H.R. 3662 (110th): Forewarn Act of 2007

Introduced:
Sep 25, 2007 (110th Congress, 2007–2009)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
John McHugh
Representative for New York's 23rd congressional district
Party
Republican
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Sep 25, 2007
Length
5 pages
Related Bills
S. 1792 (Related)
FOREWARN Act of 2007

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Jul 16, 2007

 
Status

This bill was introduced on September 25, 2007, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Sep 25, 2007
Referred to Committee Sep 25, 2007
 
Full Title

To amend the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act to improve such Act.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
1 cosponsors (1D) (show)
Committees

House Education and the Workforce

Workforce Protections

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


9/25/2007--Introduced.
Forewarn Act of 2007 - Amends the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (the Act) to redefine the terms "employer," "plant closing," and "mass layoff" for purposes of the Act to, among other things, make the Act applicable to employers of 50 or more employees (under current law, 100 employees).
Requires an employer to:
(1) give 90-day written notice (under current law, 60-day) to employees and appropriate state and government officials before ordering a plant closing or mass layoff; and
(2) give notice of such closing or layoff to the Secretary of Labor (including the number of employees), to U.S. and state Senators and Representatives who represent the area in which the plant is located, and to the Governor of the state in which the plant is located and to the chief elected official of the unit of local government within such closing or layoff is to occur.
Revises criteria used in determining whether a plant closing or mass layoff has occurred or will occur.
Makes an employer who violates such notice requirements liable to the employee for two days of pay multiplied by the number of days short of the 90-days notice provided before such closing or layoff (under current law, for back pay) for each day of the violation for up to 90 days (under current law, 60 days).
Authorizes the Secretary to bring a civil action on behalf of one or more employees for certain relief under the Act.
Directs the Secretary to make educational materials concerning employee rights and employer responsibilities available to the general public and employers.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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