H.R. 3037: Government Litigation Savings Act

Introduced:
Aug 02, 2013
Status:
Referred to Committee on Aug 02, 2013
Prognosis
12% chance of being enacted
Track this bill

This bill was assigned to a congressional committee on August 2, 2013, which will consider it before possibly sending it on to the House or Senate as a whole.

Introduced
Aug 02, 2013
Reported by Committee
Passed House
Passed Senate
Signed by the President
 
Sponsor
Cynthia Lummis
Representative for Wyoming At Large
Party
Republican
Text
Read Text »
Last Updated
Aug 02, 2013
Length
7 pages
Related Bills
H.R. 1996 (112th) was a previous version of this bill.

Reported by Committee
Last Action: Nov 17, 2011

 
Full Title

To amend titles 5 and 28, United States Code, with respect to the award of fees and other expenses in cases brought against agencies of the United States, and for other purposes.

Summary

No summaries available.

 
Prognosis

62% chance of getting past committee.
12% chance of being enacted.

Only 11% of bills made it past committee and only about 3% were enacted in 2011–2013. [show factors | methodology]

 
Primary Source

THOMAS.gov (The Library of Congress)

GovTrack gets most information from THOMAS, which is updated generally one day after events occur. Activity since the last update may not be reflected here. Data comes via the congress project.

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Citation

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Notes

H.R. stands for House of Representatives bill.

A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the president to become law.

The bill’s title was written by its sponsor.

GovTrack’s Bill Summary

We don’t have a summary available yet.

Library of Congress Summary

The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress.


8/2/2013--Introduced.
Government Litigation Savings Act - Revises provisions of the Equal Access to Justice Act (EAJA) and the federal judicial code relating to the fees and other expenses of parties in agency proceedings and court cases against the federal government.
Restricts awards of fees and other expenses under EAJA to prevailing parties with a direct and personal interest in an adjudication, including because of medical costs, property damage, determination of benefits, an unpaid disbursement, and other expenses of adjudication, or because of a policy interest.
Requires (currently, authorizes) the reduction or denial of an award if the party during the course of the proceedings engaged in conduct which unduly or unreasonably (currently, unduly and unreasonably) protracted the final resolution of the matter in controversy.
Increases to $200 per hour the cap on attorney fees awarded under EAJA and eliminates the cost-of-living and special factor considerations for allowing an increase in the hourly rate for such fees.
Eliminates the net worth exemption for determining eligibility for fees and expenses under EAJA for tax-exempt organizations and cooperative associations under the Agricultural Marketing Act.

House Republican Conference Summary

The summary below was written by the House Republican Conference, which is the caucus of Republicans in the House of Representatives.


No summary available.

House Democratic Caucus Summary

The House Democratic Caucus does not provide summaries of bills.

So, yes, we display the House Republican Conference’s summaries when available even if we do not have a Democratic summary available. That’s because we feel it is better to give you as much information as possible, even if we cannot provide every viewpoint.

We’ll be looking for a source of summaries from the other side in the meanwhile.

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