H.R. 3011 (112th): Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011

112th Congress, 2011–2013. Text as of Sep 22, 2011 (Introduced).

Status & Summary | PDF | Source: GPO

I

112th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 3011

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

September 22, 2011

(for himself, Mr. King of New York, Mr. Daniel E. Lungren of California, Mr. Walberg, Mr. Cravaack, and Mr. Brooks) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Homeland Security, and in addition to the Committee on the Judiciary, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned

A BILL

To authorize the programs of the Transportation Security Administration relating to the provision of transportation security, and for other purposes.

1.

Short title; table of contents

(a)

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011.

(b)

Table of contents

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.

Sec. 2. Definitions.

Title I—AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 101. Authorization of appropriations.

Title II—AVIATION SECURITY

Subtitle A—Reform

Part 1—Airport Screening

Sec. 201. Checkpoint screening of passengers.

Sec. 202. Trusted passenger credential.

Sec. 203. Security screening of individuals with metal implants, prosthetics, and physical disabilities traveling in air transportation.

Sec. 204. Security screenings of children.

Sec. 205. Requirements for baggage screening technology.

Sec. 206. Explosives detection canine teams for aviation security.

Sec. 207. Pilot program on security screening of passengers on commercial flights originating outside the United States.

Sec. 208. Standard operating procedures at airport checkpoints.

Sec. 209. Advanced passenger prescreening system.

Sec. 210. Screening in areas other than primary passenger terminals.

Sec. 211. Automated targeting recognition software.

Sec. 212. Disabling image retention.

Sec. 213. Screening strategy.

Part 2—Transportation Security Officer Training and Accountability

Sec. 221. Prohibition of advance notice of covert testing to security screeners.

Sec. 222. Transportation security training programs.

Sec. 223. Hiring preference for part-time employees.

Sec. 224. Removal of Administration officers due to performance.

Sec. 225. Administration ombudsman office.

Part 3—Air Cargo Security

Sec. 241. Air cargo advanced screening pilot program.

Sec. 242. Status of efforts to promote air cargo shipper certification.

Sec. 243. Explosive detection canine teams for air cargo security.

Part 4—Information Sharing and Security Directives

Sec. 261. TSA and homeland security information sharing.

Sec. 262. Issuance of regulations and security directives using emergency procedures.

Subtitle B—Other Matters

Sec. 281. Efficiency review by Assistant Secretary.

Sec. 282. Aviation security stakeholder participation.

Sec. 283. Detailed aviation security technology plans for airports.

Sec. 284. Federal air marshals.

Sec. 285. Canine detection research and development.

Sec. 286. Vendor enhancements.

Sec. 287. Security risk assessment of airport perimeter access controls.

Sec. 288. Electromagnetic emissions from passenger screening equipment deployed in airports.

Sec. 289. Electromagnetic emissions exposure assessment.

Sec. 290. Reimbursement for airports that have incurred eligible costs.

Sec. 291. Review of airport security plans.

Sec. 292. Security procedures during temporary flight restrictions.

Sec. 293. Security training and assistance to foreign airports.

Sec. 294. Federal air marshal risk assessments.

Sec. 295. Protection of the names Federal Air Marshal and Administration.

Sec. 296. Allowable costs on airport security improvement projects.

Sec. 297. Report on diversity efforts.

Sec. 298. Report to Congress on time and attendance programs for transportation security officers.

Title III—SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

Subtitle A—Streamlining Threat Assessments for Credentials

Sec. 301. Definitions.

Sec. 302. Task force.

Sec. 303. Limitations on rulemaking.

Sec. 304. Surface transportation credentialing.

Sec. 305. Transportation worker identification credential enrollment centers.

Sec. 306. Limitation on issuance of HAZMAT licenses.

Sec. 307. Deadlines and effective dates.

Sec. 308. Streamlining credentials for secure area access at airports.

Sec. 309. Jobs impact.

Subtitle B—Security Assistance and Enhancements

Sec. 321. Visible intermodal prevention and response teams.

Sec. 322. Transit security grants.

Sec. 323. Freight rail security demonstration project.

Sec. 324. Explosives detection canine teams for surface transportation.

Sec. 325. Pipeline security study.

Sec. 326. Repeal of limitation relating to motor carrier security-sensitive material tracking technology.

Subtitle C—Information Sharing

Sec. 341. Surface Transportation Security stakeholder participation.

Sec. 342. Plan to improve information sharing.

Sec. 343. Best practices sharing.

2.

Definitions

In this Act:

(1)

The term Department means the Department of Homeland Security.

(2)

The term Secretary means the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(3)

The term Assistant Secretary means the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration).

(4)

The term Administration means the Transportation Security Administration.

(5)

The term Aviation Security Advisory Committee means the advisory committee established by section 44946 of title 49, United States Code, as added by this Act.

(6)

The term trusted passenger means any passenger eligible for expedited screening through a checkpoint, as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

I

AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

101.

Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary $7,822,743,000 for fiscal year 2012 and $7,588,743,000 for fiscal year 2013 for the necessary expenses of the Administration for such fiscal years.

II

AVIATION SECURITY

A

Reform

1

Airport Screening

201.

Checkpoint screening of passengers

(a)

Trusted passenger screening program

(1)

In general

Section 44901 of title 49, United States Code is amended—

(A)

by redesignating subsections (a) through (k) as subsections (b) through (l), respectively; and

(B)

by inserting before subsection (b), as so redesignated, the following new subsection (a):

(a)

Checkpoint screening of passengers

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall carry out a risk-based program at airport checkpoints that provides expedited screening for trusted passengers based on a comprehensive analysis of factors which may include but not be limited to:

(A)

Low-risk population determinations.

(B)

Security threat assessments and background checks.

(C)

Travel frequency analysis, travel pattern analysis.

(2)

Brief assessment interview

As part of the program required by paragraph (1), a brief assessment interview of passengers not eligible for expedited screening may be conducted by a transportation security officer who has received appropriate training to conduct such interviews.

(3)

Inspector General reviews

The Inspector General of the Department shall review the program required by paragraph (1) on a quarterly basis and submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and other appropriate committees of Congress reports on the results of such reviews.

(4)

Consideration of other programs

In developing the trusted passenger program required by paragraph (1), the Assistant Secretary shall review and consider all trusted passenger programs established pursuant to section 109(a)(3) of the Aviation Transportation Security Act (Public Law 107–71; 115 Stat. 613; 49 U.S.C. 114 note), including the Registered Traveler program and any other Department of Homeland Security pilot or operational trusted passenger programs.

(5)

Other trusted passenger programs

In addition to the program established under paragraph (1), the Assistant Secretary may elect to designate trusted passenger status to passengers who are members of other governmental or non-governmental trusted passenger programs, as long as such passengers meet the standards and requirements set by the Assistant Secretary.

(6)

Suspension

The Assistant Secretary shall have the authority to suspend expedited screening for trusted passengers as security conditions may warrant.

(7)

Trusted passenger defined

In this subsection, the term trusted passenger means any passenger eligible for expedited screening through a checkpoint, as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

.

(2)

Implementation

The Assistant Secretary shall establish the program required by subsection (c) of section 44901 of title 49, United States Code, as added by paragraph (1), by not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

(3)

Report to Congress

Not later than 180 days after first implementing the program required by subsection (c) of section 44901 of title 49, United States Code, as added by paragraph (1), the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on the status and efficacy of the program.

(b)

Security screening for members of the Armed Forces

(1)

In general

Section 44901 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by subsection (a), is further amended—

(A)

by redesignating subsections (d) through (l), as redesignated by subsection (a), as subsections (e) through (m), respectively;

(B)

by inserting after subsection (c) the following new subsection (d):

(d)

Security screening for members of the Armed Forces

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall develop and implement a plan to provide expedited security screening services for a member of the Armed Forces, and any accompanying family member, when the member of the Armed Forces presents documentation indicating official orders while in uniform through a primary airport (as defined by section 47102 of this title).

(2)

Protocols

In developing the plan, the Assistant Secretary shall consider—

(A)

leveraging existing security screening models used by airports and air carriers to reduce passenger wait times before entering a security screening checkpoint;

(B)

establishing standard guidelines for the screening of military uniform items, including combat boots; and

(C)

incorporating any new screening protocols into an existing trusted passenger program, as established pursuant to section 109(a)(3) of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (Public Law 107–71; 115 Stat. 613; 49 U.S.C. 114 note) or subsection (c), or into the development of any new credential or system that incorporates biometric technology and other applicable technologies to verify the identity of individuals traveling in air transportation.

(3)

Report to Congress

The Assistant Secretary shall submit to the appropriate committees of Congress a report on the implementation of the plan.

;

(C)

in subsection (g), as so redesignated, by striking subsection (b)(1)(A) and inserting subsection (c)(1)(A); and

(D)

in subsection (j)(2), as so redesignated, by striking subsection (c) and inserting subsection (e).

(2)

Effective date

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall establish the plan required by the amendments made by paragraph (1).

202.

Trusted passenger credential

Section 44903(h) of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

by redesignating paragraph (7) as paragraph (8); and

(2)

by inserting after paragraph (6) the following:

(7)

Trusted passenger credential

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall—

(A)

work with industry to establish standards for a voluntary trusted passenger credential that incorporates biometric identifier technology;

(B)

establish a process by which the credential will be used to verify the identity of trusted passengers and allow them expedited passenger and carry-on baggage screening;

(C)

establish procedures—

(i)

to ensure that only trusted passengers are issued the trusted passenger credential;

(ii)

to resolve failures to enroll, false matches, and false nonmatches relating to use of the trusted passenger credential; and

(iii)

to invalidate any trusted passenger credential that is lost, stolen, or no longer authorized for use;

(D)

establish standards for the issuance of the trusted passenger credential to each trusted passenger that applies for a credential;

(E)

establish eligibility procedures for the trusted passenger credential;

(F)

take such other actions with respect to the trusted passenger credential as the Assistant Secretary considers appropriate; and

(G)

ensure that the credential is not required for expedited screening under section 44901(a) of this title.

.

203.

Security screening of individuals with metal implants, prosthetics, and physical disabilities traveling in air transportation

Section 44901 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by section 201, is further amended—

(1)

by redesignating subsections (e) through (m), as redesignated by section 201, as subsections (f) through (n), respectively; and

(2)

by inserting after subsection (d), as inserted by section 201, the following new subsection (e):

(e)

Security screening of individuals with metal implants, prosthetics, physical disabilities, and special medical needs traveling in air transportation

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall carry out a program to ensure appropriate treatment in the screening of individuals with metal implants, prosthetics, and physical disabilities traveling in air transportation.

(2)

Plan

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary shall submit a plan to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives for improving security screening procedures for individuals with metal implants, prosthetics, and physical disabilities to limit disruptions in the screening process while maintaining security. The plan shall include an analysis of approaches to limit such disruptions for individuals with metal implants, and benchmarks for implementing changes to the screening process.

(3)

Program

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary shall implement a program to improve security screening procedures for individuals with metal implants, prosthetics, or physical disabilities to limit disruptions in the screening process while maintaining security.

(4)

Metal implant defined

In this paragraph, the term metal implant means a metal device or object that has been surgically implanted or otherwise placed in the body of an individual, including any metal device used in a hip or knee replacement, metal plate, metal screw, metal rod inside a bone, and other metal orthopedic implants.

.

204.

Security screenings of children

Section 44901 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by sections 201 and 202, is further amended—

(1)

by redesignating subsections (f) through (n), as redesignated by section 202, as subsections (g) through (o), respectively; and

(2)

by inserting after subsection (e), as inserted by section 202, the following new subsection (f):

(f)

Security screening of children

(1)

In general

A child shall not be subject to pat-down screening before boarding a passenger aircraft, unless a screening anomaly cannot be reasonably resolved by checkpoint technology. If a screening anomaly cannot be resolved by checkpoint technology, the anomaly may be resolved by the child’s parent or guardian as directed by a transportation security officer or by a transportation security officer with the expressed consent of the child’s parent or guardian. Such a pat-down may be conducted in a private setting at the request of the parent or guardian. Any such pat-down conducted in a private setting of a child who is 16 years of age or younger must be conducted in the presence of the child’s parent or guardian.

(2)

Random screening

Children shall not be subject to random pat-down screenings, unless the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) determines that threat conditions warrant such screenings.

.

205.

Requirements for baggage screening technology

(a)

Implementation of requirements for checked baggage

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall develop and implement plans to—

(1)

acquire needed data for implementation of the Administration’s 2010 explosives detection system requirements; and

(2)

deploy explosives detection systems that meet those requirements, whether through new acquisitions or through upgrading existing systems.

(b)

Establishment of new requirements

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall establish and publish detailed technical requirements for screening technologies for all carry-on baggage and cargo destined for commercial aircraft.

(c)

Coordination

The Assistant Secretary may coordinate with the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Science and Technology to ensure that the requirements provided for under subsection (b) and any related research and development requirements published by the Under Secretary are aligned to the greatest extent possible.

(d)

Communication with industry

The Assistant Secretary shall establish a process to communicate with industry in an open and timely manner regarding acquisition of baggage screening technology and the requirements for such technology.

(e)

In-Line baggage screening study

The Assistant Secretary shall consult with the Aviation Security Advisory Committee and submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on the Administration’s plans, estimated costs, and current benchmarks for replacing explosive detection equipment that is nearing the end of its life cycle or needs to be upgraded to meet current standards.

206.

Explosives detection canine teams for aviation security

(a)

Passenger screening teams

The Assistant Secretary shall ensure that by the end of 2013 at least 100 explosives detection canine teams are used for passenger screening purposes at large airports in the United States at which the Administration has passenger screening responsibilities.

(b)

Prohibition of use of existing teams

The Assistant Secretary shall ensure that explosives detection canine teams used for transportation security activities before the date of enactment of this Act are not used to meet the requirement under subsection (a).

(c)

Use of canines To resolve screening anomalies

Where canine teams trained to screen passengers are available in airports in the United States at which the Administration has passenger screening responsibilities, the Assistant Secretary may use such teams to resolve screening anomalies.

(d)

Authorization of appropriations

Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under section 101, there is authorized to be appropriated $25,000,000 to carry out this section.

207.

Pilot program on security screening of passengers on commercial flights originating outside the United States

Not later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary, working in cooperation with the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection, shall develop and carry out a pilot program at a large airport to test the feasibility of streamlining and eliminating duplicative aviation security screening of baggage and passengers arriving in the United States from certain last point of departure airports selected by the Assistant Secretary who continue on domestic United States flights to a final destination.

208.

Standard operating procedures at airport checkpoints

(a)

Standardization

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall require, to the extent practicable, that standard operating procedures at airport checkpoints for passengers and carry-on baggage are standardized and carried out in a uniform manner among similarly situated airports.

(b)

Report to Congress

Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on how standard operating procedures were standardized and made uniform in accordance with subsection (a).

(c)

Audits

Beginning one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Inspector General of the Department shall conduct periodic audits of adherence to the standard operating procedures, as established by the Assistant Secretary, by screening personnel at large, medium, and small airports in diverse geographical areas.

209.

Advanced passenger prescreening system

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report that—

(1)

describes the progress made by the Department in implementing the advanced passenger prescreening system; and

(2)

identifies the total number of misidentified passengers who must undergo secondary screening or have been prevented from boarding a plane during the preceding year.

210.

Screening in areas other than primary passenger terminals

The Administration is authorized to provide screening services to commercial air carriers in areas other than primary passenger terminals upon the request of a commercial air carrier. A commercial air carrier shall direct any such request to the Federal Security Director for the airport where services are needed. A Federal Security Director may elect to provide screening services should they be available. The Administration shall seek compensation from a commercial air carrier requesting the use of screening services for all reasonable costs in addition to overtime costs that are incurred in the provision of screening services under this section.

211.

Automated targeting recognition software

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall certify to Congress that automated targeting recognition software is installed on all advanced imaging technology machines that are currently deployed in commercial airports for passenger screening and for any and all subsequent deployments of advanced imaging technology machines.

212.

Disabling image retention

Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall certify to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Commiittee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate that, in order to improve airport security screening processes while ensuring passenger privacy protection, the image retention capabilities of all advanced imaging technology utilized by the Administration to screen passengers at checkpoints in the Nation’s airports have been disabled.

213.

Screening strategy

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to appropriate congressional committees, including the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives, a risk-based strategy with benchmarks for modifying standard operating procedures at the checkpoint for trusted passengers to enter the secure area without removing their shoes.

2

Transportation Security Officer Training and Accountability

221.

Prohibition of advance notice of covert testing to security screeners

Section 44935 of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

by redesignating the second subsection (i) (as redesignated by section 111(a)(1) of the Aviation and Transportation Security Act (Public Law 107–71; 115 Stat. 616), relating to accessibility of computer-based training facilities) as subsection (k); and

(2)

by adding at the end the following new subsection:

(l)

Prohibition of advance notice to security screeners of covert testing and evaluation

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall ensure that information concerning a covert test of a transportation security system to be conducted by a covert testing office, the Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security, or the Government Accountability Office is not provided to any individual prior to the completion of the test.

(2)

Exceptions

Notwithstanding paragraph (1)—

(A)

an authorized individual involved in a covert test of a transportation security system may provide information concerning the covert test to—

(i)

employees, officers, and contractors of the Federal Government (including military personnel);

(ii)

employees and officers of State and local governments; and

(iii)

law enforcement officials who are authorized to receive or directed to be provided such information by the Assistant Secretary, the Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security, or the Comptroller General of the United States, as the case may be; and

(B)

for the purpose of ensuring the security of any individual in the vicinity of a site where a covert test of a transportation security system is being conducted, an individual conducting the test may disclose his or her status as an individual conducting the test to any appropriate individual if a security screener or other individual who is not a covered employee identifies the individual conducting the test as a potential threat.

(3)

Special rules for TSA

(A)

Monitoring and security of testing personnel

The head of each covert testing office shall ensure that a person or group of persons conducting a covert test of a transportation security system for the covert testing office is accompanied at the site of the test by a cover team composed of one or more employees of the covert testing office for the purpose of monitoring the test and confirming the identity of personnel involved in the test under subparagraph (B).

(B)

Responsibility of cover team

Under this paragraph, a cover team for a covert test of a transportation security system shall—

(i)

monitor the test; and

(ii)

for the purpose of ensuring the security of any individual in the vicinity of a site where the test is being conducted, confirm, notwithstanding paragraph (1), the identity of any individual conducting the test to any appropriate individual if a security screener or other individual who is not a covered employee identifies the individual conducting the test as a potential threat.

(C)

Aviation screening

Notwithstanding subparagraph (A), the Transportation Security Administration is not required to have a cover team present during a test of the screening of persons, carry-on items, or checked baggage at an aviation security checkpoint at or serving an airport if the test—

(i)

is approved, in coordination with the designated security official for the airport operator by the Federal Security Director for such airport; and

(ii)

is carried out under an aviation screening assessment program of the Department of Homeland Security.

(D)

Use of Other Personnel

The Transportation Security Administration may use employees, officers, and contractors of the Federal Government (including military personnel) and employees and officers of State and local governments to conduct covert tests.

(4)

Definitions

In this subsection, the following definitions apply:

(A)

Appropriate individual

The term appropriate individual, as used with respect to a covert test of a transportation security system, means any individual that—

(i)

the individual conducting the test determines needs to know his or her status as an individual conducting a test under paragraph (2)(B); or

(ii)

the cover team monitoring the test under paragraph (3)(B)(i) determines needs to know the identity of an individual conducting the test.

(B)

Covered employee

The term covered employee means any individual who receives notice of a covert test before the completion of a test under paragraph (2)(A).

(C)

Covert test

(i)

In general

The term covert test means an exercise or activity conducted by a covert testing office, the Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security, or the Government Accountability Office to intentionally test, compromise, or circumvent transportation security systems to identify vulnerabilities in such systems.

(ii)

Limitation

Notwithstanding clause (i), the term covert test does not mean an exercise or activity by an employee or contractor of the Transportation Security Administration to test or assess compliance with relevant regulations.

(D)

Covert testing office

The term covert testing office means any office of the Transportation Security Administration designated by the Assistant Secretary to conduct covert tests of transportation security systems.

(E)

Employee of a covert testing office

The term employee of a covert testing office means an individual who is an employee of a covert testing office or a contractor or an employee of a contractor of a covert testing office.

.

222.

Transportation security training programs

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall establish recurring training of transportation security officers regarding updates to screening procedures and technologies, including methods to identify the verification of false or fraudulent travel documents, in response to weaknesses identified in covert tests at airports. The training shall include—

(1)

internal controls for monitoring and documenting compliance of transportation security officers with training requirements; and

(2)

such other matters as identified by the Assistant Secretary with regard to training.

223.

Hiring preference for part-time employees

The Assistant Secretary shall provide a preference for the hiring of an individual as a full-time transportation security officer if the individual is already employed as a part-time transportation security officer, as long as the individual meets the performance standards of such employment.

224.

Removal of Administration officers due to performance

Section 44935(f) of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

by redesignating paragraphs (5) and (6) as paragraphs (6) and (7), respectively; and

(2)

by inserting after paragraph (4) the following new paragraph (5):

(5)

Removal for performance

(A)

In general

If an individual employed as a transportation security officer fails any scheduled or covert operational test, including an annual proficiency review, more than three times during a testing period and if such results are documented, the individual shall be removed from screening operations within 24 hours.

(B)

Immediate removal for negligence

The following individuals shall be immediately removed from screening operations:

(i)

An individual employed as a transportation security officer who negligently fails to detect a live explosive with the potential to do serious harm to human life or property.

(ii)

An individual employed as a transportation security officer responsible for the verification of travel documents who negligently fails to verify such travel documents.

(C)

Removal and review

Any transportation security officer removed pursuant to subparagraph (A) or (B) shall suspended with pay pending an immediate investigation and review by the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration), who shall have the discretion to reinstate or terminate any individual removed under this paragraph.

.

225.

Administration ombudsman office

(a)

In general

Subchapter II of chapter 449 of title 49, United States Code is amended by adding at the end the following new section:

44946.

Ombudsman

(a)

In general

(1)

Establishment

There is established an Office of the Ombudsman in the Transportation Security Administration.

(2)

Ombudsman

(A)

In general

The Office shall be under the direction of the Ombudsman of the Transportation Security Administration, who shall be appointed by the Chief Human Capital Officer of the Department of Homeland Security on behalf of the Secretary of Homeland Security.

(B)

Qualifications

An individual appointed as the Ombudsman must have expertise in—

(i)

labor and employment relations with Federal agencies; and

(ii)

dispute resolution.

(C)

Notification of Appointment and removal

The Chief Human Capital Officer of the Department of Homeland Security shall notify the appropriate congressional committees within 30 days after the effective date of any of the following actions:

(i)

The appointment of an individual as Ombudsman.

(ii)

The reappointment as Ombudsman of an individual who is serving as Ombudsman.

(iii)

The removal of an individual from the position of Ombudsman.

(3)

Ensuring independence of Ombudsman

(A)

In general

The Ombudsman shall report—

(i)

to the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration; and

(ii)

to the Chief Human Capital Officer of the Department of Homeland Security with respect to any dispute between the Ombudsman and the Administrator of Transportation Security Administration over matters involving the execution of the Ombudsman’s duties as set forth in subsection (b).

(B)

Inspector general’s authority to conduct investigations not affected

Nothing in this section shall prohibit the Inspector General of the Department of Homeland Security from initiating, carrying out, or completing any investigation.

(b)

Duties

The Ombudsman shall—

(1)

conduct outreach to Transportation Security Administration employees, including publicizing a toll-free telephone number to report complaints;

(2)

evaluate each complainant’s claim objectively;

(3)

provide information, advice, and assistance to complainants and, as appropriate, initiate informal, impartial fact-finding and inquiries, on complaints or on the Ombudsman’s own initiative;

(4)

inform each complainant—

(A)

when the Ombudsman decides against conducting a fact-finding inquiry into the complaint;

(B)

on the status of the Ombudsman’s fact-finding inquiry to the complainant, on a regular basis if requested by the complainant; and

(C)

of the Ombudsman’s recommendations and information, as appropriate, for the complainant to formally complain to the appropriate authority;

(5)

work with the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration to address issues identified through fact-finding and inquiries;

(6)

maintain confidential any matter related to complaints and inquiries, including the identities of the complainants and witnesses; and

(7)

submit an annual report to the appropriate congressional committees in accordance with subsection (c).

(c)

Annual report

(1)

In general

The Ombudsman shall report no later than September 30 each year to the appropriate congressional committees on the actions taken by the Office of the Ombudsman over the preceding year and the objectives of those actions.

(2)

Contents

Each such report shall, for the period covered by the report, include—

(A)

statistical information, by region, on the volume of complaints received, general nature of complaints, general information on complainants, and the percentage of complaints that resulted in a fact-finding inquiry;

(B)

a summary of problems encountered by complainants, including information on the most pervasive or serious types of problems encountered by complainants;

(C)

policy recommendations that the Office of the Ombudsman made to the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration;

(D)

an inventory of the items described in subparagraphs (B) and (C) for which action has been taken, and the result of such action;

(E)

an inventory of the items described in subparagraphs (B) and (C) for which action remains to be completed; and

(F)

such other information as the Ombudsman considers relevant.

(3)

Report to be submitted directly

Each report under this subsection shall be provided directly to the committees described in paragraph (1) without any prior comment or amendment by the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration. However, the Ombudsman shall seek comment from the Administrator to be submitted by the Ombudsman together with the annual report.

(4)

Other reports

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to preclude the Ombudsman from issuing other reports on the activities of the Office of the Ombudsman.

(d)

Appropriate congressional committee defined

In this section the term appropriate congressional committee means the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and any committee of the House of Representatives or the Senate having legislative jurisdiction under the rules of the House of Representatives or Senate, respectively, over the matter concerned.

.

(b)

Clerical amendment

The analysis at the beginning of such chapter is amended by adding at the end the items relating to subchapter II the following new item:

44946. Ombudsman.

.

(c)

Authorization of Appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2012, 2013, and 2014 $575,000 for implementing section 44946 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by this section.

3

Air Cargo Security

241.

Air cargo advanced screening pilot program

(a)

Program authorized

The Secretary is authorized to establish and implement a voluntary air cargo advanced screening pilot program (hereinafter in this section referred to as the ACAS Program) to include the electronic transmission to the Department of data elements for targeting high-risk cargo, including appropriate security elements of shipment level data, as determined by the Secretary, to be provided as advanced information with respect to cargo on aircraft inbound to the United States no later than loading of such cargo onto aircraft at the last point of departure before entering the United States. Advance information shall be provided on a best available basis and shall not be subject to penalties related to data timeliness or accuracy. The goals of the pilot include—

(1)

establishing appropriate communications systems with freight forwarders and air carriers; and

(2)

encouraging freight forwarders and air carriers to provide shipment level data for air cargo, departing from any location that is inbound to the United States.

(b)

Inspection of high-Risk cargo

Under the ACAS Program, the Secretary shall ensure that all cargo that has been identified as high-risk under paragraph (1), or through other means, is inspected prior to loading of such cargo onto aircraft at the last point of departure before entering the United States.

(c)

Consultations

In carrying out the ACAS Program, the Secretary shall consult with the trade community to ensure that an operationally feasible and practical approach to the collection of advanced air cargo information and inspection of high-risk cargo is adopted that recognizes the significant differences among air cargo business models and modes of transportation.

(d)

Analysis

The Secretary may analyze the information referred to in paragraph (1) in the Department’s automated targeting system and integrate the information with other intelligence to enhance the accuracy of the risk assessment process for each shipment.

(e)

No duplication

This section shall be carried out in a manner that does not duplicate other programs or requirements relating to the submission of air cargo data.

(f)

Consideration of industry

In carrying out the ACAS Program, the Secretary shall—

(1)

take into consideration that the content and timeliness of the available data may vary among entities in the air cargo industry and among countries and shall explore procedures to accommodate the variations while maximizing the contribution of the data to the risk targeting process;

(2)

test the business processes, technology, and operational procedures required to provide advance air cargo data, while ensuring delays and other negative impacts on vital supply chains are minimized; and

(3)

consider the cost, benefit, and feasibility before establishing any set time period for submission of certain elements of the shipment data for aircraft and air cargo in line with the regulatory guidelines set forth in Executive Order 13563, and any successor Executive Order or regulation.

(g)

Guidance

The Secretary shall provide guidance for participants in the ACAS Program regarding the requirements for participation, including requirements for transmitting shipment level data.

(h)

Use of data

The Secretary shall use the data provided under the ACAS Program for targeting shipments for screening and law enforcement purposes only.

(i)

Report

Not later than 180 days after the date of the commencement of the ACAS Program, the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report detailing the lessons learned regarding the operational feasibility of providing the advance information and the value of that information in targeting high-risk cargo.

242.

Status of efforts to promote air cargo shipper certification

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on the status of the implementation of the Administration’s program to certify the screening methods used by shippers in a timely manner, in accordance with section 44901(g) of title 49, United States Code, including participation by shippers with robust and mature internal security programs.

243.

Explosive detection canine teams for air cargo security

(a)

In general

In order to enhance the screening of air cargo and to ensure that third-party explosives detection canine assets are leveraged for this purpose, the Assistant Secretary shall, within 180 days of the date of the enactment of this Act, develop a process to certify third-party explosive detection canines for the screening of air cargo that can be used by air carriers, foreign air carriers, freight forwarders, and shippers and that meet the certification standards of the Administration, as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

(b)

Implementation

Upon completion of the development of the process under subsection (a), the Assistant Secretary shall begin testing third-party explosives detection canine assets and shall facilitate the use of deployment of those teams that meet the certification standards of the Administration, as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

(c)

Definition

For purposes of this section, the term third-party explosives detection canine assets means any explosives detection canine or handler that is not owned or employed by the Administration.

4

Information Sharing and Security Directives

261.

TSA and homeland security information sharing

(a)

Federal security director

Section 44933 of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

in the section heading, by striking Managers and inserting Directors;

(2)

by striking Manager each place it appears and inserting Director;

(3)

by striking Managers each place it appears and inserting Directors; and

(4)

by adding at the end the following:

(c)

Information sharing

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary shall—

(1)

encourage airports to develop clear reporting procedures to provide that the Federal Security Director of the airport is immediately notified whenever any Federal, State, or local law enforcement personnel are called to an aircraft at a gate or on an airfield at the airport to respond to any security matter;

(2)

require each Federal Security Director of an airport to meet at least quarterly with law enforcement agencies serving the airport to discuss incident management protocols, including the resolution of screening anomalies at passenger screening checkpoints; and

(3)

require each Federal Security Director at an airport to inform, consult, and coordinate, as appropriate, with the airport operator in a timely manner on security matters impacting airport operations and to establish and maintain operational protocols with airport operators to ensure coordinated responses to security matters.

.

(b)

Conforming amendments

(1)

Section 114(f)(6) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking Managers and inserting Directors.

(2)

Section 44940(a)(1)(F) of title 49, United States Code, is amended by striking Managers and inserting Directors.

(c)

Technical amendment

The chapter analysis for chapter 449 is amended by striking the item relating to section 44933 and inserting the following:

44933. Federal Security Directors.

.

262.

Issuance of regulations and security directives using emergency procedures

(a)

In general

Section 114(l) of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

in paragraph (2)—

(A)

in subparagraph (A) by striking immediately in order to protect transportation security and inserting in order to respond to an imminent threat of finite duration; and

(B)

in subparagraph (B) by inserting to determine if the regulation or security directive is needed to respond to an imminent threat of finite duration before the period at the end of the first sentence;

(2)

by striking paragraph (3) and inserting the following:

(3)

Factors to consider

(A)

In general

In determining whether to issue, rescind, or revise a regulation or security directive under this subsection, the Assistant Secretary shall consider, as factors in the final determination—

(i)

whether the costs of the regulation or security directive are excessive in relation to the enhancement of security the regulation or security directive will provide;

(ii)

whether the regulation or security directive will remain effective for longer than a 90-day period; and

(iii)

whether the regulation or security directive will require revision if in effect for a subsequent 90-day period.

(B)

Authority to waive certain requirements

For purposes of subparagraph (A)(i), the Assistant Secretary may waive any requirement for an analysis that estimates the number of lives that will be saved by the regulation or security directive or the cost basis for carrying out the regulation or security directive if the Assistant Secretary determines that it is not feasible to make such an estimate.

; and

(3)

by adding at the end the following:

(5)

Rulemaking required

Any regulation or security directive issued under paragraph (2) that remains effective, with or without revision, for a period of more than 180 days shall be subject to a rulemaking pursuant to subchapter II of chapter 5 of title 5.

.

(b)

Applicability

The amendment made by subsection (a)(3) shall apply to a regulation issued under section 114(l)(2) of title 49, United States Code, before, on, or after the date of the enactment of this Act.

B

Other Matters

281.

Efficiency review by Assistant Secretary

(a)

Review required

Not later than 270 days after the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall conduct and complete a comprehensive, agency-wide efficiency review of the Administration to identify and effectuate spending reductions and administrative savings through the streamlining and any necessary restructuring of agency divisions to make the agency more efficient. In carrying out the review under this section, the Assistant Secretary shall consider each of the following:

(1)

The elimination of any duplicative or overlapping programs and initiatives that can be streamlined.

(2)

The elimination of any unnecessary or obsolete rules, regulations, directives, or procedures.

(3)

The reduction of the workforce over a set period of time through natural attrition, as a direct result of efficiencies gained through the implementation of risk-based screening or through any other means as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

(4)

Any other matters the Assistant Secretary determines are appropriate.

(b)

Workforce reduction plan

Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, acting through the Assistant Secretary, shall develop a strategic plan, including a timeline, to reduce the workforce of the Administration by 5 percent by the end of fiscal year 2013, to the extent that such a reduction does not impact security operations.

(c)

Report to Congress

Not later than 30 days after the completion of the efficiency review required under subsection (a) and the strategic plan required under subsection (b), the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report setting forth—

(1)

the results and cost savings expected to be achieved through the efficiency review; and

(2)

a copy of the strategic plan.

282.

Aviation security stakeholder participation

(a)

In general

Subchapter II of chapter 449 of title 49, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

44946.

Aviation Security Advisory Committee

(a)

Establishment of Aviation Security Advisory Committee

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall establish in the Transportation Security Administration an advisory committee, to be known as the Aviation Security Advisory Committee (in this chapter referred to as the Advisory Committee), to assist the Assistant Secretary with issues pertaining to aviation security, including credentialing.

(2)

Recommendations

The Assistant Secretary shall require the Advisory Committee to develop recommendations for improvements to civil aviation security methods, equipment, and processes.

(3)

Meetings

The Assistant Secretary shall require the Advisory Committee to meet at least semiannually and may convene additional meetings as necessary.

(4)

Unpaid position

Advisory Committee members shall serve at their own expense and receive no salary, reimbursement of travel expenses, or other compensation from the Federal Government.

(b)

Membership

(1)

Member organizations

The Assistant Secretary shall ensure that the Advisory Committee is composed of not more than one individual representing not more than 27 member organizations, including representation of air carriers, all cargo air transportation, indirect air carriers, labor organizations representing air carrier employees, aircraft manufacturers, airport operators, general aviation, and the aviation technology security industry, including biometrics.

(2)

Appointments

Members shall be appointed by the Assistant Secretary, and the Assistant Secretary shall have the discretion to review the participation of any Advisory Committee member and remove for cause at any time.

(c)

Nonapplicability of FACA

The Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the Advisory Committee under this section.

(d)

Air cargo security working group

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall establish within the Advisory Committee an air cargo security working group to provide recommendations for air cargo security issues, including the implementation of the air cargo screening initiatives proposed by the Transportation Security Administration to screen air cargo on passenger aircraft in accordance with established cargo screening mandates.

(2)

Meetings

The working group shall meet at least semiannually and provide annual reports to the Assistant Secretary with recommendations to improve the Administration’s cargo screening initiatives established to meet all cargo screening mandates set forth in section 44901(g) of title 49, United States Code.

(3)

Membership

The working group shall include members from the Advisory Committee with expertise in air cargo operations and representatives from other stakeholders as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

(4)

Reports

(A)

In general

The working group shall prepare and submit reports to the Assistant Secretary in accordance with this paragraph that provide cargo screening mandate implementation recommendations.

(B)

Submission

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this section and on an annual basis thereafter, the working group shall submit its first report to the Assistant Secretary, including any recommendations of the group—

(i)

to reduce redundancies and increase efficiencies with the screening and inspection of inbound cargo; and

(ii)

on the potential development of a fee structure to help sustain cargo screening efforts.

(e)

General aviation working group

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall establish within the Advisory Committee a general aviation working group to provide recommendations for general aviation issues, including the implementation of the general aviation initiatives proposed by the Transportation Security Administration.

(2)

Meetings

The working group shall meet at least semiannually and provide annual reports to the Assistant Secretary with recommendations to improve the Administration’s general aviation initiatives.

(3)

Membership

The working group shall include members from the Advisory Committee with expertise in general aviation operations and representatives from other stakeholders as determined by the Assistant Secretary.

(4)

Reports

(A)

In general

The working group shall prepare and submit reports to the Assistant Secretary in accordance with this paragraph that provide recommendations.

(B)

Submission

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this section and on an annual basis thereafter, the working group shall submit its first report to the Assistant Secretary, including any recommendations of the group.

.

(b)

Clerical amendment

The analysis for such subchapter is amended by adding at the end the following:

44946. Aviation Security Advisory Committee.

.

283.

Detailed aviation security technology plans for airports

(a)

Plans required

The Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate detailed acquisition and deployment plans for checkpoint security technology, explosive detection systems, and air cargo security technology for each large commercial airport for fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

(b)

Ten-Year strategic plan

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a ten-year strategic plan for the refurbishment, replacement, and installation costs associated with explosives detection technology for checked baggage.

284.

Federal air marshals

Section 44917 of title 49, United States Code, as amended by sections 201 and 283 of this Act, is further amended by adding at the end the following:

(g)

Criminal investigative training program

(1)

New employee training

Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the Federal Air Marshal Service shall establish a policy requiring Federal air marshals hired after such date to complete the criminal investigative training program at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center as part of basic training for Federal air marshals.

(2)

Existing employees

A Federal air marshal who has previously completed the criminal investigative training program may not be required to repeat such program.

(3)

Alternative training

Not later than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this subsection, an air marshal hired before such date who has not completed the criminal investigative training program shall be required to attend an alternative training program, as determined by the Director of the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, that provides the training necessary to bridge the gap between the mixed basic police training, the Federal air marshal programs already completed by the Federal air marshal, and the criminal investigative training provided through the criminal investigative training program. Any such alternative program shall be considered to have met the standards of the criminal investigative training program.

(4)

Authorization of Appropriations

Of the amount authorized to be appropriated for the Transportation Security Administration, $3,000,000 may be used to carry out this subsection for each of fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

(5)

Savings clause

Nothing in this subsection shall be construed to reclassify Federal air marshals as criminal investigators.

.

285.

Canine detection research and development

(a)

In general

Consistent with the mission of the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Science and Technology to conduct basic and applied research in support of activities relevant to any elements of the Department under section 302 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 182), the Assistant Secretary, in coordination with the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Science and Technology, shall develop and implement a basic research and applied research and development program for the purpose of advancing the scientific understanding and applicability of canine explosives detection assets in the transportation environment.

(b)

Authorization of appropriations

Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated under section 101, there is authorized to be appropriated for each of fiscal years 2012 and 2013 $1,000,000 to carry out this section.

286.

Vendor enhancements

The Assistant Secretary shall permit airport operators to use vendor services that provide security enhancements in the sterile side of an airport as long as the provider of such a service does not impede the screening operations of the Administration and all personnel are properly vetted and credentialed, as may be required.

287.

Security risk assessment of airport perimeter access controls

(a)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall develop a strategic risk-based plan to improve transportation security at airports that includes best practices to make airport perimeter access controls more secure at all commercial service and general aviation airports.

(b)

Contents

The plan shall—

(1)

incorporate best practices for enhanced perimeter access controls;

(2)

evaluate and incorporate major findings of all relevant pilot programs of the Administration;

(3)

address recommendations of the Comptroller General on perimeter access controls;

(4)

include a requirement that airports update their security plans to incorporate the best practices, as appropriate and to the extent feasible, based on risk and adapt the best practices to meet the needs specific to their facilities; and

(5)

include an assessment of the role of new and emerging technologies, including unmanned and autonomous perimeter security technologies, that could be utilized at both commercial and general aviation facilities.

288.

Electromagnetic emissions from passenger screening equipment deployed in airports

The Assistant Secretary shall—

(1)

collect information regarding the electromagnetic emission output of passenger screening equipment deployed by the Administration at airport checkpoints and, within 30 days of receipt, verify the accuracy of any evaluations or reports provided to the Administration relating to such output;

(2)

not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a summary of the information collected under paragraph (1) and the results of any verification conducted under that paragraph.

289.

Electromagnetic emissions exposure assessment

(a)

In general

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall execute an agreement with an independent third party under which the independent third party shall carry out a study of radiation exposure resulting from screening equipment used by the Administration to screen passengers and baggage at commercial service airports.

(b)

Study

The study shall be conducted for not less than 90 consecutive days during periods of operation in the operating environments of multiple commercial service airports and include consideration of—

(1)

whether passenger and baggage screening equipment results in screened passengers being exposed to radiation above acceptable levels;

(2)

whether passenger and baggage screening equipment results in bystanders being exposed to radiation above acceptable levels; and

(3)

any other factors relating to radiation exposure identified by the independent third party.

(c)

Report

Not later than 180 days after the conclusion of the study, the independent third party shall submit to the Assistant Secretary and the appropriate congressional committees a report containing its findings and recommendations regarding the study under subsection (b), including recommendations with respect to whether transportation security officers should wear a dosimeter for the purpose of continuous monitoring of radiation exposure resulting from passenger screening equipment.

290.

Reimbursement for airports that have incurred eligible costs

(a)

Process

Section 1604(b)(2) of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (49 U.S.C. 44923) is amended to read as follows:

(2)

Airports that have incurred eligible costs

(A)

In general

Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall establish a process for resolving reimbursement claims for airports that have incurred, before the date of the enactment of this Act, eligible costs associated with development of partial or completed in-line baggage systems.

(B)

Process for receiving reimbursement

The process required by this paragraph shall allow an airport—

(i)

to submit a claim to the Assistant Secretary for reimbursement for eligible costs described in subparagraph (A); and

(ii)

not later than 180 days after date on which the airport submits the claim, to receive a determination on the claim and, if the determination is positive, to be reimbursed.

(C)

Report

Not later than 60 days after the date on which the Assistant Secretary establishes the process required by this paragraph, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives a report containing a description of the process, including a schedule for the timely reimbursement of airports for which a positive determination has been made.

.

(b)

Reimbursement

No less than 10 percent of the appropriations made available for grants under section 44923 of title 49, United States Code, for each of fiscal years 2012 and 2013 shall be for reimbursements under section 1604(b)(2) of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (49 U.S.C. 44923), as amended by subsection (a).

(c)

Reimbursements of airports for eligible costs reimbursed at less than 90 percent

If the Secretary or Assistant Secretary reimbursed, after August 3, 2007, an airport that incurred an amount for eligible costs under section 44923 of title 49, United States Code, that was less than 90 percent of such costs, the Secretary or Assistant Secretary shall reimburse such airport under such section an amount equal to the difference for such eligible costs.

291.

Review of airport security plans

(a)

Review

The Assistant Secretary, in consultation with airport operators shall review the process for amending airport security plans to determine if such plans should be more easily amended to accurately reflect all security procedures and protocols carried out by airport operators that may exceed Administration standards.

(b)

Report

Not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on the findings of the review carried out under subsection (a).

292.

Security procedures during temporary flight restrictions

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall develop security procedures and protocols to enable general aviation operators that are subject to security programs administered by the Administration to obtain access to airspace during temporary flight restrictions, to the extent that such access does not affect security.

293.

Security training and assistance to foreign airports

The Assistant Secretary is authorized to donate, loan, or lease equipment that no longer meet the needs of any U.S. commercial airport to foreign airports to mitigate any security vulnerabilities determined through foreign airport assessments or based on threat. The Assistant Secretary may also offer training and other assistance as may be needed. In the event equipment is leased to a foreign airport, the Assistant Secretary is authorized to collect a reasonable fee for such lease. Any fees collected under this section shall be used for checkpoint screening.

294.

Federal air marshal risk assessments

Section 44917 of title 49, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

(e)

Risk assessment

The Assistant Secretary shall conduct a periodic risk assessment of domestic and international flights in order to determine the optimal assignment of air marshals to highest risk flights.

(f)

Deployment plan

The Assistant Secretary shall ensure that the assignment of air marshals is consistent with the most current risk assessment.

.

295.

Protection of the names Federal Air Marshal and Administration

Section 709 of title 18, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

by inserting or after the semicolon at the end of the fourteenth undesignated paragraph; and

(2)

by inserting after such paragraph the following new paragraph:

Whoever, except with the written permission of the Assistant Secretary for Transportation Security (or the Director of the Federal Air Marshal Service for issues involving the Federal Air Marshal Service), knowingly uses the words Transportation Security Administration, United States Transportation Security Administration, Federal Air Marshal Service, United States Federal Air Marshal Service, Federal Air Marshals, the initials T.S.A., F.A.M.S., F.A.M., or any colorable imitation of such words or initials, or the likeness of a Transportation Security Administration or Federal Air Marshal Service badge, logo, or insignia on any item of apparel, in connection with any advertisement, circular, book, pamphlet, software, or other publication, or with any play, motion picture, broadcast, telecast, or other production, in a matter that is reasonably calculated to convey the impression that the wearer of the item of apparel is acting pursuant to the legal authority of the Transportation Security Administration or Federal Air Marshal Service, or to convey the impression that such advertisement, circular, book, pamphlet, software, or other publication, or such play, motion picture, broadcast, telecast, or other production, is approved, endorsed, or authorized by the Transportation Security Administration or Federal Air Marshal Service;

.

296.

Allowable costs on airport security improvement projects

Paragraph (2) of subsection (a) of section 44923 of title 49, United States Code, is amended to read as follows:

(2)

for projects to reconfigure or construct new terminal baggage areas, if new construction is more cost effective and meets pertinent security requirements, as determined by the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration), as needed to install explosive detection systems;

.

297.

Report on diversity efforts

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall provide data to the appropriate congressional committees, including the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives, on the diversity of the Administration workforce. Such data shall include data on each of the following:

(1)

The number of individuals serving at all management levels, including data on representation in each pertinent pay band and the Senior Executive Service within each of the following categories:

(A)

Veterans.

(B)

Race.

(C)

Gender.

(D)

Ethnicity.

(E)

Disabled.

(2)

The retention rate of managers at all levels of the Administration.

(3)

The number of individuals employed by the Administration who were promoted to managerial positions.

298.

Report to Congress on time and attendance programs for transportation security officers

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Assistant Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on the time and attendance programs in use for transportation security officers, as well as recommendations for achieving cost savings through more efficient management of existing resources and reduction in overtime costs.

III

SURFACE TRANSPORTATION SECURITY

A

Streamlining Threat Assessments for Credentials

301.

Definitions

In this Part, the following definitions apply:

(1)

Appropriate congressional committees

The term appropriate congressional committees means the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and any committee of the House of Representatives or the Senate having legislative jurisdiction under the rules of the House of Representatives or Senate, respectively, over the matter concerned.

(2)

Security threat assessment

The term security threat assessment means an assessment conducted by a government agency that includes a check against a terrorist watch list or terrorism database, and may also include a legal presence check and a criminal history records check.

302.

Task force

(a)

Establishment of task force

Not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall establish a task force, with an official designated by the Secretary to be the Chair of the task force.

(b)

Purpose

The purpose of the task force established shall be to—

(1)

review the lists of crimes that disqualify individuals from transportation-related employment under current regulations of the Administration, to include at a minimum crimes listed under section 70105 of title 46, United States Code, and section 44936 of title 49, United States Code, and the applicable periods of disqualification for such crimes;

(2)

assess whether such lists of crimes reviewed under paragraph (1) are accurate indicators of a terrorism security risk;

(3)

assess which other transportation security credential programs for transportation-related employment should be modernized to include a waiver process as is available under section 70105 of title 46, United States Code;

(4)

assess if any cost savings, efficiencies, or elimination of redundancies, to be passed on to transportation security credential applicants in the form of lower fees, can be realized through harmonization of the Federal security threat assessment process, creation of a common list of crimes, and inclusion of a waiver process;

(5)

assess any benefits to homeland security achieved through harmonization of the Federal security threat assessment process, creation of a common list of crimes, and inclusion of a waiver process;

(6)

assess any potential increases in costs or time delays in transportation security credential programs as a result of harmonization of the Federal security threat assessment process, creation of a common list of crimes, and inclusion of a waiver process; and

(7)

assess other potential effects of creation of a common list of crimes for some or all transportation security credential programs for transportation-related employment, to include the extent to which a common list of disqualifying crimes would result in a greater number of persons being disqualified from obtaining a credential required for transportation-related employment.

(c)

Membership

The task force shall be composed of representatives of appropriate transportation industries, including labor unions representing employees of such industries, Federal agencies, motor vehicle carriers, air carriers, airport operators, port authorities, port operators, vessel operators, railroad operators, and other relevant entities, as determined by the Secretary.

(d)

Report

Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the task force shall submit to the Secretary and the appropriate congressional committees a report containing the results of the review, including recommendations for modernization of the Federal security threat assessment process for transportation security credential programs, a common list of disqualifying crimes, the rationale for the inclusion of each crime on the list, and which credential programs for transportation-related employment should include a waiver process as is available under section 70105 of title 46, United States Code.

303.

Limitations on rulemaking

(a)

Limitation on application

Any rule concerning the harmonization of the security threat assessment process for transportation workers issued by the Secretary of Homeland Security shall not apply to a process or function carried out by an airport operator, including enrollment, credentialing, and access control, as of the date of enactment of this Act, except as provided for in subsection (b).

(b)

Ongoing efforts not affected

Nothing in subsection (a) shall affect ongoing efforts by the Department to create a competitive environment for aviation channeling services.

(c)

Transmittal of report required

The Secretary of Homeland Security shall not issue any rule concerning the harmonization of the security threat assessment process for transportation workers until the report required under section 3(d) is transmitted to the Secretary and the appropriate congressional committees.

304.

Surface transportation credentialing

(a)

In general

The Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 101 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

XXI

Surface Transportation Credentialing

2101.

Transportation of security-sensitive materials

(a)

Security-Sensitive materials

Not later than one year after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary shall issue final regulations, after notice and comment, to—

(1)

identify security-sensitive materials for the purposes of this title;

(2)

prohibit an individual from operating a motor vehicle in commerce while transporting a security-sensitive material unless the individual holds a valid transportation security credential issued by the Secretary under section 70105 of title 46, United States Code; and

(3)

prohibit a person from—

(A)

offering a security-sensitive material for transportation by motor vehicle in commerce; or

(B)

causing a security-sensitive material to be transported by motor vehicle in commerce,

unless the motor vehicle operator holds a valid transportation security credential issued by the Secretary under 70105 of title 46, United States Code.
(b)

Memorandum of understanding

The Secretary may enter into a memorandum of understanding with the Secretary of Transportation to ensure compliance with this section.

(c)

Limitation on Application

This section and the regulations and prohibitions under this section shall not apply to the United States Postal Service and any other department, agency, or instrumentality of the Federal Government.

2102.

Commercial motor vehicle operators registered to operate in Mexico or Canada

The Secretary shall prohibit a commercial motor vehicle operator licensed to operate in Mexico or Canada from operating a commercial motor vehicle transporting a security-sensitive material in commerce in the United States until the operator has been subjected to, and not disqualified as a result of, a security threat assessment by a Federal agency that the Secretary determines is similar to the security threat assessment required for commercial motor vehicle operators in the United States transporting security-sensitive materials in commerce.

2103.

Redundant security threat assessments

(a)

In general

The Secretary shall prohibit a State or political subdivision thereof from requiring a separate security threat assessment of an individual, who possesses a valid transportation security credential issued under section 70105 of title 46, United States Code, seeking to transport, or involved in facilitating the transport of, a security-sensitive or hazardous material.

(b)

Waivers

The Secretary may waive the application of subsection (a) with respect to a State or political subdivision thereof if the State or political subdivision demonstrates a compelling reason that a separate security threat assessment is necessary to ensure the secure transportation of a security-sensitive or hazardous material in the State or political subdivision.

(c)

Limitation on statutory construction

Nothing in this section shall limit the authority of a State to ensure that an individual has the requisite knowledge and skills to safely transport hazardous materials in commerce.

2104.

Transition

(a)

Treatment of individuals receiving prior hazardous materials endorsements

An individual who has obtained a hazardous materials endorsement in accordance with section 1572 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, before the date of enactment of this title, is deemed to have met the background check requirements of a transportation security card under section 70105 of title 46, United States Code, subject to reissuance or expiration dates of the hazardous materials endorsement.

(b)

Reduction in fees

The Secretary shall reduce, to the greatest extent practicable, any fees associated with obtaining a transportation security card under section 70105 of title 46, United Sates Code, for any individual referred to in subsection (a).

2105.

Savings clause

Nothing in this title shall be construed as affecting the authority of the Secretary of Transportation to regulate hazardous materials under chapter 51 of title 49, United States Code.

2106.

Definitions

In this title, the following definitions apply:

(1)

Commerce

The term commerce means trade or transportation in the jurisdiction of the United States—

(A)

between a place in a State and a place outside of the State; or

(B)

that affects trade or transportation between a place in a State and a place outside of the State.

(2)

Hazardous material

The term hazardous material has the meaning given that term in section 5102 of title 49, United States Code.

(3)

Person

The term person, in addition to its meaning under section 1 of title 1, United States Code, includes a State, local, or tribal government offering security-sensitive material for transportation in commerce or transporting security-sensitive material to further a commercial enterprise.

(4)

Security-sensitive material

The term security-sensitive material has the meaning given that term in section 1501 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1151).

(5)

Security threat assessment

The term security threat assessment means any assessment conducted by a government agency that includes a check against a terrorist watch list or terrorism database, and may also include a legal presence check and a criminal history records check.

(6)

Transports; transportation

The term transports or transportation means the movement of property and loading, unloading, or storage incidental to such movement.

.

(b)

Clerical amendment

The table of contents contained in section 1(b) of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (116 Stat. 2135) is amended by adding at the end the following:

Title XXI—Surface Transportation Credentialing

Sec. 2101. Transportation of security-sensitive materials.

Sec. 2102. Commercial motor vehicle operators registered to operate in Mexico or Canada.

Sec. 2103. Redundant security threat assessments.

Sec. 2104. Transition.

Sec. 2105. Savings clause.

Sec. 2106. Definitions.

.

(c)

Security cards for certain motor vehicle operators

Section 70105(b)(2) of title 46, United States Code, is amended by striking and after the semicolon at the end of subparagraph (F), by striking the period at the end of subparagraph (G) and inserting ; and, and by adding at the end the following new subparagraph:

(H)

an individual who operates a motor vehicle in commerce while transporting security-sensitive material (as that term is defined in section 1501 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1151)).

.

(d)

Civil penalties

Section 114(v) of title 49, United States Code, is amended—

(1)

in paragraph (1)(A), by inserting under title XXI of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 or after Secretary of Homeland Security; and

(2)

by striking applicable provision of this title each place it appears and inserting applicable provision.

305.

Transportation worker identification credential enrollment centers

Section 70105 of title 46, United States Code, is further amended by adding at the end thereof the following:

(r)

Enrollment locations

The Secretary shall—

(1)

work with appropriate entities to ensure that enrollment locations for individuals applying for a transportation security card have flexible operating hours; and

(2)

permit an individual applying for or activating such transportation security card to utilize an enrollment location of such individual’s choosing, including an enrollment location outside of the individual’s State of residence.

(s)

Number of enrollment locations

The Secretary shall develop and implement a plan—

(1)

to offer individuals applying for a transportation security card the maximum number of enrollment locations practicable across diverse geographic regions; and

(2)

to conduct outreach to appropriate stake holders, including owners and operators of motor vehicles involved in the transportation of security-sensitive materials, owners and operators of facilities that require individuals to be issued a transportation security card, and labor organizations representing employees of such owners or operators, to keep the stakeholders informed of the timeframe and locations for the opening of additional enrollment locations.

.

306.

Limitation on issuance of HAZMAT licenses

Section 5103a of title 49, United States Code, and the item relating to that section in the analysis for chapter 51 of such title, are repealed.

307.

Deadlines and effective dates

(a)

Issuance of transportation security cards

Upon issuance of the final regulations as required in section 5, but not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security (as that term is defined in section 70101 of title 46, United States Code) shall begin issuance of transportation security cards under section 70105(b)(2)(H) of title 46, United States Code, as amended by this Act, to individuals who seek to operate a motor vehicle in commerce while transporting security-sensitive materials.

(b)

Effective date of prohibitions

The prohibitions under section 2101 of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (as added by section 5) shall take effect on the date that is 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act.

(c)

Effective date of section 7 amendments

The amendments made by section 7 shall take effect on the date that is 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act.

308.

Streamlining credentials for secure area access at airports

(a)

Report

Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall report to the appropriate congressional committees on the feasibility of developing a single transmission process for airport operators to submit biometric and biographic data for background checks to both the Administration and U.S. Customs and Border Protection for transportation workers requiring unescorted access to Secure Identification Display Areas at an airport.

(b)

Single data transmission process establishment

Based on the findings of the report under subsection (a), the Secretary may establish a process for airport operators to submit one data transmission of biometric and biographic information for the security threat assessment process for any agency within the Department, including the Administration and U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

309.

Jobs impact

The Assistant Secretary shall submit to appropriate congressional committees, including the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives, a report that, at a minimum, includes—

(1)

an estimate of the number of potential jobs created or lost within the private sector as a result of implementation of final regulations, as required pursuant to title XXI of the Homeland Security Act of 2002, as added by section 304 of this Act; and

(2)

information received from owners and operators about how the regulations could be revised to spur potential job creation or stem potential job loss.

B

Security Assistance and Enhancements

321.

Visible intermodal prevention and response teams

Section 1303 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1112) is amended—

(1)

in subsection (a)—

(A)

in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration, and inserting Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration),;

(B)

in paragraph (4) by striking team, and inserting team as to specific locations and times within the facilities of such entities at which VIPR teams should be deployed to maximize the effectiveness of such deployment,; and

(2)

by striking subsection (b) and inserting the following:

(b)

Performance measures

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall develop and implement a system of qualitative performance measures and objectives by which to assess the roles, activities, and effectiveness of VIPR team operations on an ongoing basis, including a mechanism through which the transportation entities referred to in subsection (a)(4) may submit feedback on VIPR team operations involving their systems or facilities.

(c)

Plan

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Assistant Secretary shall develop and implement a plan for ensuring the interoperability of communications among VIPR team participants and between VIPR teams and any transportation entities with systems or facilities that are involved in VIPR team operations. The plan shall include an analysis of the costs and resources required to carry out the plan.

.

322.

Transit security grants

(a)

Improvement of public transportation security assistance

(1)

In general

Section 1406 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1135) is amended—

(A)

in subsection (b)(1)—

(i)

in subparagraph (B), by inserting bollards, after including; and

(ii)

in subparagraph (D), by inserting after including the following: projects for the purpose of demonstrating or assessing the capability of such systems and;

(B)

by redesignating subsections (e) through (k) as subsections (f) through (l), respectively;

(C)

by redesignating subsections (l) and (m) as subsections (n) and (o), respectively; and

(D)

by inserting after subsection (d) the following new subsection (e):

(e)

Procedure

(1)

Timeline

(A)

Availability of applications

Applications for grants under this section for a grant cycle shall be made available to eligible applicants not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of the appropriations Act for the Department of Homeland Security for the same fiscal year as the grant cycle.

(B)

Submission of applications

A public transportation agency that is eligible for a grant under this section shall submit an application for a grant not later than 45 days after the applications are made available under subparagraph (A).

(C)

Action

The Secretary shall make a determination approving or rejecting each application submitted under subparagraph (B), notify the applicant of the determination, and immediately commence any additional processes required to allow an approved applicant to begin to receive grant funds by not later than 60 days after date on which the Secretary receives the application.

(D)

Availability of funds

To the extent feasible, not later than 60 days after the Secretary makes a determination under subparagraph (C) approving an application, the Secretary shall make the grant funds available to the applicant.

(2)

Prohibition of cost-sharing requirement

No grant under this section may require any cost-sharing contribution from the grant recipient or from any related State or local agency.

(3)

Annual report

Not later than the date that is 180 days after the last determination made under paragraph (1)(C) for a grant cycle, the Secretary shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations and Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committees on Appropriations and Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate a report that includes a list of all grants awarded under this section for that grant cycle for which the grant recipient is not, as of such date, able to receive grant funds and an explanation of why such funds have not yet been released for use by the recipient.

(4)

Performance

(A)

Duration

The performance period for grants made under this section shall be a period of time not less than 36 months in duration.

(B)

Timing

The performance period for any grant made under this section shall not begin to run until the recipient of the grant has been formally notified that funds provided under the terms of the grant have been released for use by the recipient.

;

(E)

by inserting after subsection (l), as redesignated by paragraph (2) of this section, the following new subsection (m):

(m)

Access

The Secretary shall ensure that, for each grant awarded under this section, the Inspector General of the Department is authorized to—

(1)

examine any records of the grant recipient or any contractors or subcontractors with which the recipient enters into a contract, or any State or local agency, that directly pertain to and involve transactions relating to grants under this section; and

(2)

interview any officer or employee of the recipient, any contractors or subcontractors with which the recipient enters into a contract, or State or local agency regarding such transactions.

; and

(F)

in subsection (o), as redesignated by paragraph (3) of this section—

(i)

by striking paragraph (1) and inserting the following new paragraph (1):

(1)

In general

There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to make grants under this section $400,000,000 for fiscal year 2012, except that not more than 50 percent of such funds may be used for operational costs under subsection (b)(2) of this section.

;

(ii)

by redesignating paragraphs (3) and (4) as paragraphs (4) and (5), respectively; and

(iii)

by inserting after paragraph (2) the following new paragraph (3):

(3)

Exception

The limitation on the percentage of funds that may be used for operational costs under paragraph (1) shall not apply to any costs involved with or relating to explosives detection canine teams acquired or used for the purpose of securing public transportation systems or facilities.

.

(2)

Report on recommendations of Comptroller General

(A)

Report required

Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate a report on the status of the Secretary’s implementation of the recommendations of the Comptroller General with respect to the improvement of the administration of security grants under section 1406 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1135).

(B)

Review by Inspector General

Before the Secretary submits the report required under paragraph (1), the report shall be reviewed by the Inspector General of the Department. When the Secretary submits the report to Congress under paragraph (1), the Secretary shall include with the report documentation verifying that the report was reviewed by the Inspector General in accordance with this paragraph.

(b)

Public transportation security assistance

(1)

Security assistance program

Section 1406(a) of the National Transit Systems Security Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1135(a)) is amended—

(A)

in paragraph (1) by inserting and law enforcement after public transportation; and

(B)

by adding at the end the following:

(3)

Law enforcement agency eligibility

A law enforcement agency is eligible for a grant under this section if the agency enters into a memorandum of agreement or other arrangement with a public transportation agency that is eligible for a grant under paragraph (2) to oversee, direct, and command the security operations of that public transportation agency.

.

(2)

Uses of Funds

Section 1406(b)(1)(J) of the National Transit Systems Security Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1135(b)(1)(J)) is amended by striking evacuation improvements and inserting consequence management investments, including investments with respect to evacuation improvements, route designation and signage, and public assistance materials.

(3)

Authorization of appropriations

Section 1406(m)(1) of the National Transit Systems Security Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1135(m)(1)) is amended—

(A)

in subparagraph (D) by striking and at the end;

(B)

in subparagraph (E)—

(i)

by striking 10 percent and inserting 50 percent; and

(ii)

by striking subsection (b)(2). and inserting subsection (b)(2); and; and

(C)

by adding at the end the following:

(F)

$400,000,000 for fiscal year 2012, except that not more than 50 percent of such funds may be used for operational costs under subsection (b)(2).

.

323.

Freight rail security demonstration project

(a)

Demonstration project

The Assistant Secretary, in consultation with the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Science and Technology, shall conduct a demonstration project in a freight rail system to test and assess the feasibility and effectiveness of technologies to strengthen the security of freight rail systems against terrorist attacks involving the use of improvised explosive devices and tampering with infrastructure to cause a derailment.

(b)

Security technologies

The demonstration project under this section shall be designed to test and assess technologies to—

(1)

detect improvised explosive devices on bridges and in tunnels through the use of foreign object detection programs; and

(2)

defeat improvised explosive devices left on rail tracks.

324.

Explosives detection canine teams for surface transportation

Section 1307 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1116) is amended—

(1)

in subsection (b)—

(A)

in paragraph (1)(A), by striking 2010 and inserting 2012; and

(B)

by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

(3)

Passenger screening teams

(A)

In general

In order to strengthen the Nation’s mass transit infrastructure against explosives threats, the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration) shall—

(i)

increase the number of explosives detection canine teams certified by the Transportation Security Administration devoted to passenger rail and public transportation security activities to not less than 200 canine teams by the end of fiscal year 2012;

(ii)

increase the assistance provided to passenger rail and public transportation agencies for participation in the Transportation Security Administration’s canine program to $75,000 per canine team; and

(iii)

expand the use of canine teams trained to detect explosives based on methods other than traditional explosives detection training techniques.

(B)

Cooperative agreements

The Assistant Secretary shall expand the use of canine teams to enhance passenger rail and public transportation security by entering into cooperative agreements with passenger rail and public transportation agencies eligible for security assistance under section 1406 of this Act for the purpose of deploying and maintaining canine teams to such agencies for use in passenger rail or public transportation security activities and providing for assistance in an amount not less than $75,000 for each canine team deployed, to be adjusted by the Assistant Secretary for inflation.

(C)

Authorization of appropriations

From amounts made available under section 101 of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, there are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary such sums as may be necessary to carry out this paragraph for each of fiscal years 2012 and 2013.

;

(2)

in subsection (d)—

(A)

in paragraph (3), by striking and;

(B)

in paragraph (4), by striking the period at the end and inserting ; and; and

(C)

by adding at the end the following new paragraph:

(5)

expand the use of canine teams trained to detect person-borne explosives in passenger rail and public transportation security environments, as the Secretary, in consultation with the Assistant Secretary of Homeland Security (Transportation Security Administration), determines appropriate.

; and

(3)

in subsection (e), by striking , if appropriate, and inserting , to the extent practicable,.

325.

Pipeline security study

(a)

Study

The Comptroller General of the United States shall conduct a study regarding the roles and responsibilities of the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Transportation with respect to pipeline security. The study shall address whether—

(1)

the Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding executed on August 9, 2006, between the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Transportation adequately delineates strategic and operational responsibilities for pipeline security, including whether it is clear which Department is responsible for—

(A)

protecting against intentional pipeline breaches;

(B)

responding to intentional pipeline breaches; and

(C)

planning to recover from the effects of intentional pipeline breaches;

(2)

the respective roles and responsibilities of each Department are adequately conveyed to relevant stakeholders and to the public; and

(3)

the processes and procedures for determining whether a particular pipeline breach is a terrorist incident are clear and effective.

(b)

Report on study

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this section, the Comptroller General shall submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report containing the findings of the study conducted under subsection (a).

(c)

Report to Congress

Not later than 90 days after the submittal of the report under subsection (b), the Secretary of Homeland Security shall review and analyze the study and submit to the Committee on Homeland Security of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate a report on such review and analysis, including any recommendations for—

(1)

changes to the Annex to the Memorandum of Understanding referred to in subsection (a)(1); and

(2)

other improvements to pipeline security activities at the Department of Homeland Security.

326.

Repeal of limitation relating to motor carrier security-sensitive material tracking technology

Section 1554 of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1204) is amended by striking subsection (d).

C

Information Sharing

341.

Surface Transportation Security stakeholder participation

(a)

In general

Title XIII of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (6 U.S.C. 1111 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following:

1311.

Surface Transportation Advisory Committee

(a)

Establishment

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall establish in the Transportation Security Administration an advisory committee, to be known as the Surface Transportation Advisory Committee (in this section referred to as the Advisory Committee), to assist the Assistant Secretary with issues pertaining to surface transportation security.

(2)

Recommendations

(A)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall require the Advisory Committee to develop recommendations for improvements to surface transportation security planning, methods, equipment, and processes.

(B)

Priority issues

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, the Advisory Committee shall submit to the Assistant Secretary recommendations on improving homeland security information sharing between components of the Department of Homeland Security and surface transportation security stakeholders, including those represented on the Advisory Committee.

(3)

Meetings

The Assistant Secretary shall require the Advisory Committee to meet at least semiannually and may convene additional meetings as necessary.

(4)

Unpaid position

Advisory Committee Members shall serve at their own expense and receive no salary, reimbursement for travel expenses, or other compensation from the Federal Government.

(b)

Membership

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall ensure that the Advisory Committee is composed of not more than one individual representing not more than 27 member organizations, including representatives from public transportation agencies, passenger rail agencies or operators, railroad carriers, motor carriers, owners or operators of highways, over-the-road bus operators and terminal owners and operators, pipeline operators, labor organizations representing employees of such entities, and the surface transportation security technology industry.

(2)

Appointments

Members shall be appointed by the Assistant Secretary and the Assistant Secretary shall have the discretion to review the participation of any Advisory Committee member and remove for cause at any time.

(c)

Nonapplicability of FACA

The Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall not apply to the Advisory Committee under this section.

(d)

Passenger carrier security working group

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall establish within the Advisory Committee a passenger carrier security working group to provide recommendations for successful implementation of initiatives relating to passenger rail, over-the-road bus, and public transportation security proposed by the Transportation Security Administration in accordance with statutory requirements, including relevant grant programs and security training provisions.

(2)

Meetings

The working group shall meet at least semiannually and provide annual reports to the Assistant Secretary with recommendations to improve the Transportation Security Administration’s initiatives relating to passenger rail, over-the-road bus, and public transportation security, including grants, training, inspection, or other relevant programs authorized in titles XIII and XIV, and subtitle C of title XV of this Act.

(3)

Membership

The working group shall be composed of members from the Advisory Committee with expertise in public transportation, over-the-road bus, or passenger rail systems and operations, all appointed by the Assistant Secretary.

(4)

Reports

(A)

In general

The working group shall prepare and submit reports to the Assistant Secretary in accordance with this paragraph that provide recommendations as described in paragraphs (1) and (2).

(B)

Submission

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, and on an annual basis thereafter, the working group shall submit a report on the findings and recommendations developed under subparagraph (A) to the Assistant Secretary.

(e)

Freight rail security working group

(1)

In general

The Assistant Secretary shall establish within the Advisory Committee a freight rail security working group to provide recommendations for successful implementation of initiatives relating to freight rail security proposed by the Transportation Security Administration in accordance with statutory requirements, including relevant grant programs and security training provisions.

(2)

Meetings

The working group shall meet at least semiannually and provide annual reports to the Assistant Secretary with recommendations to improve the Transportation Security Administration’s initiatives relating to freight rail security, including grant, training, inspection, or other relevant programs authorized in titles XIII and XV of this Act.

(3)

Membership

The working group shall be composed of members from the Advisory Committee with expertise in freight rail systems and operations, all appointed by the Assistant Secretary.

(4)

Reports

(A)

In general

The working group shall prepare and submit reports to the Assistant Secretary in accordance with this paragraph that provide recommendations as described in paragraphs (1) and (2).

(B)

Submission

Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization Act of 2011, and on an annual basis thereafter, the working group shall submit a report on the findings and recommendations developed under subparagraph (A) to the Assistant Secretary.

.

(b)

Conforming amendment

Section 1(b) of the Implementing Recommendations of the 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 (Public Law 110–53) is amended by adding at the end of the items relating to title XIII (Transportation Security Enhancements) the following:

Sec. 1311. Surface Transportation Advisory Committee.

.

342.

Plan to improve information sharing

(a)

In general

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, acting through the Assistant Secretary, shall develop a plan to improve intelligence information sharing with State and local transportation entities that includes best practices to ensure that the information shared is actionable, useful, and not redundant.

(b)

Contents

The plan required by subsection (a) shall include—

(1)

the incorporation of best practices for information sharing;

(2)

the identification of areas of overlap and redundancy;

(3)

an evaluation and incorporation of stakeholder input in the development of the plan; and

(4)

the integration of recommendations of the Comptroller General of the United States on information sharing.

(c)

The Assistant Secretary shall solicit on an annual basis input from appropriate stakeholders, including State and local transportation entities, on the quality and quantity of intelligence they receive.

343.

Best practices sharing

(a)

In general

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary, acting through the Assistant Secretary, shall establish a mechanism to share with State and local transportation entities best practices from across the law enforcement spectrum, including Federal, State, local, and tribal entities, that relate to employee training, employee professional development, technology development and deployment, hardening tactics, and passenger and employee awareness programs.

(b)

Consultation

The Assistant Secretary shall solicit and incorporate stakeholder input—

(1)

in developing the mechanism for sharing best practices as required under subsection (a); and

(2)

not less frequently than once each year on the quality and quantity of information such stakeholders receive through the mechanism established under subsection (a).