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H.Res. 1413 (111th): Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives that the holding in Miranda v. Arizona may be interpreted to provide for the admissibility of a terrorist suspect’s responses in an interrogation without administration of the Miranda warnings, to the extent that the interrogation is carried out to acquire information concerning other threats to public safety.

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The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


5/27/2010--Introduced. Expresses the sense of the House of Representatives that the public safety exception to the holding in Miranda v. Arizona may be interpreted to allow the admission into evidence in a criminal proceeding of responses of a person interrogated in connection with an act of terrorism who has not been administered Miranda warnings, to the extent that the interrogation of such person is carried out because of a reasonable concern that such person has information about other threats to public safety.