H.R. 5349 (111th): Cambodian Trade Act of 2010

111th Congress, 2009–2010. Text as of May 20, 2010 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

I

111th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. R. 5349

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

May 20, 2010

(for himself and Mr. Rohrabacher) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the Committee on Ways and Means, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned

A BILL

To provide that Cambodia’s debt to the United States may not be reduced or forgiven, and textile and apparel articles that are the product of Cambodia and imported into the United States may not be extended duty free treatment.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Cambodian Trade Act of 2010.

2.

Findings

Congress makes the following findings:

(1)

The United States Department of State has recognized and documented repeated human rights abuses of the Uighur people by the Government of the People’s Republic of China.

(2)

The United States Commission on International Religious Freedom has recognized and documented the repeated human rights abuses of the Uighur people by the Government of the People’s Republic of China.

(3)

The House of Representatives has and continues to recognize that the authorities in the People’s Republic of China have manipulated the strategic objectives of the international war on terror to increase their cultural and religious oppression of the Uighur people.

(4)

In early July 2009, ethnic unrest developed in the Xinjiang Autonomous Region of China, resulting in the unfortunate death of both Han Chinese and Uighurs.

(5)

In the aftermath of this unrest, authorities in the People’s Republic of China allegedly detained hundreds of Uighurs and, according to Human Rights Watch, 43 Uighur men have disappeared.

(6)

Following the ethnic unrest, the People’s Republic of China arrested a number of Uighurs and Han Chinese and charged 21 individuals with murder, arson, robbery, and property damage.

(7)

Human Rights Watch found the trials of the 21 individuals did not meet minimum international standards of due process and fair trials. Despite this, the Government of the People’s Republic of China handed down death sentences, and 9 of the individuals were executed in November 2009.

(8)

In late November and early December 2009, 22 Uighurs, including 3 children, fled China to Cambodia to seek refugee status. There the Uighurs worked with the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) and the Cambodian Government to follow international refugee law and convention.

(9)

The Government of Cambodia made assurances to UNHCR that the 22 Uighurs could follow UNHCR procedures so refugee status could be determined before repatriation to China.

(10)

Despite assurances and agreements with UNHCR, the Government of Cambodia sent the 20 Uighur refugees back to China before a refugee determination could be made. Two of the refugees were able to escape Cambodian custody before deportation.

(11)

Before their deportation, the Uighur refugees told UNHCR that they had fears of imprisonment, torture, and death in China.

(12)

Since arriving in China, media reports suggest that the 20 Uighurs may have been put on trial. No further information about the Uighurs, including the children, has been made available.

3.

Statement of policy

It is the policy of the United States to—

(1)

support and encourage countries that comply with international conventions, agreements, and understandings;

(2)

support and encourage countries that respect human rights and the protection of refugee populations;

(3)

assist refugees and minority populations seeking asylum and protection from oppressive governments and regimes; and

(4)

support and encourage countries that value and protect minority populations seeking asylum and protection from oppressive governments and regimes.

4.

Loan forgiveness

Notwithstanding part V of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (relating to debt reduction for developing countries with tropical forests; 22 U.S.C. 2431 et seq.) or any other provision of law providing for the reduction or forgiveness of the debt of a foreign country, the United States may not reduce or forgive any debt owed by Cambodia to the United States.

5.

Treatment of textile and apparel articles of Cambodia

(a)

In general

Notwithstanding title V of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2461 et seq.) or any other provision of law providing duty free treatment, no textile or apparel article that is the product of Cambodia may be extended duty-free treatment when entered into the customs territory of the United States.

(b)

Definitions

In this section, the term textile or apparel article means—

(1)

any apparel article classified under any chapter of section XII of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States;

(2)

any textiles classified under any such chapter from which apparel articles can be produced; and

(3)

any footwear article classified under chapter 64 of such Schedule.

6.

Effective date

This Act takes effect on the date of the enactment of this Act.