H.R. 1891 (112th): Setting New Priorities in Education Spending Act

Introduced:
May 13, 2011 (112th Congress, 2011–2013)
Status:
Died (Reported by Committee) in a previous session of Congress

This bill was introduced on May 25, 2011, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Introduced
May 13, 2011
Reported by Committee
May 25, 2011
 
Sponsor
Duncan Hunter
Representative for California's 52nd congressional district
Party
Republican
Text
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Last Updated
Jun 14, 2011
Length
14 pages
 
Full Title

To repeal ineffective or unnecessary education programs in order to restore the focus of Federal programs on quality elementary and secondary education programs for disadvantaged students.

Summary

No summaries available.

 
Cosponsors
9 cosponsors (9R) (show)
Committees

House Education and the Workforce

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

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Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


6/14/2011--Reported to House amended.
Setting New Priorities in Education Spending Act - Repeals specified provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965.
Lists the repealed provisions as those pertaining to:
the Early Reading First program, under subpart 2 of part B of title I; the William F. Goodling Even Start Family Literacy programs, under subpart 3 of part B of title I; improving literacy through school libraries, under subpart 4 of part B of title I; demonstration projects of innovative practices for enabling children to meet state academic content and achievement standards, under part E of title I; the Close Up Fellowship program, under part E of title I; comprehensive school reform, under part F of title I; school dropout prevention, under part H of title I; school leadership, under subpart 5 of part A of title II; advanced certification or advanced credentialing for teachers, under subpart 5 of part A of title II; special education teacher training, under subpart 5 of part A of title II; early childhood educator professional development, under subpart 5 of part A of title II; teacher mobility, under subpart 5 of part A of title II; the National Writing Project, under subpart 2 of part C of title II; the teaching of traditional American history, under subpart 4 of part C of title II; enhancing education through technology, under part D of title II; programs to improve language instruction for limited English proficient children, under part B of title III; state grants for safe and drug-free schools and communities, under subpart 1 of part A of title IV; grants to reduce alcohol abuse, under subpart 2 of part A of title IV; mentoring programs, under subpart 2 of part A of title IV; elementary and secondary school counseling programs, under subpart 2 of part D of title V; partnerships in character education, under subpart 3 of part D of title V; smaller learning communities, under subpart 4 of part D of title V; the Reading is Fundamental--Inexpensive Book Distribution program, under subpart 5 of part D of title V; gifted and talented students, under subpart 6 of part D of title V; the Star Schools program, under subpart 7 of part D of title V; the Ready to Teach program, under subpart 8 of part D of title V; the Foreign Language Assistance program, under subpart 9 of part D of title V; the Carol M. White Physical Education Program, under subpart 10 of part D of title V; community technology centers, under subpart 11 of part D of title V; educational, cultural, apprenticeship, and exchange programs for Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and their historical whaling and trading partners in Massachusetts, under subpart 12 of part D of title V; excellence in economic education, under subpart 13 of part D of title V; grants to improve the mental health of children, under subpart 14 of part D of title V; arts in education, under subpart 15 of part D of title V; combatting domestic violence, under subpart 17 of part D of title V; healthy, high-performance schools, under subpart 18 of part D of title V; additional assistance for certain local educational agencies impacted by federal property acquisition, under subpart 20 of part D of title V; the Women's Educational Equity Act, under subpart 21 of part D of title V; the Native Hawaiian Education program, under part B of title VII; and the Alaska Native Education program, under part C of title VII.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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