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H.R. 2872 (114th): Opioid Addiction Treatment Modernization Act

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The summary below was written by the Congressional Research Service, which is a nonpartisan division of the Library of Congress, and was published on Jun 24, 2015.


Opioid Addiction Treatment Modernization Act

This bill amends the Controlled Substances Act to require a practitioner who administers or dispenses narcotic drugs for maintenance or detoxification treatment in an opioid treatment program to complete training every two years.

The legislation revises the waiver requirements for a physician who wants to administer, dispense, or prescribe narcotic drugs for maintenance or detoxification treatment in an office-based opioid treatment program. Currently, such physician must notify the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and certify that he or she is a qualifying physician, has the capacity to refer patients for appropriate counseling and ancillary services, and will comply with a patient limit. This bill requires a physician to also certify that he or she maintains a diversion control plan and has the capacity to provide directly or by referral all drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of opioid addiction.

The bill modifies the definition of a "qualifying physician." Currently, a qualifying physician must be licensed in a state and have expertise (such as relevant certification, training, or experience). This legislation requires a qualifying physician to also complete training every two years and obtain written consent from each patient regarding available treatment options. 

It permits HHS or the Department of Justice to inspect registered practitioners who dispense narcotics to ensure compliance with the requirements of this Act.

All practitioners who are permitted to dispense narcotic drugs to individuals for maintenance treatment or detoxification treatment must submit to HHS a certification of compliance with the requirements of this Act.

The Government Accountability Office must review opioid addition treatment services in the United States and report findings to Congress every five years.