S. 1686 (111th): Judicious Use of Surveillance Tools In Counterterrorism Efforts Act of 2009

Introduced:
Sep 17, 2009 (111th Congress, 2009–2010)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
See Instead:

H.R. 4005 (same title)
Referred to Committee — Nov 03, 2009

Sponsor
Russell Feingold
Senator from Wisconsin
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Sep 17, 2009
Length
103 pages
Related Bills
H.R. 4005 (Related)
Judicious Use of Surveillance Tools In Counterterrorism Efforts Act of 2009

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Nov 03, 2009

 
Status

This bill was introduced on September 17, 2009, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Sep 17, 2009
Referred to Committee Sep 17, 2009
 
Full Title

A bill to place reasonable safeguards on the use of surveillance and other authorities under the USA PATRIOT Act, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

S. stands for Senate bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


9/17/2009--Introduced.
Judicious Use of Surveillance Tools In Counterterrorism Efforts Act of 2009 or the JUSTICE Act - Revises requirements for the issuance of and public reporting on national security letters and for judicial review of requirements for nondisclosure of the receipt of a national security letter.
Amends the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 (FISA) to revise requirements for obtaining orders for business records in counterterrorism investigations.
Amends the federal criminal code to reduce from 30 to 7 days the period for notifying the target of a criminal investigation of the issuance of a search warrant. Prohibits the use of evidence in judicial and administrative proceedings if notice of a search warrant is delayed.
Amends FISA to:
(1) impose limits on roving electronic surveillance and the use of pen registers and trap and trace devices (devices for recording incoming and outgoing telephone numbers);
(2) repeal provisions granting retroactive immunity to telecommunication providers for illegal disclosure of subscriber records;
(3) prohibit the warrantless collection of certain communications of U.S. citizens known to reside in the United States; and
(5) revise certain reporting and evidentiary requirements.
Permits the recipient of a subpoena, order, or warrant issued under FISA to bring a challenge in either the district in which the subpoena, order, or warrant was issued or the district in which it was served.
Amends the federal criminal code to: (1) redefine "domestic terrorism" as involving acts dangerous to human life that constitute a federal crime of terrorism; and (2) revise the crime of providing material support or resources to foreign terrorism organizations to require knowledge or intent that such support or resources will be used to carry out terrorist activity.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

The House Democratic Caucus does not provide summaries of bills.

So, yes, we display the House Republican Conference’s summaries when available even if we do not have a Democratic summary available. That’s because we feel it is better to give you as much information as possible, even if we cannot provide every viewpoint.

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