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H.R. 1582 (113th): Energy Consumers Relief Act of 2013

The text of the bill below is as of Apr 16, 2013 (Introduced).


I

113th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 1582

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

April 16, 2013

introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Energy and Commerce

A BILL

To protect consumers by prohibiting the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency from promulgating as final certain energy-related rules that are estimated to cost more than $1 billion and will cause significant adverse effects to the economy.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Energy Consumers Relief Act of 2013 .

2.

Prohibition against finalizing certain energy-related rules that will cause significant adverse effects to the economy

Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency may not promulgate as final an energy-related rule that is estimated to cost more than $1 billion if the Secretary of Energy determines under section 3(3) that, with respect to the rule, significant adverse effects to the economy will be caused.

3.

Reports and determinations prior to promulgating as final certain energy-related rules

Before promulgating as final any energy-related rule that is estimated to cost more than $1 billion:

(1)

Report to Congress

The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall submit to Congress a report containing—

(A)

a copy of the rule;

(B)

a concise general statement relating to the rule;

(C)

an estimate of the total costs of the rule, including the direct costs and indirect costs of the rule;

(D)

an estimate of the increases in energy prices, including potential increases in gasoline or electricity prices for consumers, that may result from implementation or enforcement of the rule; and

(E)

a detailed description of the employment effects, including potential job losses and shifts in employment, that may result from implementation or enforcement of the rule.

(2)

Initial determination on increases and impacts

The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Administrator of the Energy Information Administration, shall prepare an independent analysis to determine whether the rule will cause—

(A)

any increase in energy prices for consumers, including low-income households, small businesses, and manufacturers;

(B)

any impact on fuel diversity of the Nation’s electricity generation portfolio or on national, regional, or local electric reliability; or

(C)

any other adverse effect on energy supply, distribution, or use (including a shortfall in supply and increased use of foreign supplies).

(3)

Subsequent determination on adverse effects to the economy

If the Secretary of Energy determines, under paragraph (2), that the rule will cause an increase, impact, or effect described in such paragraph, then the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Labor, and the Administrator of the Small Business Administration, shall—

(A)

determine whether such increase, impact, or effect will cause significant adverse effects to the economy, taking into consideration impacts on economic indicators, including those related to gross domestic product, unemployment, wages, consumer prices, and business and manufacturing activity; and

(B)

publish the results of such determination in the Federal Register.

4.

Definitions

In this Act:

(1)

The terms direct costs and indirect costs have the meanings given such terms in chapter 8 of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Guidelines for Preparing Economic Analyses dated December 17, 2010.

(2)

The term energy-related rule that is estimated to cost more than $1 billion means a rule of the Environmental Protection Agency that—

(A)

regulates any aspect of the production, supply, distribution, or use of energy or provides for such regulation by States or other governmental entities; and

(B)

is estimated by the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency or the Director of the Office of Management and Budget to impose direct costs and indirect costs, in the aggregate, of more than $1,000,000,000.

(3)

The term rule has the meaning given to such term in section 551 of title 5, United States Code.