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H.R. 521 (113th): Transforming Education through Technology Act

The text of the bill below is as of Feb 6, 2013 (Introduced).


I

113th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 521

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

February 6, 2013

introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Education and the Workforce

A BILL

To award grants to encourage State educational agencies, local educational agencies, and schools to utilize technology to improve student achievement and college-and-career readiness, the skills of teachers and school leaders, and the efficiency and productivity of education systems at all levels.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the Transforming Education through Technology Act .

2.

Table of contents

The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.

Sec. 2. Table of contents.

Sec. 3. Findings.

Sec. 4. Purposes.

Sec. 5. E-rate restriction.

Sec. 6. Rule of construction regarding purchasing.

Sec. 7. Definitions.

Title I—Technology Readiness and Access

Sec. 101. Technology grants program authorized.

Sec. 102. State applications.

Sec. 103. State use of grant funds.

Sec. 104. Local subgrants.

Sec. 105. Reporting.

Sec. 106. Authorization.

Title II—Technology for Tomorrow Fund

Sec. 201. Short title.

Sec. 202. Technology for tomorrow fund.

Sec. 203. Application.

Sec. 204. Use of funds.

Sec. 205. Data collection and reporting.

Sec. 206. Performance measurement and evaluation and dissemination.

Sec. 207. Authorization of appropriations.

3.

Findings

Congress finds the following:

(1)

There is growing opportunity provided by technology in classrooms, for every grade, in every subject, and for all types of learners, to—

(A)

ensure that students are college-and-career ready; and

(B)

access the accelerating roll-out of online assessments.

(2)

Comprehensive education technology programs have shown great success in improving student achievement, reducing secondary school dropout rates, and improving graduation and college enrollment rates.

(3)

Mooresville Graded School District in the State of North Carolina has implemented an integrated education technology initiative, which has led to its ranking as the third highest achieving district in the State, with 21 percent composite achievement rate increases and 25 percent graduation rate increases over 5 years.

(4)

At Manor New Tech High School in the State of Texas, where 65 percent of students receive free or reduced price lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.) and 75 percent are students of color, a project-based learning focus on science, technology, engineering and mathematics, has led to 62 percent of students being the first generation in their families to enroll in an institution of higher education and a near zero secondary school dropout rate.

(5)

At the City Arts and Technology High School Envisions in San Francisco, California, which emphasizes personalized learning environments, integration of arts and technology in project-based learning, and development of deeper learning skills, 98 percent of the graduates enrolled at an institution of higher education, 91 percent remained enrolled at such an institution, and 100 percent met the course requirements for entrance to the University of California.

(6)

The Federal Government placed a strong emphasis on technology professional development in the past decade, but no longer provides any funding support for such activities. Annual appropriations for grants awarded under the Enhancing Education through Technology Act of 2001 under subpart D of title II of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6751 et seq.) ended in 2010 and all funds appropriated by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111–5) for such grants were to have been spent by September 2011.

(7)

Online professional development courses offer excellent opportunities for educators to receive the training that they need 24 hours each day, 7 days each week. However, a recent survey indicates that only 25 percent of teachers make use of online professional development courses.

(8)

For technology to be fully integrated into classrooms and to ensure that students are college-and-career ready, it is critical that school administrators are confident in their abilities to use technology and thereby lead change in their schools and local educational agencies. The Federal Government must invest in building leadership skills and capacity for technology to truly take hold in our Nation’s schools.

4.

Purposes

The purposes of this Act are to—

(1)

improve the achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness of students who have developed the ability to think critically, apply knowledge to solve complex problems, work collaboratively, communicate effectively, be self-directed, and be responsible digital citizens;

(2)

ensure all students have access to individualized, rigorous, and engaging digital learning experiences;

(3)

ensure that educators have the knowledge and skills to develop and implement digital learning curriculum, use technology effectively in order to personalize and strengthen instruction, and effectively deliver and utilize assessments to measure student outcomes and support student success;

(4)

ensure that administrators have the leadership, management, knowledge, and skills to design, develop, and implement a school or local educational agency-wide digital age learning environment;

(5)

improve the efficiency and productivity of education through technology;

(6)

address the connectivity needs of local educational agencies and educational service agencies that are eligible for support under the E-rate program without duplicating the support available under such program; and

(7)

ensure that State educational agencies, local educational agencies, and elementary schools and secondary schools have the technological capacity and infrastructure to meet purposes described in paragraphs (1) through (6).

5.

E-rate restriction

Funds awarded under this Act may be used to address the networking needs of a recipient of such funds for which the recipient is eligible to receive support under the E-rate program, except that such funds may not be duplicative of support received by the recipient under the E-rate program.

6.

Rule of construction regarding purchasing

Nothing in this Act shall be construed to permit a recipient of funds under this Act to purchase goods or services using such funds without ensuring that the purchase is free of any conflict of interest between such recipient, or any partner of such recipient, and the person or entity receiving such funds.

7.

Definitions

In this Act:

(1)

In general

Except as otherwise provided in this Act, any term that is defined in section 9101 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 7801) has the meaning given the term in such section.

(2)

Digital learning

The term digital learning means any instructional practice that effectively uses technology to strengthen a student’s learning experience and encompasses a wide spectrum of tools and practices, including—

(A)

interactive learning resources that engage students in academic content;

(B)

access to online databases and other primary source documents;

(C)

the use of data to personalize learning and provide targeted supplementary instruction;

(D)

student collaboration with content experts and peers;

(E)

online and computer-based assessments;

(F)

digital content, adaptive, and simulation software or courseware,

(G)

online courses, online instruction, or digital learning platforms;

(H)

mobile and wireless technologies for learning in school and at home;

(I)

learning environments that allow for rich collaboration and communication;

(J)

authentic audiences for learning in a relevant, real world experience;

(K)

teacher participation in virtual professional communities of practice; and

(L)

hybrid or blended learning, which occurs under direct instructor supervision at a school or other location away from home and, at least in part, through online delivery of instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path, or pace.

(3)

Eligible partnership

The term eligible partnership means a partnership that includes—

(A)

not less than 1—

(i)

State educational agency; or

(ii)

local educational agency or consortium of local educational agencies; and

(B)

not less than 1—

(i)

local educational agency, educational service agency, consortium of local educational agencies, or consortium of educational service agencies;

(ii)

institution of higher education;

(iii)

nonprofit or community-based organization; or

(iv)

business or for-profit organization.

(4)

Eligible technology

The term eligible technology means modern information, computer, and communication technology hardware, software, services, or tools, including computer or mobile hardware devices and other computer and communications hardware, software applications, systems and platforms, and digital and online content, courseware, and online instruction and other online services and supports.

(5)

E-rate program

The term E-rate program means the Schools and Libraries Universal Service Support Mechanism.

(6)

Professional development

The term professional development is a process of continuous improvement for teachers and school leaders that improves educator knowledge, skills, and practice toward the goal of increased student achievement and—

(A)

is intensive, ongoing, connected to practice, and on-site where allowable;

(B)

is focused on student learning and addresses the teaching of specific curriculum content;

(C)

is aligned with school improvement priorities and goals of the school and local educational agency; and

(D)

builds strong working relationships among teachers and school leaders that—

(i)

may be built around active professional learning communities; and

(ii)

may contain on-demand components, such as instructional videos, training documents, or learning modules.

(7)

Secretary

The term Secretary means the Secretary of Education.

(8)

Student technology literacy

The term student technology literacy means student knowledge and skills in using contemporary information, communication, and learning technologies in a manner necessary for successful employment, lifelong learning, and citizenship in the knowledge-based, digital, and global 21st century, including, at a minimum, the ability to—

(A)

effectively communicate and collaborate;

(B)

analyze and solve problems;

(C)

access, evaluate, manage, and create information and otherwise gain information literacy;

(D)

demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes; and

(E)

carry out the activities described in subparagraphs (A) through (D) in a safe and ethical manner.

(9)

Technology readiness survey

The term technology readiness survey means a survey completed by a local educational agency that provides standardized information comparable to the information collected through the technology readiness survey administered under the Race to the Top Assessment program under section 14006 of division A of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Public Law 111–5) on the quantity and types of technology infrastructure and access available to the students served by the local educational agency, including computer devices, Internet connectivity, operating systems, related network infrastructure, data systems, and—

(A)

requiring—

(i)

an internal review of the degree to which instruction, additional student support, and professional development is delivered in digital formats, media, and platforms and is available to students and educators at any time;

(ii)

an internal review of the ability of educators to use assessments and other student data to personalize and strengthen instruction and identify professional development needs and priorities; and

(iii)

any other information required by the State educational agency serving the local educational agency; and

(B)

may include an assessment of local community needs to ensure students have adequate on-line access and access to devices for school-related work during out-of-school time.

(10)

Universal design for learning

The term universal design for learning has the meaning given the term in section 103 of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1003).

I

Technology Readiness and Access

101.

Technology grants program authorized

(a)

In general

From the amounts appropriated under section 106 , the Secretary shall award State Grants for Technology Readiness and Access (in this title referred to as grants) to State educational agencies to strengthen State and local technological infrastructure and professional development that supports digital learning through State activities under section 103(c) and local activities under section 104(c) .

(b)

Grants to State educational agencies

(1)

Reservations

From the amounts appropriated under section 106 for any fiscal year, the Secretary shall reserve—

(A)

three-fourths of 1 percent for the Secretary of Interior to provide assistance under this title for schools operated or funded by the Bureau of Indian Education; and

(B)

1 percent to provide assistance under this title to the outlying areas; and

(2)

Grants

From the amounts appropriated under section 106 for any fiscal year and remaining after the Secretary makes reservations under paragraph (1) , the Secretary shall make a grant for the fiscal year to each State educational agency with an approved application under section 102 in an amount that bears the same relationship to such remainder as the amount the State educational agency received under part A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311 et seq.) for such year bears to the amount all State educational agencies with an approved application under section 102 received under such part (20 U.S.C. 6311 et seq.) for such year.

(c)

Minimum

The amount of a grant to a State educational agency under subsection (b)(2) for a fiscal year may not be less than one-half of 1 percent of the total amount made available for grants to all State educational agencies under such subsection for such year.

(d)

Reallotment of unused funds

If any State educational agency does not apply for a grant under subsection (b)(2) for a fiscal year, or does not use its entire grant under subsection (b)(2) for such year, the Secretary shall reallot the amount of the State educational agency’s grant, or the unused portion of the grant, to the remaining State educational agencies that use their entire grant amounts under subsection (b)(2) for such year.

(e)

Matching funds

(1)

In general

A State educational agency that receives a grant under subsection (b)(2) shall provide matching funds, from non-Federal sources, in an amount equal to 20 percent of the amount of grant funds provided to the State educational agency to carry out the activities supported by the grant. Such matching funds may be provided in cash or in-kind, except that any such in-kind contributions shall be provided for the purpose of supporting the State educational agency’s activities under section 104(c) .

(2)

Waiver

The Secretary may waive the matching requirement under paragraph (1) for a State educational agency that demonstrates that such requirement imposes an undue financial hardship on the State educational agency.

102.

State applications

(a)

Application

To receive a grant under section 101(b)(2) , a State educational agency shall submit to the Secretary an application at such time and in such manner as the Secretary may require and containing the information described in subsection (b) .

(b)

Contents

Each application submitted under subsection (a) shall include the following:

(1)

A description of how the State educational agency will meet the following goals:

(A)

Use technology to ensure all students achieve college-and-career readiness and technology literacy, including by providing high-quality education opportunities to economically or geographically isolated student populations.

(B)

Provide educators with the tools, devices, content, and resources to—

(i)

significantly improve teaching and learning, including support to increase personalization for and engagement of students in pursuit of college-and-career readiness and technology literacy; and

(ii)

develop and use assessments to improve instruction consistent with the principles of universal design for learning, including for students with disabilities and English-language learners.

(C)

Ensure administrators and school leaders have the flexibility and capacity to develop and manage systems to carry out activities described in subparagraphs (A) and (B), and support administrators and school leaders in utilizing technology to promote equity and increase efficiency and productivity.

(D)

Enable local educational agencies to build the technological capacity and infrastructure (including through local purchasing of eligible technology), necessary for the full implementation of on-line assessments for all students, (including students with disabilities and English-language learners) and to—

(i)

ensure the interoperability of data systems and eligible technology; and

(ii)

carry out subparagraphs (A) through (C).

(2)

A description of the results of the technology readiness in the State as determined by local educational agency responses to the technology readiness survey, including—

(A)

the status of the ability of each local educational agency served by the State educational agency to meet the goals described in section 104(b)(1) ;

(B)

an assurance that not less 90 percent of the local educational agencies served by the State educational agency have completed and submitted the technology readiness survey to the State educational agency; and

(C)

an assurance that the results of the technology readiness survey for each such local educational agency are made available to the Secretary and the public through the Website of the local educational agency.

(3)

A description of the plan for the State educational agency to support each local educational agency served by the State educational agency in meeting the goals described in section 104(b)(1) not later than 3 years after the local educational agency completes the technology readiness survey by addressing the readiness gaps identified in such survey.

(4)

A description of the State’s process for the adoption, acquisition, distribution, and use of content, how the State will ensure integrity of such processes, and how such processes support the goals under paragraph (1) or how a State will change such processes to support such goals, and how the State will ensure content quality.

(5)

A description of how the State educational agency will ensure its data systems and eligible technology are interoperable.

(6)

An assurance that the State educational will consider making content widely available through open educational resources when making purchasing decisions with funds received under this title.

(7)

A description of the State’s student technology literacy standards and the technology standards for teachers and administrators, and an assurance that the State’s student technology literacy standards meet the requirements of section 7(8).

(8)

An assurance that subgrant awards under section 104 will be carried out by the State educational agency staff with responsibility for leadership, coordination, and implementation of instructional and other classroom technologies.

(9)

A description of how the State educational agency will award subgrants to local educational agencies under section 104 .

(10)

A description of the process, activities, and performance measures, that the State educational agency will use to evaluate the impact and effectiveness of the grant and subgrants funds awarded under this title across the State and in each local educational agency.

(11)

A description of how the State educational agency will, in providing technical and other assistance to local educational agencies, give priority to the local educational agencies proposing to target services to—

(A)

students in schools in need of improvement and persistently low-achieving schools; and

(B)

schools with a high percentage of students that are eligible for free or reduced price lunch under the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act (42 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.).

(12)

A description of how the State educational agency consulted with local educational agencies in the development of the State educational agency’s application under this subsection.

(13)

An assurance that the State educational agency will provide matching funds as required under section 101(e) .

(14)

A description of how the State educational agency will ensure that funds received under this title is not duplicative of support received under the E-rate program.

(15)

An assurance that the State educational agency will protect the privacy and safety of students and teachers, consistent with requirements of section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C. 1232g) (commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ) and section 2441(a) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6777(a)).

103.

State use of grant funds

(a)

Reservation for subgrants To support technology infrastructure

Each State educational agency that receives a grant under section 101(b)(2) shall expend not less 90 percent of the grant amount for each fiscal year to award subgrants to local educational agencies in accordance with section 104 .

(b)

Reservation for State activities

(1)

In general

A State educational agency shall reserve not more than 10 percent of the grant received under section 101(b)(2) for the State activities described in subsection (c).

(2)

Grant administration

Of the amount reserved by a State educational agency under paragraph (1) , the State educational agency may reserve not more than 1 percent or 3 percent, in the case of a State educational agency awarding subgrants under section 104(a)(2) , for the administration of the grant under this title, except that a State educational agency that forms a State purchasing consortium under subsection (d)

(A)

may reserve an additional 1 percent to carry out the activities described in subsection (d)(1) ; and

(B)

shall receive direct approval from the local educational agencies receiving subgrants under section 104(a) from the State educational agency prior to reserving more than the additional percentage authorized under subparagraph (A) to carry out the activities described in subsection (d)(1) .

(c)

State activities

A State educational agency shall use funds described in subsection (b) to carry out each of the following:

(1)

Except for the awarding of subgrants in accordance with section 104 , activities described in the State educational agency’s application under section 102(b) .

(2)

Providing technical assistance to local educational agencies to—

(A)

identify and address technology readiness needs;

(B)

redesign curriculum and instruction, improve educational productivity, and deliver computer-based and online assessment;

(C)

use technology, consistent with the principles of universal design for learning, to support the learning needs of all students including students with disabilities and English-language learners;

(D)

support principals to have the expertise to evaluate teachers’ proficiency in implementing digital tools for teaching and learning; and

(E)

build capacity for individual school and local educational agency leaders.

(3)

Developing or utilizing research-based or innovative strategies for the delivery of specialized or rigorous academic courses and curricula through the use of technology, including digital learning technologies and assistive technology.

(4)

Integrating and coordinating activities under this title with other educational resources and programs across the State.

(5)

Disseminating information, including making publicly available on the Websites of the State educational agency promising practices to improve technology instruction, and acquiring and implementing technology tools and applications.

(6)

Ensuring that teachers, paraprofessionals, library and media personnel, specialized instructional support personnel, and administrators possess the knowledge and skills to use technology—

(A)

for curriculum redesign to change teaching and learning and improve student achievement;

(B)

for formative and summative assessment administration, data analysis, and to personalize learning;

(C)

to improve student technology literacy;

(D)

to expand the range of supports and accommodations available to English-language learners and students with disabilities; and

(E)

for their own ongoing professional development and for access to teaching resources and tools.

(7)

Coordinating with teacher and school leader preparation programs to—

(A)

align digital learning teaching standards; and

(B)

provide ongoing professional development for teachers and school leaders that is aligned to State student technology standards and activities promoting college-and-career readiness.

(d)

Purchasing consortia

(1)

In general

A State educational agency receiving a grant under section 101(b)(2) may—

(A)

form a State purchasing consortium with 1 or more State educational agencies receiving such a grant to carry out the State activities described in subsection (c), including purchasing eligible technology;

(B)

encourage local educational agencies to form local purchasing consortia under section 104(c)(4) ; and

(C)

promote pricing opportunities to local educational agencies for the purchase of eligible technology that are—

(i)

negotiated by the State educational agency or the State purchasing consortium of the State educational agency; and

(ii)

available to such local educational agencies.

(2)

Restrictions

A State educational agency receiving a grant under section 101(b)(2) may not—

(A)

except for promoting the pricing opportunities described in paragraph (1)(C) , make recommendations to local educational agencies for or require use of any specific commercial products and services by local educational agencies;

(B)

require local educational agencies to participate in a State purchasing consortia or local purchasing consortia; or

(C)

use more than the reservation amount authorized for the administration of the grant under subsection (b) to carry out the activities described in paragraph (1) , unless the State educational agency receives approval in accordance with subsection (b)(2)(B) .

104.

Local subgrants

(a)

Subgrants

(1)

Grants to local educational agencies

From the grant funds provided under section 101(b)(2) to a State educational agency that are remaining after the State educational agency makes reservations under section 104(b) for any fiscal year and subject to paragraph (2), the State educational agency shall award subgrants for the fiscal year to local educational agencies served by the State educational agency and with an approved application under subsection (b) by allotting to each such local educational agency an amount that bears the same relationship to the remainder as the amount received by the local educational agency under part A of title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6301 et seq.) for such year bears to the amount received by all such local educational agencies under such part for such year, except that no local educational agency may receive less than $5,000.

(2)

Competitive grants to local educational agencies

If the amount of funds appropriated under section 106 is less than $500,000,000 for any fiscal year, a State educational agency—

(A)

shall not award subgrants under paragraph (1) ; and

(B)

shall—

(i)

award subgrants, on a competitive basis, to local educational agencies based on the quality of applications submitted under (b), including—

(I)

the level of technology readiness as determined by the technology readiness surveys completed by local educational agencies submitting such applications; and

(II)

the technology plans described in subsection (b)(3) and how the local educational agencies with such plans will carry out the alignment and coordination described in such subsection; and

(ii)

ensure that such subgrants are of sufficient size and scope to carry out the local activities described in subsection (c) .

(3)

Definition of local educational agency for certain fiscal years

For purposes of awarding subgrants under paragraph (2) , the term local educational agency means—

(A)

a local educational agency;

(B)

an educational service agency; or

(C)

a local educational agency and an educational service agency.

(b)

Application

A local educational agency that desires to receive a subgrant under subsection (a) shall submit an application to the State at such time, in such manner, and accompanied by such information as the State educational agency may require, including—

(1)

a description of how the local educational agency will—

(A)

carry out the goals described in subparagraphs (A) through (C) of section 101(b)(1) ; and

(B)

enable schools served by the agency to build the technological capacity and infrastructure (including through local purchasing of eligible technology), necessary for the full implementation of on-line assessments for all students (including students with disabilities and English-language learners) and to—

(i)

ensure the interoperability of data systems and eligible technology; and

(ii)

carry out the goals described in subparagraphs (A) through (C) of section 101(b)(1) ;

(2)

a description of the results of the technology readiness survey completed by the local educational agency and a description of the plan for the local educational agency to meet the goals described in paragraph (1) within 3 years of completing the survey;

(3)

a description of the local educational agency’s student technology literacy standards, and its goals for the technology skills for teachers and administrators, and an assurance that the student technology literacy standards meet the requirements of section 7(8);

(4)

a description of the local educational agency’s technology plan to carry out paragraphs (1) and (3) and how the agency will align and coordinate the activities under this section with other activities across the local educational agency;

(5)

a description of the team of educators that will coordinate and carry out the activities under this section, including individuals with responsibility and expertise in instructional technology, teachers that specialize in supporting students with disabilities and English-language learners, school leaders, technology officers, and staff responsible for assessments and data analysis;

(6)

a description of how the local educational agency will evaluate teachers’ proficiency and progress in implementing technology for teaching and learning;

(7)

a description of how the local educational agency will ensure that principals have the expertise to evaluate teachers’ proficiency and progress in implementing technology for teaching and learning and the interoperability of data systems and eligible technology;

(8)

a description of the local educational agency’s procurement process and process for the creation, acquisition, distribution, and use of content, how the local educational agency will ensure integrity of such processes, and how such processes support the goals described in paragraph (1) or how a local educational agency will change such processes to support such goals, and how the local educational agency will ensure content quality;

(9)

a description of how the local educational agency will carry out activities under subsection (c) ;

(10)

a description of how the subgrant funds received under subsection (a) will be coordinated with and supported by other Federal, State, and local funds to support activities under this title;

(11)

a description of how the local educational agency will ensure that the subgrant received under subsection (a) is not duplicative of support received under the E-rate program; and

(12)

an assurance that the local educational agency will protect the privacy and safety of students and teachers, consistent with requirements section 444 of the General Education Provisions Act (20 U.S.C. 1232g) (commonly known as the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 ) and section 2441(a) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6777(a)).

(c)

Use of funds

(1)

Technology infrastructure

Subject to paragraph (3) , a local educational agency receiving a subgrant under subsection (a) shall use not less than 40 percent of such funds to support activities for the acquisition of eligible technology needed to—

(A)

except for the activities described in paragraph (2), carry out activities described in the application submitted under subsection (b), including purchasing devices, equipment, and software applications, and improving connectivity to and within schools; and

(B)

address readiness shortfalls identified under the technology readiness survey completed by the local educational agency.

(2)

Professional development for digital learning

Subject to paragraph (3) , a local educational agency receiving a subgrant under subsection (a)

(A)

shall use not less than 35 percent of such funds to carry out—

(i)

digital age professional development opportunities for teachers, paraprofessionals, library and media personnel, specialized instructional support personnel, technology coordinators, and administrators in the effective use of modern information and communication technology tools and digital resources to deliver instruction, curriculum and school classroom management, including for classroom teachers to assess, support, and provide engaging student learning opportunities, including professional development that—

(I)

is ongoing, sustainable, and scalable;

(II)

is participatory;

(III)

includes communication and regular interactions with instructors, facilitators, and peers and is directly related to up-to-date teaching methods in content areas;

(IV)

includes strategies and tools for improving communication with parents and family engagement;

(V)

may be built around active professional learning communities or online communities of practice or other tools that increase collaboration among teachers across schools, local educational agencies, or States; and

(VI)

may contain on-demand components, such as instructional videos, training documents, or learning modules;

(ii)

ongoing professional development in strategies and pedagogy in the core academic subjects that involve the use of technology and curriculum redesign as key components of supporting effective, innovative teaching and learning, and improving student achievement;

(iii)

ongoing professional development in the use of educational technologies to ensure every educator achieves and maintains technology literacy, including possessing and maintaining the knowledge and skills to use technology—

(I)

across the curriculum for student learning;

(II)

for real-time data analysis and online or digital assessment to enable individualized instruction; and

(III)

to develop and maintain student technology literacy;

(iv)

ongoing professional development for school leaders to provide and promote leadership in the use of—

(I)

educational technology to ensure a digital-age learning environment, including the capacity to lead the reform or redesign of curriculum, instruction, assessment; and

(II)

data through the use of technology in order to increase student learning opportunity, student technology literacy, student access to technology, and student engagement in learning; and

(v)

a review of the effectiveness of the professional development and regular intervals of learner feedback and data; and

(B)

may use such funds for—

(i)

the use of technology coaches to work directly with teachers, including through the preparation of teachers as technology leaders or master teachers—

(I)

who are provided with the means to serve as experts and to create professional development opportunities for other teachers in the effective use of technology; and

(II)

who may leverage technologies, such as distance learning and online virtual educator-to-educator peer communities, as a means to support ongoing, participatory professional growth around the integration of effective educational technologies;

(ii)

innovative approaches to ongoing professional development such as non-standard achievement recognition strategies, including digital badging, gamification elements, use of learner-created learning objects, integration of social and professional networking tools, rating and commenting on learning artifacts, and personalization of professional development; and

(iii)

any other activities required to carry out the local educational agency’s technology plan described in subsection (b)(4) .

(3)

Modification of funding allocations

A State educational agency may authorize a local educational agency to modify the percentage of the local educational agency’s subgrant funds required to carry out the activities described in paragraphs (1) or (2) if the local educational agency demonstrates that such modification will assist the local educational agency in more effectively carrying out such activities.

(4)

Purchasing consortia

Local educational agencies receiving subgrants under subsection (a) may—

(A)

form a local purchasing consortia with other such local educational agencies to carry out the activities described in this subsection, including purchasing eligible technology; and

(B)

use such funds for purchasing eligible technology through a State purchasing consortia under section 103(d) .

105.

Reporting

(a)

Local educational agencies

Each local educational agency receiving a subgrant under section 104 shall submit to the State educational agency that awarded such subgrant an annual report the meets the requirements of subsection (c) .

(b)

State educational agencies

Each State educational agency receiving a grant under section 101(b)(2) shall submit to the Secretary an annual report that meets the requirements of subsection (c) .

(c)

Report requirements

A report submitted under subsection (a) or (b) shall include, at a minimum, a description of—

(1)

the status of the State education agency’s plan described in section 102(b)(3) or local education agency’s technology plan under section 104(b)(4) , as applicable;

(2)

the categories eligible technology acquired with funds under this title and how such technology is being used;

(3)

the professional development activities funded under this title, including types of activities and entities involved in providing such professional development to classroom teachers and other staff, such as school librarians;

(4)

the instruction, strategies, activities, and curricula used in the programs funded under this title; and

(5)

the types of programs funded under this title.

106.

Authorization

There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this Act $500,000,000 for fiscal year 2014 and such sums as may be necessary for each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.

II

Technology for Tomorrow Fund

201.

Short title

This title may be cited as the Technology for Tomorrow Fund.

202.

Technology for tomorrow fund

(a)

Grants to eligible partnerships

From the amounts appropriated under section 207 and not reserved under subsection (b) , the Secretary shall award grants, on a competitive basis, to eligible partnerships to enable the eligible partnerships to carry out activities described in section 204 to improve student achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness through the use of technology and digital learning.

(b)

Reservation of funds

The Secretary may reserve up to 5 percent of the amounts appropriated under section 207 for a fiscal year for—

(1)

the administration of this title; and

(2)

the evaluation and dissemination activities described in section 204(b) .

(c)

Duration of grant period

A grant under subsection (a) shall be awarded to an eligible partnership for at least a 2-year period and not longer than a 3-year period, except that the Secretary may award the eligible partnership an additional 2-year grant if the eligible partnership demonstrates satisfactory progress on the performance measures described in section 206(a) .

203.

Application

(a)

In general

To receive a grant under section 202 , an eligible partnership shall submit an application at such time and in such manner as the Secretary may require, and containing the information described in subsection (b) .

(b)

Contents

An application submitted under subsection (a) shall include—

(1)

a description of the eligible partnership, the partners forming the eligible partnership, and the roles and responsibilities of each partner;

(2)

a demonstration of each partner’s capacity and commitment to fulfill its role and responsibilities to ensure the successful completion of activities described in section 204 ;

(3)

a description of how the grant funds will be used to improve the achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness of students, particularly at-risk, low-income, and low-performing students;

(4)

a description of how the activities funded by the grant will be innovative, systemic, or evidence-based by ensuring such activities—

(A)

are based on strong or promising evidence or a review of the best available research evidence; and

(B)

may contribute to the development and use of new models;

(5)

a description of how such activities will utilize technology and digital learning to—

(A)

promote personalized, individualized instruction that improves student achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness;

(B)

improve teacher and school leader preparation, training, knowledge, skills, practice, and professional capacity;

(C)

ensure all students, particularly at-risk and historically disadvantaged students, including students with disabilities and English-language learners, have equitable access to high-quality curriculum, instruction, assessments, technology, and digital learning; or

(D)

improve the efficiency and productivity of education;

(6)

a description of how the eligible partnership will measure and report data on the effectiveness of such activities under section 205(a) ;

(7)

an assurance that the grant funds will not solely be used—

(A)

to purchase materials, hardware, or technology-based tools; or

(B)

to implement online learning to the exclusion of other activities;

(8)

a description of how the eligible partnership will ensure that a grant received under this title is not duplicative of support received under the E-rate program; and

(9)

such other information as the Secretary may require.

(c)

Application review and award

(1)

Application review and approval

The Secretary shall—

(A)

establish a peer review process to assist in the review of the grant applications and approval of the grants under this section;

(B)

appoint to the peer review process individuals who are educators and experts in—

(i)

technology and digital learning;

(ii)

classroom instruction and teaching practice;

(iii)

school improvement, redesign, or turnaround;

(iv)

teacher and school leader training or professional development; and

(v)

education efficiency and productivity; and

(C)

ensure that each grant is of sufficient size and scope to carry out the activities described in the grant application under subsection (b) , including the activities described in section 204 and measuring and reporting data under section 205(a) .

(2)

Grant award

In awarding grants under this title, the Secretary shall, to the extent practicable, ensure—

(A)

diversity in the type of activities funded under the grants, including statewide and local initiatives;

(B)

equitable geographic distribution of the grants, including urban and rural areas and small and large local educational agencies; and

(C)

that eligible partnerships receiving such grants—

(i)

demonstrate that activities funded by the grant will be carried out based on strong or promising evidence; and

(ii)

are committed to and capable of successfully carrying out the activities described in the grant application submitted under subsection (b) , including the activities described in section 204 and measuring and reporting data under section 205(a) .

204.

Use of funds

(a)

Requirements

An eligible partnership receiving a grant under this title shall use grant funds to carry out 1 or more of the following activities that utilize technology and digital learning to promote:

(1)

Personalized, individualized instruction that improves student achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness, such as—

(A)

hybrid, blended, or other digital-learning opportunities that combine online and teacher-based instruction to improve student outcomes;

(B)

gaming or other personalized digital or technology-based tools that individualize instruction and promote self-directed learning and higher order thinking skills, including giving students control over the place, pace, or time of learning;

(C)

online platforms or opportunities that provide students opportunities for credit recovery or advanced credit accumulation; and

(D)

expanding the accommodations available to students with disabilities and English-language learners.

(2)

Improving teacher and school leader preparation, professional development, knowledge, skills, practice, and professional capacity, such as—

(A)

tools or programs that equip teachers to differentiate instruction, conduct ongoing formative assessments, and use real-time data or data systems to identify individual student learning needs and guide personalized instruction, learning, and appropriate interventions that address those individualized student learning needs;

(B)

on-demand professional development, online communities of practice, or other technology-based tools that improve teaching and leadership;

(C)

pre-service training in the use of technology and digital learning to improve student outcomes; and

(D)

technology-based tools to improve the administration and implementation of teacher evaluation systems or other human capital systems.

(3)

Ensuring all students, particularly at-risk and low-performing students, have equitable access to high-quality curriculum, instruction, assessments, technology, and digital learning by effectively implementing technology tools consistent with principals of universal design for learning, such as—

(A)

using tools or programs to teach students higher order thinking skills;

(B)

improving the education of students with disabilities through assessment accommodations, including assistive technology;

(C)

improving the education of English-language learners, including language proficiency and academic content, through intuitive games and interfaces, web-based interventions, or technology-based assessments and assessment accommodations;

(D)

technology-based tools or digital learning opportunities that enhance high-quality early learning or early childhood education programs;

(E)

expanding learning opportunities, particularly for students who are low-performing or live in rural areas, that increase access to high-quality curriculum and instruction, advanced placement or international baccalaureate courses, science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education, or enrichment activities; and

(F)

enhancing the quality, depth, or administration of student assessments, including summative, formative, and classroom-based assessments.

(4)

Improving the efficiency and productivity of education, such as—

(A)

extending the reach of high-quality materials, tools, curriculum, instruction, or teachers through such means as open educational resources or blended learning;

(B)

making student learning or school improvement more effective and cost-efficient through online or digital platforms; and

(C)

use of laptops, personal devices, or technology-infused instruction to reduce cost and improve delivery of instruction.

(b)

Limitations on uses of funds

An eligible partnership may not use the total amount of a grant received under this title for a fiscal year—

(1)

on materials, hardware, or technology-based tools; or

(2)

to implement online learning to the exclusion of other activities.

205.

Data collection and reporting

(a)

Reporting

Each eligible partnership receiving a grant under this title shall collect and report to the Secretary, on at least an annual basis, such information on the progress, outcomes, and best practices learned from activities under the grant as the Secretary may require, which—

(1)

shall include information on the impact of the grant on student outcomes, such as—

(A)

the number of and demographic information about students who are served by the eligible partnership under this title;

(B)

student achievement, student growth, and graduation rates of such students;

(C)

college-and-career readiness data about students of such students, such as rates of credit accumulation, course taking and completion, and college enrollment and persistence;

(D)

student attendance and participation rates; and

(E)

such other information the Secretary may require or other information the eligible partnership proposes to include and approved by the Secretary; and

(2)

may include data on—

(A)

student engagement and discipline;

(B)

school climate and teacher working conditions; and

(C)

increases in inclusion of students with disabilities and English-language learners.

(b)

Disaggregation

Each eligible partnership receiving a grant under this title shall disaggregate the information required under subsection (a) in the same manner as information is disaggregated under section 1111(h)(1)(C)(i) of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 6311(h)(1)(C)(i)).

206.

Performance measurement and evaluation and dissemination

(a)

Performance measures

Prior to the reviewing and awarding of grants under this title, the Secretary shall establish performance measures used to evaluate the progress and performance of each eligible partnership that—

(1)

shall include, at a minimum, information on the impact of the grants on student outcomes as reported under section 205(a) ; and

(2)

may include such other information as the Secretary may reasonably require.

(b)

Evaluation and dissemination

From amounts reserved under section 202(b) , the Secretary shall—

(1)

conduct or enter into a contract with an outside evaluator to conduct—

(A)

a comprehensive evaluation after the third year that the grant program is carried under this title on the effectiveness of all grants awarded under this title; and

(B)

a final evaluation following the final year of the grant program under this title—

(i)

that focuses on the improvement in student outcomes reported under paragraphs (1) through (3) of section 205(a) ;

(ii)

that compares the relative effectiveness of different types of programs carried under this title and compares the relative effectiveness of variations in implementation within such programs; and

(iii)

identifies the conditions and practices needed for the effective use of technology and digital learning, including issues related to teacher professional development, educational leadership, classroom and school practices and implementation and support;

(2)

disseminate and provide technical assistance to local educational agencies and State educational agencies on best practices in utilizing technology and digital learning to improve student achievement, academic growth, and college-and-career readiness; and

(3)

ensure that the Department of Education applies the best practices described in paragraph (2) in carrying out other innovation funds.

207.

Authorization of appropriations

There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this title $250,000,000 for fiscal year 2014 and such sums as may be necessary for each of the 4 succeeding fiscal years.