< Back to S. 2982 (111th Congress, 2009–2010)

Text of the International Violence Against Women Act of 2010

This bill was introduced on December 14, 2010, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Dec 21, 2010 (Reported by Senate Committee).

Source: GPO

II

Calendar No. 725

111th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. 2982

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

February 4, 2010

(for himself, Mrs. Boxer, Ms. Snowe, Ms. Collins, Mr. Brown of Ohio, Mr. Burris, Mr. Cardin, Mr. Casey, Mr. Dodd, Mr. Durbin, Mr. Franken, Mrs. Gillibrand, Mr. Harkin, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Kaufman, Ms. Klobuchar, Ms. Landrieu, Mr. Lautenberg, Mr. Menendez, Ms. Mikulski, Mrs. Murray, Mr. Schumer, Mrs. Shaheen, Ms. Stabenow, Mr. Udall of New Mexico, Mr. Whitehouse, Mr. Specter, Ms. Cantwell, Mr. Merkley, Mr. Bingaman, Mr. Webb, Mr. Sanders, Mrs. Lincoln, Mrs. Feinstein, Mr. Levin, and Mr. Coons) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Foreign Relations

December 21, 2010

Reported by , with an amendment

Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert the part printed in italic

A BILL

To combat international violence against women and girls.

1.

Short title; table of contents

(a)

Short title

This Act may be cited as the International Violence Against Women Act of 2010.

(b)

Table of contents

The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2. Findings.

Sec. 3. Statement of policy.

Sec. 4. Definitions.

TITLE I—International prevention of violence against women and girls

Subtitle A—Official designations and institutional changes

Sec. 101. Duties of the Secretary of State.

Sec. 102. Duties of the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development.

Subtitle B—Strategy, policy, and programs

Sec. 111. Comprehensive international strategy and assistance to reduce and prevent violence against women and girls.

Sec. 112. Assistance to reduce international violence against women and girls.

Sec. 113. Ensuring accountability of the United States response to violence against women and girls internationally.

Sec. 114. Enhancing United States training of foreign military and police forces and judicial officials on violence against women and girls.

Sec. 115. Addressing violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, peacekeeping, conflict, and post-conflict settings.

TITLE II—Other Provisions

Sec. 201. Support for multilateral efforts to end violence against women and girls.

2.

Findings

Congress makes the following findings:

(1)

According to the United Nations, approximately 1 out of every 3 women throughout the world has been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused in her lifetime. The World Health Organization has reported that up to 70 percent of women in some countries report having been victims of domestic violence at some stage in their lives.

(2)

According to the United Nations, engaging men and women to end violence against women and girls internationally should be a priority. In recognition of this priority, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon launched a multi-year campaign in 2009 to end violence against women and pledge resources to engage male leaders and to mobilize men and boys.

(3)

Violence against women dramatically impedes progress in meeting all of our global health goals, including efforts to stem maternal mortality and the spread of HIV/AIDS. Approximately 1 in 4 women are abused during pregnancy, which, according to the World Health Organization, has been linked to miscarriage, pre-term labor, low birth weight, fetal distress, and death. Women who have experienced violence are also at higher risk for contracting HIV, and women living with HIV may be up to 3 times more likely to experience violence than other women. Fear of violence also prevents women from accessing HIV/AIDS information and receiving treatment and counseling.

(4)

Increasing women’s access to economic opportunities is crucial to preventing and responding to domestic and sexual violence. Microfinance-based interventions and increased asset control reduce levels of intimate partner violence and provide economic independence for survivors.

(5)

Displaced, refugee, and stateless women and girls in humanitarian emergencies, conflict settings, and natural disasters face extreme violence and threats because of power inequities, including—

(A)

being forced to exchange sex for food and humanitarian supplies; and

(B)

being at increased risk of rape, sexual exploitation, and abuse.

(6)

Rape and sexual assault against women and girls are used to torture, intimidate, and terrorize women and their communities.

(7)

According to UNICEF, child marriage—

(A)

is a harmful practice that deprives girls of their dignity and human rights;

(B)

can result in bonded labor or enslavement, commercial sexual exploitation, and violence against the victims;

(C)

significantly increases the risk of maternal death and morbidity, infant mortality and morbidity, obstetric fistula, and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS; and

(D)

is perpetuated by poverty, a lack of educational or employment opportunities for girls, parental concerns to ensure sexual relations within marriage, the dowry system, and the perceived lack of value of girls.

3.

Statement of policy

It is the policy of the United States to—

(1)

systematically integrate and coordinate efforts to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally into United States foreign policy and foreign assistance programs;

(2)

expand the implementation of effective practices and programs;

(3)

promote women’s political, economic, educational, social, cultural, civil, and human rights and opportunities throughout the world;

(4)

support and build capacity of indigenous nongovernmental organizations that are working to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally, particularly women’s nongovernmental organizations and groups involving male advocates;

(5)

support and encourage United States organizations working in partnership with nongovernmental organizations described in paragraph (4);

(6)

prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally through multisectoral methods, working at individual, family, community, local, national, and international levels and incorporating service, prevention, training, and advocacy activities and economic, education, health, legal, and protective intervention services;

(7)

enhance training and other prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings;

(8)

enhance training by United States personnel of professional foreign military and police forces and judicial officials to include specific and thorough instruction on preventing and responding to violence against women and girls internationally;

(9)

increase communication and cooperation with nongovernmental organizations with demonstrated experience in women’s empowerment, combating violence against women and girls internationally, and engaging men and boys as partners, including consulting with such organizations during strategic planning exercises;

(10)

more regularly engage men and boys as community leaders, partners, and advocates in ending violence against women and girls;

(11)

include—

(A)

prevention of child marriage as an important part of preventing violence against girls; and

(B)

ending the practice of child marriage by promoting education and skills building for girls, community programs, and increased economic opportunities for women to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and United States global health and development objectives;

(12)

ensure that private security firms contracted for service in conflict, humanitarian, and post-conflict settings appropriately report on, and respond to, violence against women and girls internationally; and

(13)

continue United States leadership and innovative efforts at the United Nations to address violence against women and girls internationally, particularly through urging the United Nations Secretary-General and United Nations member states to fully implement the provisions of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325, 1820, and 1888, and other relevant United Nations agreements and initiatives.

4.

Definitions

In this Act:

(1)

Child marriage

The term child marriage means the marriage of a girl or a boy, who has not reached the minimum legal age for marriage in the country in which the girl or boy is a resident.

(2)

Eligible countries

The term eligible countries means countries that are not classified as high-income countries in the most recent edition of the World Development Report for Reconstruction and Development, published by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

(3)

Prevention and response

The term prevention and response means activities designed to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls.

(4)

USAID administrator

The term USAID Administrator means the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development.

(5)

Violence against women and girls

The term violence against women and girls

(A)

means any act of violence against women or girls that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or psychological harm or suffering to women or girls, including threats of such acts, coercion, or arbitrary deprivations of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life; and

(B)

includes—

(i)

physical, sexual, and psychological violence occurring in the family, including battering, sexual abuse of female children in the household, dowry-related violence, marital rape, female genital cutting and mutilation, forced child marriage, and other traditional practices harmful to women and girls, nonspousal violence, and violence related to exploitation;

(ii)

physical, sexual, and psychological violence occurring within the general community, including rape, sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation at work, in educational institutions and elsewhere, trafficking in women and girls, and forced prostitution; and

(iii)

physical, sexual, and psychological violence perpetrated or condoned by the government of the country of which the victim is a resident, regardless of where the violence occurs.

I

International prevention of violence against women and girls

A

Official designations and institutional changes

101.

Duties of the Secretary of State

(a)

Designation

The Secretary of State, in fulfilling the duties and purposes of this Act, shall designate a senior official in the Department of State to conduct the relevant activities pursuant to this Act. For the purposes of this Act, that designee shall be referred to as the Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues.

(b)

Support staff

The Secretary of State shall designate appropriate staff to support the efforts of the Ambassador.

(c)

Duties

The Ambassador shall coordinate and advise, and where relevant lead—

(1)

State Department activities and policies, including as they affect programs and funding relating to prevention and response, including gender integration and women’s development internationally as relates to prevention and response;

(2)

the design, and as appropriate, implementation of projects regarding prevention and response, including gender integration and women’s development internationally as relates to prevention and response;

(3)

the integration of prevention and response analysis into U.S. Government departments’ and agencies’ international programs, structures, processes and capacities;

(4)

allocation of State Department resources for—

(A)

prevention and response; and

(B)

development of the comprehensive international strategy described in section 300G to reduce violence against women and girls;

(5)

on behalf of the Secretary, conduct regular cooperation with civil society with demonstrated experience in prevention and response and women’s development issues internationally as relates to prevention and response;

(6)

serve as the principal advisor to the Secretary of State regarding violence against women and girls as a foreign policy matter; and

(7)

at the direction of the Secretary of State, represent the United States in bilateral, international and nongovernmental fora in matters relevant to violence against women and girls including the status of women internationally as relates to prevention and response.

(d)

Information-Sharing and transparency

On behalf of the Secretary, the Ambassador shall be the central repository of evaluation and monitoring data on Department of State programs that relate to prevention and response, and also for Federal Government agencies engaged in international prevention and response, in order to produce a full accounting of United States Government spending on prevention and response, and to prepare the comprehensive strategy developed under section 111.

(e)

Congressional briefings

Not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Ambassador shall brief Congress on the integration of gender considerations and prevention and response into its strategies, programming, and associated outcomes, and shall present Congress with an assessment of human and financial resources necessary to fulfill the purposes and duties of this section.

(f)

Authorization of appropriations

There is authorized to be appropriated, for each of fiscal years 2011 through 2015—

(1)

$5,000,000 for administration, staffing, travel, and related expenditures; and

(2)

$5,000,000 in program funds to carry out activities under this section.

102.

Duties of the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development

(a)

In general

The USAID Administrator, in fulfilling the duties and purposes of this Act, shall designate a senior official (referred to in this Act as the Women’s Development Advisor or the Advisor), who shall report directly to the USAID Administrator to coordinate and conduct prevention and response activities described in this Act.

(b)

Support staff

The USAID Administrator shall designate appropriate staff to support the efforts of the Women’s Development Advisor.

(c)

Duties

The Advisor shall coordinate and guide all USAID efforts to—

(1)

integrate prevention and response, as well as broader gender issues in foreign assistance;

(2)

coordinate and consult with the Ambassador and USAID mission directors in carrying out (c)(1);

(3)

provide high level guidance to USAID missions, offices, and bureaus on prevention and response, gender integration, design, strategy and programming; and

(4)

participate in agency-wide monitoring and evaluation on gender integration activities and strategies, including prevention and response.

(d)

Coordinated USAID reporting

(1)

In general

USAID technical and regional bureaus identified by the USAID Administrator and the Advisor shall annually provide the Advisor with such data and findings collected under subsection (c)(4) as may be requested by the Advisor.

(2)

Scope of data

The data and findings provided under paragraph (1)—

(A)

shall include relevant contractors, subcontractors, grantees, and subgrantees receiving program funds made available for prevention and response, and women’s development globally as a method of prevention; and

(B)

shall be made publicly available.

(3)

Security concerns

In determining the data and findings to be provided under this subsection, the Advisor shall take into account the security concerns of USAID grantees and subgrantees.

(e)

Congressional briefings

Not later than 6 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Advisor, in coordination with the Ambassador, shall brief Congress on the integration of gender considerations and prevention and response into its strategies, programming, and associated outcomes, using data collected under subsection (d), and shall present Congress with an assessment of human and financial resources necessary to fulfill the purposes and duties of this section.

(f)

Authorization of appropriations

(1)

In general

In addition to amounts otherwise available, there is authorized to be appropriated, for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015—

(A)

$5,000,000 for operations, administration, and related expenditures; and

(B)

$5,000,000 in program funds to carry out the activities under this section.

(2)

Supervision of expenditures

Amounts appropriated pursuant to this subsection shall be expended under the direction of the Advisor.

B

Strategy, policy, and programs

111.

Comprehensive international strategy and assistance to reduce and prevent violence against women and girls

(a)

Development and implementation of strategy

Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, under the direction of the President and with the assistance of the USAID Administrator, shall—

(1)

develop a comprehensive, 5-year international strategy to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally; and

(2)

submit the strategy developed under paragraph (1) to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.

(b)

Collaboration and coordination

In developing the strategy under subsection (a), the Secretary of State, with the assistance of the USAID Administrator, shall consult with—

(1)

executive branch agencies and entities administering international programs;

(2)

the Senior Policy Operating Group on Trafficking in Persons;

(3)

representatives of civil society with demonstrated experience combating violence against women and girls or promoting women’s health or women’s development issues internationally.

(c)

Content

The strategy developed under subsection (a) shall—

(1)

identify countries with significant levels of violence against women and girls that have the government or nongovernment organizational capacity to manage and implement gender-based violence prevention and response program activities;

(2)

select up to 20 of the countries described in paragraph (1) in which to develop a gender-integrated, comprehensive, and holistic individual country plan that incorporates at least 2 of the program activities listed in subsection (d);

(3)

assess and describe the current or potential capacity of each government or civil society to address and respond to violence against women and girls;

(4)

identify and coordinate with Federal departments and agencies that—

(A)

have existing programs relevant to the strategy; or

(B)

will be involved in new program activities;

(5)

describe the monitoring and evaluation mechanisms established for each country, and their use in assessing overall progress in prevention and response;

(6)

project general levels of resources needed to achieve the stated objectives in each country, including an accounting of—

(A)

activities and funding already expended by the Department of State, USAID, other Federal agencies, other donor country governments, and other multilateral institutions; and

(B)

leveraged private sector resources;

(7)

include capacity-building and technical assistance for community-based women’s nongovernmental organizations and community-based organizations with demonstrated expertise in women’s empowerment, including combating violence against women and girls internationally;

(8)

identify and coordinate with existing nongovernmental and multilateral programs, initiatives, and groups with demonstrated experience on preventing and responding to violence against women and girls internationally, particularly coordinating with women’s organizations and community-based groups; and

(9)

integrate gender analysis into the strategy for each country to ensure that the roles of women, girls, men, and boys are appropriately addressed.

(d)

Program activities supported

Assistance provided under this section shall be used to carry out country-specific strategies under subsection (a) through multi-sectoral prevention and response activities specified by the Ambassador and Advisor and that fall under at least 2 of the following broad categories:

(1)

Enhancing the capacity of the health sector to respond to violence against women and girls.

(2)

Development and enforcement of civil and criminal legal and judicial sanctions, protections, trainings, and capacity.

(3)

Development of programs affecting social norms, community attitudes, and male and female participation in violence and response to victims.

(4)

Ensuring accessible quality educational and literacy opportunities for women and girls.

(5)

Promotion of access to economic opportunity projects, including increasing distribution, credit, property, and inheritance rights for women and girls.

112.

Assistance to reduce international violence against women and girls

(a)

Coordination of existing assistance programs

The Ambassador, working with the Advisor, shall, to the fullest extent practicable, coordinate activities and measures to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally into existing programs, contracts, grants, agreements, and foreign assistance under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and other Acts authorizing and appropriating foreign assistance, as applicable.

(b)

Authority

To implement and execute the comprehensive international strategy developed pursuant to section 111, the Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator, in consultation with the Ambassador and the Advisor, may provide assistance to nongovernmental organizations, multilateral institutions, and foreign countries for program activities described in section 111(d).

(c)

Allocation of new funding

The Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator, based on guidance from the Ambassador and the Advisor, may allocate funds to implement and execute the comprehensive international strategy developed pursuant to section 111.

(d)

Use of funds

(1)

In general

Any funds made available under this section to nongovernmental organizations should be designated to organizations that—

(A)

have demonstrated experience regarding violence against women and girls internationally or have entered into a partnership with an organization with such experience; and

(B)

have demonstrated capabilities or experience in a particular program activity described in section 111(d).

(2)

Congressional briefings

The Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator shall brief Congress upon request, on the transparent mechanisms used to ensure that funds made available under this section through nongovernmental organizations are awarded to organizations described in paragraph (1).

(e)

Grants to women’s nongovernmental organizations and community-Based organizations

Special efforts shall be made to award amounts appropriated to carry out this Act to community-based and women’s nongovernmental organizations in recipient countries. The Advisor shall brief Congress, upon request, on efforts made to assist such organizations to be eligible for such funds.

(f)

Award process

Grant amounts awarded under this section shall be provided through an open, competitive, and transparent process to the extent possible.

(g)

Conditions

Entities receiving grants under this section—

(1)

shall allocate a reasonable portion of such grants for data collection and the evaluation of program effectiveness;

(2)

shall be responsible for developing and reporting on outcomes and impacts relating to preventing and responding to violence against women and girls internationally;

(3)

should gather input from women’s nongovernmental organizations or community-based organizations in recipient countries, including organizations with experience in working with men and boys to prevent violence; and

(4)

shall consider the safety of women and girls as a primary concern in deciding how to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate programs.

(h)

Authorization of appropriations

(1)

In general

In addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes, there is authorized to be appropriated to the President $175,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015 to carry out this section and section 111.

(2)

Availability of funds

Amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) shall remain available until expended.

113.

Ensuring accountability of the United States response to violence against women and girls internationally

(a)

In general

Not later than 1 year after the implementation of the comprehensive strategy under section 111, the Secretary of State, assisted by the Ambassador, shall prepare a public report on best practices for preventing and addressing violence against women and girls internationally, which shall include—

(1)

a description of successful efforts by governments of countries with significant levels of violence against women and girls, nongovernmental organizations, and United States, bilateral, and multilateral donors in prevention and response;

(2)

recommendations related to best practices, effective strategies, and improvements to enhance the impact of prevention and response efforts; and

(3)

the impact of activities funded by the strategy in preventing and reducing violence against women and girls internationally.

(b)

Amendments

Section 116(d) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d)) is amended—

(1)

in paragraph (10), by striking and at the end;

(2)

in paragraph (11)(C), by striking the period at the end and inserting ; and; and

(3)

by adding at the end the following:

(12)

wherever applicable, the nature and extent of violence against women and girls (as defined in section 4 of the International Violence Against Women Act of 2010).

.

(c)

Transparency

Upon request, the Secretary of State shall provide to Congress the information made available under sections 101(d) and 102(d), including outcomes and impacts related to prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally submitted by contractors, subcontractors, grantees and subgrantees, unless such disclosure would inhibit the security or effectiveness of such entities.

(d)

Research and data collection

The Ambassador, assisted by the USAID Administrator and the heads of relevant bureaus and offices of the Department of State and in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Attorney General—

(1)

shall work to improve the quality and coordination of existing data collection and evaluations of current violence against women and girls internationally programs; and

(2)

may provide financial assistance for original research or analysis of effective interventions to prevent or respond to violence against women and girls internationally.

(e)

Use of funds

Amounts authorized to be appropriated in this section may be used to—

(1)

collect and analyze new or existing data on the scope and extent of all forms of violence against women and girls internationally, including underdocumented forms of violence and violence against marginalized groups;

(2)

conduct research on effective interventions to respond to violence against women and girls internationally, including efforts to scale up effective programming; and

(3)

support systemic data collection using internationally comparable indicators, norms, and methodologies for measuring the scope, prevalence, and incidence of violence against women and girls internationally, working through—

(A)

governments of foreign countries; and

(B)

federally funded development assistance and health assistance.

(f)

Authorization of appropriations

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary of State $20,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015 to carry out the activities under this section.

114.

Enhancing United States training of foreign military and police forces and judicial officials on violence against women and girls

(a)

Purpose

The purpose of this section is to ensure that United States programs to train foreign military, police, and judicial officials include instruction on prevention of and response to violence against women and girls.

(b)

Covered programs

The programs referred to in subsection (a) include—

(1)

activities authorized under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.); and

(2)

activities under section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006 (Public Law 109–163; 119 Stat. 3456), as amended.

(c)

Guidance

The Secretary of State and the Secretary of Defense shall, as appropriate—

(1)

incorporate training on prevention and response into the basic training curricula of foreign military forces and judicial officials; and

(2)

ensure that United States assistance to units involved in regional or multilateral peacekeeping operations includes training on prevention and response.

(d)

Authorization of appropriations

There is authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015 to carry out the activities under this section.

115.

Addressing violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, peacekeeping, conflict, and post-conflict settings

(a)

Defined term

In this section, the term Inter-Agency Standing Committee means the committee established in response to United Nations General Assembly Resolution 46/182, adopted at New York on December 19, 1991.

(b)

Activities of the Department of State with the United States Agency for International Development

(1)

Guidance

Under the direction of the Secretary of State, the Ambassador is authorized to provide guidance to the USAID Administrator and the Assistant Secretary for Population, Refugees, and Migration.

(2)

Duties

The USAID Administrator and the Assistant Secretary shall—

(A)

consider the Ambassador’s guidance to the extent practicable;

(B)

provide assistance to programs carried out by international organizations, international and local nongovernmental organizations, and governments, as appropriate, that—

(i)

prevent and respond to violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings;

(ii)

adhere to the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s Guidelines for Gender-based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings;

(iii)

build the capacity of humanitarian organizations and government authorities, as appropriate, to address the special protection needs of women and children;

(iv)

support efforts to provide immediate assistance to survivors of violence and reintegrate such individuals through education, psychosocial assistance, trauma counseling, family and community reinsertion and reunification, medical assistance, and economic opportunity programs; and

(v)

provide legal services for women and girls who are victims of violence;

(C)

ensure that activities to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally are incorporated into any multilateral or bilateral disarmament, demobilization, rehabilitation, and reintegration efforts by—

(i)

providing protection and suitable separate facilities in demobilization and transit centers for women and girls formerly involved in, or associated with, fighting forces;

(ii)

ensuring equitable reintegration activities and opportunities for such women and girls, including access to schooling, vocational training, employment, and childcare;

(iii)

providing essential medical care and psychosocial support for such women and girls who are victims of violence; and

(iv)

incorporating prevention and response to violence against women and girls into programs for former combatants;

(D)

designate and deploy specialists in violence against women and girls, as appropriate, as an integral part of the United States Agency for International Development’s Disaster Assistance Response Teams to ensure the integration of prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally in strategies and programming; and

(E)

strive to ensure that all grantees deployed in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict operations—

(i)

comply with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s Six Core Principles Relating to Sexual Exploitation and Abuse;

(ii)

train all humanitarian workers in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls, including in the use of mechanisms to report violence against women and girls;

(iii)

conduct appropriate public outreach to make known to the host community the mechanisms to report violence against women and girls; and

(iv)

promptly and appropriately respond to reports of violence against women and girls and treat survivors in accordance with best practices regarding confidentiality.

(3)

Authorization of appropriations

(A)

In general

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Department of State and the United States Agency for International Development $40,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015 for programs described in paragraph (2)(C) that prevent and respond to violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict operations, in addition to amounts otherwise available for such purposes.

(B)

Sense of congress

It is the sense of Congress that amounts appropriated pursuant to paragraph (1) should not affect the amount appropriated for other humanitarian programs.

(c)

Activities of the Department of State

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, acting through the Ambassador, shall brief Congress on activities and efforts to—

(1)

create a mechanism to ensure that contractors and grantees deployed in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings—

(A)

comply with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee’s Six Core Principles Relating to Sexual Exploitation and Abuse;

(B)

train their humanitarian workers in prevention and response, including proper mechanisms to report gender-based violence; and

(C)

promptly and appropriately respond to reports of violence against women and girls and treat survivors in accordance with best practices regarding confidentiality; and

(2)

carry out the activities described in subsection (b)(2).

(d)

Coordination of United States Government efforts

Under the direction of the President, the Secretary of State is authorized to provide guidance on preventing and responding to violence against women and girls to the Secretary of Defense when United States military personnel, military contractors, and military observers are to be deployed in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings. The Ambassador shall regularly consult with counterparts at the Department of Defense and the Department of Justice to coordinate design and implementation of programs relevant to the purposes of this section.

(e)

Enhancing United States leadership and advocacy in the United Nations

(1)

Resource sharing

The Secretary of State, in consultation with the USAID Administrator, the Ambassador, the United States Representative to the United Nations, the Assistant Secretary for International Organization Affairs, and the Assistant Secretary for Population, Refugees, and Migration shall make available United States financial, material, human, and other resources to assist United Nations efforts to—

(A)

develop and implement appropriate training programs in prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally for peacekeeping and humanitarian personnel;

(B)

meet staffing goals for women military and police peacekeepers, including all-women teams and units;

(C)

enhance the deployment of civilian women at all levels to serve in peacekeeping missions, including through innovative staffing formulas;

(D)

improve protection mechanisms in and around United Nations managed refugee and internally displaced persons camps;

(E)

implement a zero tolerance policy for sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping and humanitarian operations;

(F)

support troop and police contributing countries in—

(i)

taking appropriate actions to prevent violence and abuse;

(ii)

providing materials for pre-deployment and in-theater awareness training; and

(iii)

taking other actions to promote full accountability in cases of abusive conduct involving the personnel of such countries;

(G)

continue to expand appropriate mechanisms to permit individuals to safely bring allegations of violence against women and girls internationally to the attention of United Nations peacekeeping commanders and heads of humanitarian missions; and

(H)

ensure the capacity of the United Nations Office of Internal Oversight to investigate all credible allegations in a timely and efficient manner, while protecting the whistleblower.

(2)

Report

Not later than 18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs and the United States Representative to the United Nations, in consultation with the Ambassador-at-Large of the Office for Global Women’s Issues, shall submit a report to Congress that describes United States efforts to support the implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolutions 1325, 1820, and 1888.

(f)

Emergency response to widespread reports of violence against women

(1)

Emergency response to credible reports of critical or widespread violence against women and girls

The Secretary of State, in consultation with the Ambassador and in coordination with relevant bureaus of the Department of State, shall—

(A)

identify critical or widespread incidents of violence against women and girls in situations of armed conflict when they occur, through consultation with other Federal agencies, the United Nations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations;

(B)

determine emergency response measures not later than 45 days after such identification; and

(C)

brief Congress on the implementation of such emergency response measures and outcomes not later than 30 days after such determination.

(2)

Content

The emergency measures developed under paragraph (1) shall include a description of—

(A)

bilateral diplomatic efforts with—

(i)

the government of the country in which the violence is occurring;

(ii)

governments in the region in which the violence is occurring; and

(iii)

other donor governments.

(g)

Authorization of appropriations

In addition to amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (c), there is authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for emergency measures, including the expansion of reporting mechanisms and programs, for each situation identified under this section.

II

Other Provisions

201.

Support for multilateral efforts to end violence against women and girls

There is authorized to be appropriated to the International Organizations and Programs Account $10,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015 to support the United Nations Development Fund for Women Trust Fund in Support of Actions to Eliminate Violence Against Women.

1.

Short title; table of contents

(a)

Short title

This Act may be cited as the International Violence Against Women Act of 2010.

(b)

Table of contents

The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2. Findings.

Sec. 3. Statement of policy.

Sec. 4. Definitions.

TITLE I—International Prevention of Violence Against Women and Girls

Subtitle A—Official designations and institutional changes

Sec. 101. Duties of the Secretary of State.

Sec. 102. Duties of the Administrator of USAID.

Subtitle B—Strategy, policy, and programs

Sec. 111. Comprehensive international strategy and assistance to reduce and prevent violence against women and girls.

Sec. 112. Assistance to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally.

Sec. 113. Ensuring accountability of the United States response to violence against women and girls internationally.

Sec. 114. Enhancing United States training of foreign military and police forces and judicial officials on violence against women and girls.

Sec. 115. Addressing violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, peacekeeping, conflict, and post-conflict settings.

TITLE II—Authorization of appropriations

Sec. 201. Authorization of appropriations.

2.

Findings

Congress makes the following findings:

(1)

According to the United Nations, approximately one out of every three women throughout the world has been beaten, coerced into sex, or otherwise abused in her lifetime. The World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that up to 70 percent of women in some countries report having been victims of domestic violence at some stage in their lives.

(2)

According to the United Nations, engaging men and women to end violence against women and girls internationally should be a priority. In recognition of this priority, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon launched a multi-year campaign in 2009 to end violence against women and pledge resources to engage male leaders and to mobilize men and boys.

(3)

Violence against women dramatically impedes progress in meeting all of our global health goals, including efforts to stem maternal mortality and the spread of HIV/AIDS. Approximately one in four women are abused during pregnancy, which, according to WHO, has been linked to miscarriage, pre-term labor, low birth weight, fetal distress, and death. Women who have experienced violence are also at higher risk for contracting HIV, and women living with HIV may be up to three times more likely to experience violence than other women. Fear of violence also prevents women from accessing HIV/AIDS information and receiving treatment and counseling.

(4)

Increasing women’s access to economic opportunities is crucial to preventing and responding to domestic and sexual violence. Microfinance-based interventions and increased asset control reduce levels of intimate partner violence and provide economic independence for survivors.

(5)

Displaced, refugee, and stateless women and girls in humanitarian emergencies, conflict settings, and natural disasters face extreme violence and threats because of power inequities, including—

(A)

being forced to exchange sex for food and humanitarian supplies; and

(B)

being at increased risk of rape, sexual exploitation, and abuse.

(6)

Rape and sexual assault against women and girls are used to torture, intimidate, and terrorize women and their communities.

(7)

According to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), child marriage—

(A)

is a harmful practice that deprives girls of their dignity and human rights;

(B)

can result in bonded labor or enslavement, commercial sexual exploitation, and violence against the victims;

(C)

significantly increases the risk of maternal death and morbidity, infant mortality and morbidity, obstetric fistula, and sexually-transmitted diseases, including HIV/AIDS; and

(D)

is perpetuated by poverty, a lack of educational or employment opportunities for girls, parental concerns to ensure sexual relations within marriage, the dowry system, and the perceived lack of value of girls.

3.

Statement of policy

It is the policy of the United States to—

(1)

systematically integrate and coordinate efforts to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally into United States foreign policy and foreign assistance programs;

(2)

expand the implementation of effective practices and programs;

(3)

promote women’s political, economic, educational, social, cultural, civil, and human rights and opportunities throughout the world;

(4)

support and build capacity of indigenous nongovernmental organizations that are working to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally, particularly women’s nongovernmental organizations and groups involving male advocates;

(5)

support and encourage United States organizations working in partnership with nongovernmental organizations described in paragraph (4);

(6)

prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally through multisectoral methods, working at individual, family, community, local, national, and international levels and incorporating service, prevention, training, and advocacy activities and economic, education, health, legal, and protective intervention services;

(7)

enhance training and other prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings;

(8)

enhance training by United States personnel of professional foreign military and police forces and judicial officials to include specific and thorough instruction on preventing and responding to violence against women and girls internationally;

(9)

increase communication and cooperation with nongovernmental organizations with demonstrated experience in prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally, and engaging men and boys as partners, including consulting with such organizations during strategic planning exercises;

(10)

more regularly engage men and boys as community leaders, partners, and advocates in ending violence against women and girls;

(11)

include—

(A)

prevention of child marriage as an important part of preventing violence against girls; and

(B)

ending the practice of child marriage by promoting education and skills building for girls, community programs, and increased economic opportunities for women to achieve the Millennium Development Goals and United States global health and development objectives;

(12)

ensure that private security firms contracted for service in conflict, humanitarian, and post-conflict settings appropriately report on, and respond to, violence against women and girls internationally; and

(13)

continue United States leadership and innovative efforts to address violence against women and girls internationally.

4.

Definitions

In this Act:

(1)

Child marriage

The term child marriage means the marriage of a girl or a boy, who has not reached the minimum legal age for marriage in the country in which the girl or boy is a resident.

(2)

Eligible country

The term eligible country means a country that is not classified as a high-income country in the most recent edition of the World Development Report for Reconstruction and Development, published by the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

(3)

Prevention and response

The term prevention and response means activities designed to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls.

(4)

USAID

The term USAID means the United States Agency for International Development.

(5)

Violence against women and girls

The term violence against women and girls

(A)

means any act of violence against women or girls that results in, or is likely to result in, physical, sexual, or psychological harm or suffering to women or girls, including threats of such acts, coercion, or arbitrary deprivations of liberty, whether occurring in public or private life; and

(B)

includes—

(i)

physical, sexual, and psychological violence occurring in the family, including battering, sexual abuse of female children in the household, dowry-related violence, marital rape, female genital cutting and mutilation, forced child marriage, and other traditional practices harmful to women and girls, nonspousal violence, and violence related to exploitation;

(ii)

physical, sexual, and psychological violence occurring within the general community, including rape, sexual abuse, sexual harassment and intimidation at work, in educational institutions and elsewhere, trafficking in women and girls, and forced prostitution; and

(iii)

physical, sexual, and psychological violence perpetrated or condoned by the government of the country of which the victim is a resident, regardless of where the violence occurs.

I

International Prevention of Violence Against Women and Girls

A

Official designations and institutional changes

101.

Duties of the Secretary of State

(a)

Designation

The Secretary of State, in fulfilling the duties and purposes of this Act, shall designate a senior official in the Department of State to conduct the activities of the Secretary under this Act.

(b)

Information-Sharing and Transparency

The Secretary’s designee shall work with the heads of relevant bureaus and offices of the Department of State and other Federal departments and agencies to track and analyze monitoring and evaluation data on programs that relate to international prevention and response in order to produce a full accounting of United States Government spending on international prevention and response, and to prepare the comprehensive strategy developed under section 111.

(c)

Congressional briefings

Not later than six months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Secretary’s designee shall brief Congress on international prevention and response strategies, programming, and associated outcomes, and shall submit to Congress an assessment of human and financial resources necessary to fulfill the purposes and duties of this Act.

102.

Duties of the Administrator of USAID

(a)

In general

The USAID Administrator, in fulfilling the duties and purposes of this Act, shall designate a senior official in USAID to conduct the activities of the USAID Administrator under this Act.

(b)

Coordinated USAID reporting

Consistent with USAID-wide monitoring and evaluation activities, and in order to assist in the preparation of the comprehensive strategy developed under section 111, the USAID Administrator’s designee shall work with relevant USAID technical and regional bureaus engaged in any aspect of international prevention and response to track and analyze monitoring and evaluation data and findings on USAID international prevention and response programs.

(c)

Congressional briefings

Not later than six months after the date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the Administrator’s designee shall brief Congress on international prevention and response strategies, programming, and associated outcomes, using data collected under subsection (b), and shall submit to Congress an assessment of human and financial resources necessary to fulfill the purposes and duties of this Act.

B

Strategy, policy, and programs

111.

Comprehensive international strategy and assistance to reduce and prevent violence against women and girls

(a)

Development and implementation of Strategy

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, with the assistance of the USAID Administrator, shall—

(1)

develop a comprehensive, five-year international strategy to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally;

(2)

submit the strategy developed under paragraph (1) to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives; and

(3)

make the strategy available to the public.

(b)

Collaboration and coordination

In developing the strategy under subsection (a), the Secretary of State shall consult with—

(1)

Federal departments and agencies that have expertise preventing and responding to violence against women and girls or administering international programs;

(2)

the Senior Policy Operating Group on Trafficking in Persons;

(3)

representatives of civil society organizations with demonstrated experience in combating violence against women and girls or promoting women’s health or women’s development issues internationally.

(c)

Content

The strategy developed under subsection (a) shall—

(1)

identify eligible countries with significant levels of violence against women and girls, including within displaced communities, that have the government or nongovernment organizational capacity to manage and implement gender-based violence prevention and response program activities and should, when possible, be geographically, ethnically, and culturally diverse from one another;

(2)

select five to 20 of the eligible countries identified under paragraph (1) in which to develop a comprehensive and holistic individual country plan that incorporates at least two of the program activities listed in subsection (d);

(3)

assess and describe the current or potential capacity of the government of each eligible country selected under paragraph (2) and civil society organizations in each such eligible country to address and respond to violence against women and girls;

(4)

identify and coordinate with Federal departments and agencies that—

(A)

have existing programs relevant to the strategy; or

(B)

will be involved in new program activities;

(5)

describe the monitoring and evaluation mechanisms established for each eligible country, and their use in assessing overall progress in prevention and response;

(6)

project general levels of resources needed to achieve the stated objectives in each eligible country, including an accounting of—

(A)

activities and funding already expended by the Department of State, USAID, other Federal departments and agencies, other donor country governments, and other multilateral institutions; and

(B)

leveraged private sector resources;

(7)

include capacity-building and technical assistance for community-based women’s nongovernmental organizations and community-based organizations with demonstrated experience relating to prevention and response, including combating violence against women and girls internationally;

(8)

identify and coordinate with existing nongovernmental and multilateral programs, initiatives, and groups with demonstrated experience in prevention and response internationally, particularly coordinating with women’s organizations and community-based groups;

(9)

integrate gender analysis into the strategy for each country to ensure that the roles of women, girls, men, and boys are appropriately addressed; and

(10)

include, as appropriate, strategies designed to accommodate the needs of stateless, internally displaced, refugee, or religious or ethnic minority women and girls.

(d)

Program activities supported

The strategy developed under subsection (a) for an eligible country shall contain a country plan that incorporates at least two of the following program activities:

(1)

Enhancing the capacity of the health sector to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls.

(2)

Development and enforcement of civil and criminal legal and judicial sanctions, protections, trainings, and capacity.

(3)

Development and implementation of programs, including programs targeting men and boys and media campaigns, that work to change social norms and attitudes so that violence against women and girls is neither condoned nor tolerated.

(4)

Ensuring accessible quality educational and literacy opportunities for women and girls.

(5)

Promotion of access to economic opportunity projects, including increasing distribution, credit, property, and inheritance rights for women and girls.

112.

Assistance to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally

(a)

In general

The Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator are authorized to provide assistance pursuant to the comprehensive international strategy developed under section 111 for eligible countries identified and selected under such section, including to support program activities described in subsection (d) of such section. Assistance under this section shall be provided through USAID and the Department of State implementing agencies, including local and international civil society organizations, multilateral institutions, and governments of eligible countries, in accordance with existing procedures.

(b)

Coordination of existing assistance programs

The Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator shall, to the maximum extent practicable, coordinate programs, projects, and activities under this section with other programs, projects, and activities to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) and other foreign assistance laws, as applicable.

(c)

Use of funds

(1)

In general

Any funds made available under this section to nongovernmental or civil society organizations should be made available to organizations that—

(A)

have demonstrated experience regarding violence against women and girls internationally or have entered into a partnership with an organization with such experience; and

(B)

have demonstrated capabilities or experience in a particular program activity described in section 111(d).

(2)

Congressional briefings

The Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator shall brief Congress upon request, on the transparent mechanisms used to ensure that funds made available under this section through nongovernmental organizations are awarded to organizations described in paragraph (1).

(d)

Grants to women’s nongovernmental organizations and community-based organizations

To the extent possible, 10 percent of the amount of assistance provided to an eligible country under this section should be provided to community-based organizations, including community-based women’s nongovernmental organizations. The USAID Administrator shall brief Congress, upon request, on efforts made to assist such organizations to be eligible for such assistance.

(e)

Award process

Assistance provided under this section shall be provided through an open, competitive, and transparent process to the extent possible.

(f)

Conditions

A recipient of assistance under this section—

(1)

shall allocate a reasonable portion of such grants for data collection and the evaluation of program effectiveness;

(2)

shall be responsible for developing and reporting on outcomes and impacts relating to preventing and responding to violence against women and girls internationally;

(3)

should gather input from women’s nongovernmental organizations or community-based organizations in recipient countries, including organizations with experience in working with men and boys to prevent violence; and

(4)

shall consider the safety of women and girls as a primary concern in deciding how to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate programs.

113.

Ensuring accountability of the United States response to violence against women and girls internationally

(a)

In general

Not later than one year after the implementation of the comprehensive strategy under section 111, the Secretary of State, shall prepare and make available to the public a report on best practices for preventing and addressing violence against women and girls internationally, which shall include—

(1)

a description of successful efforts by governments of countries with significant levels of violence against women and girls, nongovernmental organizations, and United States, bilateral, and multilateral donors in prevention and response;

(2)

recommendations related to best practices, effective strategies, and improvements to enhance the impact of prevention and response efforts; and

(3)

the impact of activities funded by the strategy in preventing and reducing violence against women and girls internationally.

(b)

Amendments

The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 is amended—

(1)

in section 116(d) (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d))—

(A)

in paragraph (10), by striking and at the end;

(B)

in paragraph (11)(C), by striking the period at the end and inserting ; and; and

(C)

by adding at the end the following:

(12)

wherever applicable, the nature and extent of violence against women and girls (as defined in section 4 of the International Violence Against Women Act of 2010).

; and

(2)

in section 502B (22 U.S.C. 2304), by adding at the end the following:

(i)

The report required by subsection (b) shall include, wherever applicable, the nature and extent of violence against women and girls, as defined in section 4 of the International Violence Against Women Act of 2010.

.

(c)

Transparency

Upon request, the Secretary of State shall provide to Congress the information made available under sections 101(b) and 102(b), including outcomes and impacts related to prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally submitted by contractors, subcontractors, grantees and subgrantees, unless such disclosure would inhibit the security or effectiveness of such entities.

(d)

Research and data collection

The Secretary of State, with assistance from the USAID Administrator and the heads of relevant bureaus and offices of the Department of State and in consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the Attorney General—

(1)

shall seek to coordinate data collection and evaluations of international violence against women and girls programs; and

(2)

may provide financial assistance for original research or analysis of effective interventions to prevent or respond to violence against women and girls internationally.

(e)

Use of funds

Amounts authorized to be appropriated in this section may be used to—

(1)

collect and analyze new or existing data on the scope and extent of all forms of violence against women and girls internationally, including under documented forms of violence and violence against marginalized groups;

(2)

conduct research on effective interventions to respond to violence against women and girls internationally, including efforts to scale up effective programming; and

(3)

support systemic data collection using internationally comparable indicators, norms, and methodologies for measuring the scope, prevalence, and incidence of violence against women and girls internationally.

114.

Enhancing United States training of foreign military and police forces and judicial officials on violence against women and girls

(a)

Purpose

The purpose of this section is to ensure that United States programs to train foreign military, police, and judicial officials include instruction on prevention of and response to violence against women and girls.

(b)

Guidance

The Secretary of State is authorized to provide guidance to the Secretary of Defense, as appropriate, on how to—

(1)

incorporate training on prevention and response into the basic training curricula of foreign military forces, police forces and judicial officials under covered programs; and

(2)

ensure that assistance under covered programs to units involved in regional or multilateral peacekeeping operations includes training on prevention and response.

(c)

Covered programs

The programs referred to in subsection (a) include—

(1)

programs carried out by the Secretary of Defense under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.); and

(2)

programs authorized under section 1206 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2006 (Public Law 109–163; 119 Stat. 3456).

115.

Addressing violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, peacekeeping, conflict, and post-conflict settings

(a)

Activities of the Department of State with USAID

The Secretary of State and the USAID Administrator shall—

(1)

provide assistance to programs carried out by international organizations, international and local nongovernmental organizations, and governments, as appropriate, that—

(A)

prevent and respond to violence against women and girls in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings;

(B)

build the capacity of humanitarian organizations and government authorities, as appropriate, to address the special protection needs of women and children;

(C)

support efforts to provide immediate assistance to survivors of violence and reintegrate such individuals through education, psychosocial assistance, trauma counseling, family and community reinsertion and reunification, medical assistance, and economic opportunity programs; and

(D)

provide legal services for women and girls who are victims of violence;

(2)

work to incorporate activities to prevent and respond to violence against women and girls internationally into any multilateral or bilateral disarmament, demobilization, rehabilitation, and reintegration efforts by—

(A)

providing protection and suitable separate facilities in demobilization and transit centers for women and girls formerly involved in, or associated with, fighting forces;

(B)

ensuring equitable reintegration activities and opportunities for such women and girls, including access to schooling, vocational training, employment, and childcare;

(C)

providing essential medical care and psychosocial support for such women and girls who are victims of violence; and

(D)

incorporating prevention and response to violence against women and girls into programs for former combatants;

(3)

designate and deploy specialists in violence against women and girls, as appropriate, as an integral part of the USAID’s Disaster Assistance Response Teams to ensure the integration of prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally in strategies and programming; and

(4)

strive to ensure that all grantees deployed in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict operations—

(A)

train all humanitarian workers in preventing and responding to violence against women and girls, including in the use of mechanisms to report violence against women and girls;

(B)

conduct appropriate public outreach to make known to the host community the mechanisms to report violence against women and girls; and

(C)

promptly and appropriately respond to reports of violence against women and girls and treat survivors in accordance with best practices regarding confidentiality.

(b)

Congressional briefings

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall brief Congress on activities and efforts to—

(1)

create a mechanism to ensure that contractors and grantees deployed in humanitarian relief, conflict, and post-conflict settings—

(A)

train their humanitarian workers in prevention and response, including proper mechanisms to report gender-based violence; and

(B)

promptly and appropriately respond to reports of violence against women and girls and treat survivors in accordance with best practices regarding confidentiality; and

(2)

carry out the activities described in subsection (a).

(c)

Coordination of United States Government efforts

The Secretary of State shall regularly consult with the Secretary of Defense and the Attorney General to coordinate design and implementation of programs relevant to the purposes of this section.

(d)

Enhancing United States Leadership and Advocacy in the United Nations

(1)

Strengthening United Nations Procedures

The Secretary of State, in consultation with the USAID Administrator and the United States Permanent Representative to the United Nations, shall assist United Nations efforts to—

(A)

develop and implement appropriate training programs in prevention and response to violence against women and girls internationally for peacekeeping and humanitarian personnel;

(B)

meet staffing goals for women military and police peacekeepers, including all-women teams and units;

(C)

enhance the deployment of civilian women at all levels to serve in peacekeeping missions, including through innovative staffing formulas;

(D)

institute effective protection mechanisms in and around United Nations managed refugee and internally displaced persons camps;

(E)

implement a zero tolerance policy for sexual exploitation and abuse in United Nations peacekeeping and humanitarian operations;

(F)

support troop and police contributing countries in—

(i)

taking appropriate actions to prevent violence and abuse;

(ii)

providing materials for pre-deployment and in-theater awareness training; and

(iii)

taking other actions to promote full accountability in cases of abusive conduct involving the personnel of such countries;

(G)

continue to expand appropriate mechanisms to permit individuals to safely bring allegations of violence against women and girls internationally to the attention of United Nations peacekeeping commanders and heads of humanitarian missions; and

(H)

ensure the capacity of the United Nations Office of Internal Oversight to investigate all credible allegations in a timely and efficient manner, while protecting the whistleblower.

(e)

Emergency response to widespread reports of violence against women

(1)

Emergency response to credible reports of critical or widespread violence against women and girls

The Secretary of State, acting through the heads of relevant bureaus and offices of the Department of State, shall—

(A)

identify critical or widespread incidents of violence against women and girls in situations of armed conflict when such incidents occur, through consultation with other Federal departments and agencies, the United Nations, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations;

(B)

determine emergency response measures not later than 45 days after such identification; and

(C)

brief Congress, upon request, on the implementation of such emergency response measures and outcomes not later than 90 days after such determination.

(2)

Content

The emergency measures developed under paragraph (1) shall include a description of bilateral diplomatic efforts with—

(A)

the government of the country in which the violence is occurring;

(B)

governments in the region in which the violence is occurring; and

(C)

other donor governments.

II

Authorization of appropriations

201.

Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2011 through 2015 to carry out the duties and purposes of this Act. Amounts appropriated should not affect the amount appropriated for other humanitarian programs.

December 21, 2010

Reported with an amendment