H.R. 911 (111th): Stop Child Abuse in Residential Programs for Teens Act of 2009

Introduced:
Feb 09, 2009 (111th Congress, 2009–2010)
Status:
Died (Passed House)
Sponsor
George Miller
Representative for California's 7th congressional district
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Feb 24, 2009
Length
31 pages
Related Bills
H.R. 5876 (110th) was a previous version of this bill.

Reported by Committee
Last Action: May 14, 2008

H.R. 3126 (112th) was a re-introduction of this bill in a later Congress.

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Oct 06, 2011

 
Status

This bill was introduced in a previous session of Congress and was passed by the House on February 23, 2009 but was never passed by the Senate.

Progress
Introduced Feb 09, 2009
Referred to Committee Feb 09, 2009
Reported by Committee Feb 11, 2009
Passed House Feb 23, 2009
 
Full Title

To require certain standards and enforcement provisions to prevent child abuse and neglect in residential programs, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

Votes
On Motion to Suspend the Rules and Pass
Feb 23, 2009 7:01 p.m.
Passed 295/102

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


2/23/2009--Passed House without amendment.
Stop Child Abuse in Residential Programs for Teens Act of 2009 -
Section 3 -
Directs the Assistant Secretary for Children and Families of the Department of Health and Human Services to require each location of a covered program to meet specified minimum standards if individually or together with other locations it has an effect on interstate commerce.
Defines "covered program" as one operated by a public or private entity that with respect to one or more children unrelated to the program owner or operator: (1) provides a residential environment; and (2) operates with a focus on serving children with emotional, behavioral, or mental health problems or disorders, or problems with alcohol or substance abuse.
Directs the Assistant Secretary to: (1) implement an ongoing review process for investigating and evaluating reports of child abuse and neglect; (2) establish public websites with information about each covered program, as well as a national toll-free telephone hotline to receive complaints; (3) establish civil penalties for violations of standards; and (4) establish a process to ensure that complaints received by the hotline are promptly reviewed by persons with appropriate expertise.
Section 4 -
Requires the Assistant Secretary to refer any violation of such standards to the Attorney General for appropriate action. Authorizes the Attorney General to file such a complaint on his or her own initiative regardless of whether such a referral has been made.
Section 6 -
Authorizes appropriations for FY2010-FY2014.
Section 7 -
Amends the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act to establish additional eligibility requirements for grants to states to prevent child abuse and neglect at residential programs. Require such states to develop policies and procedures to prevent child abuse and neglect at covered programs consistent with the standards specified by this Act.
Section 8 -
Directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services to study and report to Congress on outcomes for children in both private and public covered programs under this Act encompassing a broad representation of treatment facilities and geographic regions.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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