H.R. 36: Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act

Introduced:

Jan 6, 2015

Status:

Failed Cloture on Sep 22, 2015

This bill is provisionally dead due to a failed vote for cloture on September 22, 2015. Cloture is required to move past a Senate filibuster or the threat of a filibuster and takes a 3/5ths vote. In practice, most bills must pass cloture to move forward in the Senate.

Sponsor:

Trent Franks

Representative for Arizona's 8th congressional district

Republican

Text:

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Last Updated: Sep 16, 2015
Length: 24 pages

Prognosis:

15% chance of being enacted (details)

About the bill

Full Title

To amend title 18, United States Code, to protect pain-capable unborn children, and for other purposes.

The bill’s titles are written by its sponsor.

Summary

The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act would ban abortion at 20 weeks and later. The bill includes congressional recognition that an unborn child of 20 weeks has developed pain receptors and responds to painful stimuli as reasoning behind the ban. It creates exceptions in the case of risk of death or permanent injury of the mother, in case of rape ...

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History

Jan 6, 2015
 
Introduced

This is the first step in the legislative process.

May 13, 2015
 
Passed House

The bill was passed in a vote in the House. It goes to the Senate next.

Sep 22, 2015
 
Failed Cloture in the Senate

The Senate must often vote to end debate before voting on a bill, called a cloture vote. The vote on cloture failed. This is often considered a filibuster. The Senate may try again.

 
Passed Senate

 
Signed by the President

This page is about a bill in the United States Congress. A bill must be passed by both the House and Senate in identical form and then be signed by the President to become law.

Links & tools

Primary Source

Congress.gov

Congress.gov is updated generally one day after events occur. Legislative activity since the last update may not be reflected on GovTrack. Data via congress project.

Citation

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