< Back to H.Res. 85 (113th Congress, 2013–2015)

Text of Recognizing the importance of acknowledging the contributions of Dominican-Americans to the United States.

This resolution was introduced on February 26, 2013, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted. The text of the bill below is as of Feb 26, 2013 (Introduced).

IV

113th CONGRESS

1st Session

H. RES. 85

IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

February 26, 2013

(for himself, Mr. Serrano, Mr. Pierluisi, Mr. Moran, Mr. Crowley, and Mr. Cicilline) submitted the following resolution; which was referred to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform

RESOLUTION

Recognizing the importance of acknowledging the contributions of Dominican-Americans to the United States.

Whereas since the initial wave of Dominican migration in the 1960s to the most recent arrivals of today, Dominicans have worked hard to contribute to the national identity of the United States, educating people on their culture and traditions and enriching the quality of our shared futures;

Whereas Dominican-Americans living on our shores have been motivated by the value of hard work and the bonds of family, the same pillars of our society that has built this great Nation for over 230 years;

Whereas contributions from Dominican-Americans can be found in every facet of United States life, from the many baseball stars in our national pastime, to fashion legend Oscar de la Renta, to the thousands of professionals that do battle as soldiers, doctors, lawyers, journalists, educators, and many other public servants;

Whereas many of our hemisphere's first institutions were established on the shores of the Dominican Republic, including the first cathedral and the oldest university;

Whereas Dominicans are freedom loving people who first began their campaign for their independence in 1831 under the leadership of Juan Pablo Duarte, who formed a secret society named The Trinity that led to a decisive uprising, which resulted in independence for the Dominican Republic;

Whereas after the long and hard fought campaign for freedom, a ceremonial musket shot fired on February 27, 1844, marked the Dominican Republic's first official Independence Day;

Whereas it is appropriate that the United States reserve the period between January 21 to February 27 to celebrate and honor Dominican heritage;

Whereas it would be befitting to celebrate Dominican heritage beginning on January 21, The Day of the Procession of Altagracia, The Dominican Republic's most important religious celebration;

Whereas it would also be befitting to end the period of Dominican heritage on February 27, the Dominican Republic's Independence Day;

Whereas during the period between January 21 to February 27 of each year, the Dominican people also celebrate Carnival, the biggest, most colorful event in the Dominican Republic where participants dress in colorful masks and costumes, crack whips, and dance in the street as a symbol of the end of slavery and Spanish rule;

Whereas it would give us the opportunity to acknowledge and applaud the economic, cultural, and social contributions Dominican-Americans have made to the United States; and

Whereas it would also give us an opportunity to consider the many Dominican achievements, on the island and in the United States: Now, therefore, be it

That the House of Representatives

(1)

recognizes the importance of acknowledging the contributions of Dominican-Americans to the United States;

(2)

supports the establishment of a national month of recognition for Dominican-Americans to honor the Dominican people and their contributions; and

(3)

urges the President to issue a proclamation calling on the people of the United States to observe a national month of recognition for Dominican-Americans with appropriate ceremonies, programs, and activities.