H.Res. 874 (110th): Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the Congressional Philanthropy Caucus was established in July ...

...2007 to provide a platform that can be used to communicate and highlight issues that face the philanthropic sector

110th Congress, 2007–2009. Text as of Dec 13, 2007 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

IV

110th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. RES. 874

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

December 13, 2007

(for herself, Mr. Hayes, Mr. Holt, Ms. Clarke, Mr. English of Pennsylvania, Mr. Filner, Mrs. Davis of California, and Mrs. Tauscher) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on House Administration

RESOLUTION

Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the Congressional Philanthropy Caucus was established in July 2007 to provide a platform that can be used to communicate and highlight issues that face the philanthropic sector and allows Members of Congress to discuss common legislative objectives that affect the foundation community.

Whereas philanthropy is a uniquely American phenomenon and one that is spreading rapidly around the world;

Whereas Americans gave a record $295,000,000,000 dollars to charities in 2006, according to Giving USA 2007;

Whereas the Nation’s more than 71,000 foundations, which collectively hold approximately $550,000,000,000 in assets, contributed over $40,000,000,000 in 2006 to support communities in America and around the world;

Whereas foundations are making important contributions to education, health care, the arts, economic and rural development, and various other issues across the country;

Whereas globally, grantmakers are working to fight the spread of global disease, combat poverty, and curb environmental decline;

Whereas foundations value and embrace diversity in their leadership and in the communities they serve;

Whereas individuals, communities, and corporations can choose to establish the most effective type of foundation or giving vehicle that will help them achieve their charitable goals;

Whereas private, independent foundations are usually endowed by one source, such as an individual’s bequest or through the conversion of a nonprofit to a for-profit organization;

Whereas community foundations seek to create a permanent resource for the community, most often through the creation of endowed funds from a wide range of donors, that include local citizens, corporations, government, other foundations, and nonprofits;

Whereas the first community foundation was established in Cleveland, Ohio, by Frederick H. Goff in 1914;

Whereas family foundations are where the original donor or the donor’s family plays a significant role in governing the foundation;

Whereas corporate grantmakers can either be private foundations established by for-profit corporations, but legally separate from the parent corporation or corporate giving programs, which are programs within a corporation that make charitable contributions from the corporation’s pretax income;

Whereas private, operating foundations use most of their income to support their own charitable services or programs, rather than make grants to outside organizations;

Whereas public foundations are public charities that operate significant grantmaking programs in addition to their other charitable activities;

Whereas donor-advised funds, first established in 1931 by a community foundation in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, are an integral part of American philanthropy with currently over 100,000 accounts holding $17,500,000 in assets;

Whereas while philanthropic institutions can never replace government, there are times when foundations can collaborate with government to create innovative solutions to solve pressing problems; and

Whereas Congress and the philanthropic sector must find a way to work together to produce healthier communities, more educated children, higher rates of employability and employment, decent housing, and compassion for those who cannot compete: Now, therefore, be it

That it is the sense of the United States House of Representatives that—

(1)

Congress and the philanthropic sector should partner to create a legislative and regulatory environment that enhances the growth of philanthropy;

(2)

the Congressional Philanthropy Caucus will help lawmakers and congressional staff learn more about foundations and the role these organizations play in our communities and around the globe;

(3)

the Congressional Philanthropy Caucus will highlight issues of mutual interest to both Congress and the philanthropic sector; and

(4)

lawmakers are encouraged to join the Congressional Philanthropy Caucus.