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H.R. 938 (113th): United States-Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2014

The text of the bill below is as of Mar 4, 2013 (Introduced).

I

113th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. R. 938

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

March 4, 2013

(for herself and Mr. Deutch) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and in addition to the Committees on the Judiciary and Science, Space, and Technology, for a period to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned

A BILL

To strengthen the strategic alliance between the United States and Israel, and for other purposes.

1.

Short title

This Act may be cited as the United States-Israel Strategic Partnership Act of 2013 .

2.

Findings

Congress finds the following:

(1)

The turmoil in the Middle East poses a serious threat to United States national security interests and requires cooperation with allies that are willing to work with the United States in pursuit of shared objectives.

(2)

The October 31, 1998, Memorandum of Agreement signed by President Clinton and Prime Minister Netanyahu commits the United States to working jointly with Israel towards enhancing Israel’s defensive and deterrent capabilities and upgrading the framework of the United States-Israel strategic and military relationships, as well as the technological cooperation between both countries.

(3)

On August 16, 2007, the United States and Israel signed a Memorandum of Understanding reaffirming United States commitment to the security of Israel and establishing a 10-year framework for incremental increases in United States military assistance to Israel.

(4)

The Memorandum of Understanding signed two years later on January 16, 2009 reaffirmed the United States commitment and noted the security, military and intelligence cooperation between the United States and Israel.

(5)

The United States and Israel conduct a semi-annual Strategic Dialogue. The Department of State, in a statement following the July 12, 2012, meeting of the Strategic Dialogue, noted that the discussions focused on such issues of mutual concern as Iran’s continued quest to develop nuclear weapons, which the United States and Israel are both determined to prevent and how the continued violence of the Syrian regime against its citizens [assisted by Iran and Hezbollah] could also lead to severe consequences for the entire region.

3.

Declaration of policy

Congress declares that Israel is a major strategic partner of the United States.

4.

Amendments to the United States-Israel Enhanced Security Cooperation Act of 2012

(a)

United States actions To assist in the defense of Israel and protect United States interests

Section 4 of the United States-Israel Enhanced Security Cooperation Act of 2012 (Public Law 112–150; 22 U.S.C. 8603) is amended—

(1)

by striking It is the sense of Congress that the United States Government should and inserting (a) In general.—The President should, to the maximum extent practicable,; and

(2)

by adding at the end the following:

(b)

Report

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this subsection, the President shall submit to Congress a report on the implementation of this section.

.

(b)

Extension of War Reserves Stockpile authority

Section 5(a) of the United States-Israel Enhanced Security Cooperation Act of 2012 (Public Law 112–150) is amended to read as follows:

(a)

Extension of War Reserves Stockpile authority

(1)

Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2005

Section 12001(d) of the Department of Defense Appropriations Act, 2005 (Public Law 108–287; 118 Stat. 1011), is amended by striking more than 10 years after and inserting more than 11 years after.

(2)

Foreign Assistance Act of 1961

Section 514(b)(2)(A) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h(b)(2)(A)) is amended by striking and 2014 and inserting , 2014, and 2015.

.

5.

Authorization of assistance for Israel

(a)

Finding

Congress finds that Israel has adopted high standards in the field of export controls, including by becoming adherent to the Australia Group, the Missile Technology Control Regime, the Nuclear Suppliers Group, and the Wassenaar Arrangement, and by enacting robust legislation and regulations for the control of dual-use and defense items.

(b)

Expedited licensing procedures

The President should include Israel on the list of destinations described in paragraph (c)(1) of section 740.20 of title 15, Code of Federal Regulations (relating to License Exception Strategic Trade Authorization).

(c)

Overseas Private Investment Corporation

In carrying out its authorities under title IV of chapter 2 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2191 et seq.), the Overseas Private Investment Corporation should consider giving preference to providing insurance, financing, or reinsurance for energy and water projects in Israel.

(d)

Energy, water, homeland security, agriculture, and alternative fuel technologies

(1)

In general

The President is authorized to carry out United States-Israel cooperative activities and to provide assistance promoting cooperation in the fields of energy, water, homeland security, agriculture, and alternative fuel technologies.

(2)

Requirements

In carrying out paragraph (1), the President is authorized to share and exchange with Israel research, technology, intelligence, information, equipment, and personnel that the President determines will advance the national security interests of the United States and is consistent with the Strategic Dialogue and pertinent provisions of law—

(A)

by enhancing scientific cooperation between Israel and the United States; or

(B)

by the sale, lease, exchange in kind, or other techniques the President determines to be suitable.

6.

Extension of existing authorization of United States-Israel energy cooperation

Section 917(c) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (42 U.S.C. 17337(c)) is amended by striking 7 years and inserting 17 years.

7.

United States-Israel cooperation on cyber-security

It is a sense of Congress that the United States and Israel should take steps and explore avenues to increase cooperation on cyber-security.

8.

Statement of United States Policy Regarding Israel’s defense systems

(a)

Findings

Congress

(1)

commends the first phase completion of the David’s Sling Weapon System (DSWS) by the Israel Missile Defense Organization and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency, which is designed to provide additional opportunities for interception by the joint United States-Israel Arrow Weapon System (Arrow 2 and Arrow 3);

(2)

congratulates the Israel Missile Defense Organization and the U.S. Missile Defense Agency on successfully executing the Arrow 3 flyout of a more advanced interceptor, which will improve Israel’s defenses against upper tier ballistic missile threats from nations including Iran;

(3)

recognizes that during Operation Pillar of Defense in November 2012, Israel deployed Iron Dome short-range rocket defense batteries to intercept Hamas-launched rockets fired from Gaza—of those rockets that posed a threat to the life of Israeli citizens, 80 to 85 percent were successfully intercepted, saving countless lives; and

(4)

agrees that, as stated by former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, Iron Dome performed, I think it’s fair to say, remarkably well during the recent escalation … Iron Dome does not start wars. It helps prevent wars..

(b)

Statement of policy

The President, acting through the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State, should provide assistance, upon request by the Government of Israel, for the enhancement of the David’s Sling Weapon System, the enhancement of the joint United States-Israel Arrow Weapon System (Arrow 2 and Arrow 3), and the procurement and enhancement of the Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system for purposes of intercepting short-range rockets, missiles, and other projectiles launched against Israel.

9.

Report on eligibility of Israel for visa waiver program

(a)

Statement of policy

It shall be the policy of the United States to include Israel in the list of countries that participate in the visa waiver program under section 217 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1187) when Israel satisfies the requirements for inclusion in such program specified in such section.

(b)

Report

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives and the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate a report on the extent to which Israel satisfies the requirements specified in section 217 of the Immigration and Nationality Act for inclusion in the visa waiver program under such section and what additional steps, if any, are required in order for Israel to qualify for inclusion in such program.