H.R. 265 (112th): New Columbia Admission Act

Introduced:
Jan 12, 2011 (112th Congress, 2011–2013)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee)
See Instead:

S. 3696 (same title)
Referred to Committee — Dec 19, 2012

Sponsor
Eleanor Norton
Delegate for District of Columbia At Large
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Jan 12, 2011
Length
29 pages
Related Bills
H.R. 51 (104th) was a previous version of this bill.

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Jan 04, 1995

H.R. 292 (113th) was a re-introduction of this bill in a later Congress.

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Jan 15, 2013

 
Status

This bill was introduced on January 12, 2011, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Progress
Introduced Jan 12, 2011
Referred to Committee Jan 12, 2011
 
Full Title

To provide for the admission of the State of New Columbia into the Union.

Summary

No summaries available.

Cosponsors
28 cosponsors (28D) (show)
Committees

House Oversight and Government Reform

Energy Policy, Health Care, and Entitlements

House Rules

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


1/12/2011--Introduced.
New Columbia Admission Act - Sets forth procedures for admission into the United States of the state of New Columbia. Requires the Mayor of the District of Columbia to:
(1) submit to the eligible voters propositions for statehood and adoption of a State Constitution, and
(2) issue a proclamation for the first elections to Congress of two Senators and one Representative of New Columbia. Requires the President, upon adoption of such propositions and certification of such elections, to issue a proclamation announcing the results and admitting New Columbia into the Union.
Provides for conversion of District government offices to state offices.
Provides that New Columbia shall consist of all territory of the District as of the enactment of this Act, excluding land within specified metes and bounds that shall remain the District of Columbia and that shall include the principal federal monuments, the White House, the Capitol Building, the Supreme Court Building, the federal executive, legislative, and judicial office buildings located adjacent to the Mall and the Capitol Building, and certain military property.
Prohibits New Columbia from imposing taxes on federal property except as provided by Congress.
Maintains the applicability to New Columbia of current District laws and continues pending judicial proceedings.
Maintains: (1) the District of Columbia as the seat of the federal government, and (2) the federal government's authority over military lands and specified other property.
Requires each state that is the last place an individual resided before residing in the District of Columbia to permit such individual to vote in federal elections by absentee ballot. Sets forth a rule for expedited consideration of a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution to repeal the 23d amendment (which provides for the appointment of electors for President and Vice President for the District).

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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