H.R. 1179 (112th): Respect for Rights of Conscience Act of 2011

Introduced:
Mar 17, 2011 (112th Congress, 2011–2013)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
See Instead:

S. 1467 (same title)
Referred to Committee — Aug 02, 2011

Sponsor
Jeff Fortenberry
Representative for Nebraska's 1st congressional district
Party
Republican
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Mar 17, 2011
Length
8 pages
Related Bills
H.R. 6570 (111th) was a previous version of this bill.

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Dec 22, 2010

S. 1467 (identical)

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Aug 02, 2011

 
Status

This bill was introduced on March 17, 2011, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Mar 17, 2011
Referred to Committee Mar 17, 2011
 
Full Title

To amend the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act to protect rights of conscience with regard to requirements for coverage of specific items and services.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
223 cosponsors (213R, 10D) (show)
Committees

House Energy and Commerce

Health

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


3/17/2011--Introduced.
Respect for Rights of Conscience Act of 2011 - Amends the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) to permit a health plan to decline coverage of specific items and services that are contrary to the religious beliefs of the sponsor, issuer, or other entity offering the plan or the purchaser or beneficiary (in the case of individual coverage) without penalty.
Declares that such plans are still considered to:
(1) be providing the essential health benefits package or preventive health services,
(2) be a qualified health plan, and
(3) have fulfilled other requirements under PPACA.
Declares that nothing in PPACA shall be construed to authorize a health plan to require a provider to provide, participate in, or refer for a specific item or service contrary to the provider's religious beliefs or moral convictions.
Prohibits a health plan from being considered to have failed to provide timely or other access to items or services or to fulfill any other requirement under PPACA because it has respected the rights of conscience of such a provider.
Prohibits an American Health Benefit Exchange (a state health insurance exchange) or other official or entity acting in a governmental capacity in the course of implementing PPACA from discriminating against a health plan, plan sponsor, health care provider, or other person because of an unwillingness to provide coverage of, participate in, or refer for, specific items or services.
Creates a private cause of action for the protection of individual rights created under this Act. Authorizes any person or entity to assert a violation of this Act as a claim or defense in a judicial proceeding.
Designates the Office for Civil Rights of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to receive and investigate complaints of discrimination based on this Act. Makes this Act effective as if it were included in PPACA.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

The House Democratic Caucus does not provide summaries of bills.

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