< Back to H.Res. 1593 (111th Congress, 2009–2010)

Text of Supporting academically-based social studies curriculum standards for the Nation’s elementary and secondary education public school textbooks.

This resolution was introduced on July 30, 2010, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Jul 30, 2010 (Introduced).

Source: GPO

IV

111th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. RES. 1593

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

July 30, 2010

(for herself, Mr. Ortiz, Mr. Hinojosa, Mr. Reyes, and Mr. Gene Green of Texas) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Education and Labor

RESOLUTION

Supporting academically based social studies curriculum standards for the Nation’s elementary and secondary education public school textbooks.

Whereas the National Council for the Social Studies believes that State social studies standards should be developed by consulting scholars for their expertise, soliciting input from community members and educators, and having master social studies educators write standards to ensure that they are effective and grade appropriate;

Whereas the Texas State Board of Education appointed teachers and scholars to serve on writing teams and tasked them to use their expertise and professional judgment to draft curriculum standards for each subject or grade level;

Whereas elected officials at the Texas State Board of Education disregarded many academically based recommendations and approved politically biased standards within the curriculum that are outside of mainstream scholarship;

Whereas due to the size and influence of the Texas textbook market, curriculum standards adopted in Texas have long exerted a strong influence on public school textbooks used around the United States;

Whereas changes made by the Texas State Board of Education, such as downplaying the struggle leading up to and during the civil rights movement and undermining basic concepts of the constitutionally mandated boundaries between institutions of religion and government are outside the mainstream of historical scholarship;

Whereas over 1,200 history scholars from universities across Texas and the Nation signed a letter stating that Texas’ social studies curriculum revisions would undermine the study of the social sciences in public schools by misrepresenting and even distorting the historical record and the functioning of United States society; and

Whereas civil rights organizations expressed concern that the curriculum standards adopted by the Texas State Board of Education do not accurately portray the struggle by minorities and women to achieve civil and equal rights in the United States: Now, therefore, be it

That the House of Representatives—

(1)

supports standards that guide curriculum development, instruction, and assessment in classrooms that are developed by experts and not subject to political biases;

(2)

supports social studies curriculum standards that reflect current historical scholarship to accurately present vocabulary and content-specific knowledge to students, help students acquire the analytical skills to understand chronology, and engage in comprehension, interpretation, problem-solving, and decisionmaking required for college readiness and the 21st century workforce;

(3)

supports social studies curriculum standards that accurately address the fundamental conflicts and triumphs that have shaped the Nation’s past and influence its future; and

(4)

supports social studies curriculum standards that are clear, informed, and inclusive to allow students to be knowledgeable of the Nation’s diverse history and culture, just as our diversity represents an integral part of the Nation as a whole.