H.Res. 501 (112th): Expressing the sense of the House of Representatives regarding any final measure to extend the payroll tax holiday, extend Federally funded unemployment insurance benefits, or prevent decreases in reimbursement for physicians who provide care to Medicare beneficiaries.

Introduced:
Dec 19, 2011 (112th Congress, 2011–2013)
Status:
Agreed To (Simple Resolution)
Sponsor
Tom Price
Representative for Georgia's 6th congressional district
Party
Republican
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Dec 20, 2011
Length
5 pages
Related Bills
H.Res. 502 (Related)
Providing for consideration of the Senate amendments to the bill (H.R. 3630) to provide ...

Agreed To (Simple Resolution)
Dec 20, 2011

 
Status

This simple resolution was agreed to on December 20, 2011. That is the end of the legislative process for a simple resolution.

Progress
Introduced Dec 19, 2011
Referred to Committee Dec 19, 2011
Agreed To (Simple Resolution) Dec 20, 2011
 
Summary

No summaries available.

Votes
Dec 20, 2011 4:16 p.m.
Passed 226/185

Cosponsors
none
Committees

House Energy and Commerce

Health

House House Administration

House Transportation and Infrastructure

Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials

House Ways and Means

The committee chair determines whether a resolution will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

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Notes

H.Res. stands for House simple resolution.

A simple resolution is used for matters that affect just one chamber of Congress, often to change the rules of the chamber to set the manner of debate for a related bill. It must be agreed to in the chamber in which it was introduced. It is not voted on in the other chamber and does not have the force of law.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


12/19/2011--Passed House without amendment.
Expresses the sense of the House of Representatives that any final measure to extend the payroll tax holiday, extend federally funded unemployment insurance benefits, or prevent decreases in reimbursement for physicians who provide care to Medicare beneficiaries:
(1) extend the payroll tax holiday through December 31, 2012;
(2) extend and reform federally funded unemployment insurance benefits;
(3) eliminate for two years the cut in reimbursement for physicians who provide care to Medicare beneficiaries;
(4) reduce spending from areas throughout the federal government, including a freeze on congressional salaries, in order to protect the Social Security Trust Fund, whose solvency would otherwise be diminished as a result of the payroll tax holiday; and
(5) provide immediate job creation through final approval of the Keystone XL pipeline, expensing for capital assets placed in service in 2012, and drafting new regulations for boilers that are achievable and cost-effective.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

The House Democratic Caucus does not provide summaries of bills.

So, yes, we display the House Republican Conference’s summaries when available even if we do not have a Democratic summary available. That’s because we feel it is better to give you as much information as possible, even if we cannot provide every viewpoint.

We’ll be looking for a source of summaries from the other side in the meanwhile.

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