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Text of A resolution supporting the goals and ideals of American Diabetes Month.

This simple resolution was agreed to on November 29, 2012. That is the end of the legislative process for a simple resolution. The text of the bill below is as of Nov 29, 2012 (Resolution Agreed to).

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Source: GPO

III

112th CONGRESS

2d Session

S. RES. 600

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

November 26, 2012

(for herself, Ms. Collins, Mr. Lautenberg, Ms. Mikulski, Ms. Landrieu, Mr. Akaka, Mr. Tester, and Mr. Blumenthal) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions

November 29, 2012

Committee discharged; considered and agreed to with an amended preamble

RESOLUTION

Supporting the goals and ideals of American Diabetes Month.

Whereas according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (referred to in this preamble as the CDC), nearly 26,000,000 people in the United States have diabetes and 79,000,000 people in the United States have pre-diabetes;

Whereas diabetes is a serious chronic condition that affects people of every age, race, ethnicity, and income level;

Whereas the CDC reports that Hispanics, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and Native Americans are disproportionately affected by diabetes and suffer from diabetes at rates that are much higher than the general population of the United States;

Whereas according to the CDC, someone is diagnosed with diabetes every 17 seconds;

Whereas each day, approximately 5,205 people are diagnosed with diabetes;

Whereas in 2010, the CDC estimated that approximately 1,900,000 individuals age 20 and older were newly diagnosed with diabetes;

Whereas a joint National Institutes of Health and CDC study found that approximately 15,000 youth in the United States are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes annually and approximately 3,600 youth are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes annually;

Whereas according to the CDC, between 1980 and 2007, the prevalence of diabetes in the United States increased by more than 300 percent;

Whereas the CDC reports that more than 27 percent of individuals with diabetes are undiagnosed;

Whereas the National Diabetes Fact Sheet issued by the CDC states that more than 11 percent of adults in the United States and 26.9 percent of people in the United States age 65 and older have diabetes;

Whereas the CDC estimates that as many as 1 in 3 adults in the United States will have diabetes in 2050 if present trends continue;

Whereas the CDC estimates that as many as 1 in 2 Hispanic, African-American, Asian-American, and Native American adults will have diabetes in 2050 if present trends continue;

Whereas according to the American Diabetes Association, in 2007, the total cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States was $174,000,000,000, and 1 in 10 dollars spent on health care was attributed to diabetes and its complications;

Whereas according to a Lewin Group study, in 2007, the total cost of diabetes (including both diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes, pre-diabetes, and gestational diabetes) was $218,000,000,000;

Whereas a Mathematica Policy Research study in 2007 found that, for fiscal year 2005, total expenditures for Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes comprise 32.7 percent of the Medicare budget;

Whereas according to the CDC, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in 2007 and contributed to the deaths of more than 230,000 people in the United States in 2007;

Whereas there is not yet a cure for diabetes;

Whereas there are proven means to reduce the incidence, and delay the onset, of type 2 diabetes;

Whereas with the proper management and treatment, people with diabetes live healthy, productive lives; and

Whereas American Diabetes Month is celebrated in November: Now, therefore, be it

That the Senate—

(1)

supports the goals and ideals of American Diabetes Month, including—

(A)

encouraging the people of the United States to fight diabetes through public awareness about prevention and treatment options; and

(B)

increasing education about the disease;

(2)

recognizes the importance of early detection of diabetes, awareness of the symptoms of diabetes, and the risk factors that often lead to the development of diabetes, including—

(A)

being over the age of 45;

(B)

having a specific racial and ethnic background;

(C)

being overweight;

(D)

having a low level of physical activity;

(E)

having high blood pressure; and

(F)

having a family history of diabetes or a history of diabetes during pregnancy; and

(3)

supports decreasing the prevalence of type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes in the United States through increased research, treatment, and prevention.