skip to main content

H.R. 5979 (110th): Stillbirth Awareness and Research Act of 2008

The text of the bill below is as of May 6, 2008 (Introduced).

Source: GPO

I

110th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. R. 5979

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

May 6, 2008

introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce

A BILL

To amend the Public Health Service Act to provide for the national collection of data on stillbirths in a standardized manner, and for other purposes.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Stillbirth Awareness and Research Act of 2008.

2.

Findings; sense of Congress

(a)

Findings

The Congress finds the following:

(1)

While States issue both a birth and a death certificate when a baby lives for only moments outside the womb, most States issue only a death certificate in the case of a stillbirth.

(2)

Almost half of the States have enacted legislation called MISSing Angels bills allowing a State to issue a Certificate of Birth Resulting in Stillbirth, and many other States are considering such legislation.

(b)

Sense of Congress

It is the sense of the Congress that more States should enact legislation that allows the issuance of a Certificate of Birth Resulting in Stillbirth when the pregnancy results in a stillbirth.

3.

National stillbirth registry

Part B of title III of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 243 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 317S the following:

317T.

National stillbirth registry

(a)

Establishment

For the purposes described in subsection (b), the Secretary, acting through the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall, by grant or contract, establish and maintain a scientific registry of stillbirths in the United States (in this section referred to as the registry).

(b)

Purposes

The purposes of the registry are—

(1)

to provide a national repository for reporting and maintaining in a consistent manner data on stillbirths; and

(2)

to make such data available for research on the causes and prevention of stillbirths.

(c)

Content

The registry shall include, with respect to each stillbirth, information on the stillborn fetus and the mother’s health and pregnancy as collected and submitted by States on the U.S. Standard Report of Fetal Death. In submitting such information, the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shall require States to use the standard definition of stillbirth and the standard protocol for stillbirth data collection and surveillance as determined pursuant to subsection (d).

(d)

Determination of standard stillbirth definition and protocol

(1)

In general

For purposes of this section, the Secretary shall provide for the development of the following:

(A)

A standard definition of stillbirth.

(B)

A standard protocol for stillbirth data collection and surveillance.

(2)

Consultation

The Secretary shall ensure that the standard definition and protocol described paragraph (1) are developed under such paragraph in a manner that ensures the consultation of representatives of health care organizations, State and local governments, and other interested entities specified by the Secretary.

.

4.

Sense of Congress on NIH funding for stillbirth research

It is the sense of the Congress that the Director of the National Institutes of Health should increase the allocation of funds and other resources for stillbirth research.

5.

National public awareness campaign

(a)

In general

The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall carry out a national campaign to increase public awareness and knowledge of stillbirths and public and State awareness of the standard stillbirth definition and standard protocol for stillbirth data collection and surveillance under section 306(h)(3) of the Public Health Service Act, as added by section 3.

(b)

Measures To reduce the incidence of stillbirths

Activities under the national campaign under subsection (a) shall include—

(1)

the dissemination of information on measures for mothers to maintain a healthy pregnancy and assess fetal health;

(2)

the dissemination of information on good prenatal care practices such as not drinking alcohol or smoking; and

(3)

the promotion of fetal movement awareness and taking proactive steps to monitor a baby’s movement beginning at approximately 28 weeks into the pregnancy.