities; and

      `(B) to take actions to protect human health and welfare in emergency circumstances, including undertaking rescue operations.

    `(4) Assistance furnished to the Government of Colombia under this section--

      `(A) shall be subject, for fiscal year 2006, to the limitations on the assignment of United States personnel in Colombia set forth in section 1021(c) of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-375);

      `(B) shall be subject to the condition that no United States Armed Forces personnel and no employees of United States contractors participate in any combat operation in connection with such assistance; and

      `(C) shall be subject to the condition that the Government of Colombia is fulfilling its commitment to the United States with respect to its human rights practices and its policy with respect to paramilitary organizations, including the specific conditions set forth in subparagraphs (A) through (E) of section 556(a)(2) of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2005 (division D of Public Law 108-447).'.

SEC. 2122. ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUND.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Section 532(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346a(a)) is amended to read as follows:

    `(a) There are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry out the purposes of this chapter $3,036,375,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.'.

    (b) AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE FOR ISRAEL- Section 513(b)(1) of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-280; 114 Stat. 856), as amended by section 1221(a) of the Security Assistance Act of 2002 (division B of Public Law 107-228; 116 Stat. 1430), is further amended by striking `2002 and 2003' and inserting `2006 and 2007'.

    (c) AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE FOR EGYPT- Section 514(b)(1) of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (114 Stat. 857), as amended by section 1221(b) of the Security Assistance Act of 2002 (116 Stat. 1430), is further amended by striking `2002 and 2003' and inserting `2006 and 2007'.

SEC. 2123. INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- Section 542 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347a) is amended by striking `There are authorized' and all that follows through `fiscal year 1987' and inserting `There are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry out the purposes of this chapter $86,744,000 for the fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, of which not less than $2,000,000 should be made available for Greece in each such fiscal year'.

    (b) AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS- Section 541 of the Foreign Assistance Act (22 U.S.C. 2347) is amended in the first sentence by inserting `and comparable personnel of international organizations' after `foreign countries'.

SEC. 2124. PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.

    Section 552(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2348a(a)) is amended by striking `There are authorized' and all that follows through `fiscal year 1987' and inserting `There are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry out the purposes of this chapter, in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, $195,800,000 for the fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007'.

SEC. 2125. NONPROLIFERATION, ANTI-TERRORISM, DEMINING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for fiscal year 2006, $440,100,000, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, for Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs for the purpose of carrying out nonproliferation, anti-terrorism, demining, and related programs and activities under--

      (1) chapter 8 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349aa et seq.);

      (2) chapter 9 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2349bb et seq.);

      (3) paragraph (2) of section 551 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2348), as added by section 2211(a) of this Act, including not to exceed $700,000 for administrative expenses related to the activities described in such paragraph, which amount shall be in addition to funds otherwise made available for such purposes;

      (4) section 504 of the FREEDOM Support Act (22 U.S.C. 5854) and programs under the Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund to promote bilateral and multilateral activities relating to nonproliferation and disarmament, notwithstanding any other provision of law, including, when in the national security interests of the United States, with respect to international organizations and countries other than the independent states of the former Soviet Union;

      (5) section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763), for demining activities, the clearance of unexploded ordnance, the destruction of small arms, and related activities, notwithstanding any other provision of law;

      (6) section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2221);

      (7) the Radiological Terrorism Security Act of 2005 under title XXIII of this Act; and

      (8) the Global Pathogen Surveillance Act of 2005 under title XXIV of this Act.

    (b) AVAILABILITY- Amounts appropriated under this section for the purpose specified in subsection (a)--

      (1) are authorized to remain available until expended; and

      (2) are in addition to amounts otherwise available for that purpose.

SEC. 2126. FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for grant assistance under section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763), $4,588,600,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007.

    (b) ASSISTANCE FOR ISRAEL- Section 513(c) of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-280; 114 Stat. 856), as amended by section 1221(a) of the Security Assistance Act of 2002 (division B of Public Law 107-228; 116 Stat. 1430), is further amended--

      (1) in paragraph (1), by striking `2002 and 2003' and inserting `2006 and 2007';

      (2) in paragraph (3), by striking `Funds authorized' and all that follows through `later.' and inserting `Funds authorized to be available for Israel under subsection (b)(1) and paragraph (1) for fiscal year 2006 shall be disbursed not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of an Act making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for fiscal year 2006, or October 31, 2005, whichever is later'; and

      (3) in paragraph (4)--

        (A) by striking `2002 and 2003' and inserting `2006 and 2007'; and

        (B) by striking `$535,000,000 for fiscal year 2002 and not less than $550,000,000 for fiscal year 2003' and inserting `$596,000,000 for fiscal year 2006'.

    (c) ASSISTANCE FOR EGYPT- Section 514 of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (114 Stat. 857), as amended by section 1221(b) of the Security Assistance Act of 2002 (116 Stat. 1430), is further amended--

      (1) in subsection (c) by striking `2002 and 2003' and inserting `2006 and 2007'; and

      (2) in subsection (e), by striking `Funds estimated' and all that follows through `of the respective fiscal year, whichever is later' and inserting `Funds estimated to be outlayed for Egypt under subsection (c) during fiscal year 2006 shall be disbursed to an interest-bearing account for Egypt in the Federal Reserve Bank of New York not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of an Act making appropriations for foreign operations, export financing, and related programs for fiscal year 2006, or by October 31, 2005, whichever is later'.

Subtitle C--Independent Agencies Authorizations

SEC. 2131. INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION.

    Section 401(s) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1969 (22 U.S.C. 290f(s)) is amended to read as follows:

    `(s) There are authorized to be appropriated $17,826,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007, to carry out this section. Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization in this subsection are authorized to remain available until expended.'.

SEC. 2132. AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION.

    The first sentence of section 510 of the International Security and Development Cooperation Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 290h-8) is amended by striking `$3,872,000 for fiscal year 1986 and $3,872,000 for fiscal year 1987' and inserting `$18,850,000 for fiscal year 2006 and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2007'.

TITLE XXII--AMENDMENTS TO GENERAL FOREIGN ASSISTANCE AUTHORITIES

Subtitle A--Foreign Assistance Act Amendments and Related Provisions

SEC. 2201. DEVELOPMENT POLICY.

    Section 102(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151-1(b)) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (5), by--

        (A) striking `development; and' and inserting `development;'; and

        (B) inserting before the period at the end the following: `; democracy and the rule of law; and economic growth and the building of trade capacity'; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      `(18) The United States development assistance program should take maximum advantage of the increased participation of United States private foundations, business enterprises, and private citizens in funding international development activities. The program should utilize the development experience and expertise of its personnel, its access to host-country officials, and its overseas presence to facilitate public-private alliances and to leverage private sector resources toward the achievement of development assistance objectives.'.

SEC. 2202. ASSISTANCE FOR NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    Section 123(e) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151u(e)) is amended to read as follows:

    `(e)(1) Restrictions contained in this or any other Act with respect to assistance for a country shall not be construed to restrict assistance in support of programs of nongovernmental organizations from--

      `(A) funds made available to carry out this chapter and chapters 10, 11, and 12 of part I and chapter 4 of part II; or

      `(B) funds made available for economic assistance activities under the Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 (22 U.S.C. 5401 et seq.).

    `(2) The President shall submit to Congress, in accordance with section 634A, advance notice of an intent to obligate funds under the authority of this subsection to furnish assistance in support of programs of nongovernmental organizations.

    `(3) Assistance may not be furnished through nongovernmental organizations to the central government of a country under the authority of this subsection, but assistance may be furnished to local, district, or subnational government entities under such authority.'.

SEC. 2203. AUTHORITY FOR USE OF FUNDS FOR UNANTICIPATED CONTINGENCIES.

    Section 451(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2261(a)(1)) is amended--

      (1) by inserting `or the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.)' after `chapter 1 of this part)'; and

      (2) by striking `$25,000,000' and inserting `$50,000,000'.

SEC. 2204. AUTHORITY TO ACCEPT LETHAL EXCESS PROPERTY.

    Section 482(g) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291a(g)) is amended--

      (1) by striking `(g) EXCESS PROPERTY- For' and inserting the following:

    `(g) EXCESS PROPERTY-

      `(1) AUTHORITY- For';

      (2) by striking `nonlethal';

      (3) by inserting `(including lethal or nonlethal property)' after `excess property'; and

      (4) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      `(2) NOTIFICATION- Before obligating any funds to obtain lethal excess property under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall submit a notification of such action to Congress in accordance with the procedures set forth in section 634A.'.

SEC. 2205. RECONSTRUCTION AND FAMINE ASSISTANCE UNDER INTERNATIONAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE AUTHORITY.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 491 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a)--

        (A) by striking `manmade disasters' and inserting `manmade disasters, including famine,'; and

        (B) by striking `disasters.' and inserting `disasters and for programs of reconstruction following such disasters.';

      (2) in subsection (b), by inserting `programs of reconstruction following disasters,' after `preparedness,'; and

      (3) in subsection (c)--

        (A) by striking `relief and rehabilitation' and inserting `relief, rehabilitation, and reconstruction assistance'; and

        (B) by striking `disasters.' and inserting `disasters, including famine.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- The heading of chapter 9 of part I of such Act is amended by inserting `AND FAMINE' after `DISASTER'.

SEC. 2206. FUNDING AUTHORITIES FOR ASSISTANCE FOR THE INDEPENDENT STATES OF THE FORMER SOVIET UNION.

    Chapter 11 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2295 et seq.) is amended--

      (1) in section 498B(j)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2295b(j)(1))--

        (A) by striking `authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 1993 by' and inserting `made available to carry out'; and

        (B) by striking `appropriated for fiscal year 1993'; and

      (2) in paragraphs (1) and (2) of section 498C(b) (22 U.S.C. 2295c(b) (1) and (2)), by striking `under subsection (a)' and inserting `to carry out this chapter'.

SEC. 2207. WAIVER OF NET PROCEEDS RESULTING FROM DISPOSAL OF UNITED STATES DEFENSE ARTICLES PROVIDED TO A FOREIGN COUNTRY ON A GRANT BASIS.

    Section 505(f) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2314(f)) is amended by striking `In the case of items which were delivered prior to 1985, the' in the second sentence and inserting `The'.

SEC. 2208. ADDITIONS TO WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES FOR ALLIES FOR FISCAL YEARS 2006 AND 2007.

    Section 514(b)(2)(A) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h(b)(2)(A)) is amended by striking `for each of fiscal years 2004 and 2005' and inserting `for each of fiscal years 2006 and 2007'.

SEC. 2209. RESTRICTIONS ON ECONOMIC SUPPORT FUNDS FOR LEBANON.

    Section 1224 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (22 U.S.C. 2346 note) is amended by adding at the end the following subsection:

    `(c) EXCEPTION- Subsection (a) does not apply to assistance made available to address the needs of southern Lebanon.'.

SEC. 2210. ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE.

    Section 534 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346c) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a), by striking `in countries in Latin America and the Caribbean';

      (2) in subsection (b)(3)--

        (A) in subparagraph (C), by striking `procedures; and' and inserting `procedures;';

        (B) in subparagraph (D), by inserting `and' after the semicolon; and

        (C) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

        `(E) programs to enhance the protection of participants in judicial cases;';

      (3) by striking subsection (c);

      (4) in subsection (e), by striking the second and third sentences; and

      (5) by redesignating subsections (d) and (e) as subsections (c) and (d), respectively.

SEC. 2211. DEMINING PROGRAMS.

    (a) CLARIFICATION OF AUTHORITY- Section 551 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2348) is amended--

      (1) in the second sentence, by striking `Such assistance may include reimbursements' and inserting `Such assistance may include the following:

      `(1) Reimbursements'; and

      (2) by adding at the end the following:

      `(2) Demining activities, clearance of unexploded ordnance, destruction of small arms, and related activities, notwithstanding any other provision of law.'.

    (b) DISPOSAL OF DEMINING EQUIPMENT- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, demining equipment available to the United States Agency for International Development and the Department of State and used in support of the clearance of landmines and unexploded ordnance for humanitarian purposes, may be disposed of on a grant basis in foreign countries, subject to such terms and conditions as the President determines appropriate.

    (c) LANDMINE AWARENESS PROGRAM FOR THE CHILDREN OF AFGHANISTAN AND OTHER CHILDREN AT RISK IN AREAS OF CONFLICT-

      (1) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

        (A) Most landmines in Afghanistan were laid between 1980 and 1992.

        (B) Additional landmines were laid between 1992 and 1996, during the conflict between the Taliban and the Northern Alliance.

        (C) United States bombings against the Taliban in 2001 and 2002 further increased the unexploded ordinance and cluster bombs throughout Afghanistan.

        (D) The clearance of landmines is a slow and expensive process.

        (E) Certain types of landmines and other unexploded ordinance are small, brightly colored, and attractive to children.

        (F) More than 150 Afghans, many of them children, are injured every month by these weapons.

        (G) In 2003, reconstituted Taliban forces sought out and attacked workers clearing landmines, in an attempt to discredit the Government of President Karzai and the United States military presence.

        (H) In May 2003, after a string of Taliban attacks in which mine removal workers were killed or seriously injured, the United Nations suspended all mine-clearing operations in much of southern Afghanistan.

        (I) Effective landmine awareness programs targeted to children could save lives in Afghanistan and in other areas of conflict where unexploded ordinance are a danger to the safety of children.

      (2) ASSISTANCE AUTHORITY- The President is authorized to furnish assistance to fund innovative programs designed to educate children in Afghanistan and other affected areas about the dangers of landmines and other unexploded ordinances, especially those proposed by organizations with extensive background in children's educational programs.

      (3) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS- In addition to funds otherwise authorized to be appropriated for demining and related activities under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.), there are authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 such sums as may be necessary to carry out the purposes of this subsection.

SEC. 2212. SPECIAL WAIVER AUTHORITY.

    (a) REVISION OF AUTHORITY- Section 614 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2364) is amended in subsection (a)--

      (1) by striking paragraphs (1) and (2) and inserting the following new paragraph:

    `(1) The President may authorize any assistance, sale, or other action under this Act, the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.), or any other law that authorizes the furnishing of foreign assistance or the appropriation of funds for foreign assistance, without regard to any of the provisions described in subsection (b) if the President determines, and notifies the Committees on Foreign Relations and Appropriations of the Senate and the Committees on International Relations and Appropriations of the House of Representatives in writing--

      `(A) with respect to assistance or other actions under chapter 2 or 5 of part II of this Act, or sales or other actions under the Arms Export Control Act, that to do so is vital to the national security interests of the United States; and

      `(B) with respect to other assistance or actions, that to do so is important to the security interests of the United States.'; and

      (2) by redesignating paragraphs (3), (4), and (5) as paragraphs (2), (3), and (4), respectively.

    (b) INCREASED LIMITATION ON SINGLE COUNTRY ALLOCATION- Subsection (a)(3)(C) of such section, as redesignated, is amended by striking `$50,000,000' and inserting `$75,000,000'.

    (c) REPEAL OF PROVISIONS RELATING TO GERMANY AND A CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENT- Section 614 of such Act is further amended by striking subsections (b) and (c).

    (d) INAPPLICABLE OR WAIVABLE LAWS- Such section, as amended by subsection (c), is further amended by adding at the end the following:

    `(b) INAPPLICABLE OR WAIVABLE LAWS- The provisions referred to in subsection (a) are those set forth in any of the following:

      `(1) Any provision of this Act.

      `(2) Any provision of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.).

      `(3) Any provision of law that authorizes the furnishing of foreign assistance or appropriates funds for foreign assistance.

      `(4) Any other provision of law that restricts assistance, sales or leases, or other action under a provision of law referred to in paragraph (1), (2), or (3).

      `(5) Any provision of law that relates to receipts and credits accruing to the United States.'.

SEC. 2213. PROHIBITION OF ASSISTANCE FOR COUNTRIES IN DEFAULT.

    (a) CLARIFICATION OF PROHIBITED RECIPIENTS- Section 620(q) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2370(q)) is amended--

      (1) by striking `any country' and inserting `the government of any country'; and

      (2) by striking `such country' each place it appears and inserting `such government'.

    (b) PERIOD OF PROHIBITION- Such section is further amended by striking `six calendar months' and inserting `one year'.

SEC. 2214. MILITARY COUPS.

    Section 620 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2370) is amended by inserting after subsection (l) the following new subsection (m):

    `(m)(1) No assistance may be furnished under this Act or the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) for the government of a country if the duly elected head of government for such country is deposed by decree or military coup. The prohibition in the preceding sentence shall cease to apply to a country if the President determines and certifies to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations of the House of Representatives that after the termination of assistance a democratically elected government for such country has taken office.

    `(2) Paragraph (1) does not apply to assistance to promote democratic elections or public participation in democratic processes.

    `(3) The President may waive the application of paragraph (1), and any comparable provision of law, to a country upon determining that it is important to the national security interest of the United States to do so.'.

SEC. 2215. DESIGNATION OF POSITION FOR WHICH APPOINTEE IS NOMINATED.

    Section 624 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2384) is amended by inserting after subsection (c) the following new subsection (d):

    `(d) Whenever the President submits to the Senate a nomination of an individual for appointment to a position authorized under subsection (a), the President shall designate the particular position in the agency for which the individual is nominated.'.

SEC. 2216. EXCEPTIONS TO REQUIREMENT FOR CONGRESSIONAL NOTIFICATION OF PROGRAM CHANGES.

    Section 634A(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1(b)) is amended--

      (1) by striking `or' at the end of paragraph (1);

      (2) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (2) and inserting a semicolon; and

      (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:

      `(3) of funds if the advance notification would pose a substantial risk to human health or welfare, but such notification shall be provided to the committees of Congress named in subsection (a) not later than 3 days after the action is taken; or

      `(4) of funds made available under section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763) for the provision of major defense equipment (other than conventional ammunition), aircraft, ships, missiles, or combat vehicles in quantities not in excess of 20 percent of the quantities previously justified under section 25 of such Act (22 U.S.C. 2765).'.

SEC. 2217. COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURES OF FUNDS.

    Section 635(h) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2395(h)) is amended by striking `available' and all that follows through `may,' and inserting `made available under this Act may,'.

SEC. 2218. ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION.

    Section 635(i) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2395(i)) is amended to read as follows:

    `(i) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, claims arising as a result of operations under this Act may be settled (including by use of alternative dispute resolution procedures) or arbitrated with the consent of the parties. Payment made pursuant to any such settlement or arbitration shall be final and conclusive.'.

SEC. 2219. ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITIES.

    Section 636 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2396) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (a)--

        (A) in paragraph (3), by striking `Civil Service Commission' and inserting `Office of Personnel Management';

        (B) by striking paragraph (5) and inserting the following new paragraph:

      `(5) purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles;'; and

        (C) in paragraph (10), by striking `for not to exceed ten years';

      (2) in subsection (c), by striking `not to exceed $6,000,000 of the'; and

      (3) in subsection (d), by striking `Not to exceed $2,500,000 of funds' and inserting `Funds'.

SEC. 2220. ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT FORCES.

    Section 660 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2420) is amended--

      (1) in subsection (b)--

        (A) in paragraph (4), by striking `or';

        (B) in paragraph (6), by striking `and the provision of professional' and all that follows through `democracy' and inserting `including any regional, district, municipal, or other subnational entity emerging from instability';

        (C) by striking the period at the end of paragraph (7) and inserting a semicolon; and

        (D) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:

      `(8) with respect to assistance to combat corruption in furtherance of the objectives for which programs are authorized to be established under section 133 of this Act;

      `(9) with respect to the provision of professional public safety training, including training in internationally recognized standards of human rights, the rule of law, and the promotion of civilian police roles that support democracy;

      `(10) with respect to assistance to combat trafficking in persons; or

      `(11) with respect to assistance for constabularies or comparable law enforcement authorities in support of developing capabilities for and deployment to peace operations.'; and

      (2) by striking subsection (d) and inserting the following new subsection:

    `(d) Subsection (a) shall not apply to assistance for law enforcement forces for which the President, on a case-by-case basis, determines that it is important to the national interest of the United States to furnish such assistance and submits to the committees of the Congress referred to in subsection (a) of section 634A of this Act an advance notification of the obligation of funds for such assistance in accordance with such section.'.

SEC. 2221. SPECIAL DEBT RELIEF FOR THE POOREST COUNTRIES.

    The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended by adding at the end the following:

`PART VI--SPECIAL DEBT RELIEF FOR THE POOREST COUNTRIES

`SEC. 901. SPECIAL DEBT RELIEF FOR THE POOREST COUNTRIES.

    `(a) AUTHORITY- Subject to subsections (b) and (c), the President may reduce amounts owed to the United States (or any agency of the United States) by an eligible country as a result of any of the following transactions:

      `(1) Concessional loans extended under part I or chapter 4 of part II, or antecedent foreign economic assistance laws.

      `(2) Guarantees issued under sections 221 and 222.

      `(3) Credits extended or guarantees issued under the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.).

      `(4) Any obligation, or portion of such obligation, to pay for purchases of United States agricultural commodities guaranteed by the Commodity Credit Corporation under export credit guarantee programs authorized pursuant to--

        `(A) section 5(f) of the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act (15 U.S.C. 714c(f));

        `(B) section 201(b) of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5621(b)); or

        `(C) section 202 of the Agricultural Trade Act of 1978 (7 U.S.C. 5622).

    `(b) GENERAL LIMITATIONS-

      `(1) EXCLUSIVE CONDITIONS- The authority provided in subsection (a) may be exercised--

        `(A) only to implement multilateral official debt relief and referendum agreements, commonly referred to as `Paris Club Agreed Minutes';

        `(B) only in such amounts or to such extent as is provided in advance in appropriations Acts; and

        `(C) only with respect to countries with heavy debt burdens that--

          `(i) are eligible to borrow from the International Development Association, but not from the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development, commonly referred to as `IDA-only' countries; and

          `(ii) are not determined ineligible under subsection (c).

      `(2) ADVANCE NOTIFICATION OF CONGRESS- The authority provided by subsection (a) shall be subject to the requirements of section 634A.

    `(c) ELIGIBILITY LIMITATIONS- The authority provided by subsection (a) may be exercised only with respect to a country the government of which, as determined by the President--

      `(1) does not make an excessive level of military expenditures;

      `(2) has not repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism;

      `(3) is not failing to cooperate on international narcotics control matters;

      `(4) does not engage, through its military or security forces or by other means, in a consistent pattern of gross violations of internationally recognized human rights; and

      `(5) is not ineligible for assistance under section 527 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (22 U.S.C. 2370a).

    `(d) CERTAIN PROHIBITIONS INAPPLICABLE- A reduction of debt pursuant to subsection (a) may not be considered assistance for purposes of any provision of law limiting assistance to a country. The authority provided in subsection (a) may be exercised notwithstanding section 620(r) of this Act or section 321 of the International Development and Food Assistance Act of 1975 (22 U.S.C. 2220a note).'.

SEC. 2222. CONGO BASIN FOREST PARTNERSHIP.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Deforestation and environmental degradation in the Congo Basin in central Africa pose a major threat to the wellbeing and livelihood of the African people and to the world at large.

      (2) It is in the national interest of the United States to assist the countries of the Congo Basin to reduce the rate of forest degradation and loss of biodiversity.

      (3) The Congo Basin Forest Partnership, an initiative involving the Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment of the United States Agency for International Development, and also the Department, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, the National Forest Service, and National Aeronautics and Space Administration, was established to address in a variety of ways the environmental conditions in the Congo Basin.

      (4) In partnership with nongovernmental environmental groups, the Congo Basin Forest Partnership will foster improved conservation and management of natural resources through programs at the local, national, and regional levels to help reverse the environmental degradation of the Congo Basin.

    (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that--

      (1) the Congo Basin Forest Partnership program represents a significant effort at addressing the complex environmental and development challenges in the Congo Basin; and

      (2) the President should make available for fiscal years 2006 and 2007 such sums as may be necessary to capitalize on the strong cooperation and momentum of State governments, international organizations, and non-governmental organizations in protecting the natural resources in the region.

SEC. 2223. LANDMINE CLEARANCE PROGRAMS.

    The Secretary is authorized to support cooperative arrangements commonly known as public-private partnerships for landmine clearance programs by grant or cooperative agreement.

SEC. 2224. MIDDLE EAST FOUNDATION.

    (a) PURPOSES- The purpose of this section is to support, through the provision of grants, technical assistance, training, and other programs, in the countries of the Middle East, the expansion of--

      (1) civil society;

      (2) opportunities for political participation for all citizens;

      (3) protections for internationally recognized human rights, including the rights of women;

      (4) educational system reforms;

      (5) independent media;

      (6) policies that promote economic opportunities for citizens;

      (7) the rule of law; and

      (8) democratic processes of government.

    (b) MIDDLE EAST FOUNDATION-

      (1) DESIGNATION- The Secretary is authorized to designate an appropriate private, nonprofit organization that is organized or incorporated under the laws of the United States or of a State as the Middle East Foundation (referred to in this section as the `Foundation').

      (2) FUNDING- The Secretary is authorized to provide funding to the Foundation through the Middle East Partnership Initiative of the Department of State. The Foundation shall use amounts provided under this paragraph to carry out the purposes of this section, including through making grants and providing other assistance to entities to carry out programs for such purposes.

      (3) NOTIFICATION TO CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES- The Secretary shall notify the appropriate congressional committees before designating an appropriate organization as the Foundation.

    (c) GRANTS FOR PROJECTS-

      (1) FOUNDATION TO MAKE GRANTS- The Secretary shall enter into an agreement with the Foundation that requires the Foundation to use the funds provided under subsection (b)(2) to make grants to persons (other than governments or government entities) located in the Middle East or working with local partners based in the Middle East to carry out projects that support the purposes specified in subsection (a).

      (2) CENTER FOR PUBLIC POLICY- Under the agreement described in paragraph (1), the Foundation may make a grant to an institution of higher education located in the Middle East to create a center for public policy for the purpose of permitting scholars and professionals from the countries of the Middle East and from other countries, including the United States, to carry out research, training programs, and other activities to inform public policymaking in the Middle East and to promote broad economic, social, and political reform for the people of the Middle East.

      (3) APPLICATIONS FOR GRANTS- An entity seeking a grant from the Foundation under this section shall submit an application to the head of the Foundation at such time, in such manner, and including such information as the head of the Foundation may reasonably require.

    (d) PRIVATE CHARACTER OF THE FOUNDATION- Nothing in this section shall be construed--

      (1) to make the Foundation an agency or establishment of the United States Government, or to make the officers or employees of the Foundation officers or employees of the United States for purposes of title 5, United States Code; or

      (2) to impose any restriction on the Foundation's acceptance of funds from private and public sources in support of its activities consistent with the purposes of this section.

    (e) LIMITATION ON PAYMENTS TO FOUNDATION PERSONNEL- No part of the funds provided to the Foundation under this section shall inure to the benefit of any officer or employee of the Foundation, except as salary or reasonable compensation for services.

    (f) RETENTION OF INTEREST- The Foundation may hold funds provided under this section in interest-bearing accounts prior to the disbursement of such funds to carry out the purposes of this section and may retain for use for such purposes any interest earned without returning such interest to the Treasury of the United States and without further appropriation by Congress.

    (g) FINANCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY-

      (1) INDEPENDENT PRIVATE AUDITS OF THE FOUNDATION- The accounts of the Foundation shall be audited annually in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards by independent certified public accountants or independent licensed public accountants certified or licensed by a regulatory authority of a State or other political subdivision of the United States. The report of the independent audit shall be included in the annual report required by subsection (h).

      (2) GAO AUDITS- The financial transactions undertaken pursuant to this section by the Foundation may be audited by the Government Accountability Office in accordance with such principles and procedures and under such rules and regulations as may be prescribed by the Comptroller General of the United States.

      (3) AUDITS OF GRANT RECIPIENTS-

        (A) IN GENERAL- A recipient of a grant from the Foundation shall agree to permit an audit of the books and records of such recipient related to the use of the grant funds.

        (B) RECORDKEEPING- Such recipient shall maintain appropriate books and records to facilitate an audit referred to subparagraph (A), including--

          (i) separate accounts with respect to the grant funds;

          (ii) records that fully disclose the use of the grant funds;

          (iii) records describing the total cost of any project carried out using grant funds; and

          (iv) the amount and nature of any funds received from other sources that were combined with the grant funds to carry out a project.

    (h) ANNUAL REPORTS- Not later than January 31, 2007, and annually thereafter, the Foundation shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and make available to the public an annual report that includes, for the fiscal year prior to the fiscal year in which the report is submitted, a comprehensive and detailed description of--

      (1) the operations and activities of the Foundation that were carried out using funds provided under this section;

      (2) grants made by the Foundation to other entities with funds provided under this section;

      (3) other activities of the Foundation to further the purposes of this section; and

      (4) the financial condition of the Foundation.

SEC. 2225. DATABASE OF UNITED STATES MILITARY ASSISTANCE.

    Section 655 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2415) is amended by striking subsection (c) and inserting the following new subsection:

    `(c) AVAILABILITY OF REPORT INFORMATION ON THE INTERNET-

      `(1) REQUIREMENT FOR DATABASE- The Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, shall make available to the public the unclassified portion of each such report in the form of a database that is available via the Internet and that may be searched by various criteria.

      `(2) SCHEDULE FOR UPDATING- Not later than April 1 of each year, the Secretary of State shall make available in the database the information contained in the annual report for the fiscal year ending the previous September 30.'.

SEC. 2226. MILLENNIUM CHALLENGE ASSISTANCE FOR CERTAIN COUNTRIES.

    Section 616(d) of the Millennium Challenge Act of 2003 (22 U.S.C. 7715(d)) is amended by striking `fiscal year 2004' and inserting `a fiscal year'.

Subtitle B--Arms Export Control Act Amendments and Related Provisions

SEC. 2231. THRESHOLDS FOR ADVANCE NOTICE TO CONGRESS OF SALES OR UPGRADES OF DEFENSE ARTICLES, DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, AND MAJOR DEFENSE EQUIPMENT.

    (a) LETTERS OF OFFER TO SELL- Subsection (b) of section 36 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776) is amended--

      (1) in the first sentence of paragraph (1)--

        (A) by striking `Subject to paragraph (6), in' and inserting `In';

        (B) by striking `Act for $50,000,000' and inserting `Act for $100,000,000';

        (C) by striking `services for $200,000,000' and inserting `services for $350,000,000';

        (D) by striking `$14,000,000' and inserting `$50,000,000'; and

        (E) by inserting `and in other cases if the President determines it is appropriate,' before `before such letter';

      (2) in the first sentence of paragraph (5)(C)--

        (A) by striking `Subject to paragraph (6), if' and inserting `If';

        (B) by striking `costs $14,000,000' and inserting `costs $50,000,000';

        (C) by striking `equipment, $50,000,000' and inserting `equipment, $100,000,000';

        (D) by striking `or $200,000,000' and inserting `or $350,000,000'; and

        (E) by inserting `and in other cases if the President determines it is appropriate,' before `then the President'; and

      (3) by striking paragraph (6).

    (b) EXPORT LICENSES- Subsection (c) of section 36 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776) is amended--

      (1) in the first sentence of paragraph (1)--

        (A) by striking `Subject to paragraph (5), in' and inserting `In';

        (B) by striking `$14,000,000' and inserting `$50,000,000';

        (C) by striking `services sold under a contract in the amount of $50,000,000' and inserting `services sold under a contract in the amount of $100,000,000'; and

        (D) by inserting `and in other cases if the President determines it is appropriate,' before `before issuing such';

      (2) in the last sentence of paragraph (2), by striking `(A) and (B)' and inserting `(A), (B), and (C)'; and

      (3) by striking paragraph (5).

    (c) PRESIDENTIAL CONSENT- Section 3(d) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2753(d)) is amended--

      (1) in paragraphs (1) and (3)(A)--

        (A) by striking `Subject to paragraph (5), the' and inserting `The';

        (B) by striking `$14,000,000' and inserting `$50,000,000'; and

        (C) by striking `service valued (in terms of its original acquisition cost) at $50,000,000' and inserting `service valued (in terms of its original acquisition cost) at $100,000,000'; and

      (2) by striking paragraph (5).

SEC. 2232. CLARIFICATION OF REQUIREMENT FOR ADVANCE NOTICE TO CONGRESS OF COMPREHENSIVE EXPORT AUTHORIZATIONS.

    Subsection (d) of section 36 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (1)--

        (A) by inserting `(A)' after `(1)';

        (B) by striking `this subsection' and inserting `this subparagraph'; and

        (C) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

    `(B) Notwithstanding section 27(g), in the case of a comprehensive authorization described in section 126.14 of title 22, Code of Federal Regulations (or any corresponding similar regulation) for the proposed export of defense articles or defense services in an amount that exceeds a limitation set forth in subsection (c)(1), before the comprehensive authorization is approved or the addition of a foreign government or other foreign partner to the comprehensive authorization is approved, the President shall submit a certification with respect to the comprehensive authorization in a manner similar to the certification required under subsection (c)(1) of this section and containing comparable information, except that the last sentence of such subsection shall not apply to certifications submitted pursuant to this subparagraph.'; and

      (2) in paragraph (4), by striking `Approval for an agreement subject to paragraph (1) may not be given under section 38' and inserting `Approval for an agreement subject to paragraph (1)(A), or for a comprehensive authorization subject to paragraph (1)(B), may not be given under section 38 or section 126.14 of title 22, Code of Federal Regulations (or any corresponding similar regulation), as the case may be,'.

SEC. 2233. AUTHORITY TO PROVIDE CATALOGING DATA AND SERVICES TO NON-NATO COUNTRIES.

    Section 21(h)(2) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2761(h)(2)) is amended by striking `to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or to any member government of that Organization if that Organization or member government' and inserting `to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, to any member government of that Organization, or to the government of any other country if that Organization, member government, or other government'.

SEC. 2234. FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT PERMANENT WAIVER AUTHORITY.

    (a) AUTHORITY TO WAIVE RESTRICTIONS AND ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS- If the President submits the certification and report described in subsection (b) with respect to an independent state of the former Soviet Union for a fiscal year, funds may be obligated and expended during that fiscal year under sections 503 and 504 of the FREEDOM Support Act (22 U.S.C. 5853 and 5854) for assistance or other programs and activities for that state even if that state has not met one or more of the requirements for eligibility under paragraphs (1) through (4) of section 502 of such Act (22 U.S.C. 5852).

    (b) CERTIFICATION AND REPORT-

      (1) IN GENERAL- The certification and report referred to in subsection (a) are a written certification submitted by the President to Congress that the waiver of the restriction under such section 502 and the requirements in that section during the fiscal year covered by such certification is important to the national security interests of the United States, together with a report containing the following:

        (A) A description of the activity or activities that prevent the President from certifying that the state is committed to the matters set forth in the provisions of law specified in subsection (a) in such fiscal year.

        (B) An explanation of why the waiver is important to the national security interests of the United States.

        (C) A description of the strategy, plan, or policy of the President for promoting the commitment of the state to, and compliance by the state with, such matters, notwithstanding the waiver.

      (2) FORM OF REPORT- A report under paragraph (1) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

    (c) INAPPLICABILITY TO CERTAIN PROGRAMS- The authority provided in subsection (a) does not apply to any program described in section 1501(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public Law 104-201; 50 U.S.C. 2362 note) or any activity under such a program.

SEC. 2235. EXTENSION OF PAKISTAN WAIVERS.

    (a) Fiscal Year 2006- Section 1(b) of the Act entitled `An Act to authorize the President to exercise waivers of foreign assistance restrictions with respect to Pakistan through September 30, 2003, and for other purposes', approved October 27, 2001 (Public Law 107-57; 115 Stat. 403), is amended to read as follows:

    `(b) Fiscal Year 2006-

      `(1) WAIVER- The President is authorized to waive, with respect to Pakistan, any provision of the foreign operations, export financing, and related programs appropriations Act for fiscal year 2006 that prohibits direct assistance to a country whose duly elected head of government was deposed by decree or military coup, if the President determines and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that such waiver--

        `(A) would facilitate the transition to democratic rule in Pakistan; and

        `(B) is important to United States efforts to respond to, deter, or prevent acts of international terrorism.'.

    (b) EXEMPTION OF PAKISTAN FROM FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROHIBITIONS RELATING TO FOREIGN COUNTRY LOAN DEFAULTS- Section 3(2) of such Act is amended to read as follows:

      `(2) Such provisions of annual foreign operations, export financing, and related programs appropriations Act for fiscal years 2005 and 2006, as are comparable to section 512 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2001 (Public Law 106-429; 114 Stat. 1900A-25).'.

    (c) TERMINATION DATE- Section 6 of such Act is amended to read as follows:

    `Except as otherwise provided in section 1 or 3, the provisions of this Act shall terminate on October 1, 2006.'.

SEC. 2236. CONSOLIDATION OF REPORTS ON NONPROLIFERATION IN SOUTH ASIA.

    Section 1601(c) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 is amended to read as follows:

    `(c) REPORT- The report required to be submitted to Congress not later than April 1, 2006, pursuant to section 620F(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2376(c)) shall include a description of the efforts of the United States Government to achieve the objectives described in subsections (a) and (b), the progress made toward achieving such objectives, and the likelihood that such objectives will be achieved by September 30, 2006.'.

SEC. 2237. HAITIAN COAST GUARD.

    The Government of Haiti shall be eligible to purchase defense articles and services for the Haitian Coast Guard under the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.), subject to the prior notification requirements under section 634A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1).

SEC. 2238. REQUIREMENT FOR THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE TO INDONESIA.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The cooperation offered by the Government of Indonesia in working with the Federal Bureau of Investigation on the investigation into the murders of two United States Citizens and one Indonesian citizen that occurred on August 31, 2002, in Timika, Indonesia is appreciated and welcomed by Congress.

      (2) The successful conclusion of the investigation into those murders and bringing the responsible individuals to justice will require the continued cooperation of the Government of Indonesia.

    (b) REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT- None of the funds made available under section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2763) or under chapter 5 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347 et seq.) for fiscal year 2006 may be made available for assistance to the Government of Indonesia or to the Indonesian Armed Forces until the Secretary submits a report to the appropriate congressional committees that describes--

      (1) the status of the investigation of the murders of two United States citizens and one Indonesian citizen that occurred on August 31, 2002 in Timika, Indonesia, the status of any individuals indicted within the United States or Indonesia for crimes relating to those murders, and the status of judicial proceedings relating to those murders;

      (2) the ability of United States officials to investigate those murders, including the ability to conduct unimpeded interviews during fiscal year 2005 in Indonesia with individuals identified by officials of the Federal Bureau of Investigation or other United States officials;

      (3) the efforts made during fiscal year 2005 by the Government of the United States or the Government of Indonesia to arrest individuals indicted for crimes relating to those murders;

      (4) the ability of United States officials to access documents or other items determined by United States officials to be pertinent to the investigation of those murders;

      (5) the ability of United States officials, working in cooperation with Indonesian officials, to take evidence that may be related to those murders from Indonesia for analysis in the United States;

      (6) the cooperation provided by the Government of Indonesia, the police in Indonesia, the Armed Forces of Indonesia, or the judiciary in Indonesia in response to requests related to those murders made by the Secretary of State or the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation during fiscal year 2005; and

      (7) any other actions taken during fiscal year 2005 by the Government of Indonesia, the police in Indonesia, the Armed Forces of Indonesia, or the judiciary in Indonesia to bring the individuals responsible for those murders to justice.

TITLE XXIII--RADIOLOGICAL TERRORISM SECURITY

SEC. 2301. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `Radiological Terrorism Security Act of 2005'.

SEC. 2302. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:

      (1) BYPRODUCT MATERIAL- The term `byproduct material' has the meaning given the term in section 11 e. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2014(e)).

      (2) IAEA- The term `IAEA' means the International Atomic Energy Agency.

      (3) RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL- The term `radioactive material' means--

        (A) source material and special nuclear material, but does not include natural or depleted uranium;

        (B) nuclear byproduct material;

        (C) material made radioactive by bombardment in an accelerator; and

        (D) all refined isotopes of radium.

      (4) SOURCE MATERIAL- The term `source material' has the meaning given the term in section 11 z. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2014(z)).

      (5) SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL- The term `special nuclear material' has the meaning given the term in section 11 aa. of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 (42 U.S.C. 2014(aa)).

SEC. 2303. EMBASSY THREAT ASSESSMENT REPORTS.

    (a) REPORTS REQUIRED- The Secretary shall, at the times specified in subsection (c), submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report--

      (1) detailing the preparations made at United States diplomatic missions abroad to detect and mitigate a radiological attack on United States missions and other United States facilities under the control of the Secretary;

      (2) setting forth a rank-ordered list of the Secretary's priorities for improving radiological security and consequence management at United States missions; and

      (3) providing a rank-ordered list of the missions where such improvement is most important.

    (b) BUDGET REQUEST- Each report under subsection (a) shall also include a proposed budget to carry out the improvements listed in such report pursuant to subsection (a)(2).

    (c) TIMING-

      (1) FIRST REPORT- The first report under subsection (a) shall be submitted not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

      (2) SUBSEQUENT REPORTS- Subsequent reports under subsection (a) shall be submitted with the budget justification materials submitted by the Secretary to Congress in support of the budget of the President for the fiscal year (as submitted under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States Code) for each fiscal year after fiscal year 2006.

    (d) FORM- Each report shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

SEC. 2304. FOREIGN FIRST RESPONDERS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The Secretary is authorized to assist foreign countries, or to propose that the IAEA assist foreign countries, in the development of appropriate national response plans and the training of first responders to--

      (1) detect, identify, and characterize radioactive material;

      (2) understand the hazards posed by radioactive contamination;

      (3) understand the risks encountered at various dose rates;

      (4) enter contaminated areas safely and speedily; and

      (5) evacuate persons within a contaminated area.

    (b) CONSIDERATIONS- In carrying out activities under subsection (a), the Secretary shall take into account the findings of the threat assessment reports required by section 2303.

SEC. 2305. AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.

    Of the funds appropriated under this Act for Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs, there is authorized to be appropriated to the President for fiscal year 2006, $2,000,000 to carry out this title.

TITLE XXIV--GLOBAL PATHOGEN SURVEILLANCE

SEC. 2401. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `Global Pathogen Surveillance Act of 2005'.

SEC. 2402. FINDINGS; PURPOSE.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Bioterrorism poses a grave national security threat to the United States. The insidious nature of the threat, the likely delayed recognition in the event of an attack, and the underpreparedness of the domestic public health infrastructure may produce catastrophic consequences following a biological weapons attack upon the United States.

      (2) A contagious pathogen engineered as a biological weapon and developed, tested, produced, or released in another country can quickly spread to the United States. Given the realities of international travel, trade, and migration patterns, a dangerous pathogen released anywhere in the world can spread to United States territory in a matter of days, before any effective quarantine or isolation measures can be implemented.

      (3) To effectively combat bioterrorism and ensure that the United States is fully prepared to prevent, diagnose, and contain a biological weapons attack, measures to strengthen the domestic public health infrastructure and improve domestic surveillance and monitoring, while absolutely essential, are not sufficient.

      (4) The United States should enhance cooperation with the World Health Organization, regional health organizations, and individual countries, including data sharing with appropriate United States departments and agencies, to help detect and quickly contain infectious disease outbreaks or bioterrorism agents before they can spread.

      (5) The World Health Organization (WHO) has done an impressive job in monitoring infectious disease outbreaks around the world, including the recent emergence of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic, particularly with the establishment in April 2000 of the Global Outbreak Alert and Response network.

      (6) The capabilities of the World Health Organization are inherently limited by the quality of the data and information it receives from member countries, the narrow range of diseases (plague, cholera, and yellow fever) upon which its disease surveillance and monitoring is based, and the consensus process it uses to add new diseases to the list. Developing countries in particular often cannot devote the necessary resources to build and maintain public health infrastructures.

      (7) In particular, developing countries could benefit from--

        (A) better trained public health professionals and epidemiologists to recognize disease patterns;

        (B) appropriate laboratory equipment for diagnosis of pathogens;

        (C) disease reporting based on symptoms and signs (known as `syndrome surveillance'), affording the earliest possible opportunity to conduct an effective response;

        (D) a narrowing of the existing technology gap in syndrome surveillance capabilities and real-time information dissemination to public health officials; and

        (E) appropriate communications equipment and information technology to efficiently transmit information and data within national and regional health networks, including inexpensive, Internet-based Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and relevant telephone-based systems for early recognition and diagnosis of diseases.

      (8) The United States is working with states of the former Soviet Union to monitor disease outbreaks in that region, and it has begun a program under the United States-Mexico Border Health Commission to work with the Secretariat of Health of the government of Mexico and the States of Mexico that border the United States by providing, among other forms of assistance, assistance of the kind provided for in this title. What is needed now is an effort to improve pathogen surveillance worldwide.

      (9) An effective international capability to monitor and quickly diagnose infectious disease outbreaks will offer dividends not only in the event of biological weapons development, testing, production, and attack, but also in the more likely cases of naturally occurring infectious disease outbreaks that could threaten the United States. Furthermore, a robust surveillance system will serve to deter terrorist use of biological weapons, as early detection will help mitigate the intended effects of such malevolent uses.

    (b) PURPOSE- The purposes of this title are as follows:

      (1) To enhance the capability and cooperation of the international community, including the World Health Organization and individual countries, through enhanced pathogen surveillance and appropriate data sharing, to detect, identify, and contain infectious disease outbreaks, whether the cause of those outbreaks is intentional human action or natural in origin.

      (2) To enhance the training of public health professionals and epidemiologists from eligible developing countries in advanced Internet-based and other electronic syndrome surveillance systems, in addition to traditional epidemiology methods, so that they may better detect, diagnose, and contain infectious disease outbreaks, especially those due to pathogens most likely to be used in a biological weapons attack.

      (3) To provide assistance to developing countries to purchase appropriate public health laboratory equipment necessary for infectious disease surveillance and diagnosis.

      (4) To provide assistance to developing countries to purchase appropriate communications equipment and information technology, including, as appropriate, relevant computer equipment, Internet connectivity mechanisms, and telephone-based applications to effectively gather, analyze, and transmit public health information for infectious disease surveillance and diagnosis.

      (5) To make available greater numbers of United States Government public health professionals to international health organizations, regional health networks, and United States diplomatic missions where appropriate.

      (6) To establish `lab-to-lab' cooperative relationships between United States public health laboratories and established foreign counterparts.

      (7) To expand the training and outreach activities of overseas United States laboratories, including Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Department of Defense entities, to enhance the disease surveillance capabilities of developing countries.

      (8) To provide appropriate technical assistance to existing regional health networks and, where appropriate, seed money for new regional networks.

SEC. 2403. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:

      (1) BIOLOGICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION- The term `Biological Weapons Convention' means the Convention on the Prohibition of the Development, Production and Stockpiling of Bacteriological (Biological) and Toxin Weapons and on Their Destruction, signed at Washington, London, and Moscow April 10, 1972.

      (2) ELIGIBLE DEVELOPING COUNTRY- The term `eligible developing country' means any developing country that--

        (A) has agreed to the objective of fully complying with requirements of the World Health Organization on reporting public health information on outbreaks of infectious diseases;

        (B) has not been determined by the Secretary, for purposes of section 40 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2780), section 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2371), or section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2405j), to have repeatedly provided support for acts of international terrorism, unless the Secretary exercises a waiver certifying that it is in the national interest of the United States to provide assistance under the provisions of this title;

        (C) is a state party to the Biological Weapons Convention; and

        (D) is determined by the United States Government not to have an offensive biological weapons program.

      (3) ELIGIBLE NATIONAL- The term `eligible national' means any citizen or national of an eligible developing country who--

        (A) is eligible to receive a visa under the provisions of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101 et seq.); and

        (B) is not currently or previously affiliated with or employed by a laboratory or entity determined by the United States Government to be involved in offensive biological weapons activities.

      (4) INTERNATIONAL HEALTH ORGANIZATION- The term `international health organization' includes the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization.

      (5) LABORATORY- The term `laboratory' means a facility for the biological, microbiological, serological, chemical, immuno-hematological, hematological, biophysical, cytological, pathological, or other examination of materials derived from the human body for the purpose of providing information for the diagnosis, prevention, or treatment of any disease or impairment of, or the assessment of the health of, human beings.

      (6) SELECT AGENT- The term `select agent' has the meaning given such term for purposes of section 72.6 of title 42, Code of Federal Regulations.

      (7) SYNDROME SURVEILLANCE- The term `syndrome surveillance' means the recording of symptoms (patient complaints) and signs (derived from physical examination) combined with simple geographic locators to track the emergence of a disease in a population.

SEC. 2404. PRIORITY FOR CERTAIN COUNTRIES.

    Priority in the provision of United States assistance for eligible developing countries under all the provisions of this title shall be given to those countries that permit personnel from the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate outbreaks of infectious diseases on their territories, provide early notification of disease outbreaks, and provide pathogen surveillance data to appropriate United States departments and agencies in addition to international health organizations.

SEC. 2405. RESTRICTION.

    Notwithstanding any other provision of this title, no foreign nationals participating in programs authorized under this title shall have access, during the course of such participation, to select agents that may be used as, or in, a biological weapon, except in a supervised and controlled setting.

SEC. 2406. FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.

    (a) ESTABLISHMENT- There is established a fellowship program (in this section referred to as the `program') under which the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and subject to the availability of appropriations, shall award fellowships to eligible nationals to pursue public health education or training, as follows:

      (1) MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH DEGREE- Graduate courses of study leading to a master of public health degree with a concentration in epidemiology from an institution of higher education in the United States with a Center for Public Health Preparedness, as determined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      (2) ADVANCED PUBLIC HEALTH EPIDEMIOLOGY TRAINING- Advanced public health training in epidemiology to be carried out at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (or equivalent State facility), or other Federal facility (excluding the Department of Defense or United States National Laboratories), for a period of not less than 6 months or more than 12 months.

    (b) SPECIALIZATION IN BIOTERRORISM- In addition to the education or training specified in subsection (a), each recipient of a fellowship under this section (in this section referred to as a `fellow') may take courses of study at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or at an equivalent facility on diagnosis and containment of likely bioterrorism agents.

    (c) FELLOWSHIP AGREEMENT-

      (1) IN GENERAL- In awarding a fellowship under the program, the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall require the recipient to enter into an agreement under which, in exchange for such assistance, the recipient--

        (A) will maintain satisfactory academic progress (as determined in accordance with regulations issued by the Secretary and confirmed in regularly scheduled updates to the Secretary from the institution providing the education or training on the progress of the recipient's education or training);

        (B) will, upon completion of such education or training, return to the recipient's country of nationality or last habitual residence (so long as it is an eligible developing country) and complete at least four years of employment in a public health position in the government or a nongovernmental, not-for-profit entity in that country or, with the approval of the Secretary, complete part or all of this requirement through service with an international health organization without geographic restriction; and

        (C) agrees that, if the recipient is unable to meet the requirements described in subparagraph (A) or (B), the recipient will reimburse the United States for the value of the assistance provided to the recipient under the fellowship, together with interest at a rate determined in accordance with regulations issued by the Secretary but not higher than the rate generally applied in connection with other Federal loans.

      (2) WAIVERS- The Secretary may waive the application of paragraph (1)(B) and (1)(C) if the Secretary determines that it is in the national interest of the United States to do so.

    (d) IMPLEMENTATION- The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, is authorized to enter into an agreement with any eligible developing country under which the country agrees--

      (1) to establish a procedure for the nomination of eligible nationals for fellowships under this section;

      (2) to guarantee that a fellow will be offered a professional public health position within the country upon completion of his studies; and

      (3) to certify to the Secretary when a fellow has concluded the minimum period of employment in a public health position required by the fellowship agreement, with an explanation of how the requirement was met.

    (e) PARTICIPATION OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS- On a case-by-case basis, the Secretary may provide for the participation of United States citizens under the provisions of this section if the Secretary determines that it is in the national interest of the United States to do so. Upon completion of such education or training, a United States recipient shall complete at least 5 years of employment in a public health position in an eligible developing country or an international health organization.

SEC. 2407. IN-COUNTRY TRAINING IN LABORATORY TECHNIQUES AND SYNDROME SURVEILLANCE.

    (a) IN GENERAL- In conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense, the Secretary shall, subject to the availability of appropriations, support short training courses in-country (not in the United States) for laboratory technicians and other public health personnel from eligible developing countries in laboratory techniques relating to the identification, diagnosis, and tracking of pathogens responsible for possible infectious disease outbreaks. Training under this section may be conducted in overseas facilities of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or in Overseas Medical Research Units of the Department of Defense, as appropriate. The Secretary shall coordinate such training courses, where appropriate, with the existing programs and activities of the World Health Organization.

    (b) TRAINING IN SYNDROME SURVEILLANCE- In conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense, the Secretary shall, subject to the availability of appropriations, establish and support short training courses in-country (not in the United States) for public health personnel from eligible developing countries in techniques of syndrome surveillance reporting and rapid analysis of syndrome information using Geographic Information System (GIS) and other Internet-based tools. Training under this subsection may be conducted via the Internet or in appropriate facilities as determined by the Secretary. The Secretary shall coordinate such training courses, where appropriate, with the existing programs and activities of the World Health Organization.

SEC. 2408. ASSISTANCE FOR THE PURCHASE AND MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC HEALTH LABORATORY EQUIPMENT.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION- The President is authorized, on such terms and conditions as the President may determine, to furnish assistance to eligible developing countries to purchase and maintain public health laboratory equipment described in subsection (b).

    (b) EQUIPMENT COVERED- Equipment described in this subsection is equipment that is--

      (1) appropriate, where possible, for use in the intended geographic area;

      (2) necessary to collect, analyze, and identify expeditiously a broad array of pathogens, including mutant strains, which may cause disease outbreaks or may be used as a biological weapon;

      (3) compatible with general standards set forth, as appropriate, by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to ensure interoperability with regional and international public health networks;

      (4) necessary to secure and monitor pathogen collections containing select agents; and

      (5) not defense articles or defense services as those terms are defined under section 47 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2794).

    (c) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION- Nothing in this section shall be construed to exempt the exporting of goods and technology from compliance with applicable provisions of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2401 et seq.) or any successor statute.

    (d) LIMITATION- Amounts appropriated to carry out this section shall not be made available for the purchase from a foreign country of equipment that, if made in the United States, would be subject to the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) or likely be barred or subject to special conditions under the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2401 et seq.) or any successor statute.

    (e) HOST COUNTRY'S COMMITMENTS- The assistance provided under this section shall be contingent upon the host country's commitment to provide the resources, infrastructure, and other assets required to house, maintain, support, secure, monitor, and maximize use of this equipment and appropriate technical personnel.

SEC. 2409. ASSISTANCE FOR IMPROVED COMMUNICATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH INFORMATION.

    (a) ASSISTANCE FOR PURCHASE OF COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT AND INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY- The President is authorized to provide, on such terms and conditions as the President may determine, assistance to eligible developing countries for the purchase and maintenance of communications equipment and information technology described in subsection (b), and supporting equipment, necessary to effectively collect, analyze, and transmit public health information.

    (b) COVERED EQUIPMENT- Equipment (and information technology) described in this subsection is equipment that--

      (1) is suitable for use under the particular conditions of the area of intended use;

      (2) meets appropriate World Health Organization standards to ensure interoperability with like equipment of other countries and international health organizations; and

      (3) is not defense articles or defense services as those terms are defined under section 47 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2794).

    (c) RULE OF CONSTRUCTION- Nothing in this section shall be construed to exempt the exporting of goods and technology from compliance with applicable provisions of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2401 et seq.) or any successor statute.

    (d) LIMITATION- Amounts appropriated to carry out this section shall not be made available for the purchase from a foreign country of equipment that, if made in the United States, would be subject to the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) or likely be barred or subject to special conditions under the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2401 et seq.) or any successor statute.

    (e) ASSISTANCE FOR STANDARDIZATION OF REPORTING- The President is authorized to provide, on such terms and conditions as the President may determine, technical assistance and grant assistance to international health organizations to facilitate standardization in the reporting of public health information between and among developing countries and international health organizations.

    (f) HOST COUNTRY'S COMMITMENTS- The assistance provided under this section shall be contingent upon the host country's commitment to provide the resources, infrastructure, and other assets required to house, support, maintain, secure, and maximize use of this equipment and appropriate technical personnel.

SEC. 2410. ASSIGNMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH PERSONNEL TO UNITED STATES MISSIONS AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Upon the request of a United States chief of diplomatic mission or an international health organization, and with the concurrence of the Secretary, the head of a Federal agency may assign to the respective United States mission or organization any officer or employee of the agency occupying a public health position within the agency for the purpose of enhancing disease and pathogen surveillance efforts in developing countries.

    (b) REIMBURSEMENT- The costs incurred by a Federal agency by reason of the detail of personnel under subsection (a) may be reimbursed to that agency out of the applicable appropriations account of the Department if the Secretary determines that the relevant agency may otherwise be unable to assign such personnel on a non-reimbursable basis.

SEC. 2411. EXPANSION OF CERTAIN UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT LABORATORIES ABROAD.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Subject to the availability of appropriations, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Department of Defense shall each--

      (1) increase the number of personnel assigned to laboratories of the Centers or the Department, as appropriate, located in eligible developing countries that conduct research and other activities with respect to infectious diseases; and

      (2) expand the operations of those laboratories, especially with respect to the implementation of on-site training of foreign nationals and regional outreach efforts involving neighboring countries.

    (b) COOPERATION AND COORDINATION BETWEEN LABORATORIES- Subsection (a) shall be carried out in such a manner as to foster cooperation and avoid duplication between and among laboratories.

    (c) RELATION TO CORE MISSIONS AND SECURITY- The expansion of the operations of overseas laboratories of the Centers or the Department under this section shall not--

      (1) detract from the established core missions of the laboratories; or

      (2) compromise the security of those laboratories, as well as their research, equipment, expertise, and materials.

SEC. 2412. ASSISTANCE FOR REGIONAL HEALTH NETWORKS AND EXPANSION OF FOREIGN EPIDEMIOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAMS.

    (a) AUTHORITY- The President is authorized, on such terms and conditions as the President may determine, to provide assistance for the purposes of--

      (1) enhancing the surveillance and reporting capabilities of the World Health Organization and existing regional health networks; and

      (2) developing new regional health networks.

    (b) EXPANSION OF FOREIGN EPIDEMIOLOGY TRAINING PROGRAMS- The Secretary of Health and Human Services is authorized to establish new country or regional Foreign Epidemiology Training Programs in eligible developing countries.

SEC. 2413. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS-

      (1) IN GENERAL- Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under this division for Nonproliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs, there is authorized to be appropriated $35,000,000 for the fiscal year 2006 to carry out this title.

      (2) ALLOCATION OF FUNDS- Of the amounts made available under paragraph (1)--

        (A) $25,000,000 for the fiscal year 2006 is authorized to be available to carry out sections 2406, 2407, 2408, and 2409;

        (B) $500,000 for the fiscal year 2006 is authorized to be available to carry out section 2410;

        (C) $2,500,000 for the fiscal year 2006 is authorized to be available to carry out section 2411; and

        (D) $7,000,000 for the fiscal year 2006 is authorized to be available to carry out section 2412.

    (b) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- The amount appropriated pursuant to subsection (a) is authorized to remain available until expended.

    (c) REPORTING REQUIREMENT- Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of this title, the Secretary shall submit a report, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Secretary of Defense, containing--

      (1) a description of the implementation of programs under this title; and

      (2) an estimate of the level of funding required to carry out those programs at a sufficient level.

TITLE XXV--REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND OTHER MATTERS

Subtitle A--Elimination and Modification of Certain Reporting Requirements

SEC. 2501. ANNUAL REPORT ON TERRITORIAL INTEGRITY.

    Section 560 of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1994 (titles I through V of Public Law 103-87; 107 Stat. 966) is amended by striking subsection (g).

SEC. 2502. ANNUAL REPORTS ON ACTIVITIES IN COLOMBIA.

    Section 694 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228; 116 Stat. 1415; 22 U.S.C. 2291 note) is amended by adding at the end the following:

    `(c) REPORT CONSOLIDATION- The Secretary may satisfy the annual reporting requirements of this section by incorporating the required information with the annual report submitted pursuant to section 489(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2291h(a)).'.

SEC. 2503. ANNUAL REPORT ON FOREIGN MILITARY TRAINING.

    Subsection (a)(1) of section 656 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2416) is amended--

      (1) by striking `January 31' and inserting `March 1'; and

      (2) by striking `and all such training proposed for the current year'.

SEC. 2504. REPORT ON HUMAN RIGHTS IN HAITI.

    Section 616(c) of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999 (section 101(b) of division A of Public Law 105-277; 112 Stat. 2681-114), is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (2), by striking `not later than 3 months after the date of the enactment of this Act' and inserting `as part of the annual report submitted under paragraph (4) of this subsection'; and

      (2) in paragraph (3), by inserting `, as part of the annual report submitted under paragraph (4) of this subsection,' after `the appropriate congressional committees'.

Subtitle B--New Reports and Other Matters

SEC. 2511. AMENDMENTS TO THE ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT ACT.

    (a) VERIFICATION OF COMPLIANCE- Section 306(a) of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (22 U.S.C. 2577(a)) is amended by inserting `or other formal commitment' after `agreement' each place it appears in paragraphs (1) and (2).

    (b) ANNUAL REPORTS TO CONGRESS-

      (1) REQUIREMENT FOR REPORTS- Section 403 of the Arms Control and Disarmament Act (22 U.S.C. 2593a) is amended to read as follows:

    `SEC. 403. (a) REPORT ON OBJECTIVES AND NEGOTIATIONS- Not later than April 15 of each year, the President shall submit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report prepared by the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Energy, the Director of National Intelligence, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, on the status of United States policy and actions with respect to arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament. Such report shall include--

      `(1) a detailed statement concerning the arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament objectives of the executive branch of Government for the forthcoming year; and

      `(2) a detailed assessment of the status of any ongoing arms control, nonproliferation, or disarmament negotiations, including a comprehensive description of negotiations or other activities during the preceding year and an appraisal of the status and prospects for the forthcoming year.

    `(b) REPORT ON COMPLIANCE- Not later than April 15 of each year, the President shall submit to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and to the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate a report prepared by the Secretary of State with the concurrence of the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency and in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Energy, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on the status of United States policy and actions with respect to arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament compliance. Such report shall include--

      `(1) a detailed assessment of adherence of the United States to obligations undertaken in arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements, including information on the policies and organization of each relevant agency or department of the United States to ensure adherence to such obligations, a description of national security programs with a direct bearing on questions of adherence to such obligations and of steps being taken to ensure adherence, and a compilation of any substantive questions raised during the preceding year and any corrective action taken;

      `(2) a detailed assessment of the adherence of other nations to obligations undertaken in all arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements or commitments, including the Missile Technology Control Regime, to which the United States is a participating state, including information on actions taken by each nation with regard to the size, structure, and disposition of its military forces in order to comply with arms control, nonproliferation, or disarmament agreements or commitments, including, in the case of each agreement or commitment about which compliance questions exist--

        `(A) a description of each significant issue raised and efforts made and contemplated with the other participating state to seek resolution of the difficulty;

        `(B) an assessment of damage, if any, to United States security and other interests;

        `(C) recommendations as to any steps that should be considered to redress any damage to United States national security and to reduce compliance problems; and

        `(D) for states that are not parties to such agreements or commitments, a description of activities of concern carried out by such states and efforts underway to bring such states into adherence with such agreements or commitments;

      `(3) a discussion of any material noncompliance by foreign governments with their binding commitments to the United States with respect to the prevention of the spread of nuclear explosive devices (as defined in section 830(4) of the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6305(4)) by non-nuclear-weapon states (as defined in section 830(5) of that Act (22 U.S.C. 6305(5)) or the acquisition by such states of unsafeguarded special nuclear material (as defined in section 830(8) of that Act (22 U.S.C. 6305(8)), including--

        `(A) a net assessment of the aggregate military significance of all such violations;

        `(B) a statement of the compliance policy of the United States with respect to violations of those commitments; and

        `(C) what actions, if any, the President has taken or proposes to take to bring any country committing such a violation into compliance with those commitments; and

      `(4) a specific identification, to the maximum extent practicable in unclassified form, of each and every question that exists with respect to compliance by other countries with arms control, nonproliferation, and disarmament agreements and other formal commitments with the United States.

    `(c) CHEMICAL WEAPONS CONVENTION COMPLIANCE REPORT REQUIREMENT SATISFIED- The report submitted pursuant to subsection (b) shall include the information required under section 2(10)(C) of Senate Resolution 75, 105th Congress, agreed to April 24, 1997, advising and consenting to the ratification of the Convention on the Prohibition of Development, Production, Stockpiling and Use of Chemical Weapons and on Their Destruction, with annexes, done at Paris January 13, 1993 and entered into force April 29, 1997 (popularly known as the `Chemical Weapons Convention'; T.Doc. 103-21)

    `(d) CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT- The reports required by this section shall be submitted in unclassified form, with classified annexes, as appropriate. The report portions described in paragraphs (2) and (3) of subsection (b) shall summarize in detail, at least in classified annexes, the information, analysis, and conclusions relevant to possible noncompliance by other countries that are provided by United States intelligence agencies.

    `(e) REPORTING CONSECUTIVE NONCOMPLIANCE- If the President in consecutive reports submitted to the Congress under subsection (b) reports that any country is not in full compliance with its binding nonproliferation commitments to the United States, then the President shall include in the second such report an assessment of what actions are necessary to compensate for such violations.

    `(f) ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENT- Each report required by subsection (b) shall include a discussion of each significant issue described in subsection (b)(4) that was contained in a previous report issued under this section during 1995, or after December 31, 1995, until the question or concern has been resolved and such resolution has been reported in detail to the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate and the Committee on International Relations and the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives.'.

      (2) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- The heading of such section is amended to read as follows:

`ANNUAL REPORTS TO CONGRESS'.

SEC. 2512. SUPPORT FOR INDEPENDENT MEDIA IN ETHIOPIA.

    Of the amounts made available under chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.), such sums as are necessary may be made available in fiscal years 2006 and 2007 to support independent media in Ethiopia, including providing support to--

      (1) strengthen the capacity of journalists; and

      (2) increase access to printing facilities by individuals who work in the print media.

SEC. 2513. SUPPORT FOR JUSTICE SECTOR IN CENTRAL AFRICAN STATES AND THE AFRICAN UNION.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The President has expressed enthusiasm for increasing African judicial capacity and for supporting the development of the African Union's proposed African Court of Justice.

      (2) In recent years, the Central African States of Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda have all been involved in overlapping conflicts that have destabilized the region and contributed to the deaths of millions of civilians.

      (3) The Department of State's 2004 Country Report on Human Rights Practices in Burundi states that `impunity and the continuing lack of accountability for those who committed past abuses remained serious problems.'

      (4) The Department of State's 2004 Country Report on Human Rights Practices in Rwanda states that `arbitrary arrest and detention and prolonged pretrial detention remained serious problems. . . . The judiciary did not always ensure due process or expeditious trials. The Government continued to conduct genocide trials at a slow pace.'

      (5) The Department of State's 2004 Country Report on Human Rights Practices in the Democratic Republic of the Congo states that `government security forces committed unlawful killings, torture, beatings, acts of rape, extortion, and other abuses, such as lootings and interference with citizens, right to privacy. In general, security forces operated with impunity. . . . Armed groups committed numerous, serious abuses with impunity against civilians, including deliberate large-scale killings, the burning of villages, kidnappings, torture, rape, cannibalism, mutilation, looting, and extortion.'

      (6) The Department of State's 2004 Country Report on Human Rights Practices in Uganda states that `the Government punished some security force officials who were guilty of abuses; however, impunity remained a problem. . . . Poor judicial administration, lack of resources, a large case backlog, and lengthy trial delays limited due process rights, including the right to a fair trial.'

      (7) The report submitted to Congress by the Secretary on February 2, 2005, under section 4 of the Northern Uganda Crisis Response Act (Public Law 108-283) states that `The UPDF [Ugandan People's Defense Force] is feared by many ordinary civilians in northern Uganda and its record of civil-military relations is mixed. . . . The relation between the UPDF's complaint processing system, the civil judicial process, and the UHCR [Ugandan Human Rights Commission] needs to be clarified, and links between the various systems need to be strengthened.'

    (b) AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS-

      (1) Of the amounts made available under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.), up to $15,000,000 may be made available for fiscal year 2006 to support the development of responsible justice and reconciliation mechanisms in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda, including programs to combat impunity for abuses committed by the security services and programs to increase awareness of gender-based violence and to improve local capacity to prevent and respond to such violence.

      (2) Of the amounts made available under chapter 3 of part I of such Act for International Organizations and Programs, such sums as may be necessary may be made available to support the efforts of the African Union to enhance its judicial capacity.

    (c) REPORT-

      (1) REPORT REQUIRED- Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on efforts to strengthen the judicial capacity in Africa.

      (2) CONTENT- The report required under paragraph (1) shall include a description of--

        (A) the steps that the Department of State has taken to engage with the organs and member states of the African Union to determine what technical, logistical, financial, or political support the United States could provide to more effectively strengthen judicial capacity in Africa;

        (B) the specific requests made by the African Union for assistance to strengthen judicial capacity in Africa;

        (C) the assistance provided thus far by the United States Government to the African Union for the purposes of strengthening the institutional and judicial capacity of the African Union;

        (D) a 5-year strategy for bolstering the judicial capacity of the African Union; and

        (E) the specific steps taken by the Department of State and additional steps planned in the next 5 years to address the ongoing impunity for grave human rights abuses and to increase independent judicial capacity in Burundi, Rwanda, the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Uganda.

SEC. 2514. SUPPORT FOR HAITI.

    Of the amounts appropriated for fiscal year 2006 pursuant to the authorizations of appropriations in sections 2101(a), 2102, 2107, and 2126(a) and pursuant to the amendments made by sections 2108, 2121(a), 2122(a), 2123, and 2124, not less than $163,000,000 should be made available to provide assistance to Haiti.

SEC. 2515. GLOBAL PEACE OPERATIONS INITIATIVE.

    (a) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS- Of the amounts made available under chapter 6 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C 2348 et seq.), $114,400,000 may be made available in fiscal year 2006, and such amounts as may be necessary may be made available in fiscal year 2007, to support the Global Peace Operations Initiative developed and approved by the President in 2004.

    (b) ELIGIBILITY FOR PARTICIPATION-

      (1) CRITERIA- Countries receiving support under the Global Peace Operations Initiative should be selected on the basis of--

        (A) the country's willingness to participate in peace support operations;

        (B) the country's military capability;

        (C) the country's democratic governance;

        (D) the nature of the relations between the civil and military authorities within the country;

        (E) the human rights record of the country, with particular attention paid to the record of the military; and

        (F) the relations between the country and its neighboring states.

      (2) ELIGIBILITY REVIEW- The eligibility status of participating countries shall be reviewed at least annually.

    (c) SENSE OF CONGRESS ON LOCAL CONSULTATIONS- It is the sense of Congress that the Department of State should--

      (1) provide information about the nature and purpose of the training provided under the Global Peace Operations Initiative to nationals of a country participating in that Initiative, including parliamentarians and nongovernmental humanitarian and human rights organizations; and

      (2) to the extent possible, provide such information prior to the beginning of training activities in such country under the Global Peace Operations Initiative.

    (d) SENSE OF CONGRESS ON MONITORING- It is further the sense of Congress that--

      (1) the Secretary of State and the heads of other relevant departments and agencies should monitor the performance and conduct of military units that receive training or support under the Global Peace Operations Initiative; and

      (2) the Secretary should provide to the appropriate congressional committees an annual report on the information gained through such monitoring.

SEC. 2516. ASSISTANCE TO COMBAT HIV/AIDS IN CERTAIN COUNTRIES OF THE CARIBBEAN REGION.

    Section 1(f)(2)(B)(ii)(VII) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(f)(2)(B)(ii)(VII)) is amended by inserting after `Zambia,' the following: `Antigua and Barbuda, the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Saint Lucia, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Dominican Republic,'.

SEC. 2517. REPEAL OF OBSOLETE ASSISTANCE AUTHORITY.

    Sections 495 through 495K of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292f through 2292q) are repealed.

SEC. 2518. CONSOLIDATION OF CERTAIN SUBMISSIONS UNDER THE AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT OF 2002.

    Section 305 of the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7555) is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(c) CONSOLIDATION OF REPORTS-

      `(1) AUTHORITY- In order to enhance efficient use of resources, the President may consolidate or combine into one submission for any year any of the following matters required to be submitted in or for that year:

        `(A) The strategy under subsection (a).

        `(B) An annual report under subsection (b).

        `(C) An annual submission of the Afghanistan assistance plan required under section 104(c).

        `(D) The semiannual report required under section 206(c), relating to the implementation of strategies for meeting the immediate and long-term security needs of Afghanistan.

      `(2) COMBINED DISCUSSION- The authority under paragraph (1) includes authority to satisfy a requirement for addressing a factor or a criterion in a strategy, plan, or report referred to in that paragraph by addressing that factor or criterion once in the consolidated or combined submission for the purposes of all such requirements.'.

SEC. 2519. TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS.

    (a) ERROR IN ENROLLMENT- Effective as of November 21, 1990, as if included therein, section 10(a)(1) of Public Law 101-623 (104 Stat. 3356), relating to an amendment of section 610(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2360(a)), is amended by striking `part I' and inserting `part I)'.

    (b) REDESIGNATION OF DUPLICATIVELY NUMBERED SECTION- Section 620G of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as added by section 149 of Public Law 104-164 (110 Stat. 1436; 22 U.S.C. 2378a), is redesignated as section 620J.

    (c) CORRECTION OF SHORT TITLE- Effective as of September 30, 1961, as if included therein, section 111 of Public Law 87-329 (75 Stat. 719; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note) is amended by striking `The Foreign' and inserting `the `Foreign'.

SEC. 2520. REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT ON UNITED STATES POLICY TOWARD HAITI.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Haiti is plagued by chronic political instability, economic and political crises, and significant social challenges.

      (2) The United States has a political and economic interest and a humanitarian and moral responsibility in assisting the Government and people of Haiti in resolving the country's problems and challenges.

      (3) The situation in Haiti is increasingly cause for alarm and concern, and a sustained, coherent, and active approach by the United States Government is needed to make progress toward resolving Haiti's political and economic crises.

    (b) REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT- Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report that describes United States policy toward Haiti. The report shall include the following:

      (1) The plan for the reconstruction of Haiti for fiscal years 2006 and 2007.

      (2) A description of the activities that have been and will be carried out by the United States Government, and the activities that will be carried out by the United States Government, for the following purposes:

        (A) To establish democracy and rule of law in Haiti, in a manner that is consistent with the Constitution of Haiti and international requirements described in resolutions of the United Nations, the Organization of American States, or other international organizations.

        (B) To assist in the disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of illegally armed forces in Haiti, in coordination with the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH) and the Organization of American States.

        (C) To assist in the reform and training of the Haitian National Police, in coordination with MINUSTAH and the Organization of American States, to include vetting, human rights, and weapons monitoring programs that adhere to internationally accepted norms.

        (D) To promote, in collaboration with the Haitian interim government, the holding of free and fair elections in Haiti that are monitored by international monitors and observers.

        (E) To combat the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) in Haiti.

        (F) To promote economic development in Haiti through assistance to critical sectors such as health and education, and for job creation, including through support for trade preference legislation specifically for Haiti.

        (G) To encourage other countries and international organizations to provide assistance to Haiti, including by fulfilling the pledges for over $1,200,000,000 in assistance made at the July 2004 International Donors Conference on Haiti.

        (H) To ensure that MINUSTAH is fully staffed at the authorized levels of military and civilian personnel and that it remains in Haiti for a period of time sufficient to adequately retrain the Haitian National Police.

SEC. 2521. UNITED STATES POLICY ON TSUNAMI RELIEF AND RECONSTRUCTION IN ACEH, INDONESIA.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The destruction in South and Southeast Asia caused by the tsunami that occurred on December 26, 2004, has created a possible opportunity for progress in resolving the 30-year dispute between the Government of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM).

      (2) In negotiations during February 2005, the GAM and Government of Indonesia made important progress in resolving some of their differences, prompting the Vice President of Indonesia to say he was pleased with the progress of the talks and that `[t]he result is much better than [the result of] previous meetings'.

      (3) In a joint statement, issued on January 25, 2005, the Co-Chairs of the Tokyo Conference on Reconstruction and Development of Sri Lanka stated that tsunami assistance should adhere to `basic principles of equity' and be `sensitive to and strengthens the Peace Process'.

    (b) POLICY- It should be the policy of the United States to work to formulate a joint statement with other donor countries which are providing assistance for tsunami relief and reconstruction efforts in Aceh, Indonesia, that calls for the provision of such assistance--

      (1) to be equitably distributed throughout the impacted areas of Indonesia; and

      (2) to be used to strengthen and support the negotiations between the Government of Indonesia and the Free Aceh Movement.

SEC. 2522. DRUG PRICE TRANSPARENCY IN THE EMERGENCY PLAN FOR AIDS RELIEF.

    (a) REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT- Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Coordinator of United States Government Activities to Combat HIV/AIDS Globally shall make available to the public a report setting forth the amount of United States funding provided under the authorities of the United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003 (22 U.S.C. 7601 et seq.), or under an amendment made to that Act, to procure anti-retroviral drugs in a country described in section 1(f)(2)(B)(VII) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(f)(2)(B)(VII). The report shall include a detailed description of the anti-retroviral drugs procured, including--

      (1) the amount expended for generics and name brand drugs;

      (2) the price paid per unit of each drug; and

      (3) the vendor from which the drugs were purchased.

    (b) ANNUAL UPDATE- The Coordinator of United States Government Activities to Combat HIV/AIDS Globally shall update the report required by subsection (a) by January 31 each year and make such updates available to the public.

TITLE XXVI--SAFE WATER

SEC. 2601. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `Safe Water: Currency for Peace Act of 2005'.

SEC. 2602. FINDINGS.

    Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) Water-related diseases are a human tragedy, killing and debilitating millions of people annually, preventing millions of people from leading healthy lives, and undermining development efforts.

      (2) Providing safe supplies of water, and sanitation and hygiene improvements would save millions of lives by reducing the prevalence of water-borne diseases, water-based diseases, water-privation diseases, and water-related vector diseases.

      (3) An estimated 1,800,000 people die of diarrhoeal diseases every year. Ninety percent of these people are children under the age of five who live in developing countries. Simple household and personal hygiene measures, such as household water treatment and safe storage and effective hand washing with soap, reduce the burden of diarrhoeal disease by more than 40 percent.

      (4) According to the World Health Organization, 88 percent of diarrhoeal disease can be attributed to unsafe water supply, and inadequate sanitation and hygiene.

      (5) Around the world, more than 150,000,000 people are threatened by blindness caused by trachoma, a disease that is spread through poor hygiene and sanitation, and aggravated by inadequate water supply.

      (6) Chronic intestinal helminth infections are a leading source of global morbidity, including cognitive impairment and anemia for hundred of millions of children and adults. Access to safe water and sanitation and better hygiene practices can greatly reduce the number of these infections.

      (7) Schistosomiasis is a disease that affects 200,000,000 people, 20,000,000 of whom suffer serious consequences, including liver and intestinal damage. Improved water resource management to reduce infestation of surface water, improved sanitation and hygiene, and deworming treatment can dramatically reduce this burden.

      (8) In 2002, 2,600,000,000 people lacked access to improved sanitation. In sub-Saharan Africa, only 36 percent of the population has access to improved sanitation. In developing countries, only 31 percent of the population in rural areas has access to improved sanitation.

      (9) Improved management of water resources can contribute to comprehensive strategies for controlling mosquito populations associated with life-threatening vector-borne diseases in developing countries, especially malaria, which kills more than 1,000,000 people each year, most of whom are children.

      (10) Natural disasters such as floods and droughts threaten people's health. Floods contaminate drinking-water systems with industrial waste refuse, sewage, and human and animal excreta. Droughts exacerbate malnutrition and limit access to drinking water supplies. Sound water resource management can mitigate the impact of such natural disasters.

      (11) The United Nations Population Fund report entitled `Water: A Critical Resource' stated that `Nearly 500 million people [suffer from] water stress or serious water scarcity. Under current trends, two-thirds of the world's population may be subject to moderate to high water stress by 2025'. Effective water management and equitable allocation of scarce water supplies for all uses will become increasingly important for meeting both human and ecosystem water needs in the future.

      (12) The participants in the World Summit on Sustainable Development, held in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 2002, agreed to the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development which included an agreement to work to reduce by one-half `the proportion of people who are unable to reach or afford safe drinking water,' and `the proportion of people without access to basic sanitation' by 2015.

      (13) At the World Summit on Sustainable Development, building on the U.S.-Japan Partnership for Security and Prosperity announced in June 2001 by President Bush and Prime Minister Koizumi, the United States and Japan announced a Clean Water for People Initiative to cooperate in providing safe water and sanitation to the world's poor, improve watershed management, and increase the productivity of water.

      (14) At the World Summit on Sustainable Development, the United States announced the Water for the Poor Initiative which committed the United States to provide $750,000,000 over 3 years to increase access to safe water and sanitation services, improve watershed management, and increase the productivity of water. During fiscal year 2004, the United States provided an estimated $472,000,000 in assistance to the Water for the Poor Initiative, including funds made available for reconstruction activities in Iraq, of which $388,000,000 was made available for safe drinking water and sanitation programs.

      (15) During fiscal year 2004, the United States provided $49,000,000 in assistance for activities to provide safe drinking water and sanitation in sub-Saharan Africa, an amount that is equal to 6.5 percent of total United States foreign assistance provided for all water activities in the Water for the Poor Initiative.

      (16) At the 2003 Summit of the Group of Eight in Evian, France, the members of the Group of Eight produced a plan entitled `Water: A G8 Action Plan' that stated that a lack of water can undermine human security. The Action Plan committed the members of the Group of Eight to playing a more active role in international efforts to provide safe water and sanitation to the world's poor by mobilizing domestic resources in developing countries for water infrastructure financing through the development and strengthening of local capital markets and financial institutions, particularly by establishing, where appropriate, at the national and local levels, revolving funds that offer local currency financings, which allow communities to finance capital-intensive water infrastructure projects over an affordable period of time at competitive rates.

      (17) The G8 Action Plan also committed members of the Group of Eight to provide risk mitigation mechanisms for such revolving funds and to provide technical assistance for the development of efficient local financial markets and building municipal government capacity to design and implement financially viable projects and provide, as appropriate, targeted subsidies for the poorest communities that cannot fully service market rate debt.

      (18) The United Nations General Assembly Resolution 58/217 of February 9, 2004, proclaimed `the period from 2005 to 2015 the International Decade for Action, `Water for Life', to commence on World Water Day, 22 March 2005' for the purpose of increasing the focus of the international community on water-related issues at all levels and on the implementation of water-related programs and projects.

SEC. 2603. WATER FOR HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 104C the following new section:

`SEC. 104D. WATER FOR HEALTH AND DEVELOPMENT.

    `(a) FINDING- Congress makes the following findings:

      `(1) Access to safe water and sanitation and improved hygiene are significant factors in controlling the spread of disease in the developing world and positively affecting economic development.

      `(2) The health of children and other vulnerable rural and urban populations in developing countries, especially sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, is threatened by a lack of adequate safe water, sanitation, and hygiene.

      `(3) Efforts to meet United States foreign assistance objectives, including those related to agriculture, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and the environment will be advanced by improving access to safe water and sanitation and promoting sound water management throughout the world.

      `(4) Developing sustainable financing mechanisms, including private sector financing, is critical to the long-term sustainability of improved water supply, sanitation, and hygiene.

      `(5) The annual level of investment needed to meet the water and sanitation needs of developing countries far exceeds the amount of Official Development Assistance (ODA) and spending by governments of developing countries, so attracting greater public and private investment is essential.

      `(6) Long-term sustainability in the provision of access to safe water and sanitation and in the maintenance of water and sanitation facilities requires a legal and regulatory environment conducive to private sector investment and private sector participation in the delivery of water and sanitation services.

      `(7) The absence of robust domestic financial markets and sources for long-term financing are a major impediment to the development of water and sanitation projects in developing countries.

      `(8) At the 2003 Summit of the Group of Eight in Evian, France, the members of the Group of Eight produced a plan entitled `Water: A G8 Action Plan' that contemplated the promotion of domestic revolving funds to provide local currency financing for capital-intensive water infrastructure projects. Innovative financing mechanisms such as revolving funds and pooled-financings have been very effective vehicles for mobilizing domestic savings for investments in water and sanitation both in the United States and in some developing countries. These mechanisms can serve as a catalyst for greater investment in water and sanitation projects by villages, small towns, and municipalities.

      `(9) The G8 Action Plan also committed members of the Group of Eight to improving coordination and cooperation between donors, and such improved coordination and cooperation is essential for enlarging the beneficial impact of donor initiatives.

    `(b) POLICY- It is a major objective of United States foreign assistance--

      `(1) to promote good health and economic development by providing assistance to expand access to safe water and sanitation, promote sound water management, and improve hygiene for people around the world; and

      `(2) to promote, to the maximum extent practicable and appropriate, long-term sustainability in the provision of access to safe water and sanitation by encouraging private investment in water and sanitation infrastructure and services.

    `(c) AUTHORIZATION-

      `(1) IN GENERAL- To carry out the policy set out in subsection (b), the President is authorized to furnish assistance, including health information and education, to advance good health and promote economic development by improving the safety of water supplies, expanding access to safe water and sanitation, promoting sound water management, and promoting better hygiene.

      `(2) LOCAL CURRENCY- The President may use payments made in local currencies under an agreement made under title I of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (7 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) to provide assistance under this section, including assistance for activities related to drilling or maintaining wells.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- Section 104(c) of the Agricultural Trade Development and Assistance Act of 1954 (7 U.S.C. 1704(c)) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

      `(9) SAFE WATER- To provide assistance under section 104D of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 to advance good health and promote economic development by improving the safety of water supplies, including programs related to drilling or maintaining wells.'.

SEC. 2604. PILOT PROGRAM FOR WATER SUSTAINABILITY INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT AND CAPACITY BUILDING.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Section 104D of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as added by section 2603(a), is amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:

    `(d) PILOT CLEAN WATER SUSTAINABILITY INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM-

      `(1) AUTHORITY FOR PILOT PROGRAM- In order to study the feasibility and desirability of a program to assist countries that have a high proportion of the population that is susceptible to water-borne illnesses as a result of a lack of basic infrastructure for clean water and sanitation, the President, in close coordination with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development and the Director of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation, is authorized to establish a 5-year pilot program under which the President may--

        `(A) provide for the issuance of investment insurance, investment guarantees, or loan guarantees, provide for direct investment or investment encouragement, or carry out special projects and programs for eligible investors to assist such countries in the development of safe drinking water and sanitation infrastructure programs; and

        `(B) provide assistance to support the activities described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of paragraph (2) for the purposes of--

          `(i) carrying out the policy set out in subsection (b); and

          `(ii) maximizing the effectiveness of assistance provided under subparagraph (A).

      `(2) ACTIVITIES SUPPORTED- Assistance provided to a country under paragraph (1)(B) shall be used to--

        `(A) assess the water development needs of such country;

        `(B) design projects to address such water development needs;

        `(C) develop the capacity of individuals and institutions in such country to carry out and maintain water development programs through training, joint work projects, and educational programs; and

        `(D) provide long-term monitoring of water development programs.

      `(3) GEOGRAPHIC LIMITATION- The President may only provide assistance under the pilot program under paragraph (1) to a country based on consultation with Congress.

      `(4) ADDITIONAL CRITERIA- In making determinations of eligibility under this subsection, the President should give preferential consideration to projects sponsored by or significantly involving United States small businesses or cooperatives.

      `(5) IMPLEMENTATION- To the extent provided for in advance in appropriations Acts, the President is authorized to create such legal mechanisms as may be necessary for the implementation of its authorities under this subsection. Such legal mechanisms may be deemed non-Federal borrowers for purposes of the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 661 et seq.).

      `(6) LOAN GUARANTEES- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the President is authorized to provide assistance under the pilot program under paragraph (1) in the form of partial loan guarantees, provided that such a loan guarantee may not exceed 75 percent of the total amount of the loan.

      `(7) COORDINATION- The President is authorized to coordinate the activities of each agency or department of the United States to provide to a country assistance for an activity described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of paragraph (2).

      `(8) FEDERAL AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES- Under the direction of the President, the head of each agency or department of the United States is authorized to assign, detail, or otherwise make available to the Department of State any officer or employee of such agency or department who possesses expertise related to an activity described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) of paragraph (2).

      `(9) REPORT TO CONGRESS- The President shall annually prepare and submit to the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate and the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on International Relations, and the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives a report concerning the implementation of the pilot program under this subsection.'.

    (b) EFFECTIVE DATE- The amendment made by subsection (a) shall be effective during the 5-year period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 2605. SAFE WATER STRATEGY.

    (a) REQUIREMENT FOR STRATEGY- The Secretary, in close coordination with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development and in consultation with other appropriate Federal agencies, appropriate international organizations, foreign governments, United States nongovernmental organizations, and other appropriate entities, shall develop and implement a strategy to further the United States foreign assistance objective to promote economic development by promoting good health through the provision of assistance to expand access to safe water and sanitation, to promote sound water management, and to improve hygiene for people around the world.

    (b) CONTENT- The strategy required by subsection (a) shall include--

      (1) an assessment of the activities that have been carried out, or that are planned to be carried out, by the United States to improve hygiene or access to safe water and sanitation by underserved rural or urban poor populations, the countries of sub-Saharan Africa, or in countries that receive assistance from the United States Agency for International Development;

      (2) methods to achieve long-term sustainability in the provision of access to safe water and sanitation, the maintenance of water and sanitation facilities, and effective promotion of improved hygiene, in the context of appropriate financial, municipal, health, and water management systems;

      (3) methods to use United States assistance to promote community-based approaches, including the involvement of civil society, to further the objectives described in subsection (a);

      (4) methods to mobilize and leverage the financial, technical, and managerial expertise of businesses, governments, nongovernmental, and civil society in the form of public-private alliances such as the Global Development Alliances of the Agency which encourage innovation and effective solutions for improving sustainable access to safe water and sanitation;

      (5) goals to further the objectives described in subsection (a) and methods to measure whether progress is being made to meet such goals, including indicators to measure progress and procedures to regularly evaluate and monitor progress;

      (6) assessments of the challenges and obstacles that impede the provision of access to safe water and sanitation, as well as the improvement of hygiene practices, critical in developing countries;

      (7) assessments of how access to safe water, sanitation, and hygiene programs, as well as water resource programs, effectively support the goal of combating the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS);

      (8) assessments of the roles that other countries or entities, including international organizations, could play in furthering such objective and mechanisms to establish coordination among the United States, foreign countries, and other entities;

      (9) assessments of the level of resources that are needed each year to further such objective; and

      (10) methods to coordinate and integrate programs of the United States to further such objective with other United States foreign assistance programs.

    (c) REPORTS TO CONGRESS-

      (1) INITIAL REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to Congress a report that describes the strategy required by subsection (a).

      (2) REPORT- Not less than once every 2 years after the submission of the initial report under paragraph (1), the President shall submit to Congress a report on the status of the implementation of the strategy and progress made in achieving the objective described in subsection (a).

SEC. 2606. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- There are authorized to be appropriated for each of the fiscal years 2006 through 2011 such sums as may be necessary to carry out this title and the amendments made by this title.

    (b) OTHER AMOUNTS- Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization of appropriations in subsection (a) shall be in addition to the amounts otherwise available to carry out this title and the amendments made by this title.

TITLE XXVII--PROTECTION OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS DURING HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCIES

Sec. 2701. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `Protection of Vulnerable Populations During Humanitarian Emergencies Act of 2005'.

SEC. 2702. DEFINITIONS.

    In this title:

      (1) AGENCY- The term `Agency' means the United States Agency for International Development.

      (2) CHILDREN- The term `children' means persons under the age of 18 years.

      (3) COORDINATOR- The term `coordinator' means the individual designated by the Secretary under section 2712(a).

      (4) DEPARTMENT- The term `Department' means the Department of State.

      (5) EXPLOITATION OF CHILDREN- The term `exploitation of children' includes--

        (A) adult sexual activity with children;

        (B) kidnapping or forcibly separating children from their families;

        (C) subjecting children to forced child labor;

        (D) forcing children to commit or witness acts of violence, including compulsory recruitment into armed forces or as combatants; and

        (E) withholding or obstructing access of children to food, shelter, medicine, and basic human services.

      (6) HIV- The term `HIV' means the human immunodeficiency virus, the virus that causes the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

      (7) HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCY- The term `humanitarian emergency' means a situation in which, due to a natural or manmade disaster, civilians, including refugees and internally displaced persons, require basic humanitarian assistance.

      (8) INTER-AGENCY STANDING COMMITTEE- The term `Inter-Agency Standing Committee' means the Inter-Agency Standing Committee established in response to United Nations General Assembly Resolution 46/182 of December 19, 1991.

      (9) PROTECTION- The term `protection' means all appropriate measures to provide the physical and psychological security of, provide equal access to basic services for, and safeguard the legal and human rights of, individuals.

      (10) SEX TRAFFICKING- The term `sex trafficking' has the meaning given the term in section 103 of Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

      (11) SEXUAL EXPLOITATION AND ABUSE- The term `sexual exploitation and abuse' means causing harm to a person through--

        (A) rape;

        (B) sexual assault or torture;

        (C) sex trafficking and trafficking in persons;

        (D) demands for sex in exchange for employment, goods, services, or protection; and

        (E) other forms of sexual violence.

      (12) TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS- The term `trafficking in persons' has the meaning given the term `severe forms of trafficking in persons' in section 103 of Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

      (13) VULNERABLE POPULATIONS- The term `vulnerable populations' means those people, such as women, children, the disabled, and the elderly, who by virtue of their status are at a disadvantage in obtaining or accessing goods and services.

SEC. 2703. FINDINGS.

    Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The nature of war has changed dramatically in recent decades, putting civilians, especially women and children, at greater risk of death, disease, displacement, and exploitation.

      (2) In the last decade alone, more than 2,000,000 children have been killed during wars, while more than 4,000,000 have survived physical mutilation, and more than 1,000,000 have been orphaned or separated from their families as a result of war.

      (3) The use of rape, particularly against women and girls, is an increasingly common tactic in modern war.

      (4) Civilians, particularly women and children, account for the vast majority of those adversely affected by humanitarian emergencies, including as refugees and internally displaced persons, and increasingly are targeted by combatants and armed elements for murder, abduction, forced military conscription, involuntary servitude, displacement, sexual abuse and slavery, mutilation, and loss of freedom.

      (5) Large-scale natural disasters, such as the tsunami that struck South East Asia, South Asia, and East Africa on December 26, 2004, and claimed over 200,000 lives, are particularly threatening to children, who are often orphaned or separated from their families.

      (6) Traditionally, the response to such humanitarian emergencies has focused on providing food, medical care, and shelter needs, and has placed less emphasis on the safety and security of those affected by a humanitarian emergency.

      (7) Refugee women and girls face particular threats because of power inequities, including being forced to exchange sex for food and humanitarian supplies, and being at increased risk of rape and sexual exploitation and abuse due to poor security in refugee camps.

      (8) In some circumstances, humanitarian agencies have failed to make individuals affected by a humanitarian emergency, especially women and children, aware of their rights to protection and assistance, to give them access to effective channels of redress, and to make humanitarian workers aware of their duty to respect these rights and provide adequate assistance.

      (9) Refugee and displaced women face heightened risks of developing complications during pregnancy, suffering a miscarriage, dying, being injured during childbirth, becoming infected with HIV or another sexually transmitted infection, or suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder.

      (10) Despite the heightened risks for women during a humanitarian emergency, women's needs for specialized health services have often been overlooked by donors and relief organizations, which are focused on providing food, water, and shelter.

      (11) There is a substantial need for the protection of civilians, especially women and children, to be given a high priority during all humanitarian emergencies.

Subtitle A--Program and Policy Coordination

SEC. 2711. REQUIREMENT TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE STRATEGY.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The Secretary shall, in consultation with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, develop a comprehensive strategy for the protection of vulnerable populations, especially women and children, who are affected by a humanitarian emergency. The strategy shall include--

      (1) measures to address the specific protection needs of women and children;

      (2) training for personnel to respond to the specific needs of such vulnerable populations; and

      (3) measures taken to comply with section 2731.

    (b) REPORT- Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this title, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report setting forth the strategy described in subsection (a).

SEC. 2712. DESIGNATION OF COORDINATOR.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this title, the Secretary shall designate an individual within the Department or the Agency as the coordinator to be responsible for the oversight and coordination of efforts by the Department and the Agency to provide protection for vulnerable populations, especially women and children, affected by a humanitarian emergency.

    (b) CONSULTATION REQUIREMENT- The Secretary shall consult with the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development in making a designation under subsection (a).

    (c) NOTIFICATION- Not later than 5 days after designating an official as a coordinator under subsection (a), the Secretary shall inform the appropriate congressional committees of such designation.

Subtitle B--Prevention and Preparedness

SEC. 2721. REPORTING AND MONITORING SYSTEMS.

    (a) DUTIES OF COORDINATOR- The coordinator shall--

      (1) develop and maintain a database of historical information about occurrences of sexual exploitation and abuse, and other exploitation, of children during a humanitarian emergency;

      (2) establish a reporting and monitoring system for United States diplomatic missions to collect and submit to the coordinator information that indicates that vulnerable populations, especially women and children, are being targeted for or are at substantial risk of violence or exploitation in humanitarian emergencies;

      (3) assist United States diplomatic missions in developing responses to situations where there is a substantial risk of sexual exploitation and abuse or exploitation of children that may occur during a humanitarian emergency; and

      (4) develop mechanisms for the receipt and distribution of reports to and from the public and relevant nongovernmental and international organizations of evidence of sexual exploitation and abuse and exploitation of children during a humanitarian emergency.

    (b) CONSULTATION- In carrying out duties under paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (a), the Coordinator shall consult with inter-governmental organizations and nongovernmental organizations.

SEC. 2722. PROTECTION TRAINING AND EXPERTISE.

    (a) FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM- The Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development is authorized to establish a fellowship program at the Agency to increase the expertise of the personnel of the Agency in developing programs and policies to carry out activities related to the protection of vulnerable populations, especially women and children, affected by a humanitarian emergency.

    (b) TERM OF FELLOWSHIP- An individual may participate in a fellowship under this section for a term of not more than 3 years.

    (c) NUMBER OF FELLOWS- The Administrator is authorized to employ up to 10 fellows at any one time under this program.

    (d) QUALIFICATION- An individual is qualified to participate in a fellowship under this section if such individual has the specific expertise required--

      (1) to develop and implement policies and programs related to the protection of vulnerable populations, especially women and children; and

      (2) to promote the exchange of knowledge and experience between the Agency and entities that assist the Agency in carrying out assistance programs.

Subtitle C--Protection of Refugees and Internally Displaced Persons

SEC. 2731. CODES OF CONDUCT.

    None of the funds made available by the Department or Agency to provide assistance under section 491 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2292) or overseas assistance under section 2 of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (22 U.S.C. 2601) may be provided to a primary grantee or contractor for the purpose of providing assistance to refugees or internally displaced persons unless such grantee or contractor has adopted a code of conduct that is consistent with the 6 core principles recommended by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee. To the extent practicable, a grantee or contractor that has adopted such a code of conduct shall ensure that subgrantees and subcontractors of such grantee or contractor have adopted, or agree to act in accordance with, such a code of conduct.

SEC. 2732. HEALTH SERVICES FOR REFUGEES AND DISPLACED PERSONS.

    (a) PROVISION OF HEALTH SERVICES TO VULNERABLE POPULATIONS AFFECTED BY HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCIES- The coordinator shall seek to ensure that organizations funded by the Department and the Agency for the purpose of responding to a humanitarian emergency coordinate and implement activities needed to respond to the health needs of vulnerable populations, especially women and children, as soon as practicable and not later than 30 days after the onset of a humanitarian emergency.

    (b) ACTIVITIES DEFINED- The activities referred to in subsection (a) include activities to--

      (1) prevent and manage the consequences of sexual violence;

      (2) reduce transmission of HIV;

      (3) provide obstetric care; and

      (4) develop a plan to integrate women's health services into the primary health care services provided during a humanitarian emergency.

SEC. 2733. ECONOMIC SELF-SUFFICIENCY OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS AFFECTED BY A HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCY.

    (a) Amendments to Microenterprise Act of 2000- Section 102 of the Microenterprise for Self-Reliance Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 2151f note) is amended--

      (1) in paragraph (4)--

        (A) by redesignating subparagraphs (B), (C), and (D) and subparagraphs (C), (D), and (E), respectively; and

        (B) by inserting after subparagraph (A) the following:

      `(B) Women displaced by armed conflict are particularly at risk, lacking access to traditional livelihoods and means for generating income.'; and

      (2) in paragraph (13)--

        (A) by redesignating subparagraph (B) as subparagraph (C); and

        (B) by inserting after subparagraph (A) the following:

      `(B) Particular efforts should be made to expand the availability of microcredit programs to internally displaced persons, who historically have not had access to such programs.'.

    (b) AMENDMENT TO THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT- Section 256(b)(3) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2212(b)(3)) is amended by inserting after `clients' the following: `, including women microentrepeneurs,'.

SEC. 2734. INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING.

    Section 541 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347) is amended--

      (1) by striking `or (iv)' and inserting `(iv)'; and

      (2) by striking `rights.' and inserting `rights, or (v) improve the protection of civilians, especially women and children, including those who are refugees or displaced persons.'.

SEC. 2735. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ACTIONS OF UNITED NATIONS PEACEKEEPERS.

    It is the sense of Congress that--

      (1) the Secretary-General of the United Nations should strengthen the existing ability of the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations to protect civilians, especially women and children, from sexual exploitation and abuse by personnel in peace operation missions by--

        (A) directing the Department of Peacekeeping Operations to identify nongovernmental organizations and local community officials to receive and communicate to senior level mission officials credible reports from civilians of sexual exploitation and abuse;

        (B) ensuring that there is a mechanism in place for all credible allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse to be brought to the attention of senior level mission officials in an expedited fashion;

        (C) developing missions based rapid response teams to investigate allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse;

        (D) improving informational programs for United Nations personnel on their responsibility not to engage in acts of sexual exploitation and abuse and the sanctions for such actions;

        (E) identifying troop contributing countries that refuse to investigate allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by nationals serving in peacekeeping missions;

        (F) permanently excluding individuals found to have engaged in sexual abuse or exploitation, as well as troop contingent commanders and civilian managerial personnel complicit in such behavior, from participating in future United Nations peacekeeping missions; and

        (G) demanding that troop contributing countries--

          (i) thoroughly investigate cases in which their nationals have been alleged to have engaged in sexual abuse or exploitation which on United Nations peacekeeping missions; and

          (ii) punish those found guilty of such misconduct;

      (2) troop contributing states should ensure that their soldiers are properly trained on United Nations guidelines regarding proper conduct towards civilians, in particular those guidelines that address gender-based violence, before participating in United Nations peace operation missions;

      (3) the United Nations should suspend payment of peacekeeping funds to countries when there is credible evidence of sexual exploitation and abuse by troops of such countries that are participating in peacekeeping operations, and the governments of such countries are not investigating or punishing such conduct; and

      (4) the Secretary should consider a suspension of United States military assistance to countries that do not--

        (A) investigate allegations of sexual exploitation and abuse by troops participating in United Nations peacekeeping operations; or

        (B) hold perpetrators of such abuse and exploitation accountable.

Subtitle D--Protection of Vulnerable Populations Affected by a Humanitarian Emergency

SEC. 2741. ACTIONS TO SUPPORT PROTECTION.

    (a) PROGRAMS OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANK FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT- The United States Executive Director of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development should take steps to ensure that disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration programs developed and funded by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development provide benefits to former combatants that are comparable to the benefits provided by such programs to other individuals.

    (b) REPORT REGARDING PROGRAMS TO ASSIST CIVILIAN POLICE- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this title, the Secretary shall submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on all current programs being conducted by the Department or the Agency to assist foreign countries with the enforcement of the laws of such countries that are designed to protect women and children and improve accountability for sexual exploitation and abuse.

SEC. 2742. PROTECTION ASSISTANCE.

    Chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

`SEC. 135. ASSISTANCE FOR THE PROTECTION OF VULNERABLE POPULATIONS DURING HUMANITARIAN EMERGENCIES.

    `(a) AUTHORITY- Notwithstanding any other provision of law, and subject to the limitations of subsection (b), the President is authorized to provide assistance for programs, projects, and activities to promote the security of, provide equal access to basic services for, and safeguard the legal and human rights of civilians, especially women and children, who are affected by a humanitarian emergency. Such assistance shall include programs--

      `(1) to build the capacity of nongovernmental organizations to address the special protection needs of vulnerable populations, especially women and children, affected by a humanitarian emergency;

      `(2) to support local and international nongovernmental initiatives to prevent, detect, and report exploitation of children and sexual exploitation and abuse, including through the provision of training humanitarian protection monitors for refugees and internally displaced persons;

      `(3) to conduct protection and security assessments for refugees and internally displaced persons in camps or in communities for the purpose of improving the design and security of camps for refugees and internally displaced persons, with special emphasis on the security of women and children;

      `(4) to provide, when practicable, education during a humanitarian emergency, including structured activities that create safe spaces for children, in particular girls;

      `(5) to reintegrate and rehabilitate former combatants and survivors of a humanitarian emergency, including through education, psychosocial assistance and trauma counseling, family and community reinsertion, medical assistance, and strengthening community systems to support sustained reintegration;

      `(6) to establish registries and clearinghouses to trace relatives and begin family reunification, with a specific focus on helping children find their families;

      `(7) to provide interim care and placement for separated children and orphans, including monitoring and followup services;

      `(8) to provide legal services for survivors of sexual exploitation, abuse, or torture, including the collection of evidence for war crimes tribunals and advocacy for legal reform; and

      `(9) to provide to local law enforcement personnel working in areas affected by a humanitarian emergency training in human rights law, particularly as it relates to the protection of women and children.

    `(b) AVAILABILITY OF ASSISTANCE- Amounts made available to carry out this part and chapter 4 of part II may be made available to carry out this section.'.

TITLE XXVIII--CONVENTIONAL ARMS DISARMAMENT

SEC. 2801. SHORT TITLE.

    This title may be cited as the `Conventional Arms Disarmament Act of 2005'.

SEC. 2802. FINDINGS; SENSE OF CONGRESS.

    (a) FINDINGS- Congress makes the following findings:

      (1) The global proliferation of man-portable air defense systems (MANPADS), other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems poses a direct threat to the national security of the United States.

      (2) The use of MANPADS and other conventional weapons by terrorists and insurgent groups continues to hamper United States efforts to achieve peace and security in Iraq and Afghanistan.

      (3) The proliferation of tactical missile systems provides many regimes with a means of income and threatens international peace and security.

      (4) The Government Accountability Office has estimated that there are between 500,000 and 750,000 MANPADS in the world.

      (5) Many countries that possess stocks of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems no longer require such weapons for their own security or self defense, but do not possess the means for the elimination or safeguarding of such systems.

      (6) There is currently no single United States program designed to promote efforts in other countries related to conventional arms threat reduction and the elimination of tactical missiles.

      (7) The Department of State has not used the Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund for any activity to eliminate any tactical missile systems since 2002.

      (8) The proliferation of conventional weapons in developing countries that have experienced civil conflict threatens political stability and economic development in those countries and neighboring countries.

      (9) Land mines left over from past conflicts continue to pose a humanitarian threat and a barrier to economic development in many countries around the world.

    (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS- It is the sense of Congress that--

      (1) where appropriate, the United States Government should provide assistance to countries seeking to secure, remove, or eliminate stocks of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems that pose a proliferation threat; and

      (2) given the clear links between global networks of terrorism and networks of the illicit trade in conventional weapons, the United States Government should place consistent, broad, and continued emphasis on combating the proliferation of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems within the broader nonproliferation strategy of the United States.

SEC. 2803. STATEMENT OF POLICY.

    It is the policy of the United States to assist the governments of other countries in safeguarding or eliminating stocks of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems that pose a proliferation, local or regional security, or humanitarian threat.

SEC. 2804. GLOBAL PROGRAM FOR THE SAFEGUARDING AND ELIMINATION OF CONVENTIONAL ARMS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- The Secretary is authorized to carry out an accelerated global program to secure, remove, or eliminate stocks of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems, as well as related equipment and facilities, that are determined by the Secretary to pose a proliferation threat.

    (b) PROGRAM ELEMENTS- The program authorized under subsection (a) may include the following activities:

      (1) Humanitarian demining activities.

      (2) Programs for the elimination or securing of tactical missile systems.

      (3) Programs for the elimination or securing of MANPADS.

      (4) Activities to destroy other conventional weapons.

      (5) Programs to assist countries in the safe handling and proper storage of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems.

      (6) Cooperative programs with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization and other international organizations to assist countries in the safe handling and proper storage or elimination of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems.

      (7) The utilization of funds for the elimination or safeguarding of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems.

      (8) The management of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems at locations where United States funds have been used to provide for the security of such weapons.

      (9) Actions to ensure that equipment and funds, including security upgrades at locations for the storage or disposition of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, tactical missile systems, and related equipment that are determined by the Secretary of State to pose a proliferation threat, continue to be used for authorized purposes.

SEC. 2805. REDESIGNATION OF OFFICE OF WEAPONS REMOVAL AND ABATEMENT AS OFFICE OF CONVENTIONAL ARMS THREAT REDUCTION.

    (a) REDESIGNATION- The Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement of the Department of State is redesignated the Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction. The principal duties of the office are to formulate policy on conventional arms threat reduction and to plan and administer programs for carrying out activities under section 2804.

    (b) REFERENCE- Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, paper, or other record of the United States to the Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement referred to in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be a reference to the Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction.

SEC. 2806. REPORT ON CONVENTIONAL ARMS THREAT REDUCTION.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the Committees on Foreign Relations and Appropriations of the Senate and the Committees on International Relations and Appropriations of the House of Representatives a report on conventional arms threat reduction.

    (b) CONTENT- The report required under subsection (a) shall include the following information:

      (1) A description of prior efforts of the Department of State regarding conventional arms threat reduction.

      (2) A description of the progress made in initiating the operations of the Office of Conventional Arms Threat Reduction, as redesignated under section 2805.

      (3) A description, on a country-by-country basis, of the implementation of a global strategy for the elimination or safeguarding of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, and tactical missile systems, including, to the extent possible, a prioritization of such elimination and safeguarding efforts with respect to the proliferation sensitivity of such weapons in each country and their potential impact on local and regional security.

      (4) An evaluation of the extent to which activities under this title and other United States Government programs are integrated to ensure that the conventional arms threat reduction efforts of the United States are consistent with United States policy and goals in countries receiving assistance through such activities.

      (5) A description of the scope and nature of United States programs related to the elimination of tactical missile systems, in particular, efforts under the Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund regarding the elimination of such systems.

    (c) FORM- The report required under subsection (a) shall be in unclassified form, but may contain a classified annex.

SEC. 2807. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Of the amount authorized to be appropriated in section 2125 for Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs for fiscal year 2006, other than for humanitarian demining and demining and mine action programs under the International Trust Fund, not less than $20,000,000 should be made available for activities related to the securing, removal, or elimination of stocks of MANPADS, other conventional weapons, tactical missile systems, and related equipment and facilities.

    (b) LIMITATION- Of the funds made available under subsection (a), not more than $10,000,000 may be obligated until the Secretary submits to the Committees on Foreign Relations and Appropriations of the Senate and the Committees on International Relations and Appropriations of the House of Representatives the report required under section 2806.

SEC. 2808. NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT FUND DEFINED.

    In this title, the term `Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund' means the Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund established under section 504 of the FREEDOM Support Act (22 U.S.C. 5854).

Calendar No. 48

109th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 600

[Report No. 109-35]

A BILL

To authorize appropriations for the Department of State and international broadcasting activities for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, for the Peace Corps for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, for foreign assistance programs for fiscal years 2006 and 2007, and for other purposes.


March 10, 2005

Read twice and placed on the calendar