H.Con.Res. 112 (112th): Establishing the budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2013 and setting forth appropriate budgetary ...

...levels for fiscal years 2014 through 2022.

112th Congress, 2011–2013. Text as of Apr 16, 2012 (Placed on Calendar in the Senate).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

III

Calendar No. 354

112th CONGRESS

2d Session

H. CON. RES. 112

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

April 16, 2012

Received and referred to the Committee on the Budget; committee discharged pursuant to Section 300 of the Congressional Budget Act; placed on the calendar

CONCURRENT RESOLUTION

Establishing the budget for the United States Government for fiscal year 2013 and setting forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2014 through 2022.

1.

Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2013

(a)

Declaration

The Congress determines and declares that this concurrent resolution establishes the budget for fiscal year 2013 and sets forth appropriate budgetary levels for fiscal years 2014 through 2022.

(b)

Table of Contents

The table of contents for this resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2013.

Title I—Recommended levels and amounts

Sec. 101. Recommended levels and amounts.

Sec. 102. Major functional categories.

Title II—Reconciliation and Directive to the Committee on the Budget

Sec. 201. Reconciliation in the House of Representatives.

Sec. 202. Directive to the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives to replace the sequester established by the Budget Control Act of 2011.

Title III—Recommended Levels and Amounts for Fiscal Years 2030, 2040, and 2050

Sec. 301. Policy statement on long-term budgeting.

Title IV—Reserve funds

Sec. 401. Reserve fund for the repeal of the 2010 health care laws.

Sec. 402. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the sustainable growth rate of the Medicare program.

Sec. 403. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for revenue measures.

Sec. 404. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for rural counties and schools.

Sec. 405. Deficit-neutral reserve fund for transportation.

Title V—Budget Enforcement

Sec. 501. Limitation on advance appropriations.

Sec. 502. Concepts and definitions.

Sec. 503. Adjustments of aggregates and allocations for legislation.

Sec. 504. Limitation on long-term spending.

Sec. 505. Budgetary treatment of certain transactions.

Sec. 506. Application and effect of changes in allocations and aggregates.

Sec. 507. Congressional Budget Office estimates.

Sec. 508. Budget rule relating to transfers from the general fund of the treasury to the highway trust fund that increase public indebtedness.

Sec. 509. Separate allocation for overseas contingency operations/global war on terrorism.

Sec. 510. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

Title VI—Policy

Sec. 601. Policy Statement on Medicare.

Sec. 602. Policy Statement on Social Security.

Sec. 603. Policy statement on deficit reduction through the cancellation of unobligated balances.

Sec. 604. Recommendations for the elimination of waste, fraud, and abuse in Federal programs.

Title VII—Sense of the House provisions

Sec. 701. Sense of the House regarding the importance of child support enforcement.

I

Recommended levels and amounts

101.

Recommended levels and amounts

The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of fiscal years 2013 through 2022:

(1)

Federal revenues

For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution:

(A)

The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: $2,058,604,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: $2,248,773,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: $2,459,718,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: $2,627,541,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: $2,770,342,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: $2,891,985,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: $3,021,132,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: $3,173,642,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021: $3,332,602,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: $3,498,448,000,000.
(B)

The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal revenues should be changed are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: -$234,735,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: -$302,411,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: -$356,566,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: -$388,565,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: -$423,997,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: -$460,304,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: -$497,440,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: -$534,378,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021: -$574,350,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: -$617,033,000,000.
(2)

New budget authority

For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total new budget authority are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: $2,793,848,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: $2,681,566,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: $2,756,471,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: $2,888,570,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: $2,998,681,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: $3,117,133,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: $3,290,908,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: $3,455,514,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021: $3,570,712,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: $3,780,807,000,000.
(3)

Budget outlays

For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget outlays are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: $2,891,589,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: $2,769,702,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: $2,784,233,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: $2,892,523,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: $2,977,372,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: $3,080,794,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: $3,248,524,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: $3,398,470,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021: $3,531,790,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: $3,748,801,000,000.
(4)

Deficits (on-budget)

For purposes of the enforcement of this resolution, the amounts of the deficits (on-budget) are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: -$832,985,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: -$520,930,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: -$324,515,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: -$264,982,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: -$207,030,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: -$188,810,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: -$227,392,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: -$224,828,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021: -$199,189,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: -$250,353,000,000.
(5)

Debt subject to limit

The appropriate levels of the public debt are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: $17,072,810,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: $17,769,762,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: $18,277,348,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: $18,752,806,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: $19,216,661,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: $19,676,545,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: $20,168,534,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: $20,657,588,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021: $21,121,620,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: $21,627,396,000,000.
(6)

Debt held by the public

The appropriate levels of debt held by the public are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2013: $12,261,337,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2014: $12,860,706,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2015: $13,260,430,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2016: $13,597,083,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2017: $13,874,203,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2018: $14,125,515,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2019: $14,417,373,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2020: $14,717,285,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2021; $15,005,091,000,000.
  • Fiscal year 2022: $15,363,610,000,000.
102.

Major functional categories

The Congress determines and declares that the appropriate levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 2013 through 2022 for each major functional category are:

(1)

National Defense (050):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $562,166,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $621,469,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $574,807,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $589,720,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $588,501,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $586,446,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $602,958,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $599,658,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $618,519,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $607,874,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $635,241,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $617,648,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $653,094,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $639,165,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $671,528,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $656,950,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $690,261,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $675,190,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $709,450,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $699,316,000,000.

(2)

International Affairs (150):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $43,128,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $46,999,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $40,113,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $44,758,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $38,271,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $45,707,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $38,082,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $46,041,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $40,446,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $46,529,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $42,366,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $46,777,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $43,303,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $45,780,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,294,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $45,774,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $45,329,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $46,737,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $46,649,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $47,872,000,000.

(3)

General Science, Space, and Technology (250):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $28,001,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $29,204,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $28,154,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $28,535,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $28,633,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $28,591,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $29,176,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $29,006,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $29,759,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $29,526,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $30,412,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $30,127,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $31,066,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $30,719,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $31,747,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $31,377,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $32,454,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $31,973,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $33,173,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $32,680,000,000.

(4)

Energy (270):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, -$3,025,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $9,407,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $1,670,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $4,220,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $952,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $2,375,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $990,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $2,128,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $960,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $1,832,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $960,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $1,903,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $1,017,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $2,103,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $975,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $2,110,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $863,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $2,130,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $900,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $2,221,000,000.

(5)

Natural Resources and Environment (300):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $33,274,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $37,882,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $31,554,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $36,144,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $30,181,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $35,058,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $30,868,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $33,832,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $31,848,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $33,756,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $33,140,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $33,245,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $33,981,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $33,845,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $35,132,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $34,707,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $35,338,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $35,178,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $36,046,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $35,666,000,000.

(6)

Agriculture (350):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $21,691,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $24,611,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $18,145,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $19,113,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $19,395,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $19,107,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $19,142,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $18,761,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $18,962,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $18,571,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $19,291,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $18,849,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $19,556,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $19,152,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $20,045,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $19,667,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $20,543,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $20,154,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $20,571,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $20,187,000,000.

(7)

Commerce and Housing Credit (370):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, -$7,095,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$3,151,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, -$1,455,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$12,070,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $711,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$11,591,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $2,675,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$12,166,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $5,135,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$11,195,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $6,515,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$10,525,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,778,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$15,134,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $9,491,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$14,115,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $10,206,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$6,446,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $11,311,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$6,533,000,000.

(8)

Transportation (400):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $57,139,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $49,729,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $80,829,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $84,541,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $74,602,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $77,294,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $76,512,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $79,831,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $77,561,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $80,358,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $80,640,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $81,412,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $81,636,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $81,348,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $85,165,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $84,201,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $80,486,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $79,090,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $93,104,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $91,180,000,000.

(9)

Community and Regional Development (450):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $11,047,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $21,732,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,307,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $16,886,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,389,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $13,927,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,415,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $10,647,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,427,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $8,848,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,435,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $8,044,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,410,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $7,673,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,501,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $7,691,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,604,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $7,805,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $7,726,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $7,997,000,000.

(10)

Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services (500):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $57,626,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $78,335,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $56,151,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $60,269,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $63,904,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $64,931,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $71,626,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $71,719,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $79,630,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $78,652,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $84,076,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $84,121,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $87,738,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $87,647,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $89,329,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $89,911,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $90,305,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $91,272,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $91,458,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $92,408,000,000.

(11)

Health (550):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $363,596,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $365,614,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $358,322,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $362,556,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $365,058,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $369,455,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $376,993,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $376,408,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $393,219,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $394,754,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $404,124,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $406,143,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $419,428,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $417,557,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $446,427,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $433,169,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $449,759,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $446,710,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $471,657,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $468,212,000,000.

(12)

Medicare (570):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $510,144,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $510,056,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $532,701,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $532,004,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $554,995,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $554,555,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $601,515,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $601,281,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $615,386,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $614,665,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $634,539,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $634,089,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $692,173,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $691,921,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $737,284,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $736,531,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $784,647,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $784,158,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $866,591,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $866,448,000,000.

(13)

Income Security (600):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $517,076,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $516,848,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $475,714,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $474,603,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $472,820,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $471,200,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $453,169,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $455,843,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $450,453,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $448,404,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $453,608,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $447,336,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $469,525,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $467,922,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $481,660,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $480,331,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $494,347,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $493,341,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $511,458,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $515,356,000,000.

(14)

Social Security (650):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $53,216,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $53,296,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $31,892,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $32,002,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $35,135,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $35,210,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $38,953,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $38,991,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $43,140,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $43,140,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $47,590,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $47,590,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $52,429,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $52,429,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $57,425,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $57,425,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $62,604,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $62,604,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $68,079,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $68,079,000,000.

(15)

Veterans Benefits and Services (700):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $134,635,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $135,222,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $137,004,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $137,230,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $139,862,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $139,774,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $148,556,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $148,044,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $147,499,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $146,846,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $146,341,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $145,634,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $156,034,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $155,291,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $160,511,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $159,760,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $165,065,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $164,272,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $175,431,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $174,607,000,000.

(16)

Administration of Justice (750):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $54,277,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $57,623,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $51,201,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $54,168,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $52,499,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $54,276,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $55,868,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $56,929,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $55,704,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $56,547,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $57,407,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $60,053,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $59,263,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $60,828,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $61,091,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $62,003,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $63,137,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $64,045,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $68,922,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $69,817,000,000.

(17)

General Government (800):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $23,155,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $25,051,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, 23,415,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $24,042,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $23,067,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $23,435,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $22,814,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $22,961,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $23,149,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $23,170,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $23,734,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $23,699,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $24,304,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $23,897,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $24,751,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $24,365,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $25,358,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $24,896,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $25,881,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $25,449,000,000.

(18)

Net Interest (900):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $344,415,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $344,415,000,000

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $356,352,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $356,352,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $391,014,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $391,014,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $447,356,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $447,356,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $506,642,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $506,642,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $565,014,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $565,014,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $618,628,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $618,628,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $664,102,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $664,102,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $696,908,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $696,908,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $730,179,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $730,179,000,000.

(19)

Allowances (920):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, -$22,607,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $859,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, -$87,771,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$50,682,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, -$90,146,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$80,035,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, -$94,030,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$93,943,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, -$96,411,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$101,325,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, -$101,394,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$106,211,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, -$106,767,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$111,171,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, -$113,223,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$117,350,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, -$120,493,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$123,784,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, -$121,281,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$125,413,000,000.

(20)

Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, -$84,736,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$84,736,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, -$78,697,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$78,697,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, -$84,531,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$84,531,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, -$86,226,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$86,226,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, -$94,507,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$94,507,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, -$98,066,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$98,066,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, -$104,845,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$104,845,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, -$103,878,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$103,878,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, -$108,168,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$108,168,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, -$110,655,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, -$110,655,000,000.

(21)

Overseas Contingency Operations/Global War on Terrorism:

Fiscal year 2013:

(A)

New budget authority, $96,725,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $51,125,000,000.

Fiscal year 2014:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $54,010,000,000.

Fiscal year 2015:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $48,034,000,000.

Fiscal year 2016:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $45,422,000,000.

Fiscal year 2017:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $44,284,000,000.

Fiscal year 2018:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $43,912,000,000.

Fiscal year 2019:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $43,770,000,000.

Fiscal year 2020:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $43,741,000,000.

Fiscal year 2021:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $43,727,000,000.

Fiscal year 2022:

(A)

New budget authority, $44,159,000,000.

(B)

Outlays, $43,727,000,000.

II

Reconciliation and Directive to the Committee on the Budget

201.

Reconciliation in the House of Representatives

(a)

Submissions of spending reduction

Not later than April 27, 2012, the House committees named in subsection (b) shall submit recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives. After receiving those recommendations, such committee shall report to the House a reconciliation bill carrying out all such recommendations without substantive revision.

(b)

Instructions

(1)

Committee on Agriculture

The Committee on Agriculture shall submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by $8,200,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 and 2013; by $19,700,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2017; and by $33,200,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2022.

(2)

Committee on Energy and Commerce

The Committee on Energy and Commerce shall submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by $3,750,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 and 2013; by $28,430,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2017; and by $96,760,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2022.

(3)

Committee on Financial Services

The Committee on Financial Services shall submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by $3,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 and 2013; by $16,700,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2017; and by $29,800,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2022.

(4)

Committee on the Judiciary

The Committee on the Judiciary shall submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by $100,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 and 2013; by $11,200,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2017; and by $39,700,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2022.

(5)

Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

The Committee on Oversight and Government Reform shall submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by $2,200,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 and 2013; by $30,100,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2017; and by $78,900,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2022.

(6)

Committee on Ways and Means

The Committee on Ways and Means shall submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction sufficient to reduce the deficit by $1,200,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 and 2013; by $23,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2017; and by $53,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2012 through 2022.

202.

Directive to the Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives to replace the sequester established by the Budget Control Act of 2011

(a)

Submission

In the House, the Committee on the Budget shall report to the House a bill carrying out the directions set forth in subsection (b).

(b)

Directions

The bill referred to in subsection (a) shall include the following provisions:

(1)

Replacing the sequester established by the Budget Control Act of 2011

The language shall amend section 251A of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 to replace the sequester established under that section consistent with this concurrent resolution.

(2)

Application of provisions

The bill referred to in subsection (a) shall include language making its application contingent upon the enactment of the reconciliation bill referred to in section 201.

III

Recommended Levels and Amounts for Fiscal Years 2030, 2040, and 2050

301.

Policy statement on long-term budgeting

The following are the recommended budget levels for each of fiscal years 2030, 2040, and 2050 as a percent of the gross domestic product of the United States:

(1)

Federal Revenues

The appropriate levels of Federal revenues are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2030: 19 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2040: 19 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2050: 19 percent.
(2)

Budget outlays

The appropriate levels of total budget outlays are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2030: 20.25 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2040: 18.75 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2050: 16 percent.
(3)

Deficits

The appropriate amounts of deficits are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2030: 1.25 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2040: -.25 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2050: -3 percent.
(4)

Debt held by the public

The appropriate levels of debt held by the public are as follows:

  • Fiscal year 2030: 53 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2040: 38 percent.
  • Fiscal year 2050: 10 percent.
IV

Reserve funds

401.

Reserve fund for the repeal of the 2010 health care laws

In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that repeals the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act or the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010.

402.

Deficit-neutral reserve fund for the sustainable growth rate of the Medicare program

In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that includes provisions amending or superseding the system for updating payments under section 1848 of the Social Security Act, if such measure would not increase the deficit in the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022.

403.

Deficit-neutral reserve fund for revenue measures

In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for the budgetary effects of any bill reported by the Committee on Ways and Means, or any amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that decreases revenue, but only if such measure would not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022.

404.

Deficit-neutral reserve fund for rural counties and schools

In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels and limits in this resolution for the budgetary effects of any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, that makes changes to the Payments in Lieu of Taxes Act of 1976 (Public Law 94–565) or makes changes to or provides for the reauthorization of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self Determination Act of 2000 (Public Law 106–393) by the amounts provided by that legislation for those purposes, if such legislation would not increase the deficit or direct spending for fiscal year 2013, the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2017, or the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022.

405.

Deficit-neutral reserve fund for transportation

In the House, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution for any bill or joint resolution, or amendment thereto or conference report thereon, if such measure maintains the solvency of the Highway Trust Fund, but only if such measure would not increase the deficit over the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022.

V

Budget Enforcement

501.

Limitation on advance appropriations

(a)

In general

In the House, except as provided in subsection (b), any bill or joint resolution, or an amendment thereto or conference report thereon, making a general appropriation or continuing appropriation may not provide for advance appropriations.

(b)

Exceptions

An advance appropriation may be provided for programs, projects, activities, or accounts referred to in subsection (c)(1) or identified in the report to accompany this resolution or the joint explanatory statement of managers to accompany this resolution under the heading Accounts Identified for Advance Appropriations.

(c)

Limitations

For fiscal year 2014, the aggregate amount of advance appropriation shall not exceed—

(1)

$54,462,000,000 for the following programs in the Department of Veterans Affairs—

(A)

Medical Services;

(B)

Medical Support and Compliance; and

(C)

Medical Facilities accounts of the Veterans Health Administration; and

(2)

$28,852,000,000 in new budget authority for all other programs.

(d)

Definition

In this section, the term advance appropriation means any new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill or joint resolution making general appropriations or any new discretionary budget authority provided in a bill or joint resolution making continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2014.

502.

Concepts and definitions

Upon the enactment of any bill or joint resolution providing for a change in budgetary concepts or definitions, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may adjust any appropriate levels and allocations in this resolution accordingly.

503.

Adjustments of aggregates and allocations for legislation

(a)

Enforcement

For purposes of enforcing this resolution, the revenue levels shall be those set forth in the March 2012 Congressional Budget Office baseline. The total amount of adjustments made under subsection (b) may not cause revenue levels to be below the levels set forth in paragraph (1)(A) of section 101 for fiscal year 2013 and for the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022.

(b)

Adjustments

(1)

The chair of the Committee on the Budget may adjust the allocations and aggregates of this concurrent resolution for—

(A)

the budgetary effects of measures extending the Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001;

(B)

the budgetary effects of measures extending the Jobs and Growth Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2003;

(C)

the budgetary effects of measures that adjust the Alternative Minimum Tax exemption amounts to prevent a larger number of taxpayers as compared with tax year 2008 from being subject to the Alternative Minimum Tax or of allowing the use of nonrefundable personal credits against the Alternative Minimum Tax;

(D)

the budgetary effects of extending the estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer tax provisions of title III of the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization, and Job Creation Act of 2010;

(E)

the budgetary effects of measures providing a 20 percent deduction in income to small businesses;

(F)

the budgetary effects of measures implementing trade agreements;

(G)

the budgetary effects of provisions repealing the tax increases set forth in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act of 2010;

(H)

the budgetary effects of provisions reforming the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Affordability Reconciliation Act of 2010; and

(I)

the budgetary effects of measures reforming the tax code and lowering tax rates.

(2)

A measure does not qualify for adjustments under paragraph (1)(H) if it—

(A)

increases the deficit over the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022; or

(B)

increases revenues over the period of fiscal years 2013 through 2022, other than by—

(i)

repealing or modifying the individual mandate (codified as section 5000A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986); or

(ii)

modifying the subsidies to purchase health insurance (codified as section 36B of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986).

(c)

Other adjustments

If a committee (other than the Committee on Appropriations) reports a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment thereto or a conference report thereon, providing for a decrease in direct spending (budget authority and outlays flowing therefrom) for any fiscal year and also provides for an authorization of appropriations for the same purpose, upon the enactment of such measure, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may decrease the allocation to such committee and increase the allocation of discretionary spending (budget authority and outlays flowing therefrom) to the Committee on Appropriations for fiscal year 2013 by an amount equal to the new budget authority (and outlays flowing therefrom) provided for in a bill or joint resolution making appropriations for the same purpose.

(d)

Determinations

For the purpose of enforcing this concurrent resolution on the budget in the House, the allocations and aggregate levels of new budget authority, outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, revenues, deficits, and surpluses for fiscal year 2013 and the period of fiscal years 2013 through fiscal year 2022 shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by the chair of the Committee on the Budget and such chair may adjust the applicable levels of this resolution.

504.

Limitation on long-term spending

(a)

In general

In the House, it shall not be in order to consider a bill or joint resolution reported by a committee (other than the Committee on Appropriations), or an amendment thereto or a conference report thereon, if the provisions of such measure have the net effect of increasing direct spending in excess of $5,000,000,000 for any period described in subsection (b).

(b)

Time periods

The applicable periods for purposes of this section are any of the first four consecutive ten fiscal-year periods beginning with fiscal year 2023.

505.

Budgetary treatment of certain transactions

(a)

In General

Notwithstanding section 302(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, and section 4001 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, the joint explanatory statement accompanying the conference report on any concurrent resolution on the budget shall include in its allocation under section 302(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 to the Committee on Appropriations amounts for the discretionary administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration and the United States Postal Service.

(b)

Special Rule

For purposes of applying sections 302(f) and 311 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, estimates of the level of total new budget authority and total outlays provided by a measure shall include any off-budget discretionary amounts.

(c)

Adjustments

The chair of the Committee on the Budget may adjust allocations and aggregates for legislation reported by the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform that reforms the Federal retirement system, but does not cause a net increase in the deficit for fiscal year 2013 and the period of fiscal years 2013 to 2022.

506.

Application and effect of changes in allocations and aggregates

(a)

Application

Any adjustments of allocations and aggregates made pursuant to this resolution shall—

(1)

apply while that measure is under consideration;

(2)

take effect upon the enactment of that measure; and

(3)

be published in the Congressional Record as soon as practicable.

(b)

Effect of Changed Allocations and Aggregates

Revised allocations and aggregates resulting from these adjustments shall be considered for the purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 as allocations and aggregates included in this resolution.

(c)

Exemptions

Any legislation for which the chair of the Committee on the Budget makes adjustments in the allocations or aggregates of this concurrent resolution shall not be subject to the points of order set forth in clause 10 of rule XXI of the Rules of the House of Representatives or section 504.

507.

Congressional Budget Office estimates

(a)

Fair Value Estimates

(1)

Request for supplemental estimates

Upon the request of the chair or ranking member of the Committee on the Budget, any estimate prepared for a measure under the terms of title V of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, credit reform, as a supplement to such estimate of the Congressional Budget Office shall, to the extent practicable, also provide an estimate of the current actual or estimated market values representing the fair value of assets and liabilities affected by such measure.

(2)

Enforcement

If the Congressional Budget Office provides an estimate pursuant to subsection (a), the chair of the Committee on the Budget may use such estimate to determine compliance with the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and other budgetary enforcement controls.

(b)

Budgetary Effects of the National Flood Insurance Program

The Congressional Budget Office shall estimate the change in net income to the National Flood Insurance Program by this Act if such income is included in a reconciliation bill provided for in section 201, as if such income were deposited in the general fund of the Treasury.

508.

Budget rule relating to transfers from the general fund of the treasury to the highway trust fund that increase public indebtedness

For purposes of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, or the Rules of the House of Representatives, a bill or joint resolution, or an amendment thereto or conference report thereon, or any Act that transfers funds from the general fund of the Treasury to the Highway Trust Fund shall be counted as new budget authority and outlays equal to the amount of the transfer in the fiscal year the transfer occurs.

509.

Separate allocation for overseas contingency operations/global war on terrorism

(a)

Allocation

In the House, there shall be a separate allocation to the Committee on Appropriations for overseas contingency operations and the global war on terrorism. For purposes of enforcing such separate allocation under section 302(f) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the first fiscal year and the total of fiscal years shall be deemed to refer to fiscal year 2013. Such separate allocation shall be the exclusive allocation for overseas contingency operations and the global war on terrorism under section 302(a) of such Act. Section 302(c) of such Act does not apply to such separate allocation. The Committee on Appropriations may provide suballocations of such separate allocation under section 302(b) of such Act. Spending that counts toward the allocation established by this section shall be designated pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

(b)

Adjustment

In the House, for purposes of subsection (a) for fiscal year 2013, no adjustment shall be made under section 314(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 if any adjustment would be made under section 251(b)(2)(A)(ii) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

510.

Exercise of rulemaking powers

(a)

In general

The House adopts the provisions of this title—

(1)

as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the House of Representatives and as such they shall be considered as part of the rules of the House of Representatives, and these rules shall supersede other rules only to the extent that they are inconsistent with other such rules; and

(2)

with full recognition of the constitutional right of the House of Representatives to change those rules at any time, in the same manner, and to the same extent as in the case of any other rule of the House of Representatives.

(b)

Limitation on application

The following provisions of H. Res. 5 (112th Congress) shall no longer have force or effect:

(1)

Section 3(e) relating to advance appropriations.

(2)

Section 3(f) relating to the treatment of off-budget administrative expenses.

VI

Policy

601.

Policy Statement on Medicare

(a)

Findings

The House finds the following:

(1)

More than 50 million Americans depend on Medicare for their health security.

(2)

The Medicare Trustees Report has repeatedly recommended that Medicare’s long-term financial challenges be addressed soon. Each year without reform, the financial condition of Medicare becomes more precarious and the threat to those in and near retirement becomes more pronounced. According to the Congressional Budget Office—

(A)

the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund will be exhausted in 2022 and unable to pay scheduled benefits; and

(B)

Medicare spending is growing faster than the economy and Medicare outlays are currently rising at a rate of 6.3 percent per year, and under the Congressional Budget Office’s alternative fiscal scenario, direct spending on Medicare is projected to reach 7 percent of GDP by 2035 and 14 percent of GDP by 2085.

(3)

Failing to address this problem will leave millions of American seniors without adequate health security and younger generations burdened with enormous debt to pay for spending levels that cannot be sustained.

(b)

Policy on medicare reform

It is the policy of this resolution to protect those in and near retirement from any disruptions to their Medicare benefits and offer future beneficiaries the same health care options available to Members of Congress.

(c)

Assumptions

This resolution assumes reform of the Medicare program such that:

(1)

Current Medicare benefits are preserved for those in and near retirement, without changes.

(2)

For future generations, when they reach eligibility, Medicare is reformed to provide a premium support payment and a selection of guaranteed health coverage options from which recipients can choose a plan that best suits their needs.

(3)

Medicare will provide additional assistance for lower-income beneficiaries and those with greater health risks.

(4)

Medicare spending is put on a sustainable path and the Medicare program becomes solvent over the long-term.

602.

Policy Statement on Social Security

(a)

Findings

The House finds the following:

(1)

More than 55 million retirees, individuals with disabilities, and survivors depend on Social Security. Since enactment, Social Security has served as a vital leg on the three-legged stool of retirement security, which includes employer provided pensions as well as personal savings.

(2)

The Social Security Trustees report has repeatedly recommended that Social Security’s long-term financial challenges be addressed soon. Each year without reform, the financial condition of Social Security becomes more precarious and the threat to seniors and those receiving Social Security disability benefits becomes more pronounced:

(A)

In 2016, according to the Congressional Budget Office, the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund will be exhausted and will be unable to pay scheduled benefits.

(B)

In 2036, according to the Social Security Trustees Report the combined Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund will be exhausted, and will be unable to pay scheduled benefits.

(C)

With the exhaustion of the trust funds in 2036, benefits will be cut 23 percent across the board, devastating those currently in or near retirement and those who rely on Social Security the most.

(3)

The current recession has exacerbated the crisis to Social Security. The Congressional Budget Office continues to project permanent cash deficits.

(4)

Lower-income Americans rely on Social Security for a larger proportion of their retirement income. Therefore, reforms should take into consideration the need to protect lower-income Americans’ retirement security.

(5)

Americans deserve action by their elected officials on Social Security reform. It is critical that the Congress and the administration work together in a bipartisan fashion to address the looming insolvency of Social Security. In this spirit, this resolution creates a bipartisan opportunity to find solutions by requiring policymakers to ensure that Social Security remains a critical part fo the safety net.

(b)

Policy on Social Security

It is the policy of this resolution that Congress should work on a bipartisan basis to make Social Security permanently solvent. This resolution assumes reform of a current law trigger, such that—

(1)
(A)

if in any year the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund in its annual Trustees’ Report determines that the 75-year actuarial balance of the Social Security Trust Funds is in deficit, and the annual balance of the Social Security Trust Funds in the 75th year is in deficit, the Board of Trustees should, not later than September 30 of the same calendar year, submit to the President recommendations for statutory reforms necessary to achieve a positive 75-year actuarial balance and a positive annual balance in the 75th year; and

(B)

such recommendations provided to the President should be agreed upon by both Public Trustees of the Board of Trustees;

(2)
(A)

not later than December 1 of the same calendar year in which the Board of Trustees submits its recommendations, the President shall promptly submit implementing legislation to both Houses of Congress, including recommendations necessary to achieve a positive 75-year actuarial balance and a positive annual balance in the 75th year; and

(B)

the Majority Leader of the Senate and the Majority Leader of the House should introduce such legislation upon receipt;

(3)

within 60 days of the President submitting legislation, the committees of jurisdiction to which the legislation has been referred should report such legislation, which should be considered by the full House or Senate under expedited procedures; and

(4)

legislation submitted by the President should—

(A)

protect those in and near retirement;

(B)

preserve the safety net for those who rely on Social Security, including survivors and those with disabilities;

(C)

improve fairness for participants; and

(D)

reduce the burden on, and provide certainty for, future generations.

603.

Policy statement on deficit reduction through the cancellation of unobligated balances

(a)

Findings

The House finds the following:

(1)

According to the Office of Management and Budget, Federal agencies will hold $698 billion in unobligated balances at the close of fiscal year 2013.

(2)

These funds represent direct and discretionary spending made available by Congress that remain available for expenditure beyond the fiscal year for which they are provided.

(3)

In some cases, agencies are granted funding and it remains available for obligation indefinitely.

(4)

The Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 requires the Office of Management and Budget to make funds available to agencies for obligation and prohibits the Administration from withholding or cancelling unobligated funds unless approved by an act of Congress.

(5)

Greater congressional oversight is required to review and identify potential savings from unneeded balances of funds.

(b)

Policy on deficit reduction through the cancellation of unobligated balances

Congressional committees shall through their oversight activities identify and achieve savings through the cancellation or rescission of unobligated balances that neither abrogate contractual obligations of the Federal Government nor reduce or disrupt Federal commitments under programs such as Social Security, veterans’ affairs, national security, and Treasury authority to finance the national debt.

(c)

Deficit reduction

Congress, with the assistance of the Government Accountability Office, the Inspectors General, and other appropriate agencies should make it a high priority to review unobligated balances and identify savings for deficit reduction.

604.

Recommendations for the elimination of waste, fraud, and abuse in Federal programs

(a)

Findings

The House finds the following:

(1)

The Government Accountability Office is required by law to identify examples of waste, duplication, and overlap in Federal programs, and has so identified dozens of such examples.

(2)

In testimony before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, the Comptroller General has stated that addressing the identified waste, duplication, and overlap in Federal programs could potentially save tens of billions of dollars.

(3)

The Rules of the House of Representatives require each standing committee to hold at least one hearing every four months on waste, fraud, abuse, or mismanagement in Government programs.

(4)

The findings resulting from congressional oversight of Federal Government programs should result in programmatic changes in both authorizing statutes and program funding levels.

(b)

Policy on deficit reduction through the reduction of unnecessary and wasteful spending

Each authorizing committee annually shall include in its Views and Estimates letter required under section 301(d) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of programs within the jurisdiction of such committee whose funding should be reduced or eliminated. Such recommendations shall be made publicly available.

VII

Sense of the House provisions

701.

Sense of the House regarding the importance of child support enforcement

It is the sense of the House that—

(1)

additional legislative action is needed to ensure that States have the necessary resources to collect all child support that is owed to families and to allow them to pass 100 percent of support on to families without financial penalty; and

(2)

when 100 percent of child support payments are passed to the child, rather than administrative expenses, program integrity is improved and child support participation increases.

Passed the House of Representatives March 29, 2012.

Karen L. Haas,

Clerk

April 16, 2012

Committee discharged pursuant to Section 300 of the Congressional Budget Act; placed on the calendar