S. 3722 (110th): Bipartisan Electronic Voting Reform Act of 2008

Introduced:
Dec 08, 2008 (110th Congress, 2007–2009)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
Sponsor
Dianne Feinstein
Senator from California
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Dec 08, 2008
Length
43 pages
Related Bills
S. 3212 (Related)
Bipartisan Electronic Voting Reform Act of 2008

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Jun 26, 2008

 
Status

This bill was introduced on December 8, 2008, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Dec 08, 2008
Referred to Committee Dec 08, 2008
 
Full Title

A bill to amend the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to provide for auditable, independent verification of ballots, to ensure the security of voting systems, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
1 cosponsors (1R) (show)
Committees

Senate Rules and Administration

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

S. stands for Senate bill.

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The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


12/8/2008--Introduced.
Bipartisan Electronic Voting Reform Act of 2008 - Amends the Help America Vote Act of 2002 to require any voting system other than one using paper ballots personally marked by the voter to permit independent verification of cast ballots by various specified means, including paper or electronic.
Requires each state to conduct an audit of every federal election to ensure that each certificate of election is justified by the vote totals. Directs the Federal Election Commission to establish an Audit Guidelines Development Task Force to assist the Commission in developing model audit guidelines.
Prescribes election security requirements for voting systems, including: (1) chain of custody protocols; (2) disclosure of election-dedicated software; and (3) minimum state standards to ensure the integrity of the voting process and education and training of poll workers.
Directs the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to establish a Voting System Software Review Committee which, upon request by the Commission or a state's chief election official, shall review voting system software that has not been certified by the Commission.
Establishes accreditation requirements for laboratories involved in testing of voting system hardware and software. Directs the Commission to establish the Election Assistance Commission Voting System Testing Revolving Fund for payments to accredited laboratories for testing of such hardware and software.
Requires the Commission to make grants for: (1) development and testing of new voting systems, technologies, and innovations to meet independent verification requirements under this Act; and (2) pilot programs for such testing.
Directs the Commission to establish a task force to study and develop recommendations regarding the appropriate level of funding for requirements payments.
Amends the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act to prohibit state refusal to accept voter registration and absentee ballot applications and federal write-in absentee ballots for failure to meet nonessential requirements.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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