S. 3224 (111th): Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2010

Introduced:
Apr 19, 2010 (111th Congress, 2009–2010)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
See Instead:

H.R. 5119 (same title)
Referred to Committee — Apr 22, 2010

Sponsor
Tom Udall
Senior Senator from New Mexico
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Apr 19, 2010
Length
17 pages
Related Bills
S. 791 (112th) was a re-introduction of this bill in a later Congress.

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Apr 12, 2011

H.R. 5119 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Apr 22, 2010

 
Status

This bill was introduced on April 19, 2010, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Apr 19, 2010
Referred to Committee Apr 19, 2010
 
Full Title

A bill to amend the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act to improve compensation for workers involved in uranium mining, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
5 cosponsors (3D, 2R) (show)
Committees

Senate Judiciary

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Citation

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Notes

S. stands for Senate bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


4/19/2010--Introduced.
Radiation Exposure Compensation Act Amendments of 2010 - Amends the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act to extend the Radiation Exposure Compensation Trust Fund until 19 years after enactment of this Act.
Prescribes additional periods of required presence in an affected area during atmospheric nuclear testing for individuals filing leukemia or specified disease claims. Increases the amount of compensation an individual filing a claim may receive to $150,000.
Expands "affected area" to include Colorado, Idaho, Montana, and New Mexico, as well as any county in Arizona, Nevada, or Utah.
Extends to December 31, 1990, the period during which an individual employed at any time in a uranium mine or uranium mill is made eligible to receive compensation for a disease claim due to radiation exposure. Makes a core driller eligible to receive compensation upon filing of a disease claim.
Makes miners, core drillers, and ore transporters who suffer renal cancer or any other chronic renal disease, including nephritis and kidney tubal tissue injury, eligible for compensation due to exposure to radiation while on the job.
Requires the Attorney General to accept written affidavits meeting specified requirements regarding employment history, physical presence in an affected area, or participation at a nuclear testing site in determining the eligibility of claimants.
Extends until 19 years after enactment of this Act the statute of limitations for the filing of such claims.
Increases from 2% to 10% of the payment received by a claimant the maximum amount of attorneys fees that can be charged for the filing of an initial claim.
Directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), through the National Institute of Environmental Health Services, to establish a program of grants to institutions of higher education to study the epidemiological impacts of uranium mining and milling among non-occupationally exposed individuals, including family members of uranium miners and millers.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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