S. 2020 (112th): Keeping All Students Safe Act

Introduced:
Dec 16, 2011 (112th Congress, 2011–2013)
Status:
Died (Referred to Committee) in a previous session of Congress

This bill was introduced on December 16, 2011, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.

Introduced
Dec 16, 2011
 
Sponsor
Thomas “Tom” Harkin
Junior Senator from Iowa
Party
Democrat
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Dec 16, 2011
Length
25 pages
Related Bills
S. 2036 (113th) was a re-introduction of this bill in a later Congress.

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Feb 24, 2014

H.R. 1381 (Related)
Keeping All Students Safe Act

Referred to Committee
Last Action: Apr 06, 2011

 
Full Title

A bill to protect all school children against harmful and life-threatening seclusion and restraint practices.

Summary

No summaries available.

 
Cosponsors
none
Committees

Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

The committee chair determines whether a bill will move past the committee stage.

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

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Notes

S. stands for Senate bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


12/16/2011--Introduced.
Keeping All Students Safe Act - Requires each state and local educational agency (LEA) that receives federal funds to prohibit school personnel, contractors, and resource officers from subjecting students to: (1) seclusion, (2) mechanical or chemical restraint, (3) aversive behavioral intervention that compromises student health and safety, or (4) physical restraint that is life-threatening or contraindicated based on the student's health or disability status.
Allows physical restraint only when: (1) the student's behavior poses an immediate danger of physical injury to the student or others; (2) the restraint does not interfere with the student's ability to communicate; and (3) the restraint occurs after less restrictive interventions have proven ineffective in stopping the danger, except in certain emergencies when immediate restraint is necessary.
Requires school personnel imposing physical restraint to: (1) be trained and certified by a state-approved crisis intervention training program, though others may impose such restraint in certain instances when trained personnel are not immediately available; and (2) engage in continuous face-to-face monitoring of the restrained student.
Requires:
(1) the parents of a physically restrained student to be notified on the day such restraint occurs;
(2) a debriefing session to be held as soon as practicable for the restrained student, the student's parents, and certain personnel involved in, or having duties with regard to, the event; and
(3) the state, LEA, local law enforcement, and any protection and advocacy system serving an affected student to be notified within 24 hours of any death or bodily injury that occurs in conjunction with efforts to control a student's behavior.
Authorizes the Secretary of Education to award grants to states and, through them, competitive subgrants to LEAs to: (1) establish, implement, and enforce policies and procedures to meet this Act's requirements; (2) improve their capacity to collect and analyze data related to physical restraint; and (3) implement school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports.
Requires LEAs to allow private school personnel to participate, on an equitable basis, in activities supported by such grants and subgrants.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

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